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Encyclopedia > Rhea Silvia

Rhea Silvia (also written as Rea Silvia), and also known as Ilia, was the mythical mother of the twins Romulus and Remus, who founded the city of Rome. Her story is told in the Ab Urbe Condita of Livy. This page describes the ancient heroes who founded the city of Rome. ... Romulus and Remus, founders of Rome in Roman mythology, were the supposed sons of the god Mars and the priestess Rhea Silvia. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... Penguin Classics 1976 edition of Livys Ab Urbe condita, books XXXI-XLV Ab Urbe condita (literally, from the city, having been founded) is a monumental history of Rome, from its founding (ab Urbe condita, dated to 753 BC by Varro and most modern scholars). ... A portrait of Titus Livius made long after his death. ...


The legend

According to legend, she was the daughter of Numitor, king of Alba Longa and descendant of Aeneas. Numitor's brother Amulius seized the throne and killed Numitor's son. Amulius forced Rhea Silvia to become a Vestal Virgin, a priestess to the goddess Vesta, so that she (and through her, Numitor) would have no heirs; Vestal Virgins were sworn to celibacy for a period of thirty years. In Roman mythology, King Numitor of Alba Longa, son of Procas, was the father of Rhea Silvia. ... Alba Longa (in Italian sources occasionally written Albalonga) was an ancient city of Latium, in the Alban Hills founder and head of the Latin Confederation; it was destroyed by Rome around the middle of the 7th century BC. // Legendary history According to legend Alba Longa was founded by Ascanius or... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598. ... In Roman mythology, Amulius was the brother of Numitor and son of Procas. ... In Ancient Rome, the Vestal Virgins (sacerdos Vestalis), were the virgin holy priestesses of Vesta, the goddess of the hearth. ... Vesta was the virgin goddess of the hearth, home, and family in Roman mythology, often mistaken as analogous to Hestia in Greek mythology; however, she had a large, albeit mysterious role in Roman religion long before the influence of the Greeks, and was much more important to the Romans than...


The god Mars, however, was attracted to Rhea Silvia and raped her, in the forest, engendering the twins. When Amulius learned of this, he ordered Rhea Silvia buried alive (the standard punishment for Vestal Virgins who did not remain celibate) and ordered a servant to kill the twins, but the merciful servant set them adrift in the river Tiber. Livy presents a somewhat different version of this tale. In Ab Urbe Condita, the Tiber had overflown and the soldiers ordered to expose the babies, thinking that the muddy flooded ground would be sufficient to drown the twins in. Livy also casts doubt on whether the twins were actually suckled by a wolf. Livy commented that it has been thought that the wife of the shepherd who would eventually raise the twins was a prostitute known to the other shepherds as the Wolf. The river-god, Tiberinus found the twins and gave them to a she-wolf, Lupa, who had just lost her own cubs, to suckle, and then he rescued and married Rhea Silvia. Romulus and Remus went on to found Rome and overthrow Amulius, reinstating Numitor as King of Alba Longa. Mars was the Roman god of war, the son of Juno and a magical flower (or Jupiter). ... Tiber River in Rome The Tiber (Italian Tevere, Latin Tiberis), the third-longest river in Italy at 406 km (252 miles) after the Po and the Adige, flows through Rome in its course from Mount Fumaiolo to the Tyrrhenian Sea, which it reaches in two branches that cross the suburbs... A portrait of Titus Livius made long after his death. ... Tiberinus is a figure in Roman mythology. ... Wolf Wolf Man Mount Wolf Wolf Prizes Wolf Spider Wolf 424 Wolf 359 Wolf Point Wolf-herring Frank Wolf Friedrich Wolf Friedrich August Wolf Hugo Wolf Johannes Wolf Julius Wolf Max Franz Joseph Cornelius Wolf Maximilian Wolf Rudolf Wolf Thomas Wolf As Name Wolf Breidenbach Wolf Hirshorn Other The call... The Roman Colosseum Rome (Italian and Latin Roma) is the capital city of Italy, and of its Lazio region. ...


Etymology

The name Rhea Silvia suggests a minor deity, a demi-goddess of forests. Silva means woods or forest, and Rea may be related to res and regnum; Rea may also be related to Greek rheƓ, "flow," and thus relate to her association with the spirit of the river Tiber. Niebuhr connected the name Rhea Silvia with 'Rea' meaning 'guilty' and 'Silvia' 'of the forest' and so assumed that Rhea Silvia was a generic name for 'the guilty woman of the forest,' i.e. a woman who had been raped there. Look up deity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Temperate rainforest on Northern Slopes of the Alborz mountain ranges, Iran A dense growth of softwoods (a conifer forest) in the Sierra Nevada Range of Northern California A deciduous broadleaf (Beech) forest in Slovenia. ... Tiber River in Rome The Tiber (Italian Tevere, Latin Tiberis), the third-longest river in Italy at 406 km (252 miles) after the Po and the Adige, flows through Rome in its course from Mount Fumaiolo to the Tyrrhenian Sea, which it reaches in two branches that cross the suburbs... Carsten Niebuhr Carsten Niebuhr (March 17, 1733 - April 26, 1815) was a German traveller. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Rhea articles on Encyclopedia.com (458 words)
Rhea RHEA [Rhea] in astronomy, one of the named moons, or natural satellites, of Saturn.
Hestia HESTIA [Hestia], in Greek religion and mythology, goddess of the hearth; daughter of Kronos and Rhea.
Demeter DEMETER [Demeter], in Greek religion and mythology, goddess of harvest and fertility; daughter of Kronos and Rhea.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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