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Encyclopedia > Restauration
Governments of
France series
Gaul
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Valois Dynasty
Bourbon Dynasty
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(restored)
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Following the ouster of Napoleon Bonaparte in 1814, the Allies restored the Bourbon Dynasty to the French throne. The ensuing period is called in French the Restauration, characterized by a sharp conservative reaction and the re-establishment of the Roman Catholic church as a power in French politics.

Louis-Philippe ascended the throne on the strength of the July Revolution of 1830, and ruled, not as "King of France" but as "King of the French," an evocative difference among contemporaries. Most historians treat the resulting July Monarchy, 1830 - 1848, as a separate period in French history.

Following the ouster of the last king to rule France in 1848, the Second Republic was formed after the election of Charles Louis Napoleon Bonaparte as President (1848-1852), who subsequently had himself declared Emperor Napoleon III of the Second Empire from 1852 - 1871.


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