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Look up Resurrection in
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This article concerns itself with Jewish, Christian, Islamic and other religious interpretations of resurrection in general. For the restoration of humanity on Judgment Day, see resurrection of the dead.

Also Resurrection (Common album), a 1994 hip-hop album by rapper Common. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Christianity percentage by country, purple is highest, orange is lowest Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch... Islam (Arabic:  ) is a monotheistic religion based upon the teachings of Muhammad, a 7th century Arab religious and political figure. ... This article or section should be merged with End times and Last judgment The Last Judgement - Tympanum sculpture at the Abbey Church of Ste-Foy, Conques-en-Rouergue, France In Christian eschatology, the Last Judgement is the ethical-judicial trial, judgement, and punishment/reward of individual humans (assignment to heaven... // Main article: Jewish eschatology Orthodox Judaism holds that belief in the Resurrection of the Dead is one of the cardinal principles of the Jewish faith. ... Resurrection is the 2nd album by American rapper Common. ... Hip hop (also spelled hip-hop or hiphop) is both a music genre and a cultural movement developed in urban communities starting in the 1970s, predominantly by African Americans. ... Lonnie Rashid Lynn, Jr. ...

Resurrection of the Flesh (1499-1502) Fresco by Luca SignorelliChapel of San Brizio, Duomo, Orvieto
Resurrection of the Flesh (1499-1502) Fresco by Luca Signorelli
Chapel of San Brizio, Duomo, Orvieto

Miraculous resurrection of one sort or another has been a recurrent theme or central doctrine of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Religious accounts represent the resurrection of individuals, as well as a general resurrection of humanity on Judgment Day. Christianity also uses the term to refer to God's resurrection of Jesus. Accounts of resurrection also occur in other religious traditions. Resurrection has several meanings: Bringing the dead back to life. ... Download high resolution version (969x685, 188 KB)Resurrection of the Flesh by Luca Signorelli 1499-1502 Fresco Chapel of San Brizio, Duomo, Orvieto Source: http://gallery. ... Download high resolution version (969x685, 188 KB)Resurrection of the Flesh by Luca Signorelli 1499-1502 Fresco Chapel of San Brizio, Duomo, Orvieto Source: http://gallery. ... fresco of the Last Judgment (1499) in Orvieto Cathedral Luca Signorelli (c. ... The site of Orvieto is an Etruscan acropolis. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Christianity percentage by country, purple is highest, orange is lowest Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch... Islam (Arabic:  ) is a monotheistic religion based upon the teachings of Muhammad, a 7th century Arab religious and political figure. ... // Main article: Jewish eschatology Orthodox Judaism holds that belief in the Resurrection of the Dead is one of the cardinal principles of the Jewish faith. ... This article or section should be merged with End times and Last judgment The Last Judgement - Tympanum sculpture at the Abbey Church of Ste-Foy, Conques-en-Rouergue, France In Christian eschatology, the Last Judgement is the ethical-judicial trial, judgement, and punishment/reward of individual humans (assignment to heaven... The resurrection of Jesus is an event in the New Testament in which God raised him from the dead[1] after his death by crucifixion. ...

Contents

Mesopotamia and the classical world

In the literal sense of the word, resurrection refers to the event of a dead person returning to physical life. Thus it is not to be confused with things like Hellenistic immortality in which the soul continues to live after death, "free" of the body. This article is about living for infinite period of time. ...


"Centuries before the time of Christ the nations annually celebrated the death and resurrection of Osiris, Tammuz, Attis, Mithra, and other gods" [1]. A cyclic dying-and-rising god motif was prevalent throughout ancient Mesopotamian and classical literature and practice (eg in Syrian and Greek worship of Adonis; Egyptian worship of Osiris; the Babylonian story of Tammuz; rural religious belief in the Corn King). Typical depiction of Osiris Osiris (Greek language, also Usiris; the Egyptian language name is variously transliterated Asar, Aser, Ausar, Wesir, or Ausare) is the Egyptian god of life, death, and fertility. ... Tammuz or Tamuz Arabic تمّوز Tammūz; Hebrew תַּמּוּז, Standard Hebrew Tammuz, Tiberian Hebrew Tammûz; Akkadian Duʾzu, Dūzu; Sumerian Dumuzi was the name of a Babylonian deity. ... Attis wearing the Phrygian cap. ... Mithra (Avestan Miθra, modern Persian مهر Mihr, Mehr, Meher) is an important deity or divine concept (so called Yazata) in Zoroastrianism and later Persian mythology and culture. ... The category life-death-rebirth deity also known as a dying-and-rising god is a convenient means of classifying the many divinities in world mythology who are born, suffer death or an eclipse or other death-like experience, pass a phase in the underworld among the dead, and are... Adonis is an archetypal life-death-rebirth deity in Greek mythology, and a central cult figure in various mystery religions. ... Babylon (in Arabic: بابل; in Syriac: ܒܒܙܠ in Hebrew:בבל) was an ancient city in Mesopotamia (modern Al Hillah, Iraq), the ruins of which can be found in present-day Babil Province, about 80km south of Baghdad. ... Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China An artists rendering of an aerial view of the Maryland countryside: Jane Frank (Jane Schenthal Frank, 1918-1986), Aerial Series: Ploughed Fields, Maryland, 1974, acrylic and mixed materials on apertured double canvas, 52...


Judaism

The Hebrew Bible

See: Jewish eschatology: Biblical verses

The Torah addresses the issue of bodily resurrection, but for the most part only in an indirect way.. When Jacob dies, he says "I am about to be gathered to my kin. Bury me with my forefathers in the cave which is in the field of Ephron the Hittite" (Genesis 49:29). All the Jewish patriarchs and matriarchs (except Rachel) were buried in the family cave, and so were many other biblical personalities, including King Saul and King David. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... “Tora” redirects here. ... Genesis (Hebrew: , Greek: Γένεσις, meaning birth, creation, cause, beginning, source or origin) is the first book of the Torah, the Tanakh, and the Old Testament. ... Saul or Shaul (שָׁאוּל Demanded, Standard Hebrew Šaʾul, Tiberian Hebrew Šāʾûl) was the first king of Israel according to the Old Testament of the Bible, as taught in Judaism. ... This page is about the Biblical king David. ...


The Hebrew Bible refers to the term Sheol, which in traditional Judaism is translated simply as "grave" and is perceived as a transitory state. Critical views (see below) interpret it as a referring to a permanent, shadowy underworld. For biblical references to Sheol see Genesis 42:38, Isaiah 14:11, Psalm 141:7, Daniel 12:2, Proverbs 7:27 and Job 10:21,22, and 17:16, among others. 11th century manuscript of the Hebrew Bible with Targum This article is about the term Hebrew Bible. For the Hebrew Bible itself, see Tanakh (Jewish tradition) or Old Testament (Christian tradition). ... In Hebrew, Sheol (שאול, Shol) is the abode of the dead, the underworld, the common grave of mankind or pit.[1] In the Hebrew Bible, it is a comfortless place beneath the earth, beyond gates, where both the bad and the good, slave and king, pious and wicked must go...


Passages in the Hebrew Bible traditionally interpreted as referring to resurrection include:

  • Ezekiel’s vision of the valley of dry bones being restored as a living army: a metaphorical prophecy that the house of Israel would one day be gathered from the nations, out of exile, to live in the land of Israel once more.
  • Daniel's vision, where a mysterious angelic figure tells Daniel, "Multitudes who sleep in the dust of the earth will awake; some to everlasting life, others to shame and everlasting contempt." (Daniel 12:2)
  • 1 Samuel 2: 6 - "he bringeth down to the grave, and bringeth up"
  • Job 19: 26 - "after my skin worms destroy this body, yet in my flesh shall I see God"
  • Isaiah 26: 19 - "Thy dead men shall live, together with my dead body shall they arise"
  • Ezekiel 37: 12 - "I will open your graves, and cause you to come up"

Other passages may be more ambiguous: in the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible), Elijah raises a young boy from death (1 Kings 17-23), and Elisha duplicates the feat (2 Kings 4:34-35). There are a multiplicity of views on the scopes of these acts, including the traditional view that they represented genuine miracles and critical views that they represented resuscitations rather than bona fide resurrections. Other common associations are the biblical accounts of the antediluvian Enoch and the prophet Elijah being ushered into the presence of God without experiencing death. These, however, are more in the way of ascensions, bodily disappearances , translations or apotheoses than resurrections. Ezekiel the Prophet of the Hebrew Scriptures is depicted on a 1510 Sistine Chapel fresco by Michelangelo. ... This article is about the Biblical figure called Daniel. ... The Books of Samuel (Hebrew: Sefer Shmuel ספר שמואל), are part of the Tanakh (part of Judaisms Hebrew Bible) and also of the Old Testament (of Christianity). ... The Book of Job (איוב) is one of the books of the Hebrew Bible. ... Isaiah the Prophet in Hebrew Scriptures was depicted on the Sistine Chapel ceiling by Michelangelo. ... Ezekiel the Prophet of the Hebrew Scriptures is depicted on a 1510 Sistine Chapel fresco by Michelangelo. ... Tanakh (Hebrew: ‎) (also Tanach, IPA: or , or Tenak, is an acronym that identifies the Hebrew Bible. ... 11th century manuscript of the Hebrew Bible with Targum This article is about the term Hebrew Bible. For the Hebrew Bible itself, see Tanakh (Jewish tradition) or Old Testament (Christian tradition). ... Elijah in the wilderness, by Washington Allston Elijah (Hebrew: אליהו, ) was a prophet in Israel in the 9th century BCE. He appears in the Hebrew Bible, Talmud, Mishnah, Christian Bible, and the Quran. ... Elisha (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; My God is salvation) is a Biblical prophet. ... For other meanings of CPR, see CPR (disambiguation). ... Enoch (Hebrew: חֲנוֹךְ; Tiberian: , Standard: ) is a name occurring twice in the generations of Adam. ... Elijah in the wilderness, by Washington Allston Elijah (Hebrew: אליהו, ) was a prophet in Israel in the 9th century BCE. He appears in the Hebrew Bible, Talmud, Mishnah, Christian Bible, and the Quran. ... This article is about the Ascension of Jesus Christ. ... Look up Resurrection in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Apotheosis in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Views of Pharisees and Sadducees

In the First Century B.C.E, there were debates between the Pharisees who believed in the future Resurrection, and the Sadducees who did not, over whether or not there was an afterlife. The Pharisees, whose views became Rabbinic Judaism, eventually won (or at least survived) this debate. The word Pharisees comes from the Hebrew פרושים prushim from פרוש parush, meaning a detached one, that is, one who is separated for a life of purity. ... The sect of the Sadducees (or Zadokites and other variants) - which may have originated as a political party - was founded in the 2nd century BC and ceased to exist sometime after the 1st century AD. Their rivals, the Pharisees, are said to have originated in the same time period, but... Rabbinic Judaism (or in Hebrew Yahadut Rabanit - יהדות רבנית) is a Jewish denomination characterized by reliance on the written Torah as well as the Oral Law (the Mishnah, Talmuds and subsequent rabbinic decisions) as halakha (Legally Binding, i. ...


Orthodox Judaism

A belief in bodily resurrection is one of the Thirteen Principles of Faith of Maimonides central to Orthodox Judaism. Resurrection is the thirteenth principle: Judaism affirms a number of basic principles of faith that one is expected to uphold in order to be said to be in consonance with the Jewish faith. ... Commonly used image indicating one artists conception of Maimonidess appearance Maimonides (March 30, 1135 or 1138–December 13, 1204) was a Jewish rabbi, physician, and philosopher in Spain, Morocco and Egypt during the Middle Ages. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

"I believe with complete (perfect) faith, that there will be techiat hameitim - revival of the dead, whenever it will be God's, blessed be He, will (desire) to arise and do so. May (God's) Name be blessed, and may His remembrance arise, forever and ever."

The Talmud makes it one of the few required Jewish beliefs, going so far as to say that "All Israel have a share in the World to Come...but a person who does not believe in...the resurrection of the dead...has no share in the World to Come." (Sanhedrin 50a). The first page of the Vilna Edition of the Babylonian Talmud, Tractate Berachot, folio 2a. ... For the council of seventy-one Jewish sages in Judea during the Roman period, see Sanhedrin. ...


The second blessing of the Amidah, the central thrice-daily Jewish prayer is called Tehiyyat ha-Metim ("the resurrection of the dead") and closes with the words m'chayei hameitim ("who gives life to the dead") i.e., resurrection. The Amidah is traditionally attributed to the Great Assembly of Ezra; its text was finalized in approximately its present form in about the First Century CE. The Amidah (Standing), also called the Shemoneh Esrei (The Eighteen), is the central prayer in the Jewish liturgy that observant Jews recite each morning, afternoon, and evening. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Site traditionally described as the tomb of Ezra at Al Uzayr near Basra. ...


The Rabbis of the Talmud interpreted various verses of the Torah as alluding to a resurrection of the dead. For example, the seemingly-innocuous passage

And the child was weaned, and Abraham made a great feast on the day Issac was weaned (Genesis 21:8)

is interpreted in Talmud Pesachim 119b as alluding to a Seudat Chiyat HaMatim, a feast for the righteous following the resurrection. Genesis (Hebrew: , Greek: Γένεσις, meaning birth, creation, cause, beginning, source or origin) is the first book of the Torah, the Tanakh, and the Old Testament. ... Pesahim (Hebrew: פסחים, lit. ... The Seudat Chiyat HaMatim, a Hebrew term, is a Seudah (feast) for the righteous following the Chiyat Hamatim, the bodily Resurrection of the dead, which is refered to in a passage of the Talmud in the section on Passover which alludes to a relationship between the Passover Seder and this...


Conservative Judaism

Conservative Judaism's liturgy generally includes the traditional Hebrew text affirming belief in bodily resurrection, but its thinkers are divided. Many Conservative prayer books use an ambiguous translation into English that leaves open the possibility, but not the requirement, to believe in resurrection.[2] Conservative Judaism, (also known as Masorti Judaism in Israel predominantly), is a modern stream of Judaism that arose out of intellectual currents in Germany in the mid-19th century and took institutional form in the United States in the early 1900s. ...


Reform and Reconstructionist Judaism

Reform Judaism and Reconstructionist Judaism reject Resurrection. Accordingly, they have modified the text to read m'chayei hakol ("who gives life to all"). Reform Judaism can refer to (1) the largest denomination of American Jews and its sibling movements in other countries, (2) a branch of Judaism in the United Kingdom, and (3) the historical predecessor of the American movement that originated in 19th-century Germany. ... Reconstructionist Judaism is a modern American-based Jewish movement, based on the ideas of the late Mordecai Kaplan, that views Judaism as a progressively evolving civilization. ... The Amidah (Standing), also called the Shemoneh Esrei (The Eighteen), is the central prayer in the Jewish liturgy that observant Jews recite each morning, afternoon, and evening. ...


Christianity

In Christianity, resurrection can refer to the resurrection of Jesus Christ, the resurrection of the dead on Judgment Day, or other instances of miraculous resurrection and transfiguration. Christianity percentage by country, purple is highest, orange is lowest Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Look up dead in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article or section should be merged with End times and Last judgment The Last Judgement - Tympanum sculpture at the Abbey Church of Ste-Foy, Conques-en-Rouergue, France In Christian eschatology, the Last Judgement is the ethical-judicial trial, judgement, and punishment/reward of individual humans (assignment to heaven... For the U.S. hockey teams victory in the 1980 Winter Olympics, see Miracle on Ice, or Miracle (movie) According to many religions, a miracle is an intervention by God in the universe. ... The word Transfiguration means a changing of appearance or form. ...


Resurrection of Jesus

Main article: Resurrection of Jesus

The resurrection of Jesus may have been the most central doctrinal position in Christianity taught to a Gentile audience. Only the Apostle Paul said that 'if Jesus has not risen from the dead then the Christians were the most miserable of all men'(I Corinthians 15:19). According to Paul, the entire Christian faith hinges upon the centrality of the resurrection of Jesus. Christians annually celebrate the resurrection of Jesus at Easter time. The resurrection of Jesus is an event in the New Testament in which God raised him from the dead[1] after his death by crucifixion. ... The word gentile is an anglicised version of the Latin word gentilis, meaning of or belonging to a clan or tribe. ... The Twelve Apostles (in Koine Greek απόστολος apostolos [1], someone sent forth/sent out, an emissary) were probably Galilean Jewish men (10 names are Aramaic, 4 names are Greek) chosen from among the disciples, who were sent forth by Jesus of Nazareth to preach the Gospel to both Jews and Gentiles... See also: Second Epistle to the Corinthians and Third Epistle to the Corinthians The First Epistle to the Corinthians is a book of the Bible in the New Testament. ... Faith has two general implications which can be implied either exclusively or mutually; To Trust: Believing a certain variable will act a specific way despite the potential influence of known or unknown change. ... Easter, the Sunday of the Resurrection, Pascha, or Resurrection Day, is the most important religious feast of the Christian liturgical year, observed at some point between late March and late April each year (early April to early May in Eastern Christianity), following the cycle of the moon. ...


Resurrection of the dead

Christianity started as a religious movement within 1st-century Judaism, and it retains the 1st-century Jewish belief in the resurrection of the dead. Most Christian churches continue to uphold this belief: that there will be a general resurrection of the dead at "the end of time", as prophesied by Paul when he said, "...he hath appointed a day, in the which he will judge the world..." (Acts 17:31 KJV) and "...there shall be a resurrection of the dead, both of the just and unjust." (Acts 24:15 KJV). Most also teach that it is only as a result of the atoning work of Christ, by grace through faith, that people are spared eternal punishment as judgment for their sins. // Main article: Jewish eschatology Orthodox Judaism holds that belief in the Resurrection of the Dead is one of the cardinal principles of the Jewish faith. ... // Main article: Jewish eschatology Orthodox Judaism holds that belief in the Resurrection of the Dead is one of the cardinal principles of the Jewish faith. ... Many religious faiths teach that the end of the world will occur at some point in the future. ... For other uses, see Atonement (disambiguation). ...


Belief in the resurrection of the dead, and Jesus Christ's role as judge of the dead, is codified in the Apostles' Creed, which is the fundamental creed of Christian baptismal faith. The Book of Revelation also makes many references about the Day of Judgment when the dead will be raised up. The Apostles Creed (Latin: Symbolum Apostolorum), sometimes titled Symbol of the Apostles, is an early statement of Christian belief, a creed or symbol. ... Visions of John of Patmos, as depicted in the Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry. ...


Modern de-emphasis in Christianity

Early church fathers defended the resurrection of the dead against the pagan belief that the immortal soul went to heaven immediately after death [1]. Currently, however, the popular belief among some Christians is much more in line with what the pagans taught: that the souls of the righteous do go straight to heaven [2][3], and the resurrection of the dead is downplayed[4].


Resurrection miracles

The resurrected Jesus Christ commissioned his followers to, among other things, to raise the dead. Throughout Christian history up to the present day there have been various accounts of Christians raising people from the dead.


In the New Testament of the Bible, Jesus is said to have raised several persons from death, including the daughter of Jairus shortly after death, a young man in the midst of his own funeral procession, and Lazarus, who had been buried for four days. According to the Gospel of Matthew, after Jesus's resurrection, many of the dead saints came out of their tombs and entered Jerusalem, where they appeared to many. John 21:1 Jesus Appears to His Disciples--Alessandro Mantovani: the Vatican, Rome. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library of Congress. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Resurrection of Lazarus by Juan de Flandes, around 1500 For other uses, see Lazarus (disambiguation). ... The Gospel of Matthew (literally, according to Matthew; Greek, Κατά Μαθθαίον or Κατά Ματθαίον, Kata Maththaion or Kata Matthaion) is one of the four Gospel accounts of the New Testament. ... In traditional Christian iconography, Saints are often depicted as having halos. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ...


Similar resuscitations are credited to Christian apostles and saints. Peter raised a woman named Dorcas (called Tabitha), and Paul restored a man named Eutychus who had fallen asleep and fell from a window to his death, according to the book of Acts. Proceeding the apostolic era, many saints were known to resurrect the dead, as recorded in Orthodox christian hagiographies. For other meanings of CPR, see CPR (disambiguation). ... The Twelve Apostles (in Koine Greek απόστολος apostolos [1], someone sent forth/sent out, an emissary) were probably Galilean Jewish men (10 names are Aramaic, 4 names are Greek) chosen from among the disciples, who were sent forth by Jesus of Nazareth to preach the Gospel to both Jews and Gentiles... Saint Peter, also known as Shimon Keipha Ben-Yonah/Bar-Yonah, Simon Peter, Cephas and Keipha — original name Shimon or Simeon (Acts 15:14) — was one of the Twelve Apostles whom Jesus chose as his original disciples. ... A 19th century picture of Paul of Tarsus Paul of Tarsus (originally Saul of Tarsus) or Saint Paul the Apostle (fl. ... It has been suggested that window frames be merged into this article or section. ... The Acts of the Apostles is a book of the Bible, which now stands fifth in the New Testament. ...


Faith healer William M. Branham claimed to have raised a boy from the dead in 1950.[citation needed] William Marrion Branham (April 6, 1909, Kentucky – December 24, 1965) was an influential Bible minister sometimes credited with founding the Latter Rain Movement within American Pentecostal churches, elements of which are present in most modern Pentecostal and Charismatic churches (although William Branham denied any specific connection with the movement). ...


American evangelical missionary David L Hogan claims to have witnessed 28 resurrections from the dead, and his ministers have totalled approximately 400 "dead-raisings".[citation needed] David L Hogan is an American Christian evangelical missionary, currently working in Mexico. ...


Bodily resurrection versus Platonic philosophy

In championing the bodily resurrection of Jesus and of the dead in general, early Christians opposed the common, Hellenistic concept that the immortal soul is superior to the body, and that the spiritual is superior to the material in general. In Hellenistic thought, at death the soul was said to leave the inferior body behind. The idea that Jesus was resurrected spiritually rather than physically even gained popularity among some Christian teachers, whom the author of 1 John declared to be antichrists. Similar beliefs appeared in the early church as Gnosticism. (Redirected from 1 John) The First Epistle of John is a book of the Bible New Testament. ... In Christian eschatology the Antichrist or Anti-christ (literally: anti, opposite, for, or as; christ, messiah) has come to mean a person, image of a person, or other entity that is the embodiment of evil. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


Resurrection by demonic power

Christians sometimes describe Satan as able to give his human servants the power to raise the dead [5]. Raising the devil. ...


Contemporary Biblical criticism

According to Herbert Brichtothe, writing in Reform Judaism's Hebrew Union College Annual, the family tomb is the central concept in understanding biblical views of the afterlife. Brichtothe states that it is "not mere sentimental respect for the physical remains that is...the motivation for the practice, but rather an assumed connection between proper sepulture and the condition of happiness of the deceased in the afterlife" According to Brichtothe, the early Israelites apparently believed that the graves of family, or tribe, united into one, and that this unified collectivity is what the Biblical Hebrew term Sheol refers to. Although not well defined in the Tanakh, Sheol in this view was a subterranean underworld where the souls of the dead went after the body died. The Babylonians had a similar underworld called Aralu, and the Greeks had one known as Hades. For biblical references to Sheol see Genesis 42:38, Isaiah 14:11, Psalm 141:7, Daniel 12:2, Proverbs 7:27 and Job 10:21,22, and 17:16, among others. According to Brichtothe, other Biblical names for Sheol were: Abbadon (ruin), found in Psalm 88:11, Job 28:22 and Proverbs 15:11; Bor (the pit), found in Isaiah 14:15, 24:22, Ezekiel 26:20; and Shakhat (corruption), found in Isaiah 38:17, Ezekiel 28:8. [6] Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion (also known as HUC or HUC-JIR) is the oldest Jewish seminary in the New World and the main seminary for training rabbis, cantors, educators and communal workers in Reform Judaism. ... An Israelite is a member of the Twelve Tribes of Israel, descended from the twelve sons of the Biblical patriarch Jacob who was renamed Israel by God in the book of Genesis, 32:28 The Israelites were a group of Hebrews, as described in the Bible. ... Categories: Language stubs | Judaism-related stubs | Canaanite languages | Hebrew language ... In Hebrew, Sheol (שאול, Shol) is the abode of the dead, the underworld, the common grave of mankind or pit.[1] In the Hebrew Bible, it is a comfortless place beneath the earth, beyond gates, where both the bad and the good, slave and king, pious and wicked must go... Babylonia was an ancient state in Iraq), combining the territories of Sumer and Akkad. ... Hades, Greek god of the underworld, enthroned, with his bird-headed staff, on a red-figure Apulian vase made in the 4th century BC. For other uses, see Hades (disambiguation). ...


Mormonism

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (commonly called Mormons) teach that upon death, righteous souls go to a spirit-prison called "Paradise", (See: Elysian Fields) a temporary resting place, but not the final heaven. There, they await bodily resurrection, after which they will proceed to final judgement and hopefully receive Eternal Life in Heaven. The souls of the dead wicked go to spirit "Prison", counterpart to "Paradise", where they will have a chance to learn the gospel if they didn't have the chance while alive on Earth. Likewise, they will also eventually be resurrected and judged with a chance for Eternal Life. The Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the largest attraction in the citys Temple Square. ... The term Mormon is a colloquial name, most-often used to refer to members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). ... This article is about living for infinite period of time. ...


Islam

Main article: Qiyamah

Those who believe in Allah (God) and did good deeds in their lives will go to heaven and live there for eternity. Those who did not believe in God and did bad deeds in their lives will burn in hell for eternity. Humans and other creatures of God are then made to account for all their deeds, and their final abode — Jannah or Jahannam — is determined by God's Grace and justice during the Day of Judgement. Yawm al-QÄ«yāmah (Arabic: literally: Day of the Resurrection) is the Last Judgement in Islam. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Jahannam (Arabic: ) is the Islamic equivalent to hell. ... This article or section should be merged with End times and Last judgment The Last Judgement - Tympanum sculpture at the Abbey Church of Ste-Foy, Conques-en-Rouergue, France In Christian eschatology, the Last Judgement is the ethical-judicial trial, judgement, and punishment/reward of individual humans (assignment to heaven...


One of the reasons Mohammed was sent was to explain the Doctrine of 'resurrection' and the terms 'heaven' and 'hell' from within the context of Revelations received from Allah.


Modern India

Best selling author and philosopher of Yoga, and the guru of Mahatma Gandi, Paramahansa Yogananda recorded the following accounts of resurrections in his Autobiography: Statue of Shiva performing Yogic meditation Yoga (Devanagari: योग) is a group of ancient spiritual practices originating in India. ... Guru - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Mukunda Lal Ghosh (January 5, 1893 in Gorakhpur, in northern India - March 7, 1952), better known as Paramahansa Yogananda, was a Bengali yogi and guru. ... Autobiography of a Yogi is the autobiography of Paramahansa Yogananda. ...

  • Lahiri Mahasaya resurrected Rama a friend of Sri Yukteswar who had died of Cholera. He was brought back to life a day after he had passed,Chapter 32. [7]
  • On June 19th, 1936 at the Bombay Hotel Swami Sri Yukteswar, who had died three months earlier, appeared to Yogananda in "flesh and blood" and spoke to him of life in the astral realms. Yogananda describes touching Sri Yukteswar and provides a detailed account of the meeting but some believe this could have just been a hallucination, Chapter 43.[8]
  • Mahavatar Babaji the guru of Lahiri Mahasaya is said to have healed and resurrected a disciple who had willingly thrown himself to death from a high cliff after learning he was unfit to be a disciple in his present form, Chapter 34. However, the authenticity of this account is questioned, as the body would have doubtlessly been badly broken, making any resurrection superfluous.

Sathya Sai Baba disciple Dr. John S. Hislop reported in his book My Baba and I that while attending a conference, Walter Cowan, of Tustin, California, was pronounced dead on the morning of December 25, 1971 of a heart attack. According to Hislop, later in the day, he was found sitting up in a hospital bed alive raised to life by Sai Baba. Elsie Cowen, Walter's wife provided details of the account at a lecture at the Unity Church in Santa Ana, California. According to Elsie, Walter recounted witnessing Sai Baba convincing a council to let him live again to perform a purpose.[9] Some believe many of the Sathya Sai Baba miracles are questionable, thus throwing this account of a disciple into doubt. Furthermore, according to medically established consensus, the body can be resuscitated after 9 hours. Within this time frame certain people emerge, and falsely claim to be resurrected, however, it is not true resurrection. This might explain Walter Cowen's resurrection.[citation needed] Shyama Charan Lahiri, best known as Lahiri Mahasaya (September 30, 1828 - September 26, 1895) was an Indian yogi and the guru of Sri Yukteswar Giri. ... Rama ( in IAST, in Devanāgarī) or Ramachandra is a legendary or historical king of ancient India. ... Priya Nath Karar, known in Hindu religion as Sri Yukteswar Giri (May 10, 1855-March 9, 1936) was the guru of Paramhansa Yogananda; his spiritual master and also his personal astrologer. ... Priya Nath Karar, known in Hindu religion as Sri Yukteswar Giri (May 10, 1855-March 9, 1936) was the guru of Paramhansa Yogananda; his spiritual master and also his personal astrologer. ... Mukunda Lal Ghosh (January 5, 1893 in Gorakhpur, in northern India - March 7, 1952), better known as Paramahansa Yogananda, was a Bengali yogi and guru. ... Shyama Charan Lahiri, best known as Lahiri Mahasaya (September 30, 1828 - September 26, 1895) was an Indian yogi and the guru of Sri Yukteswar Giri. ... Sathya Sai Baba (born Sathyanarayana Raju on November 23, 1926,[1][2] or later than 1927 — with the family name of Ratnakara) is a South Indian guru, religious leader, orator and philosopher [] often described as a godman[3][4] and a miracle worker. ... This article is about the original, turn of the century Shirdi Sai Baba from Bombay state (now Maharashtra). ... Sathya Sai Baba (born Sathyanarayana Raju on November 23, 1926,[1][2] or later than 1927 — with the family name of Ratnakara) is a South Indian guru, religious leader, orator and philosopher [] often described as a godman[3][4] and a miracle worker. ...


Bodily disappearances

As the knowledge of different religions has grown, the bodily disappearance of Divine Heroes has been found to be common. In ancient times pagan similarities were explained by the early Christian writers, such as Justin Martyr, as the work of demons and Satan, with the intention of leading Christians astray.[10] Gesar, the Savior of Tibet, at the end, chants on a mountain top and his clothes fall empty to the ground. [11] The bodies of the Divine Gurus of Sikhism vanish after their deaths. [12] There is a traditional spot in Jerusalem whence, while mounted, Muhammad and his horse both ascend into the sky. This shows a variety in traditions, for Muhummad's famous tomb in Medina is visited every year by the faithful. Justin Martyr (Justin the Martyr, also known as Justin of Caesarea) (100 – 165) was an early Christian apologist. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Tibet (older spelling Thibet; Tibetan: བོད་; Wylie: Bod; Lhasa dialect IPA: [; Simplified and Traditional Chinese: 西藏, Hanyu Pinyin: XÄ«zàng; also referred to as 藏区 (Simplified Chinese), 藏區 (Traditional Chinese), ZàngqÅ« (Hanyu Pinyin), see Name section below) is a plateau region in Central Asia and the indigenous home to the Tibetan people. ... Sikhism (IPA: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ) is a religion that began in fifteenth century Northern India with the teachings of Nanak and nine successive human gurus. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Muhammad, see Muhammad (name). ... Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Lord Raglan's Hero Pattern lists many Divine Heroes whose bodies disappear, or have more than one sepulchre. [13] B. Traven, author of The Treasure of Sierra Madre, wrote that the Inca Divine Hero, Virococha, walked away on the top of the sea and vanished. [14] It has been thought that teachings regarding the purity and incorruptibility of the Divine Hero's human body are linked to this phenomenon. Perhaps, this is also to deter the practice of disturbing and collecting the hero's remains. They are safely protected if they have disappeared. In Deuteronomy (34:6) Moses is secretly buried. Elijah vanishes in a whirlwind 2 Kings (2:11). After hundreds of years these two earlier Biblical heroes suddenly reappear, and are seen walking with Jesus. Then again they vanish. Mark (9:2-8), Matthew (17:1-8) and Luke (9:28-33). The last time he is seen, Luke (24:51) alone tells of Jesus leaving his disciples, by ascending into the sky. Field Marshal Lord Raglan during the Crimean War, portrait by Roger Fenton, ca. ... Heroine (female hero) redirects here. ... The Treasure of the Sierra Madre is a 1948 John Huston film in which two down-and-outers (Humphrey Bogart and Tim Holt) in Mexico (bothering director John Huston for money in a fun opening cameo) hook up with an old-timer (Walter Huston, the directors father) to prospect... For other meanings of Inca, see Inca (disambiguation). ... In Inca mythology, Apu Qun Tiqsi Wiraqutra was the creator of civilization, and one of the most important deities in the Inca canon. ... Sea as seen from jetty in Frankston, Australia Look up maritime in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Deuteronomy is the fifth book of the Hebrew Bible. ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... Elijah in the wilderness, by Washington Allston Elijah (Hebrew: אליהו, ) was a prophet in Israel in the 9th century BCE. He appears in the Hebrew Bible, Talmud, Mishnah, Christian Bible, and the Quran. ... The Books of Kings (also known as [The Book of] Kings in Hebrew: Sefer Melachim מלכים) is a part of Judaisms Tanakh, the Hebrew Bible. ... The Gospel of Mark (literally, according to Mark; Greek, Κατά Μαρκον, Kata Markon),(anonymous[1] but ascribed to Mark the Evangelist) is a Gospel of the New Testament. ... The Gospel of Matthew (literally, according to Matthew; Greek, Κατά Μαθθαίον or Κατά Ματθαίον, Kata Maththaion or Kata Matthaion) is one of the four Gospel accounts of the New Testament. ... The Gospel of Luke is the third and longest of the four canonical Gospels of the New Testament, which tell the story of Jesus life, death, and resurrection. ... The Gospel of Luke is the third and longest of the four canonical Gospels of the New Testament, which tell the story of Jesus life, death, and resurrection. ...


See also

This article concerns the holy Trinity of Christianity. ... Fleurs-de-lys on the flag of Quebec The fleur-de-lis (also spelled fleur-de-lys; plural fleurs-de-lis or -lys) is used in heraldry, where it is particularly associated with the France monarchy (see King of France). ... The Assumption has been a subject of Christian art for centuries. ... The resurrection of Jesus is an event in the New Testament in which God raised him from the dead[1] after his death by crucifixion. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... For the ethnic group of this name, see Samaritan. ... This article is about living for infinite period of time. ... Last Judgment. ... The term Voodoo (Vodun in Benin; also Vodou or other phonetically equivalent spellings in Haiti; Vudu in the Dominican Republic) is applied to the branches of a West African ancestor-based religious tradition with primary roots among the Fon-Ewe peoples of West Africa, in the country now known as... The phoenix from the Aberdeen Bestiary. ... Corporeal reanimation is the theoretical concept of reanimating a dead organism, restoring its living functions and enabling it to move and to freely interact with the world of the living as it did when it was alive. ... Spock, commonly called Mr. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Cover to Uncanny X-Men #136 (August 1980, art by John Byrne), the penultimate issue of the Dark Phoenix saga. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... A group of actors portraying zombies in a film A zombie is an animated human body devoid of a soul. ...

Additional reading

  • William F. Albright, From Stone Age to Christianity: Monotheism and Historical Process
  • Oscar Cullmann, “Immortality of the Soul or Resurrection of the Dead?” in Immortality and Resurrection Ed. Krister Stendahl. New York: 1965. pp. 9-35. (available online)
  • Nikolai Fyodorovich Fyodorov. Philosophy of Physical Resurrection 1906.
  • Edwin Hatch, Influence of Greek Ideas and Usages Upon the Christian Church (1888 Hibbert Lectures).
  • Ronald F. Hock, The Favored One: How Mary Became the Mother of God, Bible Review, p. 12-25, June 2001.
  • Richard Longenecker, Editor. Life in the Face of Death: The Resurrection Message of the New Testament. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1998.
  • George Nickelsburg, Resurrection, Immortality, and Eternal Life in Intertestmental Judaism. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1972.
  • Zoe Oldenburg. Massacre at Montsegur. A History of the Albigensian Crusade. Translated from the French by Peter Green (1959).
  • James Robinson, Editor. The Nag Hammadi Library in English. New York: Harper Collins, 1977.
  • Jean-Marc Rouvière, Le silence de Lazare, Desclée De Brouwer: Paris, 1996.
  • Charles H. Talbert, The Concept of Immortals in Mediterranian Antiquity, Journal of Biblical Literature, Volume 94, 1973, pp 419-436
  • Charles H. Talbert, The Myth of a Descending-Ascending Redeemer in Mediterranian Antiquity, New Testament Studies, 22, 1975/76, pp 418-440
  • N.T. Wright. The Resurrection of the Son of God. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2003.

William Foxwell Albright (May 24, 1891 - September 19/20, 1971) was an evangelical Methodist archaelogist, biblical authority, linguist and expert on ceramics. ... Oscar Cullmann (25 February 1902 Strasbourg - 16 January 1999 Chamonix) was a Christian theologian in the Lutheran tradition. ... Nikolai Fyodorov by Leonid Pasternak Nikolai Fyodorovich Fyodorov (Russian: ; surname also Anglicized as Fedorov) (June 9, 1829–December 28, 1903) was a Russian Orthodox Christian philosopher, who was part of the Russian cosmism movement and philosophy of Transhumanism. ... Edwin Hatch (1835-1889) was an English theologian born on 1835 September 4 in Derby, England. ... Tom (N.T.) Wright, Bishop of Durham Tom (N.T.) Wright is the Bishop of Durham of the Anglican Church and a leading British New Testament scholar. ...

External links

  • Why I Don't Buy the Resurrection Story - Columbia University Historian Richard Carrier (analyzes evidence for the resurrection of Jesus)
  • Perspectives on the Resurrection - ABC News 20/20 Special (focuses on resurrection of Jesus)
  • Jewish Encyclopedia: Resurrection
  • the Christian apostle Paul on the Christian belief in the resurrection of the dead (the Church) in I Corinthians 15 [3]
  • The enticement of the Occult: Occultism examined by an scientist and Orthodox Priest
  • Mormon Transhumanist Association
  • Rethinking the resurrection.(of Jesus Christ)(Cover Story) Newsweek, April 8th 1996, Woodward, Kenneth L.
  • Dictionary of the History of Ideas: Death and Immortality, Resurrection, Reincarnation

References

  1. ^ Do Souls Go To Heaven?
  2. ^ See, for instance, Catechism of the Catholic Church §1022: «Each man receives his eternal retribution in his immortal soul at the very moment of his death, in a particular judgment that refers his life to Christ: either entrance into the blessedness of heaven-through a purification or immediately,--or immediate and everlasting damnation.»
  3. ^ Hereafter
  4. ^ See for example Will We Be Reunited with Children Who Have Died?
  5. ^ In the webpage At the threshold of Fiery Gehenna is an example of such an account (Kurt E. Koch, ‘’Demonology Past and Present’’, Kregel Publications, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1973, pp. 31-52.)
  6. ^ Herbert Chanon Brichto "Kin, Cult, Land and Afterlife - A Biblical Complex", Hebrew Union College Annual 44, p.8 (1973)
  7. ^ Autobiography of a Yogi by Paramahansa Yogananda, .
  8. ^ Ibid, .
  9. ^ John S. Hislop, My Baba and I. Pages 28-31.
  10. ^ Justin Martyr, Dialogue with Trypho (ca 147-161 A.D.) Catholic University Press, 2003
  11. ^ Alexandra David-Neel,and Lama Yongden, The Superhuman Life of Gesar of Ling, Rider, 1933, While still in oral tradition, the Divine Hero of Tibet and Asia is recorded for the first time by an early European traveler.
  12. ^ Sikh Missionary Center, Sikh Religion, 1990
  13. ^ Otto Rank, Lord Raglan, and Alan Dundes, In Quest of the Hero, Princeton University Press, 1990
  14. ^ B. Traven, The Creation of the Sun and Moon, Lawerence Hill Books, 1977

  Results from FactBites:
 
Resurrection - definition of Resurrection - Labor Law Talk Dictionary (1085 words)
Resurrection consists of the reuniting of the spirit and the body of an individual, or the raising of a person from death back to life.
Other resurrections are symbolic, not of a physical body, but of a ghost body arising after the death of a person's body of flesh.
Examples of a resurrected deity are Syrian and Greek worship of Adonis; Egyptian worship of Osiris; the Babylonian story of Tammuz; and rural religious belief in the Corn King.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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