FACTOID # 29: 73.3% of America's gross operating surplus in motion picture and sound recording industries comes from California.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Reuben Archer Torrey
Reuben Archer Torrey
Born 28 January 1856
Hoboken, New Jersey
Died 26 October 1928
Asheville, North Carolina

Reuben Archer Torrey (28 January 185626 October 1928), was an American evangelist, pastor, educator, and writer. is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Hoboken is a city in Hudson County, New Jersey, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Downtown Asheville bustles with activity at midday while smog silently obscures the Smoky Mountains to the west. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Look up evangelist in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Contents

Biography

Torrey was born in Hoboken, New Jersey, on 28 January 1856. He graduated from Yale University in 1875 and Yale Divinity School in 1878. Following graduation, Torrey became a Congregational minister in Garrettsville, Ohio in 1878, marrying Clara Smith there in October, 1879. From 1881 to 1893, the Torreys had five children. Hoboken is a city in Hudson County, New Jersey, United States. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Yale redirects here. ... Yale Divinity School is the one of the constituent graduate schools of Yale University, in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... For other types of minister, see Minister In Christian churches, a minister is a man or woman who serves a congregation or participates in a role in a parachurch ministry; such persons can minister as a Pastor, Preacher, Bishop, Chaplain, Deacon or Elder. ... Garrettsville is a village located within Portage County in the US state of Ohio. ...


After further studies of theology at Leipzig University and Erlangen University in 1882–1883, Torrey joined Dwight L. Moody in his evangelistic work in Chicago in 1889, and became superintendent of the Bible Institute of the Chicago Evangelization Society (now Moody Bible Institute). Five years later, he became pastor of the Chicago Avenue Church (now The Moody Church) in 1894. Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... The University of Leipzig is one of the oldest universities in Europe. ... Dwight Lyman Moody (February 5, 1837 - December 22, 1899), also known as D.L. Moody, was an American evangelist and publisher who founded the Moody Church, Northfield School and Mount Hermon School in Massachusetts (now the Northfield Mount Hermon School), the Moody Bible Institute and Moody Publishers. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Moody Bible Institute (MBI) was founded by evangelist and businessman Dwight Lyman Moody in 1886. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      A pastor is an... The Moody Church (sometime also referred to as Moody Memorial Church) is a historic non-denominational protestant brick-façade church on the near-north side of Chicago. ...


In 1898, Torrey served as a chaplain with the YMCA at Camp Chicamauga during the Spanish-American War. Later, during World War I, he performed similar service at Camp Bowie (a POW camp in Texas) and Camp Kearny. A chaplain in the 45th Infantry Division leads a Christmas Day service in Italy, 1943. ... Not to be confused with YWCA. This article is about the association. ... Belligerents United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Kingdom of Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Arsenio Linares Manuel Macías y Casado Ramón Blanco y Erenas Casualties and losses 385 KIA USA 5,000... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ...


In 1902–1903, he preached in nearly every part of the English-speaking world, and with song leader Charles McCallon Alexander conducted revival services in Great Britain in 1903–1905. During this period, he also visited China, Japan, Australia, and India. Torrey conducted a similar campaign in American and Canadian cities in 1906–1907. Throughout these campaigns, Torrey utilized a meeting style that he borrowed from Moody's campaigns of the 1870s. Charles McCallon Alexander, gospel singer Charles McCallon Alexander (1867-1920), a native of East Tennessee, was a popular 19th Century gospel singer who worked the evangelistic circuit for many years. ... A revival meeting is a series of Christian religious services held with an eye to encourage active members of a religious body and to provoke those outside of it to become part of it. ...


On June 20, 1907, he was honored with a Doctorate degree from Wheaton College. In 1912, he served as Dean of Bible Institute of Los Angeles (now Biola University) and in 1915, pastor of the Church of the Open Door, Los Angeles. is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Wheaton College is the name of two colleges in the United States: Wheaton College, Illinois Wheaton College, Massachusetts External Links Wheaton College (Illinois) Wheaton College (Massachusetts) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Biola University is a private evangelical Christian college, located in Southern California that is known for its conservative evangelical theology. ... The Church of the Open Door is an historic Protestant Church founded by R. A. Torrey and formerly located in downtown Los Angeles. ...


His last evangelistic meeting was in Florida in 1927. Future planned meetings were cancelled due to his failing health. He died at home in Asheville, North Carolina on October 26, 1928, having preached the world over and having left a legacy of over forty books. Torrey Auditorium, for decades the main auditorium at Moody Bible Institute, was named in his honor. This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... Not to be confused with Ashville. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Bibliography

  • How I Bring Men to Christ, (1893)
  • Baptism with the Holy Spirit, (1895)
  • How to Study the Bible with Greatest Profit, (1896)
  • How to Pray, (E-text)
  • What the Bible Teaches, (1898)
  • Divine Origin of the Bible, (1899)
  • How to Promote and Conduct a Successful Revival, (1901)
  • How to Work for Christ, (1901)
  • Revival Addresses, (1903)
  • Studies in the Life and Teachings of our Lord, (1909)
  • The Fundamentals: a Testimony to the Truth Editor, (four volumes) ISBN 0-8010-8809-7
  • The Person & Work of the Holy Spirit
  • The Baptism with the Holy Spirit
  • The Importance and Value of Proper Bible Study
  • How to Succeed in the Christian Life
  • Talks to Men About the Bible and the Christ of the Bible, (1904)
  • The Gospel for Today
  • Real Salvation and Whole-Hearted Service
  • The Fundamental Doctrines of the Christian Faith
  • Torrey's Topical Textbook

References

Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Papers of Reuben Archer Torrey, III - Collection 331 (1977 words)
Torrey, Sr.; his work as an Episcopalian parish priest in the U.S.; teaching at an Anglican theological college in Korea; and his founding and work at Jesus Abbey, a retreat center in Korea.
Reuben Archer Torrey, III, (known as Archer) was the son of Reuben Archer Torrey, Jr., and the grandson of evangelist educator R. Torrey, Sr.
Archer Torrey died on August 6, 2002 at Severance Hospital in Seoul, Korea.
John Torrey - LoveToKnow 1911 (309 words)
JOHN TORREY (1796-1873), American botanist, was born at New York on the 15th of August 1796.
When he was 15 or 16 years of age his father received a prison appointment at Greenwich, and there he made the acquaintance of Amos Eaton (1776-1842), a pioneer of natural history studies in America.
From 1853 he was chief assayer to the United States assay office, but he continued to take an interest in botanical teaching until his death at New York on the 10th of March 1873.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m