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Encyclopedia > Return to Green Acres
Green Acres

Aerial photo featured in the opening sequence
Genre Sitcom
Created by Jay Sommers
Starring Eddie Albert
Eva Gabor
Pat Buttram
Tom Lester
Frank Cady
Country of origin  United States
No. of episodes 170
Production
Executive producer(s) Paul Henning
Running time 30 minutes per episode
Broadcast
Original channel CBS
Original run September 15, 1965September 7, 1971

Green Acres was an American television series that was produced by Filmways, Inc. and originally broadcast on CBS from September 15, 1965 to September 7, 1971. Famous aerial photo shown in the intro of the TV series Green Acres Captured from TV Land with a PixelView PlayTV MPEG-2 on 6 Oct 2004 by Hyperneural. ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... Eddie Albert, born Edward Albert Heimberger, (April 22, 1906 â€“ May 26, 2005) was a popular Oscar and Emmy Award-nominated American stage, film, character actor, gardener and humanitarian activist, perhaps best known for playing Bing Edwards in the Brother Rat films, or for his role in the 1960s television comedy... Eva Gabor (in Hungarian Gábor Éva) (February 11, 1919 – July 4, 1995) was a Hungarian actress. ... Pat Buttram (born June 19, 1915 in Addison, Alabama; died January 8, 1994 in Los Angeles, California) was an American actor, famous for his many movies as a sidekick of Gene Autry playing the role of Smiley. In Gene Autry movies, Pat Buttram played a variety of sidekicks with different... Tom Lester is an American actor and evangelist who was born September 23, 1938, in Jackson, Mississippi. ... Frank Cady, born September 8, 1915, in Susanville, California, is an American actor best known for his role as storekeeper Sam Drucker in the Green Acres and Petticoat Junction television series, which both ran at the same time in the 1960s. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Paul Henning (September 16, 1911 – March 25, 2005) was an American producer and writer, most famous for the successful sitcom The Beverly Hillbillies, but was crucial in the development of several rural comedies for CBS. Henning was born on a farm and grew up in Independence, Missouri. ... CBS is one of the largest radio and television networks in the United States. ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... September 7 is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years). ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday. ... Green Acres may refer to: Green Acres, a television series which aired 1965-1971 Green Acres, Washington, a census-designated place in Spokane County, Washington Green Acres Cemetery, in Scottsdale, Arizona Green Acres Mall, in Valley Stream, New York Greenacres, Florida, a city in Palm Beach County, Florida Category: ... Filmways, Inc. ... CBS is one of the largest radio and television networks in the United States. ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... September 7 is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years). ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday. ...

Contents

Background

After the tremendous success of The Beverly Hillbillies and Petticoat Junction, CBS offered producer Paul Henning another half-hour on the schedule with no pilot required. Lacking the time to commit to another project himself, he encouraged colleague Jay Sommers to create the series. Sommers used his 1950 radio series, Granby's Green Acres, as the basis for the new television series. The 13-episode radio series had starred Gale Gordon and Bea Benaderet as a big-city family who move to the country. This entire article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... CBS is one of the largest radio and television networks in the United States. ... Paul Henning (September 16, 1911 – March 25, 2005) was an American producer and writer, most famous for the successful sitcom The Beverly Hillbillies, but was crucial in the development of several rural comedies for CBS. Henning was born on a farm and grew up in Independence, Missouri. ... A television pilot is a test episode of an intended television series. ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Gale Gordon (February 20, 1906 – June 30, 1995) was an American character actor. ... Bea Benaderet (IPA: ) (April 4, 1906—October 13, 1968) was an American actress, born in New York City and raised in San Francisco, California. ...


The television series Green Acres featured Eddie Albert as Oliver Wendell Douglas, an accomplished, erudite and rich New York attorney who was acting on his lifelong dream to be a farmer, and Eva Gabor as Lisa Douglas, his glamorously bejeweled Hungarian wife, dragged unwillingly from the privileged city life she adored to a bucolic life on a ramshackle farm. Their hired hand is a young man named Eb (Tom Lester) and the general store is run by Sam Drucker (Frank Cady), who played the same role on "Petticoat Junction." [1] Eddie Albert, born Edward Albert Heimberger, (April 22, 1906 â€“ May 26, 2005) was a popular Oscar and Emmy Award-nominated American stage, film, character actor, gardener and humanitarian activist, perhaps best known for playing Bing Edwards in the Brother Rat films, or for his role in the 1960s television comedy... Oliver Wendell Douglas was the major character in the 1960s CBS situation comedy Green Acres. ... NY redirects here. ... For other uses, see Farmer (disambiguation). ... Eva Gabor (in Hungarian Gábor Éva) (February 11, 1919 – July 4, 1995) was a Hungarian actress. ... Lisa Douglas was the leading female character in the 1960s CBS situation comedy Green Acres. ... Farms, East of Gorgan, Iran. ... Tom Lester is an American actor and evangelist who was born September 23, 1938, in Jackson, Mississippi. ... Frank Cady, born September 8, 1915, in Susanville, California, is an American actor best known for his role as storekeeper Sam Drucker in the Green Acres and Petticoat Junction television series, which both ran at the same time in the 1960s. ...


Ostensibly a reverse Beverly Hillbillies, after the first few episodes the series shifted from a run-of-the-mill rural comedy and developed an absurdist world of its own. Though there were still many episodes that were standard 1960s sitcom fare, the show became notable for its surreal aspects that frequently included satire. They also had an appeal to children due to the slapstick, silliness and schtick, though adults are able to appreciate it on a different level. Absurdism is a philosophy stating that the efforts of humanity to find meaning in the universe will ultimately fail (and, hence, are absurd) because no such meaning exists (at least in relation to humanity). ... A schtick (or shtick) is an expression which refers to a comic theme or gimmick. ...


It was set in the same fictional universe as Henning's other rural television comedies Petticoat Junction and The Beverly Hillbillies, featuring such picturesque towns as Hooterville, Pixley, Crabwell Corners and Stankwell Falls. The shows even shared characters on occasion. On at least one episode, The Beverly Hillbillies is actually mentioned as a show enjoyed in Hooterville. Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China An artists rendering of an aerial view of the Maryland countryside: Jane Frank (Jane Schenthal Frank, 1918-1986), Aerial Series: Ploughed Fields, Maryland, 1974, acrylic and mixed materials on apertured double canvas, 52... Petticoat Junction was an American situation comedy that was produced by Filmways, Inc. ... Hooterville was a fictional rural town that was the setting of the American television sitcoms Petticoat Junction and Green Acres. ... Pixley was the name of a small town located not about 50 miles from Hooterville in the fictional world of the American 1960s sitcoms Green Acres and Petticoat Junction. ...


Much of the humor of the series derived from easily frustrated, obsessive and short-fused Oliver's attempts to make sense of the largely insane world around him. Inmates at Bedlam Asylum, as portrayed by William Hogarth Insanity, or madness, is a general term for a semi-permanent, severe mental disorder. ...


Although still reasonably popular, the show was canceled in 1971 as part of the "rural purge" when CBS decided to shift its schedule to more urban, contemporary-themed shows, which drew the younger audiences desired by advertisers. (Nearly the entire Green Acres cast was middle-aged or older.) The Beverly Hillbillies and other shows with rural settings, including Hee Haw and Mayberry R.F.D., were also dropped at the same time. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Commercialism redirects here. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Mayberry R.F.D. (R.F.D. is a postal abbreviation for Rural Free Delivery) was a spin-off, or perhaps, more accurately, a direct continuation of The Andy Griffith Show under a new title. ...


Popular western film actor Smiley Burnette (also a regular on Petticoat Junction) guested several times in the role of railway engineer Charley Pratt during the 1965 and 1966 seasons but Burnette's ill health ended the role. Justus D. Barnes, from The Great Train Robbery The Western is one of the classic American literary and film genres. ... Smiley Burnette (March 18, 1911 – February 16, 1967) was an American singer and songwriter who could play as many as 100 different musical instruments as well as a highly successful comedic actor in western-style films. ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ...


An urban legend says that the pig who played Arnold was cooked and eaten by the cast after the show ended. In reality, several different pigs were used during the show's run, none of which was ever eaten by the cast. Trainer Frank Inn used a smaller, female pig in later seasons, giving Arnold some obvious mammary ducts. The pig actors were dissimilar in more ways than one (as with the two actresses who played Doris) - for example, one Arnold had tufts of grey hair behind his ears, giving him an aged look. Yet another Arnold has spots that others lack. This may have been an intentional goof by producers for comedic effect. (Other sources point out that Arnold was actually played by a PIGLET, and because piglets grow quickly on the way to becoming adult pigs, many different piglets had to be used in the role of Arnold during the show's production run.) An urban legend or urban myth is a kind of modern folklore consisting of stories often thought to be factual by those circulating them. ... Grey or gray (see spelling differences) is a color between white and black. ... A strand of human hair under magnification Hair is also the name of a musical, see respective articles for the stage production and the movie. ... Comedy has a classical meaning (comical theatre) and a popular one (the use of humour with an intent to provoke[[ laughter in general). ...


Arnold, it is revealed in the 1990 reunion TV movie Return to Green Acres, survived his "parents", and subsequently bunks with his "cousin", the Ziffel's comely niece. The film was made and set two decades after the series (as Haney's latest product is a Russian miracle fertilizer called "Gorby Grow")...but in reality a pig life span averages 12-15 years, similar to a dog. In the reunion movie, Oliver and Lisa had moved back to New York but are miserable there and are implored by the Hootervillians to return and save the town from a scheme to destroy it which has been cooked up between Haney and a wealthy, dishonest developer (Henry Gibson). A television movie (also TV movie, TV-movie, made-for-TV movie, etc. ... Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev (Russian: ; Pronunciation: mih-kha-ILL ser-GHE-ye-vich gor-bah-CHOFF) (born March 2, 1931), was leader of the Soviet Union from 1985 until 1991. ... This article is about the pig genus. ... Trinomial name Canis lupus familiaris The dog (Canis lupus familiaris) is a domestic subspecies of the wolf, a mammal of the Canidae family of the order Carnivora. ... Henry Gibson (born September 21, 1935 in Germantown, Pennsylvania) is an American actor who was famous as a cast member of Rowan and Martins Laugh-In. ...


A book containing detailed information on the creation and history of the show has been written, titled The Hooterville Handbook : A Viewer's Guide To Green Acres (ISBN 0-312-08811-6). The first season of the show has now been released for Region 0 (suitable for all DVD players).


Cast

Green Acres starred Eddie Albert & Eva Gabor

In addition, there were crossovers from Petticoat Junction cast members, most frequently: Image File history File links Green_acres_1. ... Image File history File links Green_acres_1. ... Eddie Albert, born Edward Albert Heimberger, (April 22, 1906 â€“ May 26, 2005) was a popular Oscar and Emmy Award-nominated American stage, film, character actor, gardener and humanitarian activist, perhaps best known for playing Bing Edwards in the Brother Rat films, or for his role in the 1960s television comedy... Eva Gabor (in Hungarian Gábor Éva) (February 11, 1919 – July 4, 1995) was a Hungarian actress. ... Pat Buttram (born June 19, 1915 in Addison, Alabama; died January 8, 1994 in Los Angeles, California) was an American actor, famous for his many movies as a sidekick of Gene Autry playing the role of Smiley. In Gene Autry movies, Pat Buttram played a variety of sidekicks with different... Tom Lester is an American actor and evangelist who was born September 23, 1938, in Jackson, Mississippi. ... Hank Patterson, originally Elmer Calvin Patterson, was born on October 9, 1888, in Springville, Alabama. ... Barbara Pepper (May 31, 1915-July 18, 1969) was an American actress. ... Fran Ryan (November 29, 1916 – January 15, 2000) is an American character actress who had starred in television and in films. ... Alvy Moore (December 5, 1921–May 4, 1997), born Jack Alvin Moore in Vincennes, Indiana, was an American light comic actor best known for his role as scatterbrained county agricultural agent Hank Kimball on the television series Green Acres. ... Frank Cady, born September 8, 1915, in Susanville, California, is an American actor best known for his role as storekeeper Sam Drucker in the Green Acres and Petticoat Junction television series, which both ran at the same time in the 1960s. ... Eleanor Audley Eleanor Audley (born November 19, 1905, in New York City, New York, died November 25, 1991 in North Hollywood, California) was an actress and familiar voice in radio, film, television, and animation. ... Sid Melton, (Born Sidney Meltzer on May 23, 1920, in Brooklyn, New York) is an American actor probably best known for his roles as incompetent carpenter Alf Monroe in the sitcom Green Acres and as Uncle Charlie Halper in Make Room for Daddy and its spin-offs. ... Mary Grace Canfield (born September 3, 1926, in Rochester, New York) is an American actress who often played the role of a romance-hungry wallflower. ... Kay E. Kuter (born Kay Edwin Emmert Kuter on April 25, 1925; died on November 12, 2003) was an American character actor who starred on television and in film. ...

Bea Benaderet (IPA: ) (April 4, 1906—October 13, 1968) was an American actress, born in New York City and raised in San Francisco, California. ... Edgar Buchanan (born March 20, 1903; died April 4, 1979) was an American actor with a long career in both movies and television, but is probably most familiar as Uncle Joe Carson from the Petticoat Junction and Green Acres television sitcoms of the 1960s. ... Smiley Burnette (March 18, 1911 – February 16, 1967) was an American singer and songwriter who could play as many as 100 different musical instruments as well as a highly successful comedic actor in western-style films. ...

Surreal Humor

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The series was notable for its often surreal and Goon-ish humour, and it was one of the first American TV series which transgressed the traditional diegetic or fourth wall 'borders' of TV presentation for deliberately humorous effect -- characters addressed the audience directly and were somehow able to perceive and react to post-production elements such as the music soundtrack and the superimposed program credits. Image File history File links Circle-question. ... The Goon Show was a popular and influential British radio comedy programme, originally produced and broadcast by the BBC from 1951 to 1960 on the BBC Home Service. ... According to Gerald Prince in A Dictionary of Narratology, diegesis is (1) The (fictional) world in which the situations and events narrated occur; (2) Telling, recounting, as opposed to showing, enacting. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Some of the more noteworthy surreal aspects of the show's humour included:

  • There seemed to be a dual perspective of reality. One was that of the Hootervillians, which inexplicably included Lisa, the other was Oliver's. But there were times when it appeared that Oliver wasn't entirely sane either, such as renting a rooster and climbing up and down a telephone pole to make or recieve phone calls.
  • While general store owner Sam Drucker is a reliable Dutch uncle in Petticoat Junction his character is bent a bit here (keeping plastic pickles in a barrel to appease city-folk).
  • Oliver's affluent mother (Eleanor Audley) lampoons him and mollifies Lisa.
  • The Douglas' elderly childless neighbors, Fred and Doris Ziffel, 'adopted' a pig/son named Arnold Ziffel. Arnold understands English, lives indoors, and is pampered by everyone. Like all 1960s children, Arnold is an avid TV watcher and a big Western fan. Only Oliver seems cognizant that Arnold is just livestock, although he frequently slips and begins treating him as a boy. Arnold makes regular appearances throughout the series, often visiting the Douglas farm to watch their TV. In one episode Arnold even wins a competition and goes to Hollywood in an (unsuccessful) attempt to break into movies, although how he has been able to enter the competition is never explained. In another episode Arnold is drafted into the Army.
  • Oliver and Lisa's live-in farmhand Eb Dawson, played by Tom Lester, habitually addresses them as "Dad" and "Mom", much to Oliver's irritation.
  • In a slap to government bureaucrats and civil service employees, Alvy Moore plays spacey agricultural agent Hank Kimball, who never really seems to know which end is up.
  • The dishonest and oily salesman Mr. Haney, who sold Oliver the Green Acres farm, continues to con his easy "mark" in most episodes. Haney, along with farmhand Eb, scatterbrained county agent Hank Kimball, and grocer Sam Drucker, make up the main supporting cast. Sometimes the Petticoat Junction characters are seen in "cross-over" episodes and visa versa.
  • Oliver always farms wearing an expensive three-piece suit, just as he had done when practicing law. Lisa can be seen dusting and feeding hens wearing chic, costly designer gowns.
  • Lisa's utter domestic ignorance provides fertile ground for recurring gags -- her 'coffee' oozes from the pot in a thick, tar-like sludge; her infamous hotcakes (which she calls "hotscakes") are so tough and inedible that Oliver once repaired his truck's head-gasket using her recipe; her sandwich combos include such epicurean delights as liverwurst and jelly; instead of washing dishes, Lisa tosses them away (out the kitchen window) as though they were disposable paper plates.
  • A pair of recurring characters were two quarrelsome carpenters known as the Monroe Brothers, Alf and Ralph. Despite her name and her status as one of the brothers, Ralph was in fact a woman, played by Mary Grace Canfield. Alf was played by Sid Melton of Make Room for Daddy. In general, only Oliver seems to notice or care about this bizarre contradiction. Nothing the Monroe brothers ever did was either finished (such as the Douglas's bedroom) or ever turned out right -- Ralph once sawed through Sam Drucker's phone line and then spliced it together backwards so that Drucker had to talk into the ear receiver and listen at the mouthpiece.
  • Whenever Oliver makes a rousing speech about the American farmer, a fife can be heard playing Yankee Doodle in the background. (Lisa called this the "shoosting speech" as Oliver always included a reference to the "crops shooting up out of the ground".) The other characters would frequently look around to try to find the source of the music. The other farmers also hated his speeches lionizing farmers.
  • Despite the Douglas' apparent wealth, the dilapidated farm house is never repaired, but the run-down condition of the home is in stark contrast to the opulent furnishings they have brought with them from New York. Oliver also is unable to get the phone company to properly install their telephone when they run out of wire; as a result it remains perched atop a high wooden telegraph pole just outside the house, which they are obliged to climb every time they need to use or answer the phone. Even when the Monroe Brothers install a telephone in the kitchen, the Douglases still have to go outside to answer the phone.
  • Also, in contrast to the basic transportation owned by the citizens of Hooterville (pickup trucks, battered sedans), the Douglases tooled around in a glamorous Lincoln Continental 4-door convertible, shiny and clean, always with its top down.
  • The episode titled "A Square is Not Round" featured both a chicken that lays square eggs, which Oliver is desperate to locate, and a toaster that only works when you say "five" to it. In the end it is revealed that it has all been a dream of Oliver's, which he rushes back to bed to see how it finishes. At the very end, Lisa is muttering to herself, "Hmph, square eggs, talking to toasters..." and approaches the refrigerator and says clearly, "Mabel!" and the fridge opens by itself. In other episodes, Lisa is also evidently able to coax the chickens into laying on demand, simply by talking to them.
  • One running joke was that Oliver had a pronounced tendency to mangle words, especially when his wife, Lisa, mangled them first, as she frequently did, since English was not her native language. Oddly, the other residents of Hooterville would often inexplicably share Lisa's mangled vocabulary. Another aspect of this gag was that Lisa would often seem to mangle words or phrases, but Oliver would then discover that Lisa's supposedly 'wrong' version is correct - e.g. the title of a fictional TV series Lisa watches in one episode, entitled "Run For Your Wife". She also refers to an automatic-transmission car as a "Pernerndle" (a joke derived from the P-R-N-D-L lettering on the gear-lever) and a popular board game as "Monotony" (which turns out to the actual name of the game as sold in Hooterville). Games such as "Scribble" and "Cabbage" are also available. In one episode, Oliver complains, "Why did I have to marry someone who hears everything with an accent?"
  • The series parodies the age-old truism that country folk all know each other's business—the local telephone operator, Sarah, routinely monitors every conversation and in several episodes, the content of conversations and arguments between Oliver and Lisa in their home mysteriously and instantly become common knowledge all over the valley.
  • In some episodes, the opening credits appear to be visible to Lisa, but not Oliver. Sometimes, they appear on Lisa's rubbery hotcakes. In another instance, they are written on the eggs laid by the Douglas' hens. Another episode opens with the characters arguing, then realizing the credits are running, and sitting down and waiting for the credits to finish on the grounds that no one was paying attention to what they were saying. Another episode opens with Lisa herself first waking up, then waking up Oliver to ask if he wanted to read "the names" with her; on another occasion she calls them "the written-by's". This practice of inserting opening credits in unusual ways was also used in The Beverly Hillbillies.
  • Oliver is the only person who does not realize that he is a terrible farmer, his farmland is worthless, his Hoyt-Clagwell tractor is an antique relic, and his farmhouse a dilapidated shack -- although he appears to get wise to these facts as the series goes on; in the episode "Haney's New Image," he refers to the farm as a "dump;" and on at least one occasion he takes Haney to court to get a refund on the junky tractor.
  • The Pilot episode shows Oliver as such a fanatic farmer wannabe that during World War II, while strafing a battlefield in a P-38, he keeps talking on about the vegetables on the ground (When he finally drops his payload on a tomato field, he sadly announces "Ketchup all over everything."). When he is shot down over Hungary, he first meets Lisa who helps him escape. A later episode shows Oliver as a Air Force Reserve Officer when the Hooterville townspeople try to get him to fly a World War I-era plane to Chicago.
  • Oliver has always dreamed of becoming a farmer, but he lives in complete denial of the fact that he is virtually incapable of growing anything. Lisa, who always longs to go back to New York, actually adjusts quite well and seems quite at home in Hooterville. Despite Lisa's blatantly urban, sophisticated socialite manner, the local people like her, yet find Oliver weird and make constant references to his supposed "drinking problem".
  • Lisa claimed in one episode to be from New Jersey but went to boarding school in Hungary, thereby explaining both her accent and her lack of ability to speak Hungarian. However, in some episodes, she is seen to converse with other Hungarians in fluent Hungarian. She also has a wide variety of stories involving how her father became the King of Hungary.
  • Another running joke is Oliver's use of sarcasm and Lisa taking his comments literally. This is usually followed by Oliver shaking his head or a puzzled look on his face. He occasionally tried to explain what he meant to his wife but usually gave up.
  • In-jokes about how Hooterville is so remote:
    • In one episode Hooterville can only be found on a map if a fly isn't standing on it.
    • That the only way a high ranking Air Force Officer can get to Hooterville is by parachute. (Technically, this is a continuity error, since Hooterville has an airport (as well as Pixley International Airport). Once, Lisa and Douglas tried to go by Hooterville airplane to Washington D.C, but they ended up in Paris. There is also a railroad crossing at Sam Drucker's store and Petticoat Junction, and there are county roads for the Douglas car and Mr. Haney's truck.)
  • In the first season, it is mentioned that Hank Kimball's mother, Sarah, owns the phone company, but in the third season, Sarah is the mother of Roy Trendell, and Trendell owns the company, and winds up giving it to Oliver.
  • The comic-book style sound effects are faintly visible to the characters. For example, in the episode "Double Drick" (season 1), when the generator sparks and sputters, the word "Drick!" appears on the screen, like in the fight scenes in Batman. Lisa then asks Oliver what the word "Drick" means.
  • While a running joke is that in nearly every episode Oliver Douglas somehow loses a battle of wits to the eccentric Hooterville townsfolk, this is not necessarily so—in one episode when Haney, Hank, Mr. Ziffel, and Lisa think they have discovered an artificial milk making machine, Oliver has to tell them tongue-in-check that not only would the chemicals be so expensive that the milk has to be sold at sky-high prices, but that anyone who drinks it over a period of time goes bald!! In another episode, everyone in the valley suspects Oliver of being a C.I.A. agent. He goes along with what they think they know, telling them all that they should forget what they know for national security reasons.

Dutch uncle is a term for a person who issues frank and severe comments and criticism to educate, encourage, or admonish someone, often with benevolent intent, as an elder relative or uncle would. ... Petticoat Junction was an American situation comedy that was produced by Filmways, Inc. ... Arnold Ziffel was a fictional character featured in Green Acres, an American situation comedy that was produced by Filmways, Inc. ... Tom Lester is an American actor and evangelist who was born September 23, 1938, in Jackson, Mississippi. ... Hank Kimball was the fictitious county agent of the 1965-71 American television comedy Green Acres. ... Salesman is a 1969 cinema verité documentary film which follows four salesmen of expensive Bibles door-to-door in a low-income neighborhood which cannot afford expensive Bibles. ... Mr. ... An extension agent is a government or university employee who travels to rural areas to assist the people in learning the newest methods in agriculture and home economics. ... Hank Kimball was the fictitious county agent of the 1965-71 American television comedy Green Acres. ... Sam Drucker (potrayed by actor Frank Cady) was the operator of the general store in Hooterville in the fictional world of the 1960s American sitcoms Petticoat Junction and Green Acres, created by Paul Henning. ... Mary Grace Canfield (born September 3, 1926, in Rochester, New York) is an American actress who often played the role of a romance-hungry wallflower. ... Sid Melton, (Born Sidney Meltzer on May 23, 1920, in Brooklyn, New York) is an American actor probably best known for his roles as incompetent carpenter Alf Monroe in the sitcom Green Acres and as Uncle Charlie Halper in Make Room for Daddy and its spin-offs. ... The Danny Thomas Show (also known as Make Room for Daddy for the first three seasons) was a comedy television series starring Danny Thomas, Jean Hagen, Rusty Hamer, Sherry Jackson and Louise Beavers. ... Fife (Fìobh in Gaelic) is a council area of Scotland, situated between the Firth of Tay and the Firth of Forth, with landward boundaries to Perth and Kinross and Clackmannanshire. ... Yankee Doodle is a well-known American song, often sung patriotically today . ... Lincoln Continental is a model name that has been used several times by the Lincoln division of Ford Motor Company for a line of luxury cars. ... Saab 900 Convertible 1962 Rambler American Convertible can also refer to a convertible (security) A convertible (sometimes called cabriolet in British English) is a car body style with a folding or retracting roof (aka soft top or top in USA, hood in UK). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... An egg is a body consisting of an ovum surrounded by layers of membranes and an outer casing of some type, which purpose is to nourishes and protect a developing embryo. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This entire article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Lockheed P-38 Lightning was one of the most important American fighters of the Second World War. ... A bottle of Heinz Organic Ketchup Ketchup (or less commonly catsup) also known as Red Sauce or Tomato Sauce is a popular condiment, usually made with ripened tomatoes. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... A boarding school is an educational institution where some or all pupils not only study, but also live, amongst their peers. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... Sam Drucker (potrayed by actor Frank Cady) was the operator of the general store in Hooterville in the fictional world of the 1960s American sitcoms Petticoat Junction and Green Acres, created by Paul Henning. ... Petticoat Junction was an American situation comedy that was produced by Filmways, Inc. ... Hank Kimball was the fictitious county agent of the 1965-71 American television comedy Green Acres. ... A comic book or comicbook is a magazine or book containing sequential art in the form of a narrative. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The running gag is a popular hallmark of comedy television shows and movies. ...

DVD Releases

MGM Home Video has released the first 3 seasons of Green Acres on DVD in Region 1 for the very first time. It is unknown if the remaining 3 seasons will be released at some point. For alternate meanings of MGM, see MGM (disambiguation). ...

DVD Name Ep # Release Date
Season 1 32 January 13, 2004
Season 2 30 March 8, 2005
Season 3 30 December 6, 2005

January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 8 is the 67th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (68th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 6 is the 340th day (341st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Reruns

Reruns of Green Acres have aired in syndication in the past, and also on Nick at Nite. Since 2004, TV Land has aired episodes, and since 2006, ION Television had been airing episodes on weekday evenings. As of Monday, April 2, 2007 Green Acres no longer appears on ION Television and the only station carrying it now is TV Land as well as a few local stations. Nick at Nite is an evening programming block broadcast over Nickelodeon from 9 PM – 6 AM Eastern and Pacific Standard Time. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... ION Television is a broadcast and cable television network first broadcast on August 31, 1998 under the name PAX TV (early on in its development, it was called PaxNet). ... ION Television is a broadcast and cable television network first broadcast on August 31, 1998 under the name PAX TV (early on in its development, it was called PaxNet). ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ...


References

  • Cox, Stephen (1993). The Hooterville Handbook : A Viewer's Guide To Green Acres. St. Martin's Griffin. ISBN 0-312-08811-6. 

External links

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