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Encyclopedia > Revolver (album)
Revolver
Revolver cover
Cover of the original 1966 UK LP
Studio album by The Beatles
Released August 5, 1966 (UK)
8 August 1966 (U.S.)
Recorded Abbey Road Studios
6 April 196621 June 1966
Genre Psychedelic rock, rock, pop
Length 35:01 (UK)
28:20 (U.S.)
Label Parlophone, Capitol, EMI
Producer George Martin
Professional reviews
The Beatles UK chronology
Rubber Soul
(1965)
Revolver
(1966)
Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band
(1967)
The Beatles U.S. chronology
Yesterday and Today
(1966)
Revolver
(1966)
Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band
(1967)
Alternate cover
Cover of the original 1966 U.S. LP
Back cover
Back cover of the original 1966 UK LP. The main photo was edited in separate parts for the booklet of the 1988 Compact Disc release.

Revolver is The Beatles' seventh album, released on August 5, 1966. The album showcased a number of new stylistic developments which would become more pronounced on later albums. Many of the tracks on Revolver are marked by an electric guitar-rock sound, in contrast with their previous, folk-rock inspired Rubber Soul. It reached #1 in the UK chart for 7 weeks and #1 on the U.S. chart for 6 weeks. Cover of The Beatles album Revolver. ... A studio album is a collection of previously unreleased, studio-recorded tracks by a recording artist. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Psychedelic rock is a style of rock music that attempts to replicate the mind-altering experiences of hallucinogenic drugs; especially LSD.[1] by using lyrics that describe dreams and refer to drug use using bizarre sounds created by altering the instruments and vocals with electronic effects such as heavy distortion... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Pop music (disambiguation). ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... Parlophone is a record label, founded in Germany in 1896 by the Carl Lindstrom Company. ... Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label, owned by EMI. // The Capitol Records company was founded by the songwriter Johnny Mercer in 1942, with the financial help of movie producer Buddy DeSylva and the business acumen of Glenn Wallichs, (1910-1971) (owner of Music City, at the... For other uses, see EMI (disambiguation). ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... For other uses, see George Martin (disambiguation). ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a metadata database about music, owned by All Media Guide. ... Image File history File links 5_stars. ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a metadata database about music, owned by All Media Guide. ... Image File history File links 3. ... Image File history File links 5_stars. ... PopMatters is an international magazine of cultural criticism. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... The Beatles U.S. chronology Alternate cover Cover of the original 1965 U.S. LP, with a different colour saturation (see below) Back cover Back cover of the original 1965 UK LP Rubber Soul is the sixth album by The Beatles, first released in December 1965. ... For other uses, see Sgt. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... For other uses, see Sgt. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A compact disc or CD is an optical disc used to store digital data, originally developed for storing digital audio. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... The Beatles U.S. chronology Alternate cover Cover of the original 1965 U.S. LP, with a different colour saturation (see below) Back cover Back cover of the original 1965 UK LP Rubber Soul is the sixth album by The Beatles, first released in December 1965. ...


Revolver is often cited as one of the greatest albums in rock music history. In 1997 it was named the 3rd greatest album of all time in a 'Music of the Millennium' poll conducted by HMV, Channel 4, The Guardian and Classic FM. In 2006 Q magazine readers placed it at number 4, while in 2000 the same magazine placed it at number 1 in its list of the 100 Greatest British Albums Ever. In 2001 the TV network VH1 named it the number 1 greatest album of all time, a position it also achieved in the Virgin All Time Top 1,000 Albums.[1] A PopMatters review described the album as "the individual members of the greatest band in the history of pop music peaking at the exact same time",[2] while Ink Blot magazine claims it "stands at the summit of western pop music".[3] In 2002, the readers of Rolling Stone ranked the album the greatest of all time. In 2003, the album was ranked number 3 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. It placed behind only Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band and Pet Sounds. It was ranked 10th on Guitar World's (Readers Choice) Greatest 100 Guitar Albums Of All Time. [4] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the British television station. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... Classic FM is the United Kingdoms first national commercial radio station, broadcasting classical music in a popular and accessible style. ... Q is a music and entertainment magazinepublished monthly in the United Kingdom. ... A television network is a distribution network for television content whereby a central operation provides programming for many television stations. ... VH1 (VH-1: Video Hits One until 1994) is an American cable television channel that was created in January 1985 by Warner-Amex Satellite Entertainment, at the time a division of Warner Communications and owners of MTV. VH1 and sister channel MTV are currently part of the MTV Networks division... PopMatters is an international magazine of cultural criticism. ... This article is about the music magazine. ... This article is about the magazine. ... The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time is the cover story of a special issue of Rolling Stone magazine published in November 2003. ... For other uses, see Sgt. ... Pet Sounds is a 1966 album recorded by American pop group the Beach Boys. ...


Revolver was released before the Beatles stopped touring, and some people were disappointed that, during that touring, the Beatles did not perform songs from that album. At least one reason is that the music was getting more complicated, thus getting more difficult to play live. The newest song the Beatles performed on their 1966 tours was "Paperback Writer", released on a single and recorded at the same time as the Revolver album.

Contents

Songs

Melodic diversity and innovation in the studio

"Eleanor Rigby", one of Paul McCartney's songs on the album, was released as a single (in a double A-side with "Yellow Submarine") concurrently with the album. The song contains McCartney's lyrical imagery and a string arrangement (scored by George Martin under McCartney's direction), which was inspired by the Bernard Herrmann score for François Truffaut's film Fahrenheit 451. The strings were recorded rather dry and compressed, giving a stark, urgent sound. Ringo Starr has confirmed that he contributed the line "Father McKenzie, writing the words of a sermon that no one will hear."[5] It was originally written as "Father McCartney" but was changed as it was thought that listeners would assume that it referred to Paul's father. So, after looking through a local phone book, he found the name McKenzie. The song had a great effect upon release for its stark imagery and elegiac tone, which contrasted with The Beatles' prior output. Music sample Eleanor Rigby ( file info) Problems? See media help. ... Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE (born 18 June 1942) is an English singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who first gained worldwide fame as one of the founding members of The Beatles. ... Music sample Yellow Submarine ( file info) Problems? See media help. ... In music, an arrangement refers either to a rewriting of a piece of existing music with additional new material or to a fleshing-out of a compositional sketch, such as a lead sheet. ... For other uses, see George Martin (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... François Roland Truffaut (French IPA: ) (February 6, 1932 – October 21, 1984) was one of the founders of the French New Wave in filmmaking, and remains an icon of the French film industry. ... Fahrenheit 451 is a 1966 film of a dystopian future, based on the novel of the same name by Ray Bradbury. ... A string instrument (or stringed instrument) is a musical instrument that produces sound by means of vibrating strings. ... This article is about audio effect. ... Audio level compression, also called dynamic range compression, volume compression, compression, limiting, or DRC (often seen in DVD player settings) is a process that manipulates the dynamic range of an audio signal. ... Richard Starkey Jr, MBE (born 7 July 1940), known by his stage name Ringo Starr, is an English musician, singer, songwriter and actor, best known as the drummer of The Beatles. ... Elegiac refers either to those compositions that are like elegies or to a specific poetic meter used in Classical elegies. ...


Lennon was the main writer of "I'm Only Sleeping". George Harrison and John Lennon played the notes for the lead guitar (and for the second guitar in the solo) in reverse order, then reversed the tape and mixed it in. The backwards guitar sound builds the sleepy, ominous, and weeping tone of the song. This, along with backwards vocals used on the Beatles song "Rain" (recorded at the sessions and released separately, as the B-side to the "Paperback Writer" single), was the first recorded instance of backmasking in popular music, which Lennon stated that he discovered after mistakenly loading a reel-to-reel tape backwards under the influence of marijuana.[6] Im Only Sleeping is a song by The Beatles that appeared on their studio album Revolver (in the US on the Yesterday and Today album). ... For other persons named George Harrison, see George Harrison (disambiguation). ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... Lead guitar refers to a role within a band, that provides melody or melodic material, as opposed to the rhythm of the rhythm guitar, bass, and drums. ... BBC Local Radio Mark III radio mixing desk In professional audio, a mixing console, mixing desk (Brit. ... Rain is a song by The Beatles, first released in 1966. ... {{Infobox Single | Name = Paperback Writer | Cover = Paperrain. ... A backward message (also known as backward masking or backmasking) is a supposed subliminal message hidden in an audio recording that is only fully apparent when played backwards. ... For the audio technology, see Reel-to-reel audio tape recording Reel to Reel is the debut album by Grand Puba. ... Cannabis (also known as marijuana[1] or ganja[2] in its herbal form and hashish in its resinous form[3]) is a psychoactive product of the plant Cannabis sativa L. subsp. ...


Another key production technique used for the first time on this album was automatic double tracking (ADT), invented by EMI engineer Ken Townsend on 6 April 1966. This technique used two linked tape recorders to create automatically a doubled vocal track. The standard method was to double the vocal by singing the same piece twice onto a multitrack tape, a task Lennon particularly disliked. The Beatles were reportedly delighted with the invention, and used it extensively on Revolver. ADT quickly became a standard pop production technique, and led to related developments, including chorus. Automatic double tracking (ADT) was an electronic system designed to augment the sound of voices and instruments during the recording process. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Sony reel-to-reel tape recorder. ... Multitrack recording is a method of sound recording that allows for the recording and re-recording of multiple sound sources, independent of time. ... The chorus effect is a condition in the way people perceive nearly the same sound coming from more than one source. ...


Lennon's other contributions included "And Your Bird Can Sing" and "She Said, She Said", both of which are guitar-laden tracks with swirling melodies. And Your Bird Can Sing is a song by the British rock and roll group The Beatles, released on their 1966 album Revolver (but on Yesterday. ... The 7th song on the Beatles album Revolver(1966) John Lennon later explained that She Said, She Said had been inspired by remarks he recalled from an LSD trip he had taken in Los Angeles with other musician friends and young film star Peter Fonda. ... Look up Melody in Wiktionary, the free dictionary In music, a melody is a series of linear events or a succession, not a simultaneity as in a chord. ...


McCartney's "Got to Get You Into My Life" was a Memphis soul tribute, inspired by Stax Records, which used brass instrumentation extensively. Although cast in the form of a love song, McCartney has since revealed that the song was actually an ode to marijuana, though Lennon is quoted in The Beatles Anthology as claiming that the song is about LSD. It was released as a single in 1976, ten years after the album. Got to Get You into My Life is a song by The Beatles on the album Revolver. ... Memphis soul is stylish, funky, uptown soul music that is not as hard edged as Southern soul. ... Stax Records is an American record label, originally based out of Memphis, Tennessee. ... Image of a trumpet, foreground, a piccolo trumpet behind, and a flugelhorn in background. ... Love songs are songs about love, a subset of songs that deal with intimacy. ... For other uses, see Ode (disambiguation). ... Cannabis (also known as marijuana[1] or ganja[2] in its herbal form and hashish in its resinous form[3]) is a psychoactive product of the plant Cannabis sativa L. subsp. ... The Beatles Anthology is the name of a documentary series, a series of three albums and a book, all of which focus on the history of one of the worlds most popular rock band The Beatles. ... Lysergic acid diethylamide, commonly called LSD, LSD-25, or acid. ...


McCartney also contributed "For No One" a melancholy song featuring him playing clavichord and a horn solo played by Alan Civil; "Good Day Sunshine", a cheery pastiche of The Lovin' Spoonful, which was quickly covered as a single by The Tremeloes; and "Here, There, and Everywhere", written in the style of The Beach Boys, which was covered by The Lettermen and in 1976 was a hit for Emmylou Harris. For No One is a song written by Paul McCartney (credited to Lennon/McCartney) that originally appeared on The Beatles seventh album, Revolver. ... Large five-octave unfretted clavichord by Paul Maurici, after J.A. Haas The clavichord is a European stringed keyboard instrument known from the late Medieval, through the Renaissance, Baroque and Classical eras. ... For other uses, see Horn. ... Alan Civil (June 13, 1929 - March 19, 1989) was an English French horn player. ... Good Day Sunshine is a song by The Beatles on the 1966 album Revolver. ... The word pastiche describes a literary or other artistic genre. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Here Comes My Baby: The Ultimate Collection cover. ... Here, There and Everywhere is a song attributed to John Lennon and Paul McCartney (though largely the work of McCartney), recorded for The Beatles album Revolver (1966). ... First formed in 1961, The Beach Boys are an American rock and roll band that gained popularity for their close vocal harmonies and lyrics reflecting a California youth culture of surfing, girls and cars. ... The Lettermen are a pop music vocal group. ... Emmylou Harris (b. ...


Harrison's emergence as songwriter

Revolver was also a breakthrough album for Harrison as a songwriter, and he contributed three songs on Revolver, including the opening track, "Taxman". The guitar solo is actually played by McCartney. The "Mr. Wilson" and "Mr. Heath" referred to in the lyrics (right after the word "taxman") are Harold Wilson and Edward Heath, who were, respectively, the British Labour Prime Minister, and Conservative Leader of the Opposition at the time. This marked the first time that public figures were directly named in a Beatles song. In the Anthology 2 version, "Mr. Wilson and Mr Heath" were replaced with "Anybody got a little money." The song was a protest against the high marginal rates of income tax paid by high earners like the Beatles, which were sometimes as much as 95 percent of their income. (This would lead to many top musicians becoming tax exiles in later years.) A songwriter is someone who writes the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ... For the profession, see Tax collector. ... The guitar is used in many genres to provide rhythmic and harmonic accompaniment to a voice or other instrument, or to fill in the harmony in a ensemble. ... James Harold Wilson, Baron Wilson of Rievaulx, KG, OBE, FRS, PC (11 March 1916 – 24 May 1995) was one of the most prominent British politicians of the 20th century. ... Sir Edward Richard George Heath, KG, OBE (9 July 1916 – 17 July 2005) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1970 to 1974 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1965 to 1975. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Leader of the Opposition in the United Kingdom is the politician who leads Her Majestys Most Loyal Opposition. ... Public figure is a legal term applied in the context of defamation actions (libel and slander). ... The Beatles Anthology 2 is a compilation album released in March 1996 by Apple Records as part of The Beatles Anthology series. ... A tax (also known as a dutyor Zakat in islamic economics) is a charge or other levy imposed on an individual or a legal entity by a state or a functional equivalent of a state (e. ... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        An income tax is a tax levied on the financial income... A tax exile is one who chooses to leave a country and instead to reside in a foreign nation or jurisdiction because personal taxes there are appreciably lower or even nil. ...


Harrison also wrote "I Want to Tell You", about his difficulty expressing himself in words. "Love You To" marked a significant expansion of his burgeoning interest in Indian music and the sitar, which started with "Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown)" on 1965's Rubber Soul. Beatles fans also point out that it was the intro to "Love You To" that was playing in the background when the Harrison character first appears in Yellow Submarine, the animated Beatles movie released in 1968. I Want to Tell You is a song by the Beatles on the album Revolver. ... Love You To is a song by the Beatles off of the album Revolver. ... Timeline and Samples Genres Classical (Carnatic and Hindustani) - Rock - Pop - Hip hop Awards Bollywood Music Awards - Punjabi Music Awards Charts Festivals Sangeet Natak Akademi – Thyagaraja Aradhana – Cleveland Thyagaraja Aradhana Media Sruti, The Music Magazine National anthem Jana Gana Mana, also national song Vande Mataram Music of the states Andaman and... Diagram of some sitar parts. ... Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown) is a song by The Beatles which first appeared on the 1965 album Rubber Soul. ... The Beatles U.S. chronology Alternate cover Cover of the original 1965 U.S. LP, with a different colour saturation (see below) Back cover Back cover of the original 1965 UK LP Rubber Soul is the sixth album by The Beatles, first released in December 1965. ... For the song, see Yellow Submarine (song). ... Animation refers to the process in which each frame of a film or movie is produced individually, whether generated as a computer graphic, or by photographing a drawn image, or by repeatedly making small changes to a model (see claymation and stop motion), and then photographing the result. ... The year 1968 in film involved some significant events. ...


Heralding the psychedelic era

The most light-hearted track on Revolver is the childlike "Yellow Submarine." The song's inspiration can be traced back to one of Lennon's school drawing books from the early 1950s [citation needed]. McCartney himself has said that he wrote "Yellow Submarine" as a children's song for Starr to sing. Music sample Yellow Submarine ( file info) Problems? See media help. ...


Although not credited on the album, the Scottish singer-songwriter Donovan, who had become a close friend of the Beatles, assisted with vocals and with the writing of the song itself. Donovan came up with the line "Sky of blue, sea of green, in our yellow submarine." [citation needed] Rolling Stones guitarist Brian Jones can be heard clinking glasses in the background, and Beatles road manager Mal Evans also sang on the track. With the help of their EMI production team, the Beatles overdubbed stock sound effects they found in the Abbey Road studio tape library. (George Martin had collected these for his production of recordings of the British radio comedy programme The Goon Show.) This article is about the Scottish as an ethnic group. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... Donovan (Donovan Philips Leitch, born May 10, 1946, in Maryhill, Glasgow) is a Scottish singer, songwriter, and guitarist. ... This article is about the rock band. ... For other persons named Brian Jones, see Brian Jones (disambiguation). ... Malcolm Mal Evans (27 May 1935 – 5 January 1976). ... For other uses, see EMI (disambiguation). ... Overdubbing is a technique used by recording studios to add a supplementary recorded sound to a previously taped musical recording. ... Sound effects or audio effects are artificially created or enhanced sounds, or sound processes used to emphasize artistic or other content of movies, video games, music, or other media. ... The Goon Show was a popular and influential British radio comedy programme, originally produced and broadcast by the BBC from 1951 to 1960 on the BBC Home Service. ...


According to Lennon, some of the trippy lyrics of "She Said, She Said" were taken almost verbatim from an exchange he had with actor Peter Fonda in August 1965, while he (Lennon), Harrison and Starr were under the influence of LSD at their rented house in Benedict Canyon (in Beverly Hills, California). Fonda had stopped by to see his friends (members of the Byrds) — and to meet the Beatles. During the ensuing conversation, Fonda said to Harrison, "I know what it's like to be dead," because as a boy he had almost died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound. Hearing this, Lennon bluntly replied: "Who put all that shit in your head?" The 7th song on the Beatles album Revolver(1966) John Lennon later explained that She Said, She Said had been inspired by remarks he recalled from an LSD trip he had taken in Los Angeles with other musician friends and young film star Peter Fonda. ... Peter Henry Fonda (born February 23, 1940) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... Lysergic acid diethylamide, commonly called LSD, LSD-25, or acid. ... Benedict Canyon is: A road in Beverly Hills, California A road in West Los Angeles [1] An erotic actor - see Benedict Canyon (actor) [2] This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... For other uses, see: Beverly Hills (disambiguation). ... The Byrds (formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1964) were an American rock band. ... This article refers to the punk band. ...


In 1972, Lennon offered some context for the influence of drugs on the Beatles' creativity (quoted in The Beatles Anthology): The Beatles Anthology is the name of a documentary series, a series of three albums and a book, all of which focus on the history of one of the worlds most popular rock band The Beatles. ...

"It's like saying, 'Did Dylan Thomas write Under Milk Wood on beer?' What does that have to do with it? The beer is to prevent the rest of the world from crowding in on you. The drugs are to prevent the rest of the world from crowding in on you. They don't make you write any better. I never wrote any better stuff because I was on acid or not on acid."

Dylan Thomas Dylan Marlais Thomas (October 27, 1914 – November 9, 1953) was a Welsh poet and writer. ... We are not wholly bad or good, who live our lives under Milk Wood - prayer of the Rev Eli Jenkins from Under Milk Wood Statue of Dylans fictional Captain Cat, in Swanseas Maritime Quarter Under Milk Wood was originally a radio play and later a stage play and... “LSD” redirects here. ...

"Tomorrow Never Knows"

Main article: Tomorrow Never Knows

The Beatles' unfolding innovation in the recording studio reaches its apex with the album's final track. Lennon's "Tomorrow Never Knows" was one of the first songs in the emerging genre of psychedelic music, and included such groundbreaking techniques as reverse guitar, processed vocals and looped tape effects. Musically, it is drone-like, with a strongly syncopated, repetitive drum-beat, and is considered to be among the earliest precursors of electronica music[citation needed]. The lyrics were inspired by the Tibetan Book of the Dead, although the title itself came from one of Starr's inadvertently amusing turns of phrase, playfully called "Ringoisms" (another being "A Hard Day's Night"). Tomorrow Never Knows is the final track of The Beatles 1966 studio album Revolver, but it was the first to be recorded for the album. ... A recording studio is a facility for sound recording. ... Look up apex in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Psychedelia in music (or also psychedelic music, less formally) is a term that refers to a broad set of popular music styles, genres and scenes, that may include psychedelic rock, psychedelic folk, psychedelic pop, psychedelic soul, psychedelic ambient, psychedelic trance, psychedelic techno, and others. ... In music, a drone is a harmonic or monophonic effect or accompaniment where a note or chord is continuously sounded throughout much or all of a piece, sustained or repeated, and most often establishing a tonality upon which the rest of the piece is built. ... In music, syncopation is the stressing of a normally unstressed beat in a bar or the failure to sound a tone on an accented beat. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Electronic music. ... The Bardo Thodol, sometimes called the Tibetan Book of the Dead, is a funerary text that describes the experiences of the soul after death during the interval known as bardo between death and rebirth. ... // The British release A Hard Days Night was The Beatles third album, released in 1964 as the soundtrack to their first film of the same name. ...


Much of the backing track consists of a series of prepared tape loops, stemming from Lennon's and McCartney's interest in and experiments with magnetic tape and musique concrète techniques at that time. According to Beatles session chronicler Mark Lewisohn, Lennon and McCartney prepared a series of loops at home, and these then were added to the pre-recorded backing track. This was reportedly done live in a single take, with multiple tape recorders running simultaneously, some of the longer loops extending out of the control room and down the corridor. A backing track, is an audio or MIDI recording, which musicians play or sing along to in order to add parts to their music which would be impractical to perform live. ... Tape loops are loops of prerecorded magnetic tape used to create repetitive, rhythmic musical patterns. ... Compact audio cassette Magnetic tape is a non-volatile storage medium consisting of a magnetic coating on a thin plastic strip. ... Musique concrète (French; literally, concrete music), is a style of avant-garde music that relies on natural environmental sounds and other non-musical noises to create music. ... Mark Lewisohn (born 1958) is one of the worlds foremost experts on The Beatles. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Control Room is a 2004 documentary film about Al Jazeera and its relations with the US Central Command (CENTCOM), as well as the other news organizations that covered the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ...


Lennon's processed lead vocal was another innovation. Always in search of ways to enhance or alter the sound of his voice, he gave a directive to EMI engineer Geoff Emerick that he wanted to sound like he was singing from the top of a high mountain. Emerick solved the problem by splicing a line from the recording console into the studio's Leslie speaker, giving Lennon's vocal its ethereal, filtered quality (he was later reprimanded by the studio's management for doing that). Audio engineering is the branch of engineering dealing with the production of sound through mechanical means. ... Engineer Geoff Emerick. ... BBC Local Radio Mark III radio mixing desk In professional audio, a mixing console, digital mixing console, mixing desk (Brit. ... The Leslie speaker is a specially constructed amplifier/loudspeaker used to create special audio effects utilizing the Doppler effect. ...


The stereo and mono mixes of "Tomorrow Never Knows" have at least one noticeable difference. The opening note fades in gradually in the stereo version. The fade-in is more sudden in the mono version.


Cover art

The cover illustration was created by German-born bassist and artist Klaus Voormann, who was one of the Beatles' oldest friends from their days at the Star Club in Hamburg. At the time of the album's release, Voormann was the bassist for Manfred Mann. Klaus Voormann (born 29 April 1938) is a German artist, musician, and record producer who was associated with the early days of The Beatles in Hamburg and later designed the cover of their album Revolver. ... This article is about the city in Germany. ... Cock-A-Hoop Manfred Mann was a British R&B and pop band of the 1960s, named after its keyboard player, who later led the successful 1970s follow-on group Manfred Manns Earth Band. ...


Voormann's illustration, part line drawing and part collage, included photographs by Robert Whitaker, who also took the back cover photographs and many other famous images of the group between 1964 and 1966, such as the infamous "butcher cover" for Yesterday and Today. For other uses, see Collage (disambiguation). ... Robert Whitaker (born 1939) is a renowned British photographer, best known internationally for his many photographs of The Beatles, taken between 1964 and 1966, and for his photographs of the rock group Cream, which were used in the Martin Sharp-designed collage on the cover of their 1967 LP Disraeli... This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ...


Voormann's own photo as well as his name (Klaus O. W. Voormann) is worked into Harrison's hair on the right-hand side of the cover. In the Revolver cover appearing in his artwork for Anthology 3, he replaced this image with a more recent photo.


Harrison's Revolver image was seen again on his single release of "When We Was Fab" along with an updated version of the same image. Picture disc 12 (W8131TP) Cloud Nine track listing This Is Love (5) When We Was Fab (6) Devils Radio (7) When We Was Fab is a song written by George Harrison about the days of Beatlemania, when The Beatles were sometimes referred to as the Fab Four. The song...


Title

The title Revolver, like Rubber Soul before it, is a pun, referring both to a kind of handgun as well as the "revolving" motion of the record as it is played on a turntable. The Beatles U.S. chronology Alternate cover Cover of the original 1965 U.S. LP, with a different colour saturation (see below) Back cover Back cover of the original 1965 UK LP Rubber Soul is the sixth album by The Beatles, first released in December 1965. ... rEVOLVEr (2004) is the fourth studio album release by Swedish thrash metal band The Haunted. ... “Tonearm” redirects here. ...


Track listing

All tracks are credited to Lennon/McCartney, except where noted. The songwriting partnership of John Lennon and Paul McCartney, usually referred to as Lennon/McCartney (sometimes McCartney/Lennon), is one of the best-known and most successful musical collaborations of all time. ...


UK release

Side one

  1. "Taxman" (George Harrison) – 2:39
  2. "Eleanor Rigby" – 2:07
  3. "I'm Only Sleeping" – 3:01
  4. "Love You To" (Harrison) – 3:01
  5. "Here, There and Everywhere" – 2:25
  6. "Yellow Submarine" – 2:40
  7. "She Said She Said" – 2:37

For the profession, see Tax collector. ... For other persons named George Harrison, see George Harrison (disambiguation). ... Music sample Eleanor Rigby ( file info) Problems? See media help. ... Im Only Sleeping is a song by The Beatles that appeared on their studio album Revolver (in the US on the Yesterday and Today album). ... Love You To is a song by the Beatles off of the album Revolver. ... Here, There and Everywhere is a song by Paul McCartney (though credited to Lennon-McCartney), recorded for The Beatles 1966 album Revolver. ... Music sample Yellow Submarine ( file info) Problems? See media help. ... She Said She Said is a song by The Beatles from their 1966 album Revolver, recorded in June of that year. ...

Side two

  1. "Good Day Sunshine" – 2:09
  2. "And Your Bird Can Sing" – 2:01
  3. "For No One" – 2:01
  4. "Doctor Robert" – 2:15
  5. "I Want to Tell You" (Harrison) – 2:29
  6. "Got to Get You into My Life" – 2:30
  7. "Tomorrow Never Knows" – 2:57

Good Day Sunshine is a song by The Beatles on the 1966 album Revolver. ... And Your Bird Can Sing is a song by the British rock and roll group The Beatles, released on their 1966 album Revolver (but on Yesterday. ... For No One is a song written by Paul McCartney (credited to Lennon/McCartney) that originally appeared on The Beatles seventh album, Revolver. ... Doctor Robert is a song by The Beatles on the album Revolver, recorded April 15, 1966 with vocals overdubbed April 16. ... I Want to Tell You is a song by the Beatles on the album Revolver. ... Got to Get You into My Life is a song by The Beatles on the album Revolver. ... Tomorrow Never Knows is the final track of The Beatles 1966 studio album Revolver, but it was the first to be recorded for the album. ...

U.S. release

Side one

  1. "Taxman" (Harrison) – 2:39
  2. "Eleanor Rigby" – 2:07
  3. "Love You To" (Harrison) – 3:01
  4. "Here, There and Everywhere" – 2:25
  5. "Yellow Submarine" – 2:40
  6. "She Said She Said" – 2:37

For the profession, see Tax collector. ... Music sample Eleanor Rigby ( file info) Problems? See media help. ... Love You To is a song by the Beatles off of the album Revolver. ... Here, There and Everywhere is a song by Paul McCartney (though credited to Lennon-McCartney), recorded for The Beatles 1966 album Revolver. ... Music sample Yellow Submarine ( file info) Problems? See media help. ... She Said She Said is a song by The Beatles from their 1966 album Revolver, recorded in June of that year. ...

Side two

  1. "Good Day Sunshine" – 2:09
  2. "For No One" – 2:01
  3. "I Want to Tell You" (Harrison) – 2:29
  4. "Got to Get You into My Life" – 2:30
  5. "Tomorrow Never Knows" – 2:57

Good Day Sunshine is a song by The Beatles on the 1966 album Revolver. ... For No One is a song written by Paul McCartney (credited to Lennon/McCartney) that originally appeared on The Beatles seventh album, Revolver. ... I Want to Tell You is a song by the Beatles on the album Revolver. ... Got to Get You into My Life is a song by The Beatles on the album Revolver. ... Tomorrow Never Knows is the final track of The Beatles 1966 studio album Revolver, but it was the first to be recorded for the album. ...

Release history

Country Date Label Format Catalog
United Kingdom August 5, 1966 Parlophone mono LP PMC 7009
stereo LP PCS 7009
United States August 8, 1966 Capitol Records mono LP T 2576
stereo LP ST 2576
Worldwide reissue April 15, 1987 Apple, Parlophone, EMI CD CDP 7 46441 2
Japan March 11, 1998 Toshiba-EMI CD TOCP 51117
Japan January 21, 2004 Toshiba-EMI Remastered LP TOJP 60137

is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Parlophone is a record label, founded in Germany in 1896 by the Carl Lindstrom Company. ... Label for 1. ... A gramophone record, (also phonograph record - often simply record) is an analog sound recording medium: a flat disc rotating at a constant angular velocity, with inscribed spiral grooves in which a stylus or needle rides. ... Label for 2. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label, owned by EMI. // The Capitol Records company was founded by the songwriter Johnny Mercer in 1942, with the financial help of movie producer Buddy DeSylva and the business acumen of Glenn Wallichs, (1910-1971) (owner of Music City, at the... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Apple Records logo, featuring a Granny Smith apple. ... For other uses, see EMI (disambiguation). ... A compact disc or CD is an optical disc used to store digital data, originally developed for storing digital audio. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Toshiba-EMI - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ...

U.S. release

The original U.S. LP release of Revolver marked the last time Capitol would alter an "established" UK Beatles album for the U.S. market. As three of its tracks—"I'm Only Sleeping", "And Your Bird Can Sing" and "Doctor Robert" (all primarily John Lennon compositions)—had been used for the earlier Yesterday and Today Capitol compilation, they were simply deleted in the U.S. version, yielding an 11 track album instead of the UK version's 14 and shortening the time to 28:20. The CD era standardises this album to the original UK configuration. John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ...


Personnel

John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... Rhythm guitar is a guitar that is primarily used to provide rhythmic and harmonic accompaniment for a singer or for other instruments in an ensemble. ... Tape loops are loops of prerecorded magnetic tape used to create repetitive, rhythmic musical patterns. ... Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE (born 18 June 1942) is an English singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who first gained worldwide fame as one of the founding members of The Beatles. ... The electric bass guitar (or electric bass) is a bass stringed instrument played with the fingers by plucking, slapping, popping or using a pick. ... A short grand piano, with the top up. ... Harpsichord in the Flemish style A harpsichord is a musical instrument played by means of a keyboard. ... Tape loops are loops of prerecorded magnetic tape used to create repetitive, rhythmic musical patterns. ... Lead guitar refers to a role within a band, that provides melody or melodic material, as opposed to the rhythm of the rhythm guitar, bass, and drums. ... For other persons named George Harrison, see George Harrison (disambiguation). ... Diagram of some sitar parts. ... Richard Starkey Jr, MBE (born 7 July 1940), known by his stage name Ringo Starr, is an English musician, singer, songwriter and actor, best known as the drummer of The Beatles. ... Bass drum made from wood, rope, and cowskin A drum is a musical instrument in the percussion group that can be large, technically classified as a membranophone. ... “Percussion” redirects here. ... For other uses, see George Martin (disambiguation). ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... Alan Civil (June 13, 1929 - March 19, 1989) was an English French horn player. ... The horn is a brass instrument consisting of tubing wrapped into a coiled form. ... Malcolm Mal Evans (27 May 1935 – 5 January 1976). ... A bass drum is a large drum that produces a note of low definite or indefinite pitch. ... A typical set of Tabla. ... For other persons named Brian Jones, see Brian Jones (disambiguation). ... Donovan (Donovan Philips Leitch, born May 10, 1946, in Maryhill, Glasgow) is a Scottish singer, songwriter, and guitarist. ... Engineer Geoff Emerick. ... Audio engineering is a part of audio science dealing with the recording and reproduction of sound through mechanical and electronic means. ...

Clips

Image File history File links Beatles_taxman. ... Image File history File links Beatles_eleanor_rigby. ... Image File history File links Beatles_im_only_sleeping. ... Image File history File links Beatles_into_my_life. ...

References

  1. ^ http://archives.cnn.com/2000/SHOWBIZ/Music/09/04/britain.albums/
  2. ^ http://www.popmatters.com/music/reviews/b/beatles-revolvermft.shtml
  3. ^ http://www.inkblotmagazine.com/rev-archive/beatles2.htm
  4. ^ http://chud.com/forums/showthread.php?t=93854
  5. ^ http://www.bbc.co.uk/pressoffice/pressreleases/stories/2004/10_october/22/ringo.shtml
  6. ^ http://homepage.ntlworld.com/carousel/pob06.html

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
John Lennon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5777 words)
His 1971 solo album Imagine contained the song, "Crippled Inside", which he explained that making fun of disabled people threw the spotlight onto someone else, so that people would never see that he was also in pain.
His first 'solo' album of popular music was Live Peace in Toronto 1969, recorded in 1969 (prior to the breakup of The Beatles) at the Rock 'n' Roll Festival in Toronto with The Plastic Ono Band, which included Eric Clapton and Klaus Voormann.
Perhaps in reaction, his next album, Some Time in New York City, was loud, raucous, and explicitly political, with songs about prison riots, racial and sexual relations, the British role in the sectarian troubles in Northern Ireland, and his own problems in obtaining a United States Green Card.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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