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Encyclopedia > Resolution (law)

A resolution is a written motion adopted by a deliberative body. The substance of the resolution can be anything that can normally be proposed as a motion. For long or important motions, though, it is often better to have them written out so that discussion is easier or so that it can be distributed outside of the body after its adoption. A motion is a formal step to introduce a matter for consideration by a group. ... A deliberative body (or deliberative assembly) is an organization which collectively makes decisions after debate and discussion. ...


Resolutions are commonly used in corporations and houses of legislature.

Contents

In corporations

In corporations, a written resolution is especially useful in the case of the board of directors of a corporation, which usually needs to give its consent to real estate purchases or sales by the corporation. Such a resolution, when certified by the corporation's secretary, gives assurance to the other side of the transaction that the sale was properly authorized. Chairman of the Board redirects here. ... For other uses, see Corporation (disambiguation). ... Real estate is a legal term that encompasses land along with anything permanently affixed to the land, such as buildings. ... For other uses, see Secretary (disambiguation). ...


Houses of legislature

Houses of a legislature often adopt non-binding resolutions. A legislatureis a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to ratify laws. ... A non-binding resolution is a written motion adopted by a deliberative body that can not progress in to a law. ...


However, a legislature also uses resolutions to exercise one of its powers that isn't a lawmaking power. For example, the United States Congress declares war or proposes constitutional amendments by adopting a joint resolution. A house of a legislature can also use a resolution to exercise its specific powers, as the British House of Commons does to elect its Speaker or as the United States House of Representatives does to impeach an officer of the government. Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... A declaration of war is a formal declaration issued by a national government indicating that a state of war exists between that nation, and one or more others. ... Amend redirects here. ... A joint resolution is a legislative measure of the United States of America, designated as S.J.Res (for the Senate version) and H.J.Res (for the House version), which requires the approval of both chambers of the United States Congress. ... Type Lower House Speaker Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Leader Harriet Harman, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader Theresa May, (Conservative) since May 5, 2005 Members 659 Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin... In the United Kingdom, the Speaker of the House of Commons is the presiding officer of the House of Commons, and is seen historically as the First Commoner of the Land. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ...


Types

Non-binding

Main article: Non-binding resolution

In a house of a legislature, the term non-binding resolution refers to measures that do not become laws. This is used to differentiate those measures from a bill, which is also a resolution in the technical sense. The resolution is often used to express the body's approval or disapproval of something which they cannot otherwise vote on, due to the matter being handled by another jurisdiction, or being protected by a constitution. An example would be a resolution of support for a nation's troops in battle, which carries no legal weight, but is adopted for moral support. A non-binding resolution is a written motion adopted by a deliberative body that can not progress in to a law. ... A legislatureis a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to ratify laws. ... A non-binding resolution is a written motion adopted by a deliberative body that can not progress in to a law. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... A bill is a proposed new law introduced within a legislature that has not been ratified, adopted, or received assent. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A troop is a military unit. ... For other uses, see Battle (disambiguation). ... This article is about law in society. ... This article is about the use of the moral in storytelling. ... The word support has several specialized meanings: In mathematics, see support (mathematics). ...


Substantive and procedural

Substantive resolutions apply to essential legal principles and rules of right, analogous to substantive law, in contrast to procedural resolutions, which deal with the methods and means by which substantive items are made and administered. Substantive law is the statutory or written law that governs rights and obligations of those who are subject to it. ...


Historical examples of resolutions

The Gulf of Tonkin Resolution was a joint resolution of the U.S. Congress passed in August 1964 in direct response to a minor naval engagement known as the Gulf of Tonkin Incident. ... Thomas Jefferson. ... The Nickle Resolution, adopted by the Canadian House of Commons on 22 May 1919, marked the earliest attempt to establish a Canadian government policy forbidding the British, and, later, Canadian, Sovereign from granting knighthoods, baronetcies, and peerages to Canadians, and set the precedent for later policies prohibiting Canadians from accepting... The Parliament of Canada (in French: le Parlement du Canada) is Canadas legislative branch, seated at Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Ontario. ... A United Nations General Assembly Resolution is voted on by all member states of the United Nations in the General Assembly and requires a simple majority(50% of all votes plus one) to pass (with the exception of important questions which require two-thirds majority) Notable General Assembly resolutions 1947... A United Nations Security Council Resolution is voted on by the fifteen members of the UN Security Council. ... The War Powers Act of 1973 (Public Law 93-148) is also referred to as the War Powers Resolution (Sec. ...

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Resolution (law) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (330 words)
A resolution is a written motion adopted by a deliberative body.
Such a resolution, when certified by the corporation's secretary, gives assurance to the other side of the transaction that the sale was properly authorized.
The resolution is often used to express the body's approval or disapproval of something which they cannot otherwise vote on, due to the matter being handled by another jurisdiction, or being protected by a constitution.
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