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Encyclopedia > Rhodes College

Rhodes College

Image File history File links Rhodes_seal2. ...

Motto Truth, Loyalty, Service
Established 1848
Type Private
Endowment US$252,000,000
President William E. Troutt
Faculty 180 (152 full-time, 28 part-time)
Undergraduates 1689
Location Memphis, Tennessee, United States
Campus Urban, 100 acres (400,000 m²)
Mascot Lynx
Affiliations Presbyterian
Website http://www.rhodes.edu/

Rhodes College is a four-year, private liberal arts college located in Memphis, Tennessee. Founded in 1848, Rhodes enrolls approximately 1,700 students. About one third of Rhodes students go on to graduate and professional school soon after graduation,[1]. The acceptance rates to law and business schools are around 95%.[2] A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Emblem of the PC(USA) The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) or PC(USA) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination in the United States. ... A Web site (or colloquially, Website) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on a Web server, usually accessible via the Internet or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML, that is almost always accessible via HTTP... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

Contents

History

Rhodes College traces its origin as a degree-granting institution to the Masonic University of Tennessee, founded in 1848 in Clarksville, Tennessee. The institution became Montgomery Masonic College in 1850 and later was renamed Stewart College in honor of its president William M. Stewart. It was under Stewart's leadership that control of the college passed from the Masons to the Presbyterian Church in 1855. In 1875, the college added to its undergraduate program a School of Theology and became Southwestern Presbyterian University. The School of Theology operated until 1917. The Roxy in Clarksvilles historic downtown section. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... The Masonic Square and Compasses. ... Emblem of the PC(USA) The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) or PC(USA) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination in the United States. ...


In 1925, president Charles Diehl led the college in a move to its present campus in Memphis, Tennessee (the Clarksville campus would later become Austin Peay State University). At that time, the college shortened its name to Southwestern. In 1945, the college adopted the name Southwestern at Memphis, to distinguish itself from other colleges and universities containing the name "Southwestern." Finally, in 1984, the college's name was changed to Rhodes College to honor former college president Peyton Nalle Rhodes. For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... This article is about the university in Clarksville, Tennessee named for former governor of Tennessee Austin Peay. ...


Since 1984, Rhodes has grown from a regionally recognized institution to a nationally ranked liberal arts college."[3] Even as overall enrollment has increased over the past twenty years, the student body has been comprised of increasing proportions of students from outside Tennessee and the Southeast region.[4]


The current president of Rhodes is Dr. William Troutt, who joined the college as the 19th president in 1999. His predecessor, Dr. James Daughdrill, served as president for over a quarter century.


Campus

The campus covers a 100 acre tract in midtown Memphis across from Overton Park and the Memphis Zoo. Often cited for its beauty,[5] the campus design is notable for its stone Gothic architecture buildings, thirteen of which are currently listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[1] The original buildings, including Palmer Hall (1925), Kennedy Hall (1925), and Robb and White dormitories (1925), were designed by Henry Hibbs in consultation with Charles Klauder, who designed many buildings at Princeton University, alma mater of college president Charles Diehl. Later buildings were designed by H. Clinton Parrent, a young associate of Hibbs who was present from the beginning. Parrent's buildings include the Catherine Burrow Refectory (1957), which was an expansion of Hibbs' original dining hall. Parrent also added Halliburton Tower (1962) to Palmer Hall. The 140-foot bell tower was named in honor of explorer Richard Halliburton. Rhodes maintains its Collegiate Gothic architecture, including the new Barret Library (2005) designed by the firm of Hanbury Evans Wright and Vlattas. Overton Park is a large public park in midtown Memphis, Tennessee. ... The Memphis Zoo is a zoo located in Memphis, Tennessee. ... Interior of Cologne Cathedral Gothic architecture is a style of architecture, particularly associated with cathedrals and other churches, which flourished in Europe during the high and late medieval period. ... Charles Klauder was an American architect known for his work on university buildings. ... Princeton University is a coeducational private university located in Princeton, New Jersey, in the United States of America. ... Richard Halliburton Richard Halliburton (9 January 1900– presumed dead 23 March 1939) was an American explorer, athlete, and author. ...


Students and faculty

Rhodes enrolls 1687 undergraduate students; 84% are Caucasian, 6% are African American, 4% are Asian and 1.6% are Hispanic. Fifty-nine percent of students are female. The student-to-faculty ratio is 11:1.[6] Popular majors include economics and business administration, Biology, Political Science, English, and International Studies. This article does not cite its references or sources. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... World map showing the location of Asia. ... The Hispanic world. ... Wall Street, Manhattan is the location of the New York Stock Exchange and is often used as a symbol for the world of business. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


Traditions, sports, and clubs

Rhodes is one of 62 colleges recently classified for both "Curricular Engagement" and "Outreach & Partnerships" in the "Community Engagement" category by The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Approximately 80% of Rhodes students participate in some form of community service by the time they graduate.[7] The college's new curriculum includes a requirement that students participate in activities that broaden the connection between classroom experiences and the outside world. The mission statement of the college also reinforces community engagement, aspiring to "graduate students with...a compassion for others and the ability to translate academic study and personal concern into effective leadership and action in their communities and the world." The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching is an international centre for research in education based in the United States of America. ...


Central to the life of the college is its Honor Code, administered by students through the Honor Council. Every student is required to sign the Code, which reads, "As a member of the Rhodes College community, I pledge my full and steadfast support to the Honor System and agree neither to lie, cheat, nor steal and to report any such violation that I may witness." Because of this, students enjoy a relationship of trust with their professors and benefits such as taking closed book final exams in the privacy of their own rooms.


The college mascot is the lynx and the school colors are red and black. The athletic teams compete in the Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference in the NCAA's Division III. Type species Felis lynx Linnaeus, 1758 The overall range of Lynx species. ... The Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference (SCAC) is an athletic conference which competes in the NCAAs Division III. Member institutions are located in Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Texas. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ...


Rites of Spring, a three day music festival in early April, is a major social event of the school year, and typically attracts several major bands from around the country. In recent years, an adjunct celebration called Rites to Play has brought to campus elementary aged children from all of the various community agencies and schools that partner with Rhodes. The Rhodes students plan, organize, and execute a carnival for the kids.


Greek Life

There are a number of social fraternities and sororities at Rhodes. Approximately 50% of the students are members of Greek organizations. The fraternity and sorority lodges are not, however, residential, and most Greek-sponsored parties and activities are open to the entire campus.


Sororities

(in order of establishment at Rhodes)

Chi Omega (ΧΩ) is the largest womens fraternal organization in the National Panhellenic Conference[1]. Chi Omega boasts over 171 active collegiate chapters and hundreds of alumnae chapters. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Kappa Delta (ΚΔ) is a sorority founded at the State Female Normal School, now Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia. ... Delta Delta Delta (ΔΔΔ), also known as Tri Delta, is a national collegiate sorority founded on November 27, 1888. ... Alpha Kappa Alpha (ΑΚΑ) Sorority, Incorporated, formed in January 15, 1908 at Howard University, became Americas first Greek-letter organization established by Black college women, and remains a predominately African-American sorority. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, (ΔΣΘ) Incorporated is a non-profitGreek letter organization of college educated women committed to constructive development of its members and to public service with a primary focus on the Black community. ...

Fraternities

(in order of establishment at Rhodes)

Pi Kappa Alpha International Fraternity (ΠΚΑ) is an international, secret, social, Greek-letter, college fraternity. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... nickname: Kappa Sig Founded December 10, 1869 International Headquarters Charlottesville, VA Official Colors Scarlet, White, and Emerald green Official Flower Lily of the valley Official Jewel Pearl Official Badge Official Crest ΚΣ (Kappa Sigma) is an international fraternity with at least 300 chapters and colonies in North America. ... The Kappa Alpha Order (KA) is a secret collegiate Order of Christian Knights. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Kappa Alpha Psi (KAΨ) is the second oldest collegiate Greek-letter fraternity with a predominantly African American membership and the first black intercollegiate fraternity incorporated as a national body. ...

Noted alumni

Business

John Henry Bryan, Jr. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... Sara Lee Corporation (NYSE: SLE) is an American consumer-goods company based in Illinois. ...

Culture

Baird Callicott is Professor of Philosophy and Religion Studies in the Institute of Applied Sciences at the University of North Texas. ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... An ethicist is one whose judgement on ethics and ethical codes has come to be trusted by some community, and (importantly) is expressed in some way that makes it possible for others to mimic or approximate that judgement. ... Dixie Carter in a 1986 Designing Women episode Dixie Virginia Carter (born May 25, 1939) is an American actress noted for her portrayals of Southern women. ... Created in 1955, the Drama Desk Award was created to recognize Off-Broadway and Off-Off-Broadway shows in addition to Broadway shows. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... Designing Women was an American television sitcom that centered around the working and personal lives of four women in an interior design firm in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Carroll Cloar was a nationally known 20th century painter born in Earle, Arkansas, on Jan. ... Painting by Rembrandt self-portrait Detail from Las Meninas by Diego Velazquez, in which the painter portrayed himself at work For the computer graphics program, see Corel Painter. ... Peter Taylor (January 8, 1917-November 2, 1994) was an American short-story writer and novelist, whose work depicts the changing world of the South as its rural society gave way to industralization. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ...

Government & Military

Bill Alexander (William Vollie Alexander Jr. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,002 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives United States Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups (as of November 7, 2006 elections) Democratic Party Republican... Abe Fortas (June 19, 1910–April 5, 1982) was a U.S. Supreme Court associate justice. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch of... Lt. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ... The Military Intelligence Hall of Fame is a Hall of Fame established by the Military Intelligence Corps of the U.S. Army to honor soldiers and civilians who have made exceptional contributions to Military Intelligence. ...

Noted staff

Administrators

  • Dave Wottle, Dean of Admissions, Olympic gold-medal winner

David James Dave Wottle (born August 7, 1950) is a former American athlete, winner of 800 m at the 1972 Summer Olympics. ...

Professors

  • Daniel Arce, Professor of Economics, noted for scholarship in game theory
  • Timothy Huebner, professor of history, 2004 Tennessee Professor of the Year by The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching
  • David McCarthy, professor of art, Smithsonian Fellow[2]
  • Michael Nelson, Professor of Political Science, author, and media analyst focused on the American presidency
  • Marcus Pohlmann, Professor of Political Science, coach of the Rhodes Mock trial program, President of the American Mock Trial Association. Coached Rhodes to record numbers of national championships (4), finals appearances (7), top-ten finishes (16), and consecutive top-ten finishes (16)

Game theory is often described as a branch of applied mathematics and economics that studies situations where multiple players make decisions in an attempt to maximize their returns. ... The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching is an international centre for research in education based in the United States of America. ... The Smithsonian castle, as seen through the garden gate. ... The President of the United States of America is the head of state and head of government of the United States. ... A mock trial (similar to moot court, but dealing with trials, while moot court deals with appellate court) is a contrived or imitation trial. ...

See also

The Rhodes Singers are a noted undergraduate choir from Rhodes College in Memphis, TN, specializing in smaller, unaccompanied chamber music works. ...

References

  1. ^ Franek, Robert et al, The Best 361 Colleges: the Smart Student's Guide to Colleges, Random House, Inc., New York, 2006, p. 424.
  2. ^ Pope, Loren, Colleges that Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About Colleges, Penguin Books, New York, 2006, p. 185.
  3. ^ Pope, Loren, Colleges that Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change the Way You Think About Colleges, Penguin Books, New York, 2006, p. 181.
    See also "Best Liberal Arts Colleges", America's Best Colleges, US News and World Report, 1999-2007.
  4. ^ data available via Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS), National Center for Education Statistics.
  5. ^ as in Turner South's Blue Ribbon, Princeton Review, Collegiate Gothic: The Architecture of Rhodes College by William Stroud, and other sources
  6. ^ These figures are published in the Rhodes College Common Data Set and have been reported to the federal government via IPEDS and the state government via TICUA.
  7. ^ Franek, Robert et al, The Best 361 Colleges: the Smart Student's Guide to Colleges, Random House, Inc., New York, 2006, p. 425.

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Rhodes College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (563 words)
Rhodes enrolls approximately 1650 students and is often ranked in the top tier of the annual US News and World Report list of the best American liberal arts colleges.
In 1945 the College adopted the name Southwestern at Memphis, to distinguish itself from other colleges and universities containing the name "Southwestern." In 1984, the college's name was changed to Rhodes College in an attempt to give the school more prestige and to honor former college president Peyton Rhodes.
Rhodes enrolls 1,677 undergraduate students; 86% are Caucasian, 5% are African American, 3.5% are Asian and 1.25% are Hispanic.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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