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Encyclopedia > Rhode Island
State of Rhode Island
and Providence Plantations
Flag of Rhode Island State seal of Rhode Island
Flag of Rhode Island Seal
Nickname(s): The Ocean State, Little Rhody
Motto(s): Hope
Official language(s) English
Capital Providence
Largest city Providence
Area  Ranked 50th
 - Total 1,214*[1] sq mi
(3,144* km²)
 - Width 37 miles (60 km)
 - Length 48 miles (77 km)
 - % water 32.4
 - Latitude 41° 09′ N to 42° 01′ N
 - Longitude 71° 07′ W to 71° 53′ W
Population  Ranked 43rd
 - Total 1,048,319
 - Density 1,003.2/sq mi 
387.34/km² (2nd)
Elevation  
 - Highest point Jerimoth Hill[2]
812 ft  (247 m)
 - Mean 200 ft  (60 m)
 - Lowest point Atlantic Ocean[2]
0 ft  (0 m)
Admission to Union  May 29, 1790 (13th)
Governor Donald Carcieri (R)
U.S. Senators Jack Reed (D)
Sheldon Whitehouse (D)
Congressional Delegation List
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Abbreviations RI US-RI
Web site www.ri.gov
* Total area in acres is approximately 776,957 acres (3,144 km²)

Rhode Island (IPA: /roʊd ˈaɪlənd/), officially named the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations,[3] is a state in the New England region of the northeastern United States of America. It is the smallest state by area, and the 8th smallest by population. Its official name is the longest official name of any U.S. state. Rhode Island was the first of the thirteen original American colonies to declare independence from British rule, signaling the start of the American Revolution; it was also the first state that engaged in armed hostilities with British property and authorities. Rhode Island did not participate in the Philadelphia Convention and was also the last of the original thirteen states to ratify the United States Constitution. Aquidneck Island highlighted in red Aquidneck Island, also called Rhode Island, is the largest island in Narragansett Bay. ... RI may refer to any of the following: The state of Rhode Island The Rock Island railroad (AAR reporting mark RI) Raffles Institution, a school in Singapore. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Rhode_Island. ... Image File history File links State_seal_of_Rhode_Island. ... The flag of Rhode Island consists of an anchor (a symbol for hope) surrounded by thirteen stars for the original 13 colonies (and Rhode Islands status as the 13th state to ratify the Constitution). ... The Rhode Island State Seal features a maritime anchor as its central image. ... This is a list of U.S. state nicknames -- both official and traditional (official state nicknames are in bold). ... Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ... Image File history File links Map_of_USA_RI.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Rhode Island ... // Although the United States currently has no official language, it is largely monolingual with English being the de facto national language. ... Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, site of first U.S. capital. ... Providence redirects here. ... Providence redirects here. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... This is a complete list of the states of the United States ordered by total area, land area, and water area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A kilometer (Commonwealth spelling: kilometre), symbol: km is a unit of length in the metric system equal to 1,000 metres (from the Greek words χίλια (khilia) = thousand and μέτρο (metro) = count/measure). ... Map of states populations (2006) This is a list of states of the United States by population (with inhabited non-state jurisdictions included for comparison) as of July 1, 2006, according to the 2005 estimates of the United States Census Bureau. ... Map of states showing population density This is a list of the 50 U.S. states, ordered by population density. ... This is a list of United States states by elevation. ... Jerimoth Hill is the name of the highest natural point in the US state of Rhode Island, at 812 feet above sea level. ... The order which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order that the others were admitted to the union This is a list of U.S. states by date of statehood, that is, the date when each U.S. state joined the Union. ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Donald L. Don Carcieri (born December 16, 1942) is the governor of the U.S. state of Rhode Island. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... John Francis Jack Reed (b. ... Sheldon Whitehouse (born October 20, 1955) is the Junior Senator from the state of Rhode Island. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... These are tables of congressional delegations from Rhode Island to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... Map of U.S. time zones with new CST and EST areas displayed This is a list of United States of America States by time zone. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The following is a list of abbreviations used by the United States Postal Service. ... U.S. states This is a list of traditional abbreviations for U.S. states and territorries, which were in wide use prior to the U.S. postal abbreviations. ... This article is about the unit of measure known as the acre. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Regional definitions vary The Northeastern United States is a region of the United States. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Map of states populations (2006) This is a list of states of the United States by population (with inhabited non-state jurisdictions included for comparison) as of July 1, 2006, according to the 2005 estimates of the United States Census Bureau. ... In 1775, the British claimed authority over the red and pink areas on this map and Spain ruled the orange. ... U.S. Declaration of Independence The Declaration of Independence is the document in which the Thirteen Colonies declared themselves independent of the Kingdom of Great Britain and explained their justifications for doing so. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States, by Howard Chandler Christy. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ...


Despite its name, most of the state of Rhode Island lies on the North American mainland. Providence Plantations refers to the mainland, while Rhode Island was the 17th and 18th century name for Aquidneck Island (now composed of the city of Newport, and the towns of Middletown and Portsmouth).[4] North America North America is a continent [1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... This article is about the geomorphological/geopolitical term; MAINLAND is also a cheese brand owned by Fonterra, a New Zealand dairy company. ... Aquidneck Island highlighted in red Aquidneck Island, also called Rhode Island, is the largest island in Narragansett Bay. ... Newport, Rhode Island Newport is a city in Newport County, Rhode Island, United States, about 30 miles (48 km) south of Providence. ... Middletown is a town located in Newport County, Rhode Island. ... Location of Portsmouth, Rhode Island Portsmouth is a town in Newport County, Rhode Island, United States. ...


Rhode Island has long held the nickname of "Little Rhody", though the state has officially adopted the nickname of "the Ocean State," as nearly one tenth of Rhode Island's inland area is covered by salt water, and no part of the state is more than a 30-minute drive from the water's edge.[5]

Contents

Name origin

In 1524, Italian navigator, Giovanni da Verrazzano was the first European to visit any part of what is now Rhode Island. He came to what is now Block Island and named it "Luisa" after Louise of Savoy, Queen Mother of France. Verrazzano described Luisa as "about the size of the Island of Rhodes". When the founders of the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations surveyed the land, they thought that Aquidneck Island was the place. A mistake occurred in 1614, when Luisa was charted by the Dutch explorer Adriaen Block, after whom Luisa was renamed by the Dutch West India Company; however, their motives in doing so are unknown.[6] The official explanation by the State of Rhode Island is that Adriaen Block named the area "Roodt Eylandt" meaning "red island" in reference to the red clay that lined the shore, and that the name was later anglicized when the region came under British rule.[7] Giovanni da Verrazzano (c. ... Southeast Light, a famous Block Island landmark Block Island, shown in red, off the coast of the State of Rhode Island. ... Louise of Savoy Louise of Savoy (September 11, 1476 – September 22, 1531) was the mother of Francis I of France. ... Queen Mother is a title reserved for a widowed queen consort whose son or daughter from that union is the reigning monarch. ... This article is about the Greek island of Rhodes. ... Providence Plantation was founded in 1636 by Roger Williams, a Baptist minister fleeing from religious persecution in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. ... Aquidneck Island highlighted in red Aquidneck Island, also called Rhode Island, is the largest island in Narragansett Bay. ... Blocks map of his 1614 voyage, with the first appearance of the term New Netherland Adriaen Block (1567–1627) was a Dutch private fur trader and navigator who explored the coastal and river valley areas between present-day New Jersey and Massachusetts during four voyages from 1611 to 1614... Dutch West India Company (Dutch: West-Indische Compagnie or WIC) was a company of Dutch merchants. ...


Geography

Block Island bluffs, Rhode Island
Block Island bluffs, Rhode Island
Map of Rhode Island
Map of Rhode Island
Further information: List of Rhode Island counties

Rhode Island covers an area of approximately 1,214 square miles (3,144 km²) and is bordered on the north and east by Massachusetts, on the west by Connecticut, and on the south by Rhode Island Sound and the Atlantic Ocean. It shares a water border with New York between Block Island and Long Island. The mean elevation of the state is 200 feet (60 m). Located within the New England province of the Appalachian Region, Rhode Island has two distinct natural regions. Eastern Rhode Island contains the lowlands of the Narragansett Bay, while Western Rhode Island forms part of the New England Upland. Narragansett Bay is a major feature of the state's topography. Block Island lies approximately 12 miles (19 km) off the southern coast of the mainland. Within the Bay, there are over 30 islands. The largest is Aquidneck Island, shared by the municipalities of Newport, Middletown, and Portsmouth. The second-largest island is Conanicut; the third-largest is Prudence. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (480x640, 104 KB) Photographer: Whitney from Scottsdale, USA Title: Bluffs- Block Island, RI Taken on: 2004-11-16 02:23:14 Original source: Flickr. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (480x640, 104 KB) Photographer: Whitney from Scottsdale, USA Title: Bluffs- Block Island, RI Taken on: 2004-11-16 02:23:14 Original source: Flickr. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2122 × 1640 pixel, file size: 1,007 KB, MIME type: image/png) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Rhode Island... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2122 × 1640 pixel, file size: 1,007 KB, MIME type: image/png) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Rhode Island... List of Rhode Island counties: Rhode Island Bristol County: formed in 1747 from land gained from Bristol County, Massachusetts after resolution of a boundary dispute between the two colonies. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[2] Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Categories: US geography stubs | Rhode Island geography | Straits ... This article is about the state. ... Southeast Light, a famous Block Island landmark Block Island, shown in red, off the coast of the State of Rhode Island. ... This article is about the island in New York State. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... The Appalachian Mountains are a system of North American mountains running from Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada to Alabama in the United States, although the northernmost mainland portion ends at the Gaspe Peninsula of Quebec. ... In physical geography, a lowland is any broad expanse of land with a general low level. ... Narragansett Bay, shown in pink. ... Southeast Light, a famous Block Island landmark Block Island, shown in red, off the coast of the State of Rhode Island. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... Newport, Rhode Island Newport is a city in Newport County, Rhode Island, United States, about 30 miles (48 km) south of Providence. ... Middletown is a town located in Newport County, Rhode Island. ... Location of Portsmouth, Rhode Island Portsmouth is a town in Newport County, Rhode Island, United States. ... Conanicut Island Conanicut Island is the second largest island in Narragansett Bay, in the state of Rhode Island. ... Categories: Stub | Rhode Island geography ...


Nicknamed the Ocean State, Rhode Island is home to a number of oceanfront beaches. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


Rhode Island is mostly flat with no real mountains. Rhode Island's highest natural point is Jerimoth Hill, only 812 feet (247 m) above sea level.[2] Jerimoth Hill is the name of the highest natural point in the US state of Rhode Island, at 812 feet above sea level. ...


Climate

Rhode Island is an example of a warm, summer humid continental climate with hot, rainy summers and cold, snowy winters. The highest temperature recorded in Rhode Island was 105 °F (40 °C), recorded on August 2, 1975 in Providence, RI. The lowest temperature in Rhode Island, -13 °F (-25 °C), was recorded on February 6, 1996 in Coventry, RI. Monthly average temperatures range from a high of 82 °F (28 °C) to a low of 20 °F (-7 °C).[8] The humid continental climate is a climate found over large areas of land masses in the temperate regions of the mid-latitudes where there is a zone of conflict between polar and tropical air masses. ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... Celsius is, or relates to, the Celsius temperature scale (previously known as the centigrade scale). ... Providence redirects here. ... Country United States State Rhode Island County Kent Government  - Town Manager Richard Kerbel Area  - City  62. ...


History

The history of Rhode Island includes the history of Rhode Island from pre-colonial times (1636) to modern day. ...

Colonial Era

In 1524, Italian navigator Giovanni de Verrazzano traversed the mid-Atlantic coast of North America, searching for an all-water route through North America to China. In March of that year, he left what is now New York harbor and headed east until he discovered what was later called Block Island. Natives guided him into what is now Newport, Rhode Island harbor. He remained for two weeks while his crew surveyed the bay and the surrounding mainland. In early May, 1524, Verrazzano departed to renew his search for a Northwest Passage. Verrazano voyage of 1524 Giovanni da Verrazano (c. ... Southeast Light, a famous Block Island landmark Block Island, shown in red, off the coast of the State of Rhode Island. ... Newport, Rhode Island Newport is a city in Newport County, Rhode Island, United States, about 30 miles (48 km) south of Providence. ... For other uses, see Northwest Passage (disambiguation). ...


In 1614, the Dutch explorer Adriaen Block visited the island that is now called Block Island. Native American inhabitants included the Narragansett tribe, occupying most of the area, and the closely related Niantic tribe. Most of the Native Americans were decimated by introduced diseases such as smallpox, intertribal warfare, and the disastrous King Philip's War, but remnants of the Niantic merged into the Narragansett tribe, where they remain on a federally recognized reservation. Southeast Light, a famous Block Island landmark Block Island, shown in red, off the coast of the State of Rhode Island. ... Tribal flag The Narragansett tribe, or more accurately Nahahiganseck Sovereign Nation, are a Native American tribe who controlled the area surrounding Narragansett Bay in present-day Rhode Island, and also portions of Connecticut, and eastern Massachusetts. ... The Niantic were a tribe of New England indians, who were living in Connecticut and Rhode Island during the early colonial period. ... Native Americans redirects here. ... In medicine, infectious disease or communicable disease is disease caused by a biological agent (e. ... Smallpox (also known by the Latin names Variola or Variola vera) is a contagious disease unique to humans. ... Look up warfare in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Attack King Philips War, sometimes called Metacoms War or Metacoms Rebellion,[1] was an armed conflict between Indian inhabitants of present-day southern New England and English colonists and their Indian allies from 1675 – 1676. ...


In 1636, Roger Williams, after being banished from the Massachusetts Bay Colony for his religious views, settled at the tip of Narragansett Bay. He called the site Providence and declared it a place of religious freedom. For other persons named Roger Williams, see Roger Williams (disambiguation). ... A map of the Massachusetts Bay Colony Capital Charlestown, Boston History  - Established 1629  - New England Confederation 1643  - Dominion of New England 1686  - Province of Massachusetts Bay 1692  - Disestablished 1692 The Massachusetts Bay Colony (sometimes called the Massachusetts Bay Company, for the institution that founded it) was an English settlement on...


The following year, Anne Hutchinson was banished from Massachusetts for criticizing the clergy there. She and some others, including William Coddington and John Clark, founded the town of Portsmouth on Aquidneck Island. In 1639, Coddington left Portsmouth and founded Newport on Aquidneck Island. Anne Hutchinson on Trial by Edwin Austin Abbey Anne Hutchinson (July 1591 – August 1643) was the unauthorized Puritan minister of a dissident church discussion group and a pioneer settler in Massachusetts, Rhode Island and New Netherlands. ... William Coddington (1601 – November 1, 1678) was the first governor of Rhode Island. ... For the physicist (winner of 2004 Hughes Medal) see John Clarke (physicist) John Clarke (1609–1676) was a medical doctor, Baptist minister, co-founder of the colony of Rhode Island, and a leading advocate of religious freedom in the Americas. ... Location of Portsmouth, Rhode Island Portsmouth is a town in Newport County, Rhode Island, United States. ... Aquidneck Island highlighted in red Aquidneck Island, also called Rhode Island, is the largest island in Narragansett Bay. ...


In that same year a formal government was established for the island. William Coddington was the first governor and Philip Sherman was the first Secretary. In 1643, Samuel Gorton founded Shawomet, which is now called Warwick. In 1644, the name of Aquidneck Island was changed to Rhode Island. Philip Sherman (1610-1687) was a prominent leader in early Rhode Island and one of its founders. ... Samuel Gorton (c. ... Warwick is a city in Kent County, Rhode Island, United States. ...


John Clarke was granted a Charter in 1663 for Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, which effectively united the two colonies into one. Under the terms of the charter, only landowners could vote. Before the Industrial Revolution, when most people were employed as farmers, this was considered democratic. The original charter was used as the state constitution until 1842. A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ...


The relationship between the New Englanders and the Native Americans was strained, and caused some bloodshed. On December 19, 1675 colonist militia from Connecticut, Massachusetts Bay, Plymouth, and Rhode Island massacred about 350 Narragansetts in the Battle of the Great Swamp.[9] The largest tribes that lived near Rhode Island were the Wampanoag, Pequots, Narragansett, and Nipmuck. One native named Squanto, from the Wampanoag tribe, stayed with the Pilgrims and taught them many valuable skills needed to survive in the area. He also helped greatly with the eventual peace between the colonists and the natives. This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... The Wampanoag (Wôpanâak in the Wampanoag language) are a Native American people. ... The Mashantucket Pequots are a small Native American tribe in Connecticut which operates the successful Foxwoods Resort Casino. ... Tribal flag The Narragansett tribe, or more accurately Nahahiganseck Sovereign Nation, are a Native American tribe who controlled the area surrounding Narragansett Bay in present-day Rhode Island, and also portions of Connecticut, and eastern Massachusetts. ... Nipmuck emblem The Nipmuck are an aboriginal North American people, belonging to the family of Algonquian peoples, currently living in and around the Chaubunagungamaug Reservation of Webster, Massachusetts. ... This article is about the actual historical figure. ...


Roger Williams had kept the powerful Narragansetts on friendly terms with local white settlers. Having kept the Native Americans on friendly terms with settlers, the Narragansetts were even persuaded to form an alliance with the English in 1637, carrying out an attack that nearly extinguished the warlike Pequots. This peace did not last long, however, and by 1670 even the friendly tribes who had greeted Williams and the Pilgrims became estranged from the colonists and conflicts erupted. For the ethnic group, see White people. ... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ...


The most important and traumatic event in 17th century Rhode Island was King Philip's War, which occurred during 1675–1676. King Philip (his British nickname. His real name was Metacomet) was the chief of the Wampanoag Indians. The settlers of Portsmouth had purchased their land from his father, Massasoit. King Philip rebelled against the English. The first attacks were around Narrangansett Bay, but spread throughout New England. (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... Attack King Philips War, sometimes called Metacoms War or Metacoms Rebellion,[1] was an armed conflict between Indian inhabitants of present-day southern New England and English colonists and their Indian allies from 1675 – 1676. ... Metacomet (died August 12, 1676), also known as King Philip or Metacom, was a war chief or sachem of the Wampanoag Indians and their leader in King Philips War. ... This 1902 photo shows Profile Rock in Assonet, Massachusetts. ...


Revolution and industrialization: 1770–1860

Rhode Island's tradition of independence and dissent gave it a prominent role in the American Revolution. In 1772, the first bloodshed of the American Revolution took place in Rhode Island when a band of Providence residents attacked a grounded British ship for enforcing unpopular British trade regulations in the incident which would be come to known as the Gaspee Affair. Keeping with its culture of defiance, Rhode Island was the first of the original thirteen colonies to declare its independence from England (May 4, 1776,[1]) and the last to ratify the Constitution (which replaced the Articles of Confederation) (May 29, 1790)—doing the latter only after being threatened with having its exports taxed as a foreign nation. John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... The Gaspée Affair was an important incident in the course of the American Revolution. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1776 (disambiguation). ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ...


As the Industrial Revolution moved large numbers of workers into the cities, a permanently landless, and therefore voteless, class developed. By 1829, 60% of the state's free white males were ineligible to vote.


Several attempts had been made to address this problem, but none passed. In 1842, Thomas Dorr drafted a liberal constitution which was passed by popular referendum. However, the conservative sitting governor, Samuel Ward King, opposed the people's wishes, leading to the Dorr Rebellion. Although this collapsed, a modified version of the constitution was passed in November, which allowed any white male to vote that he owned land or could pay a US $1 poll tax. Thomas Wilson Dorr was born in 1805 and died in 1854. ... Samuel Ward King (May 22, 1786 - January 20, 1851) of Johnston, Providence County, Rhode Island, was the Governor of Rhode Island, 1839-43, who took a strong stand against the expanded voting franchise that led to the Dorr Rebellion in 1841 - 1842. ... The Dorr Rebellion was a short-lived armed insurrection in Rhode Island in 1841 and 1842, led by Thomas Wilson Dorr who was agitating for changes to the states electoral system. ... A poll tax, head tax, or capitation is a tax of a uniform, fixed amount per individual (as opposed to a percentage of income). ...


In addition to industrialization, Rhode Island was heavily involved in the slave trade during the post-revolution era. Slavery was extant in the state as early as 1652, and by 1774, the slave population of Rhode Island was 6.3%, nearly twice as high as any other New England Colony. In the late 18th century, several Rhode Island merchant families began actively engaging in the triangle slave trade. Notable among these was the Brown family, for whom Brown University is named, although some important Browns became prominent abolitionists. In the years after the Revolution, Rhode Island merchants controlled between 60% and 90% of the American trade in African slaves.[10][11] This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Slave redirects here. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ...


Civil War to Progressive Era: 1860–1929

During the Civil War, Rhode Island was the first Union state to send troops in response to President Lincoln's request for help from the states. Rhode Island furnished 25,236 fighting men, of which 1,685 died. On the home front, Rhode Island, along with the other northern states, used its industrial capacity to supply the Union Army with the materials it needed to win the war. In addition, Newport was the temporary home of the United States Naval Academy during the war. Rhode Island's continued growth and modernization led to the creation of an urban mass transit system, and improved health and sanitation programs. After the war, in 1866, Rhode Island abolished racial segregation throughout the state.[12] Post-war immigration increased the population. From the 1860s to the 1880s, most of the immigrants were from England, Ireland, Germany, Sweden, and Quebec, Canada. Towards the end of the century, however, most immigrants were from South and Eastern Europe, and the Mediterranean.[13] At the turn of the century, Rhode Island had a booming economy, which fed the demand for immigration. In the years leading up to World War I, Rhode Island's constitution remained reactionary, in contrast to the more progressive reforms that were occurring in the rest of the country. The state never ratified the 18th Amendment establishing national Prohibition of alcohol.[14] During World War I, Rhode Island furnished 28,817 troops, of whom 612 died. After the war, the state was hit hard by the Spanish Influenza.[15] In the 1920s and 30s, rural Rhode Island saw a surge in Ku Klux Klan membership largely among the Swamp Yankee population in reaction to the large waves of immigrants moving to the state. The Klan is believed to be responsible for burning the Watchman Institute in Scituate, Rhode Island, which was a school for African American children.[16] Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... For other uses, see War (disambiguation). ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The Spanish Flu Pandemic, also known as the Great Influenza Pandemic, the 1918 Flu Epidemic, and La Grippe, was an unusually severe and deadly strain of influenza, a viral infectious disease, that killed some 25 million to 40 million people (possibly significantly more) world-wide in 1918 and 1919. ... Members of the second Ku Klux Klan at a rally during the 1920s. ... Swamp Yankee is a colloquialism that has a variety of meanings. ... The Lapham Institute was a well-known Freewill Baptist academy in North Scituate, Rhode Island in the nineteenth and early twentieth century. ... Lapham Institute in Scituate at the turn of the 20th Century Scituate is a town in Providence County, Rhode Island, United States. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ...


Great Depression to present: 1929-

In the 20th century, the state continued to grow, though the decline in industry devastated many urban areas. These areas were impacted further, as with the rest of the country's urban areas, by construction of Interstate highways through city cores and the suburbanization caused by it and by the GI Bill. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... A typical rural stretch of Interstate highway, with two lanes in each direction separated by a large grassy median, and with cross-traffic limited to overpasses and underpasses. ... The G. I. Bill of Rights or Servicemens Readjustment Act of 1944 provided for college or vocational education for returning World War II veterans as well as one-year of unemployment compensation. ...

Providence in the mid-20th century
Providence in the mid-20th century

Since the Great Depression, the Rhode Island Democratic Party has dominated local politics. For years, the Speaker of the House, always a Democrat, has been one of the most powerful figures in government[citation needed]. The Democratic Party's core of support is in the urban areas of the state and immediate suburbs. While known for old school politics and corruption, Rhode Island also has comprehensive health insurance for low-income children, the RITE CARE program, as well as a large social safety net. Despite this, many urban areas still have a high rate of children in poverty. Due to an influx of residents from Boston, increasing housing costs have resulted in more homeless in Rhode Island (from about 3,000 individuals in 1999 to over 6,000 today), as well as a doubling of the cost of an average home.[17] Image File history File links Providence_old. ... Image File history File links Providence_old. ...


The Republican Party, virtually non-existent in the state legislature, has successfully put forward occasional state-wide "good government" reform candidates who criticize the state's high taxes and the excesses of the Democratic Party. Current Governor Donald Carcieri of East Greenwich, and former Mayor Vincent A. "Buddy" Cianci of Providence (who later became an independent, political boss, and was convicted on RICO charges) ran as Republican reform candidates. Look up reform in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Donald L. Don Carcieri (born December 16, 1942) is the governor of the U.S. state of Rhode Island. ... Vincent Buddy Cianci, Jr. ...


Prominent State Democrats include House Speaker William Murphy, Senate President Joseph Montalbano, Providence Mayor David Cicilline, Secretary of State A. Ralph Mollis, General Treasurer Frank Caprio, Senate Majority Leader M. Teresa Paiva-Weed, and Lt. Gov. Elizabeth Roberts. In recent years, the former Speaker of the House John Harwood, State Senator John Celona, and State Senate President William Irons were forced to resign in scandals.


In recent history, in 2003 a nightclub fire in West Warwick, Rhode Island that claimed one hundred lives caught national attention and resulted in criminal sentences.[18] The Station Nightclub Fire on the evening of Thursday, February 20, 2003, was the fourth-deadliest nightclub fire in U.S. history, killing 100 people and injuring more than 200. ... Location of West Warwick, Rhode Island. ...


Law and government

The capital of Rhode Island is Providence. The state's current governor is Donald L. Carcieri (R) and its United States Senators are Jack Reed (D) and Sheldon Whitehouse (D). Rhode Island's two United States Congressmen are Patrick J. Kennedy (D-1) and Jim Langevin (D-2). Not to be confused with capitol. ... Providence redirects here. ... Donald L. Don Carcieri (born December 16, 1942) is the governor of the U.S. state of Rhode Island. ... John Francis Jack Reed (b. ... Sheldon Whitehouse (born October 20, 1955) is the Junior Senator from the state of Rhode Island. ... For other persons named Patrick Kennedy, see Patrick Kennedy (disambiguation). ... James R. Jim Langevin (born April 22, 1964) in Providence, Rhode Island is a politician from Rhode Island. ...

Further information: List of Rhode Island Governors

Rhode Island is one of a few states that does not have an official Governor's residence. List of Rhode Island Governors Nicholas Cooke None 1775-1778 William Greene None 1778-1786 John Collins None 1786-1790 Arthur Fenner Anti-Federalist 1790-1805 Henry Smith Unknown 1805-1806 Isaac Wilbur Unknown 1806-1807 James Fenner Dem. ...


The state legislature is the Rhode Island General Assembly, consisting of the 75-member state House of Representatives and the 38-member Senate. Both houses of the bicameral body are currently dominated by the Democratic Party. Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      In the United States of America, a state legislature is a generic term referring to the... The Rhode Island General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Rhode Island. ... The Rhode Island House of Representatives is the lower body of the Rhode Island General Assembly, and consists of 75 members. ... The Rhode Island Senate chamber in the State Capitol The Rhode Island Senate is the upper house of the Rhode Island General Assembly, the state legislature of the U.S. State of Rhode Island. ... In government, bicameralism is the practice of having two legislative or parliamentary chambers. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ...


Federally, Rhode Island is one of the most reliably Democratic states during presidential elections, regularly giving the Democratic nominees one of their best showings. In 1980, Rhode Island was one of only 6 states to vote against Ronald Reagan. In the 1984 Reagan landslide, Rhode Island provided Walter Mondale with his 3rd best performance. Rhode Island was the Democrats' best state in 1988 and 2000 and 2nd best in 1996 and 2004. The state was devoted to Republicans until 1908, but has only strayed from the Democrats 7 times in the 24 elections that followed. In 2004, Rhode Island gave John Kerry a greater than 20 percentage point margin of victory (the third highest of any state) with 59.4% of its vote. All but three of Rhode Island's 39 cities and towns voted for the Democratic candidate. The only exceptions were East and West Greenwich, and Scituate.[19] Rhode Island has abolished capital punishment, making it one of the 12 states that have done so. Rhode Island abolished the death penalty very early, just after Michigan (first state to abolish it), and carried out its last execution in the 1840s. The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Reagan redirects here. ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (largely established by former Vice President Hubert Humphrey). ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... East Greenwich is a town in Kent County, Rhode Island, United States. ... West Greenwich was also an alternative name for part of Deptford in England and still refers to the western side of the adjacent town of Greenwich West Greenwich is a town in Kent County, Rhode Island, United States. ... Lapham Institute in Scituate at the turn of the 20th Century Scituate is a town in Providence County, Rhode Island, United States. ... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


Rhode Island has some of the highest taxes in the country, particularly in its property taxes, ranking seventh in local and state taxes and sixth in real estate taxes in the country, the end result of a decade's trend of increasing taxes relative to other states.[20]


Economy

Textron's headquarters, in the company of One Financial Plaza and the Rhode Island Hospital Trust building
Textron's headquarters, in the company of One Financial Plaza and the Rhode Island Hospital Trust building

The Blackstone River Valley is known as the "Birthplace of the American Industrial Revolution".[21] It was in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, that Samuel Slater set up Slater Mill in 1793,[22] using the waterpower of the Blackstone River to power his cotton mill. For a while, Rhode Island was one of the leaders in textiles. However, with the Great Depression, most textile factories relocated to the American South. The textile industry still constitutes a part of the Rhode Island economy, but does not have the same power that it once had. An interesting by-product of the textile industry is the amount of abandoned factories - many of them now being used for low-income or elderly housing or converted into offices or trendy condos. In Pawtucket and Providence, these abandoned mills are used as housing for artists. Today, much of the economy of state is based in services, particularly healthcare and education, and still to some extent, manufacturing.[23][24] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 716 KB) Summary Textrons world headquarters at the Textron Tower, next to One Financial Plaza primarily used by Sovereign Bank and the Rhode Island Hospital Trust building in use by Rhode Island School of Design for dorms. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 716 KB) Summary Textrons world headquarters at the Textron Tower, next to One Financial Plaza primarily used by Sovereign Bank and the Rhode Island Hospital Trust building in use by Rhode Island School of Design for dorms. ... The Textron World Headquarters building (formerly known as the Old Stone Tower) is an International-style skyscraper in downtown Providence, RI. At 311 feet (95m), it stands as the 4th tallest building in the city and the state. ... One Financial Plaza, also known as the Sovereign Bank Tower and formerly known as the Hospital Trust Tower, is an International Style skyscraper in the heart of downtown Providence, Rhode Island. ... A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... Pawtucket is a city in Providence County, Rhode Island, United States. ... Samuel Slater (1768 – 1835) popularly called The Father of the American Industrial Revolution Samuel Slater (June 9, 1768 – April 21, 1835) was an early American industrialist popularly known as the Founder of the American Industrial Revolution. // Mr. ... Slater Mill, located on the Blackstone River in Pawtucket, RI, is generally cited as the birthplace of the Industrial Revolution in America. ... The Blackstone River begins in central Massachusetts and travels through Rhode Island until emptying into Narragansett Bay which connects to the Atlantic Ocean. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the type of fabric. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ...


The Fortune 500 companies CVS and Textron are based in Woonsocket and Providence, respectively. FM Global, Hasbro, American Power Conversion, Nortek, and Amica Mutual Insurance are all Fortune 1000 companies based in Rhode Island. The GTECH Corporation is headquartered in Providence. CVS/pharmacy is a pharmacy and convenience store chain in the United States. ... Founded in 1923 as the Special Yarns Company by Royal Little, Textron NYSE: TXT, today is a multi-industry company with a portfolio of familiar brands such as Bell Helicopter, E-Z-GO, Cessna Aircraft, and Greenlee, among others. ... Woonsocket is a city in Providence County, Rhode Island, United States. ... Providence redirects here. ... The FM Global logotype FM Global is a U.S. based company that specializes in property protection and provides insurance and risk management services to some of the worlds largest corporations. ... Hasbro (NYSE: HAS) is an American toy and game company. ... American Power Conversion Corp. ... Amica Mutual Insurance is a mutual insurance company founded in 1907 and located in Lincoln, Rhode Island offering automobile, home, and life insurance. ... GTech is a company based in West Greenwich, Rhode Island, in the United States. ...


Rhode Island's 2000 total gross state product was $33 billion, placing it 45th in the nation. Its 2000 per capita Personal Income was $29,685, 16th in the nation. Rhode Island has the lowest level of energy consumption per capita of any state.[25]


Health services are Rhode Islands largest industry.[citation needed] Second is tourism, supporting 39,000 jobs, with tourism related sales at $3.26 billion in the year 2000. The third largest industry is manufacturing. Its industrial outputs are fashion jewelry, fabricated metal products, electric equipment, machinery, shipbuilding and boatbuilding. Rhode Island's agricultural outputs are nursery stock, vegetables, dairy products, and eggs.


The state's taxes are appreciably higher than neighboring states.[20] Governor Carcieri has claimed that this higher tax rate has had an inhibitory effect on business growth in the state and is calling for reductions to increase the competitiveness of the state's business environment. Rhode Island's income tax is based on 25% of the payer's federal income tax payment.[26]


Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1790 68,825
1800 69,122 0.4%
1810 76,931 11.3%
1820 83,059 8.0%
1830 97,199 17.0%
1840 108,830 12.0%
1850 147,545 35.6%
1860 174,620 18.4%
1870 217,353 24.5%
1880 276,531 27.2%
1890 345,506 24.9%
1900 428,556 24.0%
1910 542,610 26.6%
1920 604,397 11.4%
1930 687,497 13.7%
1940 713,346 3.8%
1950 791,896 11.0%
1960 859,488 8.5%
1970 946,725 10.1%
1980 947,154 0.0%
1990 1,003,464 5.9%
2000 1,048,319 4.5%
Demographics of Rhode Island (csv)
By race White Black AIAN Asian NHPI
AIAN is American Indian or Alaskan Native   -   NHPI is Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander
2000 (total population) 90.96% 6.45% 1.07% 2.74% 0.19%
2000 (Hispanic only) 7.14% 1.42% 0.18% 0.08% 0.07%
2005 (total population) 90.16% 7.07% 1.09% 3.07% 0.21%
2005 (Hispanic only) 9.12% 1.49% 0.22% 0.08% 0.08%
Growth 2000-2005 (total population) 1.76% 12.52% 4.91% 15.09% 9.93%
Growth 2000-2005 (non-Hispanic only) -0.75% 13.80% 1.03% 15.44% 8.90%
Growth 2000-2005 (Hispanic only) 31.21% 7.98% 24.03% 3.78% 11.64%

The center of population of Rhode Island is located in Providence County, in the city of Cranston.[27] According to the U.S. Census Bureau, as of 2005, Rhode Island had an estimated population of 1,076,189, which is a decrease of 3,727, or 0.3%, from the prior year and an increase of 27,870, or 2.7%, since the year 2000. This includes a natural increase since the last census of 15,220 people (that is 66,973 births minus 51,753 deaths) and an increase due to net migration of 14,001 people into the state. Immigration from outside the United States resulted in a net increase of 18,965 people, and migration within the country produced a net decrease of 4,964 people. The United States Census of 1790 was the first Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1800 was the second Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1810 was the third Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1820 was the fourth Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1830 was the fifth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Sixth Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 17,069,453 — an increase of 32. ... The Seventh Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 23,191,876 — an increase of 35. ... The United States Census of 1860 was the eighth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Ninth United States Census was taken in 1870. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... The Eleventh United States Census was taken June 1, 1890. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census was taken in 1910. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Fifteenth United States Census was taken in 1930. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twentieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... Center of population is a subject of study in the field of demographics. ... Providence County is a county located in the state of Rhode Island. ... Country State County Providence Government  - Mayor Michael Napolitano Area  - City 29. ...

Rhode Island Population Density Map
Rhode Island Population Density Map

The six largest ancestry groups in Rhode Island are: Italian (19%), Irish (19%), French-Canadian (17.3%),[28] English (12%), Hispanic 11%, [4] Portuguese (8.7%). Image File history File links Rhode_Island_population_map. ... Image File history File links Rhode_Island_population_map. ... Canadiens redirects here. ... English Americans (occasionally known as Anglo-Americans) are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England. ... Hispanic Americans (Spanish: Hispano Americano) are Americans of Hispanic ethnicity who largely identify with the Hispanic cultural heritage. ...


According to the 2000 U.S. Census, 8.07% of the population aged 5 and over speaks Spanish at home, while 3.80% speaks Portuguese, 1.96% French, and 1.39% Italian [5]. The 22nd United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ...


6.1% of Rhode Island's population were reported as under 5, 23.6% under 18, and 14.5% were 65 or older. Females made up approximately 52% of the population.


Rhode Island has a higher percentage of Americans of Portuguese ancestry (who dominate Bristol County), including Portuguese Americans and Cape Verdean Americans, than any other state in the nation. French-Canadians form a large part of northern Providence County whereas Irish-Americans have a strong presence in Newport and Kent counties. Yankees of English ancestry still have a presence in the state as well, especially in Washington county, and are often referred to as "Swamp Yankees." It has been suggested that Lusitanic American be merged into this article or section. ... Cape Verdean immigration to the United States began in the early 1800s. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Irish population density in the United States, 1872. ... The term Swamp Yankee has a variety of meanings. ...


Religion

The religious affiliations of the people of Rhode Island are:[29]

Rhode Island is home to the Roman Catholic Diocese of Providence and the Episcopal Diocese of Rhode Island. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... Roman Catholicism in the United States has grown dramatically over the countrys history, from being a tiny minority faith during the time of the Thirteen Colonies to being the countrys largest profession of faith today. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... This article is about the Episcopal Church in the United States. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... The Roman Catholic Diocese of Providence is an ecclesiastical territory or particular church of the Roman Catholic Church in the United States. ... The Episcopal Diocese of Rhode Island is a diocese of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America whose boundaries coincide with those of the state of Rhode Island. ...


Rhode Island has the highest percentage of Roman Catholics[30] in the nation mainly due to large Irish, Italian, and French-Canadian immigration in the past (these 3 groups form roughly 55-60% of the state population); recently, significant Portuguese (though Portuguese communities have existed since the mid 19th century) and Hispanic communities (these 2 groups form roughly 20% of the state population) have also been established in the state. Though it has the highest overall Catholic percentage of any state, none of Rhode Island's individual counties ranks among the ten most Catholic in the United States, as Catholics are very evenly spread throughout the state.[30] Rhode Island and Utah are the only two states in which a majority of the population are members of a single religious body. Catholic Church redirects here. ... Canadiens redirects here. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Culture

The Rhode Island state quarter, depicting a vintage sailboat sailing in front of the Claiborne Pell Newport Bridge
The Rhode Island state quarter, depicting a vintage sailboat sailing in front of the Claiborne Pell Newport Bridge

Many Rhode Islanders speak with a non-rhotic accent that many compare to a "Brooklyn" or a cross between a New York and Boston accent ("water" becomes "wata"). Many Rhode Islanders pronounce the 'aw' sound as one might hear in New Jersey; e.g., "coffee" is pronounced "cauwwefee."[31] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 600 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1106 × 1105 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 600 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1106 × 1105 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Claiborne Pell (Newport) Bridge. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... The Boston accent is found not only in the city of Boston, Massachusetts itself but also much of eastern Massachusetts. ...


The nautical nature of Rhode Island's geography pervades its culture. Newport harbor, in particular, holds many pleasure boats. In the lobby of the state's main airport, T. F. Green, is a large lifesize sailboat.[32] The state's license plates depict an ocean wave.[33] Additionally, the large number of beaches in Washington County (known locally as South County) lures many Rhode Islanders south for summer vacation.[34] Newport, Rhode Island Newport is a city in Newport County, Rhode Island, United States, about 30 miles (48 km) south of Providence. ... Runway layout at PVD T. F. Green Airport (IATA: PVD, ICAO: KPVD, FAA LID: PVD), also known as Theodore Francis Green State Airport, is a public airport located in Warwick, six miles (10 km) south of Providence, in Kent County, Rhode Island, USA. Dedicated in 1931, the airport was named... Washington County is a county located in the southeastern part of Rhode Island, a U.S. state. ...


The Fox show Family Guy takes place in a fictional town in Rhode Island named Quahog. That town may not be intended to have a particular real-world counterpart. Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ... For the variety of clam also known as Quahog, see Hard clam. ...


The state was notorious for organized crime activity from the 1950s into the 1990s when the Patriarca crime family held sway over most of New England from its Providence headquarters. Although the power of organized crime has greatly diminished in Rhode Island over the last 20 years, its residents are still stigmatized by popular perceptions of rampant graft and corruption that have haunted the state for decades. The Patriarca crime family is a criminal organization based in the region of New England, specifically Providence, Rhode Island and Boston, Massachusetts, that is part of a nationwide criminal phenomenon known as the Mafia or La Cosa Nostra. ...


Rhode Islanders developed a unique style of architecture in the 17th century, called the stone-ender. Arnold House, 1691, Lincoln, Rhode Island Valentine Whitman House, 1694, Lincoln, Rhode Island Irons House, 1691, Johnston, Rhode Island Tripp House, 1720, Newport, Rhode Island The Stone-ender is a unique style of Rhode Island architecture that developed in the 1600s where one wall in a house is made up...


Rhode Island is the only state to still celebrate Victory over Japan Day. It is known locally as "VJ Day", or just plain "Victory Day" is more common.[35] Victory over Japan Day (V-J Day) is the celebration of the Surrender of Japan, which took place on August 15, 1945, ending the Second World War. ...

Beavertail State Park
Beavertail State Park

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ...

Food

Rhode Island is a large per capita consumer of coffee. According to a Providence Journal article, the state features the highest number of coffee/donut shops per capita in the country, with over 225 Dunkin' Donuts locations in the state alone.[36] The Official State Drink of Rhode Island is coffee milk,[37] a beverage created by mixing milk with coffee syrup. This unique syrup was invented in the state and is bottled and sold in most Rhode Island supermarkets. Although coffee milk contains some caffeine, it is sold in school cafeterias throughout the state. Strawberry milk is also popular. Iced coffee is popular in both summer and winter, perhaps owing to the Greek immigrants. Frozen lemonade, a mixture of ice-slush, lemons and sugar is popular in the summer, especially Del's Frozen Lemonade, a company based in Cranston. Dunkin Donuts is an international coffee and donut retailer founded in 1950 in Quincy, Massachusetts, U.S. by William Rosenberg. ... Coffee milk is a drink similar to chocolate milk. ... Dels is one brand of New England Frozen Lemonade, typically found in Rhode Island and southeastern Massachusetts during the summer months. ... Country State County Providence Government  - Mayor Michael Napolitano Area  - City 29. ...

Wein-O-Rama is a popular Cranston restaurant which serves weiners.
Wein-O-Rama is a popular Cranston restaurant which serves weiners.

Several foods and dishes are unique to Rhode Island, and are hard to find outside of the state. "Wieners," which are sometimes called "gaggers" or "weenies" are smaller than a standard hot dog but are covered in a meat sauce, chopped onions, mustard, and celery salt. If you want all of these on your weiners, you don't have to ask for them separately. Just ask for one (or more) "all the way." The most common way the word is spelled on menus is "weiner." Many restaurants advertise "New York System" weiners. However, this item cannot be found in New York. Legend has it that the term was coined by Greek immigrants who wanted to increase sales of the weiners they sold. The Original New York System on Smith Street in Providence was reportedly the first in the state (look for the initials "ONYS" set in tile as you go in). The "system" is the combination of the hot dog and meat sauce. Submarine sandwiches are referred to as "grinders" in Rhode Island, with a popular version being the Italian grinder, which is made with Italian cold cuts (usually ham, prosciutto, capicola, salami, and Provolone cheese). Chouriço (a spicy Portuguese sausage) and peppers, eaten with hearty bread, is also popular among the state's large Portuguese community. Another popular item is pizza strips. Sold in most supermarkets, they are rectangular strips of pizza without the cheese. Spinach pies, similar to a calzone but filled with seasoned spinach instead of meat, sauce and cheese, are sold in many Italian bakeries and local supermarkets. Variations can include black olives or pepperoni with the spinach, or broccoli instead of spinach. Image File history File links Weiners. ... Image File history File links Weiners. ... Wiener (sometimes pronounced viener) can mean: Adjectival form of Vienna (Ger. ... Mustard on bread. ... Binomial name Apium graveolens L. Celery (Apium graveolens dulce) is a herbaceous biennial plant in the family Apiaceae, native to the coasts of western and northern Europe, most commonly in ditches and saltmarshes. ... Prosciutto Prosciutto (IPA: ) is the Italian word for ham, used in English to refer to dry-cured ham (prosciutto crudo). ... Capicola is an Italian cold cut or salumi. ... Salami Salami is cured sausage, fermented and air-dried. ... Provolone is an Italian cheese. ... A Portuguese smoked dried and spicy sausage. ...


The state is also known for its johnny cakes. As in colonial times, johnny cakes are made with corn meal and water, and pan fried much like pancakes. During fairs and carnivals, Rhode Islanders enjoy dough boys, plate-sized disks of deep fried dough sprinkled with cinnamon and sugar. While these are known as zeppolas in other states, such as New York, in Rhode Island zeppolas or zeppolis are completely different. Traditionally eaten on Saint Joseph's Day (widely celebrated across the state), St. Joseph's Day zeppolis are doughnut-like pastries with exposed centers of vanilla pudding or riccota cream, topped with a cherry. Saint Josephs Day, commonly called the Feast of St. ...


The Ocean State's tradition of seafood is one of the most celebrated in the country. Shellfish is extremely popular, with clams being used in multiple ways. The quahog (whose shell is Rhode Island's state shell) is a large clam which is mixed with stuffing and spicy minced sausage and then baked in the shell to form a "Stuffie." Steamed clams are also a very popular dish. Fried squid, or "calamari," is most popular in Italian restaurants, typically served Sicilian-style: tossed with spicy banana peppers and with marinara sauce on the side. Cooked mussels Shellfish is a term used to describe shelled molluscs and crustaceans used as food. ...


Rhode Island, like the rest of New England, has a long tradition of clam chowder. While the white "New England" variety is popular and the red "Manhattan" variety is not uncommon, Rhode Island makes a clear chowder, known as "Rhode Island Clam Chowder." It is very possible that the first chowders cooked were the RI version. Fishermen used to use clams as bait and towards the end of a trip would cook the clams with water, potatoes, onion, and salt pork. The older potatoes would create a starchier broth, so that the chowder was milk free, but still thick and creamy. Ironically, Manhattan chowder is also a Rhode Island creation - Portuguese immigrants who loved chowder but were short on cream substituted something that they had a lot of - tomatoes - to create red chowder. New England clam chowder. ...


Perhaps the most unusual culinary tradition in Rhode Island is the "clam cake." The clam cake is a deep fried ball of buttery dough with chopped bits of clam inside. They are sold by the half-dozen or dozen in most seafood restaurants around the state, and usually come . The quintessential summer meal in Rhode Island is "clam cakes and chowder." Clam cakes are a New England food, most common in Rhode Island and Massachusetts. ...


It is also said that Clams Casino originated in Rhode Island after being "invented" by Julius Keller, the maitre d' in the original Casino next to the seaside Towers in Narragansett.[original research?] Clams Casino resemble the beloved stuffed quahog but are generally made with the smaller littleneck or cherrystone clam and are unique in their use of bacon as a topping.


Rhode Island also has a couple of local happy hour treats. Sakonnet Vineyards in Little Compton, Greenvale Vineyards in Portsmouth and Newport Vineyards in Middletown produce several varieties of red and white wine. Narragansett Beer was originally brewed in Providence. It is currently brewed outside of the state, but the old brewery sign can still be found in Rhode Island, welcoming visitors to the town of the same name. Newport Storm Brewing Co. is located in Newport and makes a beer of the same name and distills Tew rum, named after the famous Rhode Island pirate. The flag of Thomas Tew Thomas Tew aka the Rhode Island Pirate. ...


Sports

The Providence Grays won the first World Championship in baseball history in 1884. The team played their home games at the old Messer Street Field in Providence. The Grays played in the National League from 1878 to 1885. They defeated the New York Metropolitans of the American Association in a best of five game series at the Polo Grounds in New York. Providence won three straight games to become the first champions in major league baseball history. Class-Level Triple-A (1973-Present) Double-A (1970-1972) Minor League affiliations International League North Division Eastern League (1970-1972) Major League affiliation Boston Red Sox (1970-Present) Current uniform Name Pawtucket Red Sox (1970-Present) Ballpark McCoy Stadium (1970-Present) Minor League titles League titles 1973, 1984 Division... Part of the History of baseball series. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... The Providence Bruins are an ice hockey team in the American Hockey League. ... The American Hockey League (AHL) is a professional ice hockey league in North America, that serves as the primary developmental circuit for the National Hockey League (NHL). ... The Boston Bruins are a professional ice hockey team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The Newport Gulls Baseball Club is a member of the New England Collegiate Baseball League (NECBL), a 12-team amateur summer baseball league. ... The New England Collegiate Baseball League (NECBL) is a 12-team amateur summer baseball league founded in 1993 and sanctioned by the NCAA and Major League Baseball. ... Providence College is a Catholic college in Providence, Rhode Island, the states capital city. ... ... The Providence Grays were a 19th century baseball team. ...


Babe Ruth played for the minor league Providence Grays of 1914 and hit his only official minor league home run for that team before being recalled by the Grays parent club, the Boston Red Stockings. This article is about the baseball player. ... 1873 Boston Red Stockings team picture: finished first with a record of 43-16 Boston Red Stockings may mean either of two Boston baseball teams, though four professional baseball teams in Boston have used the word Red in their names. ...


A now defunct professional football team, the Providence Steam Roller won the 1928 NFL title. They used to play in a 10,000 person stadium called the Cycledrome.[38] The Providence Steam Roller (also referred to as the Providence Steam Rollers, the Providence Steamroller and the Providence Steamrollers) was a professional American football team based in Providence, Rhode Island in the National Football League from 1925 to 1931. ...


A team by a similar name, the Providence Steamrollers, played in the Basketball Association of America, which would become the National Basketball Association. Steamrollers Logo The Providence Steamrollers were a National Basketball Association team based in Providence, Rhode Island. ... NBA official website NBA News from Pro Sports Daily Dougs NBA Statistics NBA Statistics from 82games. ... NBA redirects here. ...


From 1930 to 1983, America's Cup races were sailed off Newport, Rhode Island. This article is about the yachting competition. ...


Local media

Main article: Media in Rhode Island

The state of Rhode Island has the following popular media. ...

Landmarks

The state capitol building is made of white Georgian marble. On top is the world's fourth largest self-supported marble dome.[39] It houses the Rhode Island Charter of 1663 and other state treasures. Image File history File linksMetadata RI_capitol_in_front_of_mall. ... Image File history File linksMetadata RI_capitol_in_front_of_mall. ... North façade The Rhode Island State House, located in downtown Providence, Rhode Island, is the seat of government of the U.S. state of Rhode Island. ... Providence Place with The Westin Providence at far left in the distance. ...


Providence is home to the First Baptist Church in America, the oldest Baptist church in the Americas, which was founded by Roger Williams in 1638. Providence is the home of the first fully automated post office in the country. The seaside city of Newport is home to many famous mansions, including The Breakers, Marble House and Belcourt Castle. It is also home to the Touro Synagogue, dedicated on 2 December 1763, the first synagogue within the United States, and still serving. The synagogue showcases the religious freedoms that were established by Roger Williams as well as impressive architecture in a mix of the classic colonial and Sephardic style. The Newport Casino is a National Historic Landmark building complex that presently houses the International Tennis Hall of Fame and features an active grass-court tennis club. The first Baptist church in America was that founded by Roger Williams at Providence in 1639. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World, consisting of the continents of North America[1] and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... Newport, Rhode Island Newport is a city in Newport County, Rhode Island, United States, about 30 miles (48 km) south of Providence. ... The Breakers is a Vanderbilt mansion located on Ochre Point Avenue, Newport, Rhode Island, on the Atlantic Ocean. ... Marble House, Newport, Rhode Island. ... Belcourt Castle is the former summer cottage of Oliver Hazard Perry Belmont, located in Newport, Rhode Island. ... Exterior of the Touro Synagogue The Touro Synagogue is a synagogue in Newport, Rhode Island that is the oldest Jewish synagogue still in use in North America and the only surviving synagogue in the U.S. dating to the colonial era. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1763 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Newport Casino is located at 186-202 Bellevue Avenue Newport, Rhode Island ( 41° 28′ 58″ N 71° 18′ 29″ W). ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... The International Tennis Hall of Fame is a non-profit tennis hall of fame and museum at the Newport Casino in Newport, Rhode Island, USA. // The International Tennis Hall of Fame is a non-profit institution dedicated to preserving the history of tennis, inspiring and encouraging junior tennis development, enshrining...


Rhode Island is home to the famous roadside attraction Nibbles Woodaway, the Big Blue Bug, the world's largest termite. The Big Blue Bug, lit up for the holiday season The Big Blue Bug, also known as Nibbles Woodaway, is the giant termite mascot of New England Pest Control, located along I-95 in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Families Mastotermitidae Kalotermitidae Termopsidae Hodotermitidae Rhinotermitidae Serritermitidae Termitidae Termites, sometimes known as white ants, are a group of social insects usually classified at the taxonomic rank of order Isoptera. ...


Fort Adams, on Narragansett Bay, was the setting for the finish of Eco-Challenge 1995. Fort Adams in Newport, Rhode Island was established on July 4th, 1799 as a First System coastal fortification. ...


Scenic Route 1A (known locally as Ocean Road)in Narragansett is home to "The Towers", a large stone arch. It was once the entrance to the famous Narragansett casino that burned down in 1900. The towers now serve as a tourist information center and also a banquet hall for events like weddings and birthday parties. Map (state maintained in red, locally maintained in green) SCENIC 1A signs; the R.I. SCENIC 1A is unique to this sign Route 1A is a numbered state highway in Rhode Island, running 34. ... Location of Narragansett, Rhode Island Narragansett is a town in Washington County, Rhode Island, United States. ...


Famous Rhode Islanders

The following is a list of Famous People from Rhode Island Robert Aldrich, film director, born in Cranston Harry Anderson, comedian, born in Newport Rocco Baldelli, baseball player, born in Woonsocket Bryan Berard, Professional Hockey Player, Woonsocket Ambrose Burnside, general and governor but not a native Ruth Buzzi, actress in...

State items

Here is a list of state mottos for countries and their subdivisions around the world. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Binomial name Gallus gallus The Rhode Island Red is a very popular breed of chicken (Gallus gallus). ... A breed is a domesticated subspecies or infrasubspecies of an animal. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This is a list of U.S. state flowers: External link Juelies State Flower Garden of Gifs See also Lists of U.S. state insignia Categories: Lists of flowers | U.S. state insignia ... Species List of Viola species Violets (Viola) are a genus of flowering plants in the family Violaceae, with around 400-500 species throughout the world, mainly in the temperate Northern Hemisphere but also in Hawaii, Australasia, and the Andes in South America. ... This List of U.S. state trees includes official trees of the following states and U.S. possessions: See also Lists of U.S. state insignia National Grove of State Trees External link USDA list of state trees and flowers Categories: U.S. state insignia | Lists of plants | Trees ... For other uses, see Maple (disambiguation). ... This is a list of official U.S. state fish: See also Lists of U.S. state insignia Categories: U.S. state insignia ... Binomial name Morone saxatilis (Walbaum, 1792) The striped bass Morone saxatilis is a member of the temperate bass family native to North America but widely introduced elsewhere. ... This article is about the fruit. ... This is a list of U.S. state nicknames -- both official and traditional (official state nicknames are in bold). ... List of U.S. state minerals, rocks, stones, and gemstones. ... Cumberlandite is Rhode Islands state rock. ... For other uses, see Serpentine (disambiguation). ... Quahogs (pronounced KO-hog, IPA , kwag, or kwa-HOG, IPA ), mercenaria mercenaria or venus mercenaria, are also called hard-shell clams, and by terms referring to different sizes from smallest to largest, littlenecks, cherrystones, quahogs, and chowders. The Quahog takes its name from the Narragansett Indian word poquauhock (the word... Coffee milk is a drink similar to chocolate milk. ... Lyrics Written by Charlie Hall Music by Maria Day Arranged by Kathryn Chester I’ve been to every state we have, and I think I’m inclined to say that Rhody stole my heart: You can keep the forty-nine. ...

Popular culture

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Prose is writing distinguished from poetry by its greater variety of rhythm and its closer resemblance to everyday speech. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... DVD cover for Reversal of Fortune. ... Jeremy John Irons (born September 19, 1948) is an Academy Award, Tony Award, Screen Actors Guild, two-time Emmy Award and Golden Globe Award-winning English film, television and stage actor. ... The Academy Award for Best Actor is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Alan Morton Dershowitz (born September 1, 1938) is an American lawyer and criminal law professor known for his extensive published works, career as an attorney in several high-profile law cases, and commentary on the Arab-Israeli conflict. ... Claus von B low (born Claus Cecil Borberg on August 11, 1926 in Copenhagen, Denmark) is a British financier. ... For other uses, see Newport (disambiguation). ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... This article is about the novel. ... Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an American Jazz Age author of novels and short stories. ... Robert Redford (born Charles Robert Redford, Jr. ... Mia Farrow (born Maria de Lourdes Villiers-Farrow on February 9, 1945) is an American actress. ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ... Edward Herrmann (born July 21, 1943) is an American television and film actor. ... Informally, the evening is the period in which the daylight is decreasing, between the late afternoon and night; it extends from the latter portion of the daylight (before sunset) until dark (after sunset). ... Claire Catherine Danes (born on April 12, 1979) is a Golden Globe Award-winning and Emmy Award-nominated American film, television, and theater actress. ... Vanessa Redgrave, CBE (born 30 January 1937) is an Academy Award winning English actress and member of the Redgrave family, one of the enduring theatrical dynasties. ... Toni Collette (born November 1, 1972) is an Academy Award-nominated Australian actress and musician. ... Natasha Jane Richardson (born May 11, 1963 in London), is a Tony Award-winning English actress and member of the Redgrave family, an enduring theatrical dynasty. ... Hugh Dancy (born 19 June 1975) is a British actor. ... Glenn Close (born March 19, 1947) is a five-time Academy Award-nominated American film and stage actress and singer. ... Mary Louise Streep, mostly known as Meryl Streep (born June 22, 1949) is an Academy Award-winning American actress who has worked in theatre, television, and film. ... For other uses, see Newport (disambiguation). ... This article is about the pay TV channel. ... Brotherhood is a drama series on Showtime which premiered on July 9, 2006. ... Providence may mean: Divine Providence Providence College in Rhode Island, USA Providence, television series Providence, a 1977 film Providence, a 1991 film starring Keanu Reeves Providence, 1970s-era Providence may also refer to: Providence, Rhode Island (in Providence County) Providence, Alabama Providence, Kentucky Providence, New York It is also the... An animated television series or cartoon television series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ... Family Guy is an animated television series set in the fictional town of Quahog (pronounced KOH-hog), Rhode Island. ... Outside Providence is a novel by writer, producer, and director Peter Farrelly of Dumb and Dumber and Theres Something About Mary fame. ... Theres Something About Mary is an American film released in 1998 by 20th Century Fox, directed by Bobby Farrelly and Peter Farrelly (the Farrelly brothers). ... Providence was an NBC television series starring Melina Kanakaredes. ... Providence is an American/Canadian 1991 film directed by David Mackay starring Keanu Reeves. ... Dumb and Dumber is a comedy film starring Jim Carrey and Jeff Daniels, released in 1994. ... A motion picture released in 2003 that is the prequel to 1994s hit comedy Dumb and Dumber. ... Me, Myself & Irene is a 2000 comedy film directed by the Farrelly Brothers, and starring Jim Carrey and Renée Zellweger. ... Doctor Doctor refers to the name of several TV programs: A sitcom produced in the US, see Doctor Doctor (US sitcom) For the South Korean version of the sitcom see Doctor Doctor (Korean sitcom) British TV seires broadcast on Five For the Yes, Dear episode, see Doctor, Doctor Category: ... The Last Shot is a 2004 action comedy film starring Matthew Broderick, Alec Baldwin, Toni Collette, Tim Blake Nelson, an uncredited Joan Cusack, Tony Shaloub, and Calista Flockhart. ... Federal Hill can refer to: Several places in the United States: Federal Hill, a neighborhood and a park in Baltimore, Maryland. ... The Witches of Eastwick is a 1984 novel by John Updike. ... John Joseph Nicholson (born April 22, 1937), known as Jack Nicholson, is a three time Academy Award-winning American actor internationally renowned for his often dark-themed portrayals of neurotic characters. ... This article is about Cher, the entertainer. ... Susan Sarandon (born October 4, 1946) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Michelle Marie Pfeiffer (born April 29, 1958) is an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe-winning, BAFTA-winning American actress. ... X-Files intro from first 8 seasons The X-Files was a popular 1990s American science fiction television series created by Chris Carter. ... Special Agent Fox William Mulder (born October 13, 1961), nicknamed Spooky Mulder, is a fictional character played by David Duchovny on the 1993-2002 television series, The X-Files. ... The Justice League is a DC Comics superhero team. ... Happy Harbor is a fictional United States location in Rhode Island, referenced in DC Comics as the location of the first headquarters, Justice Mountain or the Secret Sanctuary, of the Justice League of America, first appearing in The Brave and the Bold #28. ... City of Heroes (CoH) is a massively multiplayer online role-playing computer game based on the superhero comic book genre, developed by Cryptic Studios and published by NCsoft. ... Caitlín Rebekah Kiernan (born May 26, 1964 in Skerries, Dublin, Ireland) is the author of many science fiction and dark fantasy works, including six novels, many comic books, more than one hundred published short stories, novellas, and vignettes, and numerous scientific papers. ... Daughter of Hounds is a 2007 dark fantasy novel by Caitlín R. Kiernan about the existence of a secret subterranean race of ghouls, set in New England. ... Woonsocket is a city located in Providence County, Rhode Island. ... Guthrie Govan Guthrie Govan (born December 27, 1971 in Chelmsford, Essex, England) is a guitarist and winner of Guitarist Magazines Guitarist of the Year award. ... For other uses of the name, see Ghosthunters (disambiguation). ...

Famous firsts in Rhode Island

For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... Slave redirects here. ... North America North America is a continent [1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events April 6 - Dutch sailor Jan van Riebeeck establishes a resupply camp for the Dutch East India Company at the Cape of Good Hope, and founded Cape Town. ... Slater Mill, located on the Blackstone River in Pawtucket, RI, is generally cited as the birthplace of the Industrial Revolution in America. ... Baptist churches are part of a Christian movement often regarded as an evangelical, protestant denomination. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... Providence may mean: Divine Providence Providence College in Rhode Island, USA Providence, television series Providence, a 1977 film Providence, a 1991 film starring Keanu Reeves Providence, 1970s-era Providence may also refer to: Providence, Rhode Island (in Providence County) Providence, Alabama Providence, Kentucky Providence, New York It is also the... Ann Smith Franklin (1696–1763) was an American colonial printer. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1762 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Exterior of the Touro Synagogue The Touro Synagogue is a synagogue in Newport, Rhode Island that is the oldest Jewish synagogue still in use in North America and the only surviving synagogue in the U.S. dating to the colonial era. ... A synagogue (from , transliterated synagogÄ“, assembly; beit knesset, house of assembly; or beit tefila, house of prayer, shul; , esnoga) is a Jewish house of worship. ... Newport, Rhode Island Newport is a city in Newport County, Rhode Island, United States, about 30 miles (48 km) south of Providence. ... The British monarch or Sovereign is the monarch and head of state of the United Kingdom and its overseas territories, and is the source of all executive, judicial and (as the Queen_in_Parliament) legislative power. ... Warwick is a city located in Kent County, Rhode Island. ... Narragansett Bay, shown in pink. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1772 (MDCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Continental Congress was the first national government of the United States. ... Providence redirects here. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... This article is about the 18th century American politician; Stephen Hopkins is also the name of a film and television director. ... Samuel Ward (May 25, 1725 – March 26, 1776) was an American farmer, shop keeper, and statesman from Westerly, Rhode Island. ... The Continental Congress was the first national government of the United States. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... The Rhode Island General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Rhode Island. ... For other uses, see Army (disambiguation). ... This article refers to a colony in politics and history. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Navy is also:- shorthand for Navy Blue the nickname of the United States Naval Academy A navy is the branch of the armed forces of a nation that operates primarily on water. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... Abraham Whipple (26 September 1733 – 27 May 1819) was an American revolutionary naval commander. ... General assembly could be: The United Nations General Assembly General Assembly (presbyterian church), a supreme governing body, such as the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland See also List of Christian denominations#Presbyterian and Reformed Churches The General Assembly of Unitarian... The United States Navy, also known as the USN or the U.S. Navy, is a branch of the United States armed forces responsible for conducting naval operations. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... This article is about firearms and similar devices. ... Abraham Whipple (26 September 1733 – 27 May 1819) was an American revolutionary naval commander. ... Commodore is a rank of the United States Navy with a somewhat complicated history. ... This article is about a type of political territory. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1776 (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Newport (disambiguation). ... Pawtucket is a city in Providence County, Rhode Island, United States. ... Watch Hill is a small coastal fire district in the southwestern Washington County, Rhode Island. ... This article is about the amusement ride. ... For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as... A patent is a set of exclusive rights granted by a government to an inventor or applicant for a limited amount of time (normally maximum 20 years from the filing date, depending on extension). ... Providence may mean: Divine Providence Providence College in Rhode Island, USA Providence, television series Providence, a 1977 film Providence, a 1991 film starring Keanu Reeves Providence, 1970s-era Providence may also refer to: Providence, Rhode Island (in Providence County) Providence, Alabama Providence, Kentucky Providence, New York It is also the... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Providence may mean: Divine Providence Providence College in Rhode Island, USA Providence, television series Providence, a 1977 film Providence, a 1991 film starring Keanu Reeves Providence, 1970s-era Providence may also refer to: Providence, Rhode Island (in Providence County) Providence, Alabama Providence, Kentucky Providence, New York It is also the... This article is about the sport of golf. ... Newport, Rhode Island Newport is a city in Newport County, Rhode Island, United States, about 30 miles (48 km) south of Providence. ... Providence may mean: Divine Providence Providence College in Rhode Island, USA Providence, television series Providence, a 1977 film Providence, a 1991 film starring Keanu Reeves Providence, 1970s-era Providence may also refer to: Providence, Rhode Island (in Providence County) Providence, Alabama Providence, Kentucky Providence, New York It is also the... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... North façade The Rhode Island State House, located in downtown Providence, Rhode Island, is the seat of government of the U.S. state of Rhode Island. ... For other uses, see Marble (disambiguation). ... “Car” and “Cars” redirect here. ... Country State County Providence Government  - Mayor Michael Napolitano Area  - City 29. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... “Car” and “Cars” redirect here. ... Newport, Rhode Island Newport is a city in Newport County, Rhode Island, United States, about 30 miles (48 km) south of Providence. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Belcourt Castle is the former summer cottage of Oliver Hazard Perry Belmont, located in Newport, Rhode Island. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... Providence redirects here. ... City Glendale, Arizona Other nicknames The Cards, The Birds, Big Red, The Buzzsaw Team colors Cardinal Red, Black, and White Head Coach Ken Whisenhunt Owner Bill Bidwill General manager Rod Graves Mascot Big Red League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1920–present) Western Division (1933-1949) American Conference (1950-1952... The Providence Steam Roller (also referred to as the Providence Steam Rollers, the Providence Steamroller and the Providence Steamrollers) was a professional American football team based in Providence, Rhode Island in the National Football League from 1925 to 1931. ...

Cities and towns

A historic side street in Newport
A historic side street in Newport

There are 39 cities and towns in Rhode Island. Image File history File linksMetadata Newport_Rhode_Island_USA.jpg‎ Newport, Rhode Island © 2004 Matthew Trump From : http://en. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Newport_Rhode_Island_USA.jpg‎ Newport, Rhode Island © 2004 Matthew Trump From : http://en. ... Newport, Rhode Island Newport is a city in Newport County, Rhode Island, United States, about 30 miles (48 km) south of Providence. ...


The cities are Providence, East Providence, Newport, Warwick, Cranston, Central Falls, Pawtucket and Woonsocket. Providence redirects here. ... Location of East Providence, Rhode Island. ... Newport, Rhode Island Newport is a city in Newport County, Rhode Island, United States, about 30 miles (48 km) south of Providence. ... Warwick is a city in Kent County, Rhode Island, United States. ... Country State County Providence Government  - Mayor Michael Napolitano Area  - City 29. ... Central Falls is a city located in Providence County, Rhode Island. ... Pawtucket is a city in Providence County, Rhode Island, United States. ... Woonsocket is a city in Providence County, Rhode Island, United States. ...


The towns are Barrington, Bristol, Burrillville, Charlestown, Coventry, Cumberland, East Greenwich, Exeter, Foster, Glocester, Hopkinton, Jamestown, Johnston, Lincoln, Little Compton, Middletown, Narragansett, New Shoreham (Block Island), North Kingstown, North Providence, North Smithfield, Portsmouth, Richmond, Scituate, Smithfield, South Kingstown, Tiverton, Warren, West Greenwich, West Warwick, and Westerly. Image:RI towns Barrington. ... Nickname: Motto: Official website: http://www. ... Image:RI towns Burrillville. ... Charlestown is a town in Washington County, Rhode Island, United States. ... Country United States State Rhode Island County Kent Government  - Town Manager Richard Kerbel Area  - City  62. ... Cumberland Town Hall Cumberland is a town in Providence County, Rhode Island, USA, incorporated in 1746. ... East Greenwich is a town in Kent County, Rhode Island, United States. ... Exeter is a town in Washington County, Rhode Island, United States. ... Foster is a town in Providence County, Rhode Island, in the United States. ... Image:RI towns Glocester. ... Hopkinton is a town located in Washington County, Rhode Island. ... Image:RI towns Jamestown. ... Johnston is a town located in Providence County, Rhode Island. ... Image:RI towns Lincoln. ... Location of Little Compton, Rhode Island. ... Middletown is a town located in Newport County, Rhode Island. ... Location of Narragansett, Rhode Island Narragansett is a town in Washington County, Rhode Island, United States. ... New Shoreham is a town located on Block Island in Washington County, Rhode Island. ... The Gilbert Stuart Birthplace is located in Saunderstown, a village of North Kingstown. ... Location of North Providence, Rhode Island. ... Image:RI towns North Smithfield. ... Location of Portsmouth, Rhode Island Portsmouth is a town in Newport County, Rhode Island, United States. ... Richmond is a town located in Washington County, Rhode Island. ... Lapham Institute in Scituate at the turn of the 20th Century Scituate is a town in Providence County, Rhode Island, United States. ... // The town was first settled in the 1600s as a farming community and named after Smithfield, London. ... South Kingstown is a town in Washington County, Rhode Island, United States. ... This is for the town, for the census designated place, see Tiverton (CDP), Rhode Island Tiverton is a town in Newport County, Rhode Island, United States. ... Warren is a town in Bristol County, Rhode Island, United States. ... West Greenwich was also an alternative name for part of Deptford in England and still refers to the western side of the adjacent town of Greenwich West Greenwich is a town in Kent County, Rhode Island, United States. ... Location of West Warwick, Rhode Island. ... Image:RI towns Westerly. ...

See also: Rhode Island locations by per capita income

In common with many other New England states, some Rhode Island cities and towns are further partitioned into villages that reflect historic townships which were later combined for administrative purposes. Notable villages include Kingston, in the town of South Kingstown, which houses the University of Rhode Island, and Wickford, in North Kingstown, the site of an annual international art festival. Rhode Island is the 17th richest state in the United States of America, with a per capita income of $21,688 (2000) and a personal per capita income of $31,916 (2003). ...


Education

Primary and secondary schools

Further information: Rhode Island schools

Rhode Island schools Note: The schools of Providence County, Rhode Island, USA are in a separate table: Providence County, Rhode Island schools // See also Category:High schools in Rhode Island ‡1: Formally known as Knotty Oak Junior High (2003-2007) and Coventry Middle School (Circa 1976-2003) *Student counts as...

Colleges and universities

Rhode Island has several colleges and universities

Brown University is a private university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Bryant University is a four-year private university located in Smithfield, Rhode Island. ... Gibbs College is the name of each of the for-profit colleges operating under the Gibbs Division of the Career Education Corporation. ... Johnson & Wales University (JWU, J&W) is a private, nonprofit, coeducational, career oriented university. ... The Naval War College. ... New England Institute of Technology is a private, non-profit technical college offering Associate’s and Bachelor’s of Science degrees in 29 programs generally geared toward persons already in the work force like some 3,000 such similar institutions in the United States. ... // From its modest beginning with 325 students in 1964, to its present enrollment of more than 16,000 students, Community College of Rhode Island has grown to meet the goals of its founders. ... This page refers to a college in Rhode Island. ... Rhode Island College (commonly referred to as RIC) is a state-supported comprehensive college founded in 1854, located in Providence, Rhode Island, USA. Rhode Island College is the oldest of the three public institutions of higher education that operate under the aegis of the Board of Governors for Higher Education. ... The Rhode Island School of Design (RISD, pronounced /RIZ-dee/) is one of the premier fine arts institutions in the United States. ... Roger Williams University, commonly abbreviated as RWU, in the colloquial of the undergraduate body the acronym RWU is sometimes said to refer to rich white underachievers, in reference to the outside perception of the typical roger williams student, is a private, coeducational American liberal arts university located on 120 acres... Ochre Court, Salves administrative building Salve Regina University is a university in Newport, Rhode Island. ... The University of Rhode Island, commonly abbreviated as URI, is the principal public research university in the State of Rhode Island, with its main campus in Kingston, Rhode Island, and three other campuses located throughout the state. ... Zion Bible College ( ZBC ) is an undergraduate institution of higher learning. ...

See also

Providence Plantation was founded in 1636 by Roger Williams, a Baptist minister fleeing from religious persecution in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. ... For other persons named Benedict Arnold, see Benedict Arnold (disambiguation). ... Fort Thunder was a warehouse on the second floor of a pre-Civil War former textile factory in the Olneyville district of Providence, Rhode Island. ... The Sandra Feinstien Gamm Theatre is a small theater in Pawtucket, Rhode Island. ... This is a partial list of the Governors of the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. ... This is a list of prominent people who were born in the U.S. State of Rhode Island or spent significant periods of their lives in the state. ... The Newport Folk Festival is an annual folk-oriented music festival founded in 1959 by George Wein, founder of the already-well-established Newport Jazz Festival, and his partner, Albert Grossman. ... The Newport Jazz Festival is a music festival held every August in Newport, Rhode Island. ... Map of the five counties of the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations The United States Census Bureau has defined one Combined Statistical Area (CSA)[1] and one Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA)[2] in the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. ... The Rhode Island State Police (RISP) is an agency of the state of Rhode Island responsible for statewide law enforcement and regulation, especially in areas underserved by local police agencies and on the states limited-access highways. ... It has been suggested that Shawomet District be merged into this article or section. ... The size of Wales is a phrase that has become legendary for its use by the British news media to enable size comparisons of large areas to be made; by quoting the size of unfamiliar areas in terms of a familiar area (for example, twice the size of Wales), the... The Trinity Repertory Company is a regional theatre located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... WaterFire is an environmental art installation created by Barnaby Evans in Providence, Rhode Island. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Know Rhode Island, RI Secretary of State. Accessed October 17, 2006.
  2. ^ a b c Elevations and Distances in the United States. U.S Geological Survey (29 April 2005). Retrieved on November 7, 2006.
  3. ^ Constitution of the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. State of Rhode Island General Assembly. Retrieved on 2007-09-09.
  4. ^ http://www.dlt.ri.gov/lmi/map.htm accessed 27 February 2007
  5. ^ "The Living Bay, Providenceri.com
  6. ^ "How Rhode Island got its name", State of Rhode Island, Secretary of State, accessed October 14, 2007
  7. ^ "Facts & History", RI.gov, accessed October 14, 2007
  8. ^ Average Temperature Range, RSSWeather.com
  9. ^ http://www.cr.nps.gov/history/online_books/regional_review/vol1-6f.htm
  10. ^ Slavery in Rhode Island, from Slavery in the North. Accessed October 17, 2006
  11. ^ Slavery, the Brown Family of Providence, and Brown University, Brown News Bureau. Accessed October 17, 2006
  12. ^ Rhode Island History: CHAPTER V: Change, Controversy, and War, 1846-1865. Retrieved on 2006-03-28.
  13. ^ Rhode Island History: CHAPTER VI: The Gilded Age, 1866-1899. Retrieved on 2006-03-28.
  14. ^ Cool Quiz
  15. ^ Rhode Island History: CHAPTER VII: Boom, Bust, and War, 1900-1945. Retrieved on 2006-03-28.
  16. ^ Robert Smith, In The 1920s the Klan Ruled the Countryside, The Rhode Island Century, The Providence Journal, 4/26/1999
  17. ^ http://204.17.79.244/profiles/cw_pro.html Providence Neighborhood Profiles
  18. ^ Butler, Brian. "Nightclub Fire Kills 39 People", CNN, February 21, 2003. 
  19. ^ Stewart, Charles. nationwide2004. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Retrieved on 2007-08-28. taken from http://web.mit.edu/cstewart/www/election2004.html
  20. ^ a b Downing, Neil. R.I. taxes rising, now seventh in the country. Retrieved on 2007-07-2007.
  21. ^ http://www.nps.gov/blac/historyculture/index.htm
  22. ^ http://www.slatermill.org/Educators.htm
  23. ^ http://www.city-data.com/us-cities/The-Northeast/Providence-Economy.html
  24. ^ http://stats.bls.gov/eag/eag.ri.htm
  25. ^ http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/aer/txt/ptb0106.html Energy Information Association
  26. ^ http://www.taxadmin.org/fta/rate/ind_inc.pdf TaxAdmin.org State Individual Income Taxes (table)
  27. ^ http://www.census.gov/geo/www/cenpop/statecenters.txt
  28. ^ [1]
  29. ^ http://www.adherents.com/adhloc/Wh_284.html#631
  30. ^ a b http://www.adherents.com/largecom/com_romcath.html
  31. ^ [2] Quahog.org Guide to Rhode Island Language Stuff. Accessed May 30, 2007
  32. ^ http://www.pvdairport.com/main.aspx?guid=E41AC564-9E66-4D80-B6B6-B5037AD944EA
  33. ^ http://www.worldlicenceplates.com/usa/US_RIXX.html
  34. ^ http://www.quahog.org/factsfolklore/index.php?id=105
  35. ^ Know Rhode Island: History And Facts About The Ocean State. Rhode Island Office of the Secretary of State.
  36. ^ Patinkin, Mark. Providence Journal Chewing over why we love doughnut shops. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  37. ^ RI Government Facts and History
  38. ^ http://www.nfl.com/history/chronology/1921-1930#1928
  39. ^ [3]
  40. ^ The Paragon Times: Capes Return to Paragon City! (2004-07-19). Retrieved on 2007-01-25. “An in-game newspaper article, that mentions Paragon City, Rhode Island.”
  41. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n RHODE ISLAND HISTORY AND FACTS OF INTEREST. Rhode Island State Library. Retrieved on 2007-08-28.
  42. ^ Slater Mill Today. Slater Mill Historic Site. Retrieved on 2007-08-28.
  43. ^ http://www.fbcia.org/page110.html

is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Bibliography

Primary sources

  • Dwight, Timothy. Travels Through New England and New York (circa 1800) 4 vol. (1969) Online at: vol 1; vol 2; vol 3; vol 4
  • McPhetres, S. A. A political manual for the campaign of 1868, for use in the New England states, containing the population and latest election returns of every town (1868)
  • Rhode Island’s Geography and Climate

Secondary sources

  • Adams, James Truslow. The Founding of New England (1921)
  • Adams, James Truslow. Revolutionary New England, 1691–1776 (1923)
  • Adams, James Truslow. New England in the Republic, 1776–1850 (1926)
  • Andrews, Charles M. The Fathers of New England: A Chronicle of the Puritan Commonwealths (1919). short survey by leading scholar.
  • Axtell, James, ed. The American People in Colonial New England (1973), new social history
  • Brewer, Daniel Chauncey. Conquest of New England by the Immigrant (1926).
  • Coleman, Peter J. The Transformation of Rhode Island, 1790–1860 (1963)
  • Conforti, Joseph A. Imagining New England: Explorations of Regional Identity from the Pilgrims to the Mid-Twentieth Century (2001)
  • Dennison, George M. The Dorr War: Republicanism on Trial, 1831–1861 (1976)
  • Hall, Donald, ed. Encyclopedia of New England (2005)
  • Karlsen, Carol F. The Devil in the Shape of a Woman: Witchcraft in Colonial New England (1998)
  • Lovejoy, David S. Rhode Island Politics and the American Revolution, 1760–1776 (1969)]
  • McLaughlin, William. Rhode Island: A Bicentennial History (1976)
  • Palfrey, John Gorham. History of New England (5 vol 1859–90)
  • Slavery in the North - Slavery in Rhode Island [6]
  • Sletcher, Michael. New England. (2004).
  • Stephenson, Nathaniel Wright. Nelson W. Aldrich, a Leader in American Politics (1930).
  • WPA. Guide to Rhode Island (1939).
  • Zimmerman, Joseph F. The New England Town Meeting: Democracy in Action. (1999)

External links

Find more information on Rhode Island by searching Wikipedia's sister projects
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Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ...

Preceded by
North Carolina
List of U.S. states by date of statehood
Ratified Constitution on May 29, 1790 (13th)
Succeeded by
Vermont

Coordinates: 41.7° N 71.5° W Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[2] Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Capital Des Moines Largest city Des Moines Largest metro area Des Moines metropolitan area Area  Ranked 26th  - Total 56,272 sq mi (145,743 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 199 miles (320 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Largest metro area Omaha Area  Ranked 16th  - Total 77,421 sq mi (200,520 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Largest metro area Albuquerque metropolitan area Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Largest metro area Greater Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42° 30′ N to 47° 05′ N  - Longitude 86° 46′ W to... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... Federal districts are subdivisions of a federal system of government. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... An insular area is United States territory that is neither a part of one of the fifty states nor a part of the District of Columbia, the nations federal district. ... Motto Samoa, Muamua Le Atua(Samoan) Samoa, Let God Be First Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner, Amerika Samoa Capital Pago Pago; Fagatogo (seat of government) Official languages English, Samoan Government  -  Governor Togiola Tulafono United States unincorporated territory  -  Treaty of Berlin 1899   -  Deed of Cession of Tutuila 1900   -  Deed of Cession... Anthem: Gi Talo Gi Halom Tasi(Chamorro) Satil Matawal Pacifiko(Carolinian) Capital Saipan Official languages English, Chamorro, Carolinian Government Presidential representative democracy  -  Governor Benigno R. Fitial  -  Lt. ... For the board game, see Puerto Rico (board game). ... Motto United in Pride and Hope Anthem Virgin Islands March Capital (and largest city) Charlotte Amalie Official languages English Government  -  Head of State George W. Bush  -  Governor John de Jongh Organized, unincorporated territory  -  Revised Organic Act 22 July 1954  Area  -  Total 346. ... The flag of the United States is used for all of the United States Minor Outlying Islands The United States Minor Outlying Islands, a statistical designation defined by ISO 3166-1, consists of nine insular United States possessions: All of these islands are in the Pacific Ocean except Navassa Island... Baker Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°13′N 176°31′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Howland Island Howland Island is an uninhabited atoll located just north of the equator in the central Pacific Ocean at 0°48′N 176°38′W, about 3,100 km (1,675 nautical miles) southwest of Honolulu. ... Jarvis Island (formerly also known as Bunker Island[1]) is an uninhabited 4. ... Johnston Atoll is a 130 km² atoll in the North Pacific Ocean at 16°45′N 169°30′W, about one-third of the way from Hawaii to the Marshall Islands. ... The flag of the US is used for Kingman Reef Kingman Reef Kingman Reef—NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Kingman Reef is a one-square-kilometer tropical coral reef located in the North Pacific Ocean, roughly half way between Hawaiian Islands and American Samoa at 6°24... Orthographic projection centred over Midway. ... Navassa Island map from The World Factbook Navassa Island - NASA NLT Landsat 7 (Visible Color) Satellite Image Navassa Island (La Navase in French, Lanavaz in Haitian Kreyòl) is a small, uninhabited island in the Caribbean Sea. ... Palmyra Atoll - Landsat Image N-03-05_2000 (1:50,000) Palmyra Atoll - Marplot Map (1:50,000) Orthographic projection over Palmyra Atoll Palmyra Atoll, is an incorporated atoll administered by the United States government. ... USGS Landsat 7 ETM+ satellite image of Wake Island. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... The order which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order that the others were admitted to the union This is a list of U.S. states by date of statehood, that is, the date when each U.S. state joined the Union. ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Rhode Island hotel deal Rhode Island cheap hotels Rhode Island discount hotel Rhode Island hotel reservations Rhode ... (375 words)
RHODE ISLAND is the smallest state of the Union, at a mere 48 miles long by 37 miles wide, and tends to be overlooked as a destination, even if it is home to more than twenty percent of the nation's historical landmarks.
Despite its size, Rhode Island has over four hundred miles of coastline, hacked out of the Narragansett Bay; it is, in fact, made up of over thirty tiny islands, including Hope and Despair.
However, no Revolutionary battles were fought on Rhode Island soil, and unwilling at first to abandon its new-found freedom, it turned out to be the last state to ratify the Constitution.
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Rhode Island (4530 words)
Rhode Island is as follows; born in Canada, 38,500; in Ireland, 32,629; In England, 24,431; In Italy, 18,014; In Sweden, 7201; In Scotland, 5649; in Portugal, 5293; In Russia, 4505; in Germany, 4463; in Poland, 4104.
Rhode Island and territory to the east in Massachusetts.
Rhode Island, and in Massachusetts, the counties of
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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