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Encyclopedia > Reykjavík
Reykjavík, Iceland


Reykjavik civic arms This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ...

City seal
City nickname:
"Stærsta smáborg í heimi"
(The biggest small city in the world)

Seal on envelope A seal is an impression printed on, embossed upon, or affixed to a document (or any other object) in order to authenticate it, in lieu of or in addition to a signature. ... A nickname is a short, clever, cute, derogatory, or otherwise substitute name for a person or things real name (for example, Nick is short for Nicholas). ... File links The following pages link to this file: Reykjavík ...


Location in Iceland
County none
Constituency Reykjavík North
Reykjavík South
Area 274.5 km² (106 mi²)
Population


 - Total (2003) Iceland is divided into 8 landsvæði (regions): The landsvæði are further divided into 23 counties, sýslur: Árnessýsla Austur-Barðastrandarsýsla Austur-Húnavatnssýsla Austur-Skaftafellssýsla Borgarfjarðarsýsla Dalasýsla Eyjafjarðarsýsla Gullbringusýsla, Kjósarsýsla Mýrasýsla Norður... Iceland is divided into 6 constituencies for the purpose of selecting representatives to the Alþingi (parliament). ... This article explains the meaning of area as a physical quantity. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


 - Density


113,387 Density (symbol: ρ - Greek: rho) is a measure of mass per unit of volume. ...


413 / km²
Postal codes 101–155

Latitude
Longitude A postal code is a series of letters and/or digits appended to a postal address for the purpose of sorting mail. ... Latitude, denoted by the Greek letter φ, gives the location of a place on Earth north or south of the Equator. ... Map of Earth showing curved lines of longitude Longitude, sometimes denoted λ, describes the location of a place on Earth east or west of a north-south line called the Prime Meridian. ...

64°08' N
021°56' W

Municipal website (http://www.rvk.is/)
See also: Reykjavík, Manitoba in Canada

Reykjavík is the capital of Iceland, its largest city and the northernmost capital city of a nation. Its latitude being 64°08' N, not far from the Arctic Circle (at 66°33' N), it receives only four hours of sunlight per day in the depth of winter, and in the summer the nights are almost as bright as day. A city is an urban area, differentiated from a town, village, or hamlet by size, population density, importance, or legal status. ... Latitude, denoted by the Greek letter φ, gives the location of a place on Earth north or south of the Equator. ... Arctic Circle - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... A Sun is the star at the center of a solar system. ... Prism splitting light Light is electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength that is visible to the eye, or in a more general sense, any electromagnetic radiation in the range from infrared to ultraviolet. ... In many parts of the world, winter is associated with snow. ... Giuseppe Arcimboldo, Summer, 1573. ...

Contents

Geography

Reykjavík is located in southwest Iceland by Faxaflói bay. The Reykjavík area coastline is characterized by peninsulas, coves, straits and islands. The city of Reykjavík is mostly located on the Seltjarnarnes peninsula but the suburbs spread to the south and east from it. Reykjavík is a spread out city, most of its urban area is in the form of low-density suburbs and houses are usually widely spaced. The outer residential neighborhoods are as well widely spaced from each other and in between run the main traffic arteries and a lot of empty spaces with little aesthetical or recreational value. The young age of the city has contributed the most to this kind of urban planning. The largest rivers to run through Reykjavík are the Elliðár Rivers, not navigable by ships. Mt. Esja, at 914 m, is the tallest mountain in the vicinity of Reykjavík. Faxaflói is a bay in Southwest-Iceland between the peninsulas of Snæfellsnes and Reykjanes. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburban redirects here. ...


People

The population of Reykjavík in 2003 was 113,387 (55,650 men and 57,737 women). The combined population of the Greater Reykjavík area in 2003 was 181,746. There are six other municipalities in the Greater Reykjavík area, those are: 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

The district of Álftanes, which is almost exactly 600 hectares in size, had on December 1, 2002, a population of about 1780, living in somewhat over 560 dwellings. ... Garðabær is a municipality in the Greater Reykjavík area of Iceland. ... City acronym: Hfj Location in Iceland County Town with county status. ... City nickname: none Location in Iceland County Town with county status. ... Mosfellsær is small city in Southwestern Iceland. ...

History

Enlarge
Hallgrímskirkja in Reykjavík

The first permanent settlement in Iceland by Nordic people is believed to have been established in Reykjavík by Ingólfur Arnarson around the year 870 AD; this is described in Landnámabók, or the Book of Settlement. Steam from hot springs in the region is supposed to have inspired Reykjavík's name, as Reykjavík translates to "Bay of Smokes". Download high resolution version (1024x768, 338 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1024x768, 338 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Nordic countries (Greenland not shown) The Nordic countries is a term used collectively for five countries in Northern Europe. ... statue of Ingólfur Arnarson by Einar Jónsson Ingólfur Arnarson is recognized as the first permanent Nordic settler of Iceland. ... Events February 28 - End of the Fourth Council of Constantinople. ... Landnámabók (the book of settlement), is one of the strangest of the works of Icelandic literature. ...


Reykjavík is not mentioned in any medieval sources except as a regular farm land but the 18th century was the beginning of urban concentration there. The Danish rulers of Iceland backed ideas of a domestic industry in Iceland that would help generate some much needed progress on the island. In 1752, the King of Denmark donated the estate of Reykjavík to the Innréttingar Corporation; the name comes from Danish "indretninger," meaning enterprise. In the 1750s several houses were constructed to house the wool industry that was to be Reykjavík's most important employer for a few decades and the original reason for its existence. Other crafts were also practiced by the Innréttingar such as fisheries, sulphur mining, agriculture, and ship building. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... The Kingdom of Denmark is geographically the smallest Nordic country and is part of the European Union. ... 1752 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... This is a list of Danish monarchs, that is, the Kings and ruling Queen of Denmark, including Regents of the Kalmar Union. ... Events and Trends Scientific navigation is developed. ... Long and short hair wool at the South Central Family Farm Research Center in Boonesville, AR Wool is the fiber derived from the hair of domesticated animals, usually sheep. ... Fishing from a Pier Fishing is both the recreation and sport of catching fish (for food or as a trophy), and the commercial fishing industry of catching or harvesting seafood (either fish or other aquatic life-forms, such as shellfish). ... General Name, Symbol, Number sulfur, S, 16 Chemical series nonmetals Group, Period, Block 16 (VIA), 3, p Density, Hardness 1960 kg/m3, 2 Appearance Lemon yellow at STP Atomic properties Atomic weight 32. ... A ship is a large, usually decked watercraft. ...

Viking Ship SunCraft, by Jon Gunnar Arnason

The Danish Crown abolished monopoly trading in 1786 and granted six communities around the country an exclusive trading charter, Reykjavík was one of them and the only one to hold on to the charter permanently. 1786 is regarded as the date of the city's founding, celebrating its 200th anniversary in 1986. Trading rights were still limited to the subjects of the Danish Crown however, and Danish traders continued to dominate trade in Iceland Over the next decades, their business in Iceland expanded. After 1880, free trade was expanded to all nationalities and the influence of Icelandic merchants started to grow. Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 456 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 456 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... In economics, a monopoly (from the Greek monos, one + polein, to sell) is defined as a persistent market situation where there is only one provider of a kind of product or service. ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1986 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1880 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... Nationality is, in English usage, a legal relationship existing between a person and a state. ...


Nationalist sentiment gained influence in the 19th century and ideas about Icelandic independence became widespread. Reykjavík, as Iceland's only city, was the melting pot of such ideas in the country. Advocates of an independent Iceland realized that a strong Reykjavík was fundamental for that objective. All the important years in the history of the independence struggle are important for Reykjavík as well. In the year 1845, Alþingi, or the general assembly that Icelanders formed in 930 was re-established in Reykjavík, however it had been suspended a few decades earlier when it was located at Þingvellir. At the time it only functioned as an advisory assembly that was supposed to advice the King about the matters of Iceland. The placement of Alþingi in Reykjavík effectively established the city as the capital of Iceland. In 1874 Iceland was given a constitution and with it, Alþingi gained some limited legislative powers and in essence became the institution that it is still today. The next step was to move most of the executive power to Iceland and that was done by the Home Rule in 1904 when the office of minister for Iceland was established in Reykjavík. The biggest step towards an independent Iceland was taken December 1, 1918 when Iceland became a sovereign country under the Crown of Denmark, the Kingdom of Iceland. Nationalism is an ethno-political ideology that sustains the concept of a nation-identity for an exclusive group of people. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Alþingi (English: Althing) is the national parliament: literally, the all-thing (or General Assembly) of Iceland. ... Events With the establishment of the Icelandic Althing, now the worlds oldest parliament, the Icelandic Commonwealth is founded. ... Þingvellir in autumn Þingvellir ( Icelandic Þing: parliament, vellir: plains) is a place in the southwest of Iceland near the peninsula of Reykjanes and the Hengill volcanic area. ... In politics a capital (also called capital city or political capital — although the latter phrase has an alternative meaning based on an alternative meaning of capital) is the principal city or town associated with its government. ... 1874 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... A legislature is a governmental deliberative body with the power to adopt laws. ... 1904 is a leap year starting on a Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... List of Prime Ministers of Iceland (the Minister of Iceland 1904-1917) Note about the coloring: Every combination which appears at least twice has been assigned a color. ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... This is a list of Danish monarchs, that is, the Kings and ruling Queen of Denmark, including Regents of the Kalmar Union. ...

Lækjartorg in Reykjavík

In the 1920's and 1930's most of the growing Icelandic fishing trawler fleet sailed from Reykjavík and salt-cod production was the main industry but the Great Depression hit Reykjavík hard with unemployment and labour union struggles that sometimes became violent. Download high resolution version (1536x1024, 380 KB)Laekjartorg in Reykjavík, GNU-FDL, own photo I made the photo by myself on april 2004, no other copyrights involved. ... Download high resolution version (1536x1024, 380 KB)Laekjartorg in Reykjavík, GNU-FDL, own photo I made the photo by myself on april 2004, no other copyrights involved. ... Sometimes referred to as the Roaring Twenties. Events and trends Technology John Logie Baird invents the first working television system. ... Events and trends Technology Jet engine invented Science Nuclear fission discovered by Otto Hahn, Lise Meitner and Fritz Strassmann Pluto, the ninth planet from the Sun, is discovered by Clyde Tombaugh British biologist Arthur Tansley coins term ecosystem War, peace and politics Socialists proclaim The death of Capitalism Rise to... The Great Depression was the global economic slump that began in 1929 and bottomed in 1933. ...


In the morning of May 10, 1940 four warships approached Reykjavík and anchored in the harbour. Many citizens were relieved to find out that those were British rather than German. In a few hours, the allied occupation of Reykjavík, illegal under international law, was complete. There was no armed resistance. The Icelandic government had received many requests from the British government about allowing the occupation but they always declined on the basis of the Neutrality Policy. For the remaining years of World War II, British and later American soldiers built bases in Reykjavík, the number of foreign soldiers in Reykjavík became about the same as the local population of the city. May 10 is the 130th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (131st in leap years). ... 1940 was a leap year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... When spelt with a capital A, Allies usually denotes the countries that fought together against the Central Powers in World War I and against the Axis powers in World War II. Other uses In general, allies are people or groups that have joined an alliance and are working together to... A neutral country takes no side in a war between other parties, and in return hopes to avoid being attacked by either of them. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...


The economic effects of the occupation were quite positive for Reykjavík, the unemployment of the depression years vanished and a lot of construction work was done. The British built Reykjavík Airport, which is still in service today, mostly serving domestic flights; the Americans built Keflavík Airport that has later become Iceland's primary international airport, situated 50 km from Reykjavík. In 1944 the Republic of Iceland was founded and a president elected in popular elections replaced the King, the office of the president was placed in Reykjavík. Keflavík is a town of around 10,200 inhabitants in the Reykjanes region in south-west Iceland. ... 1944 was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... List of Presidents of Iceland Sveinn Björnsson (1944-1952) Ásgeir Ásgeirsson (1952-1968) Kristján Eldjárn (1968-1980) Vigdís Finnbogadóttir (1980-1996) Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson (1996-present) See also: Politics of Iceland, list of Prime Ministers of Iceland, list of Icelandic rulers, lists of incumbents...


In the post-war years, the growth of Reykjavík began for real. A mass exodus from the rural countryside started mainly because of the better technology in agriculture that reduced the need for workforce in that sector and because of the population boom following better living conditions in Iceland. Young people in the prime of their lives were the most populous group that moved to the capital to live the "Reykjavík Dream", and the city became a city of children. The previously primitive village was rapidly transforming into a modern city. Private cars became common and modern apartment complexes rose in the expanding suburbs and much of Reykjavík lost its village feel. In 1972, Reykjavík hosted the world chess championship between Bobby Fischer and Boris Spassky. 1972 was a leap year that started on a Saturday. ... From left, a white king, black rook and queen, white pawn, black knight, and white bishop in Staunton chess pieces. ... Robert James Bobby Fischer (born March 9, 1943) is a former world chess champion from New York City, currently residing in Iceland. ... Boris Spassky Boris Vasilievich Spassky (Бори́с Васильевич Спасский) (born January 30, 1937) is a Russian (former Soviet) chess player and former world champion. ...


Reykjavík has in the last two decades become a significant player in the global community, the 1986 summit between Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev underlined Reykjavík's new-found international status. Deregulation in the financial sector and the computer revolution of the 1990s have transformed Reykjavík yet again. The financial sector and information technology are now significant employers in the city. The energetic city of children has fostered some world famous talents in recent years such as Björk and Sigur Rós. 1986 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Order: 40th President Vice President: George H.W. Bush Term of office: January 20, 1981 – January 20, 1989 Preceded by: Jimmy Carter Succeeded by: George H.W. Bush Date of birth: February 6, 1911 Place of birth: Tampico, Illinois Date of death: June 5, 2004 Place of death: Bel-Air... Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachyov (Gorbachev)  listen (Russian: ; pronunciation: mih-kha-ILL ser-GHE-ye-vich gor-bah-CHYOHV) (born March 2, 1931), was leader of the Soviet Union from 1985 until 1991. ... Deregulation is the process by which governments remove selected regulations on business in order to (in theory) encourage the efficient operation of markets. ... Categories: Information technology ... Björk Guðmundsdóttir (pronounced byerk), (born November 21, 1965 in Reykjavík, Iceland) is an Icelandic singer/songwriter with a great expressive range and an interest in many kinds of music including popular, hip-hop, alternative rock, torch songs, folk, and classical. ... Sigur Rós is an Icelandic post-rock band. ...


Historical Population

  • 1801 - 600
  • 1860 - 1,450
  • 1901 - 6,321
  • 1910 - 11,449
  • 1920 - 17,450
  • 1930 - 28,052
  • 1940 - 38,308
  • 1950 - 55,980
  • 1960 - 72,407
  • 1970 - 81,693
  • 1980 - 83,766
  • 1985 - 89,868
  • 1990 - 97,569
  • 1995 - 104,258
  • 2003 - 113,387

Administration

Ráðhús Reykjavíkur (Reykjavík city hall)

Reykjavík is governed by the city council, directly elected by anyone over 18 and registered with domicile in the city. The council has 15 members that are elected for 4 year terms. This photo was taken by me 11. ... This photo was taken by me 11. ...


The city council governs the city of Reykjavík according to law number 45/1998 [1] (http://www.althingi.is/lagas/128b/1998045.html). The city council selects people on the boards and each board controls a different field under the city councils authority. The most important board is the city board that wields the executive rights along with the city mayor. The city mayor is the uppermost public official in the city and also the director of city operations. Other public official then control different institution under his authority.


Therefore the administration consists of two different parts. The political power that the city council wields and other boards in its authority and the official system where public official under the authority of the city mayor take care of administering the policy and the management.


The mayor is appointed by the city council, usually one of the council members is chosen but they may also hire a mayor that is not member of the council.


In the town-laws from 1907 the term city mayor public office was introduced but in the year 1908 applications for that position were requested. Two applications were received, one from Páll Einarsson sheriff and town mayor of Hafnafjörður and another one from Knud Zimsem town councillor in Reykjavík. Páll was employed on the 7th of May and was the city mayor for six years. The city mayor received at that time a salary of 4500IKR annually and 1500IKR because of office costs. 1907 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1908 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Reverse timeline of mayors

  • Steinunn Valdís Óskarsdóttir - 30. November 2004 -
  • Þórólfur Árnason - 1. February 2003 - 30. November 2004
  • Ingibjörg Sólrún Gísladóttir - 13. June 1994 - 1. February 2003
  • Árni Sigfússon - 17. Mars 1994 - 13. June 1994
  • Markús Örn Antonsson - 16. July 1991 - 17. Mars 1994
  • Davíð Oddsson - 27. May 1982 - 16. July 1991
  • Egill Skúli Ingibergsson - 15. August 1978 - 27. May 1982
  • Birgir Ísleifur Gunnarsson - 1. December 1972 - 27. May 1982
  • Geir Hallgrímsson - 6. October 1960 - 1. December 1972
  • Auður Auðuns and Geir Hallgrímsson - 19. November 1959 - 6. October 1960
  • Gunnar Thoroddsen - 4. February 1947 - 6. October 1960
  • Bjarni Benediktsson - 8. October 1940 - 4. February 1947
  • Pétur Halldórsson - 1935 - 1940
  • Jón Þorláksson - 1932 - 1935
  • Knud Zimsem - 1914 - 1932
  • Páll Einarsson - 1908 - 1914

Þórólfur Árnason took over as the mayor of Reykjavík in 2003 when Ingibjörg Sólrún Gísladóttir the former mayor quit. ... Markús Örn Antonsson, Director General of Ríkisútvarpid, the Icelandic National Broadcasting Service - RUV. Born in Reykjavík 1943. ... Davíð Oddsson Davíð Oddsson (born 17 January 1948, in Reykjavík) is an Icelandic politician and the longest serving Prime Minister of Iceland (1991–2004). ... Geir Hallgrímsson was Prime Minister of Iceland for the Independence Party from 28 August 1974 to 1 September 1978. ... Geir Hallgrímsson was Prime Minister of Iceland for the Independence Party from 28 August 1974 to 1 September 1978. ... Gunnar Thoroddsen was Prime Minister of Iceland from 8 February 1980 to 26 May 1983. ... Bjarni Benediktsson was Prime Minister of Iceland from 14 November 1963 to 10 July 1970. ... Jón Þorláksson was Prime Minister of Iceland from 8 July 1926 to 28 August 1927. ...

Economy

Major companies

Síminn, also known as Landssíminn and Iceland Telecom is state-owned telecom company in Iceland. ... OgVodaphone is a telecommunications company located in Iceland. ... Icelandair Boeing 757. ... KB Banki, formerly Kaupþing Búnaðarbanki (Kaupthing Agricultural Bank), is one of three major commercial banks in Iceland and the largest bank overall in the country. ... Íslandsbanki (Bank of Iceland) is one of the three major commercial banks of Iceland. ... Baugur Group is an Icelandic investment company. ...

Infrastructure

Roads

Car ownership in Iceland is among the highest in the world but Reykjavík is not severely affected by congestion though since the city is rather spread out. Wide multi-lane highways run all over the city connecting the different neighbourhoods and suburbs. Parking spaces are also plentiful in most areas. Public transportation only exists in the form of a bus system and is not very popular in this car friendly city. Route 1 (the Ring Road) runs by the city outskirts and connect it to the rest of Iceland. A small variety of cars, the most popular kind of automobile. ... Congestion is a state of excessive accumulation or overfilling or overcrowding. ... 1. ...


Airports & seaports

The second largest airport in the country (after Keflavík International Airport) is positioned inside the city, just south of downtown. It is mainly used for domestic flights as well as flights to Greenland and the Faroe Islands. It was built there by the British occupation force during World War II on the outskirts of, then much smaller, Reykjavík. In later years there has been some controversy regarding the location of the airport since it takes up a lot of valuable space in downtown Reykjavík. Keflavík International Airport (also known as Flugstöð Leifs Eiríkssonar) is the largest airport in Iceland. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...


Reykjavík has two seaports, the old harbor near downtown which is mainly used by fishermen and cruise ships and Sundahöfn in the east city which is the largest cargo port in the country. Categories: Stub | Commercial item transport and distribution | Transportation ... A fishery (plural: fisheries) is an organized effort by humans to catch fish or other aquatic species, an activity known as fishing. ... Legend of the Seas moored at San Diego, California A cruise ship, or less commonly cruise liner, is a passenger ship used for pleasure voyages, where the voyage itself and the amenities of the ship are considered an essential part of the experience. ... Cargo is a term used to denotes goods or produce being transported generally for commercial gain, usually on a ship, plane, train or lorry. ...


Telecommunications

Heating

Most houses in Reykjavík use the geothermal heating system. It is the largest system of this kind in the world. See geothermal power in Iceland. Geothermal heating is a method of heating and cooling a building. ... Because of the special geological situation in Iceland with the high concentration of volcanoes, geothermal energy is very often used for heating and production of electricity. ...


Sites of interest

Tjörnin (the Pond) in Reykjavík
  • Alþingishús - the Parliament House
  • Hallgrímskirkja Skólavörðuholti
  • Perlan Öskjuhlíð
  • Laugarvegurinn - main shopping street
  • Þjóðminjasafnið (National Museum of Iceland)
  • Ráðhús Reykjavíkur (City hall)
  • Tjörnin (the Pond)
  • Nauthólsvík
  • Bæjarins Beztu pylsur (The best hotdogs in town) - A small hotdog stand near the port of Reykjavík.
  • Kringlan - The biggest mall in Reykjavík

Download high resolution version (1024x768, 42 KB)This picture was taken by Arndís Þórarinsdóttir in November 2002. ... Download high resolution version (1024x768, 42 KB)This picture was taken by Arndís Þórarinsdóttir in November 2002. ... Alþingishúsið (The Parliament House) is a classical 19th century structure which stands in the center of Reykjavík, Iceland. ... Hallgrímskirkja (literally, the church of Hallgrímur), at 73 metres, is the tallest building in Iceland. ... Laugavegur is one of the oldest shopping streets of central Reykjavík, Iceland. ... Tjörnin is not one of the biggest lakes of Iceland, but it is one of the best known. ... Bæjarins Beztu Pylsur means the towns best hot dogs. It is located on Pósthússtræti in Reykjavík, near Kolaportið. Almost everyone in Iceland has eaten a hot dog in Bæjarins beztu. ... Kringlan was one of the first shopping malls in Iceland. ...

Colleges and universities

Colleges

Reykjavik Junior College (Icelandic: Menntaskólinn í Reykjavík or MR) is the oldest junior college in Reykjavik, Iceland. ... Menntaskólinn við Hamrahlíð or MH (Hamrahlíð High School) was founded in 1966 at the initiative of the Icelandic Ministry of Education. ... Menntaskólinn við Sund ( MS ) was founded in 1969, at that time there were only 4 other collages in Iceland. ... Menntaskólinn hraðbraut is an Icelandic gymnasium established in 2003 that allows students to get a gymnasium diploma in only two years, contrary to normal period of four years. ...

Universities

The University of Iceland (Háskóli Íslands) is a state university, founded in 1911. ... Reykjavík University (Háskólinn í Reykjavík) is a private university in Reykjavík run by the Icelandic Chamber of Commerce (Verslunarráð Íslands). ...

Sports teams

  • Fram
  • Knattspyrnufélag Reykjavíkur (K.R.)
  • Víkingur
  • Þróttur
  • Knattspyrnufélagið Valur (Valur)
  • Íþróttafélag Fatlaðra í Reykjavík - for disabled people
  • Íþróttabandalag Reykjavíkur
  • Skotveiðfélag Reykjavíkur
  • Skautafélag Reykjavíkur
  • Tennis- og badmintonfélag Reykjavíkur

KR Reykjavík is an Icelandic athletic club, playing in the capital, Reykjavík. ... This article needs to be wikified. ...

Related Articles

Sirkus in Reykjavík Reykjavík, the capital of Iceland is often dubbed the nightlife capital of the north. ... Kringlan was one of the first shopping malls in Iceland. ... Alþingi (English: Althing) is the national parliament: literally, the all-thing (or General Assembly) of Iceland. ...

External links

  • Reykjavík Picture Gallery (Icelandic) (http://www.islandsmyndir.is/html_skjol/sudvesturland/reykjavik/forsida_reykjavik.htm)
  • Official Reykjavík website (Icelandic) (http://www.rvk.is)
  • Visit Reykjavík (English) (http://www.tourist.reykjavik.is/)
  • Phallological Museum (http://www.phallus.is/)
  • Map (http://www.backman.is/mapofrvk/)


Selected Municipalities of Iceland

Reykjavík | Kópavogur | Hafnarfjörður | Akureyri | Reykjanesbær | Garðabær | Mosfellsbær | Árborg | Akranes | Seltjarnarnes | Vestmannaeyjar | Skagafjörður | Ísafjörður | Fjarðabyggð | Borgarbyggð | Húsavík | Grindavík | Hornafjörður | Fljótsdalshérað | Dalvíkurbyggð | Following is a list of municipalities in Iceland sorted by 2004 population. ... Download high resolution version (1111x800, 1 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... City nickname: none Location in Iceland County Town with county status. ... City acronym: Hfj Location in Iceland County Town with county status. ... City nickname: Höfuðborg Norðursins (The Capital of the North) Location in Iceland County Eyjafjarðarsýsla Constituency Northeast Area 125 km² ( 48. ... Reykjanesbær is a municipality on the Reykjanes peninsula in Iceland, it is made up of the towns Keflavík, Njarðvík and Hafnir. ... Garðabær is a municipality in the Greater Reykjavík area of Iceland. ... Mosfellsær is small city in Southwestern Iceland. ... Árborg is the largest city in Southern Iceland. ... City nickname: Skaginn Location in Iceland County Borgarfjarðarsýsla Constituency Northwest Area 8. ... Cliffs on Heimaey, Vestmannaeyjar Vestmannaeyjar (The Westman Islands) is a small archipelago off the south coast of Iceland. ... Location in Iceland County Skagafjarðarsýsla Constituency Northwest Area 4180 km² (1614mi²) Population Total (2003) Density 4,178 0. ... Location in Iceland County Suður_Þingeyjarsýsla Constituency Northeast Area 270 km² ( 104. ... Grindavík is a fishing town at the peninsula of Reykjanes at the south_western coast of Iceland. ... Dalvík is a small fishing village in Eyjafjörður, Iceland. ...


 
 

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