FACTOID # 24: Looking for table makers? Head to Mississippi, with an overwhlemingly large number of employees in furniture manufacturing.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Resignation" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Resignation

A resignation is the formal act of giving up one's office or position. It can also refer to the act of admitting defeat in a game like chess, indicated by the resigning player turning his king on its side. A resignation can occur when a person holding a position gained by election or appointment steps down. An employee who choses to leave a permanent position is considered a resignation, but leaving a position upon the expiration of a term is not. Abdication is the equivalent of resignation of a reigning monarch or pope, or other holder of a non-political, hereditary or similar position. Tug of war is an easily organized, impromptu game that requires little equipment. ... Chess is an abstract strategy board game and mental sport for two players. ... An election is a decision making process where people choose people to hold official offices. ... Look up abdication in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up monarch in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The current Pope is Benedict XVI (born Joseph Alois Ratzinger), who was elected at the age of 78 on 19 April 2005. ... Inheritance is the practice of passing on property, titles, debts, and obligations upon the death of an individual. ...


A resignation is a personal decision to exit a position, though outside pressure exists in many cases. For example, Richard Nixon resigned from the office of President of the United States in 1974 following the Watergate scandal, when he was almost certain to have been impeached by the United States Congress. Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1969 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... The term Watergate refers to a series of events, spanning from 1972 to 1974, that got its name from burglaries of the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee in the Watergate Hotel complex in Washington, D.C.. Though then-President Nixon had endured two years of mounting political embarrassments, the... Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ... Seal of the U.S. Congress. ...


Resignation can be used politically, as in the Philippines during July 2005 when ten cabinet officials resigned in order to put pressure on President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo to do the same over allegations of electoral fraud. Although government officials may tender their resignations, they are not always accepted. Alternatively, resignation as a procedure may be used as a political weapon. In 1995, the British Prime Minister, John Major, resigned as Leader of the Conservative Party in order to contest a leadership election with the aim of silencing his critics within the party and reassert his authority. Having resigned, he stood again and was re-elected. A cabinet is a body of high-ranking members of government, typically representing the executive branch. ... Abraham Lincoln, 16th President of the United States (1861-1865) The majority of this article is about heads of states. ... PRESIDENT OF THE PHILIPPINES Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo (born April 5, 1947), also known by her initials GMA, is the current and 14th President of the Republic of the Philippines. ... PRESIDENT OF THE PHILIPPINES Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo (born April 5, 1947), also known by her initials GMA, is the current and 14th President of the Republic of the Philippines. ... The Prime Minister is in practice the most important political office in the United Kingdom. ... Sir John Major, KG, CH (born 29 March 1943) is an English politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1990 to 1997. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative & Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), and the largest in terms of public membership. ...


For many public figures, primarily departing politicians, resignation is an opportunity to deliver a valedictory resignation speech in which they can elucidate the circumstances of their exit from office and in many cases deliver a powerful speech which often commands much attention. This can be used to great political effect, particularly as, subsequent to resigning, government ministers are no longer bound by collective responsibility and can speak with greater freedom about current issues. A resignation speech is a speech made by a public figure upon resigning from office. ... Collective responsibility is a principle of British Cabinet Government in which the members of the Cabinet must support all Governmental decisions made in Cabinet, even if they do not privately agree with them. ...


List of notable resignations

1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... John Jay (December 12, 1745 – May 17, 1829) was an American politician, statesman, revolutionary, diplomat, writer, and a jurist. ... The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch of the government of the United States, and presides over the Supreme Court of the United States. ... 1800 (MDCCC) was an exceptional common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, but a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. ... Oliver Ellsworth (April 29, 1745 – November 26, 1807), an American lawyer and politician, was a revolutionary against British rule, a drafter of the United States Constitution, and third Chief Justice of the United States. ... The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch of the government of the United States, and presides over the Supreme Court of the United States. ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Portrait of U.S. Vice President Daniel D TOMPSKIN Daniel D[ecius?] TOMPSKIN (June 21, 1774 – June 11, 1825) was an entrepreneur, jurist, Congressman, Governor of New York, and the sixth Vice President of the United States. ... This is a list of the Governors of New York. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States. ... This is a list of the Governors of New York. ... 1832 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a prominent United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Minor parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal • • The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of succession... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Categories: People stubs | Governors of Pennsylvania ... List of Pennsylvania Governors The office of Pennsylvania governor was created by the states Constitution of 1790. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd (1885–1889) and 24th (1893–1897) President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. ... This is a list of the Governors of New York. ... 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... John William Griggs (July 10, 1849–November 28, 1927) was an American politician. ... The Governor of New Jersey is the chief executive of the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Charles Evans Hughes (April 11, 1862 – August 27, 1948) was Governor of New York, United States Secretary of State, Associate Justice and Chief Justice of the United States. ... This is a list of the Governors of New York. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Sun Yat-sen (November 12, 1866–March 12, 1925) was a Chinese revolutionary and political leader who had a significant role in the overthrow of the Qing Dynasty. ... The Office of the President of the Republic of China is located in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ... Yuan Shikai in military uniform Yuan Shikai (Courtesy Weiting 慰亭; Pseudonym: Rongan 容庵 Traditional Chinese: 袁世凱; Simplified Chinese: 袁世凯; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Yüan Shih-kai) (September 16, 1859 – June 5, 1916) was a Chinese military official and politician during the late Qing Dynasty and the early Republic of China. ... 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924) was the 28th President of the United States. ... The Governor of New Jersey is the chief executive of the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1942 calendar). ... Herbert Lehman Herbert Henry Lehman (March 28, 1878 – December 5, 1963) was a Democratic Party politician from the U.S. state of New York. ... This is a list of the Governors of New York. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... Edward Martin (September 18, 1879–March 19, 1967) was an American lawyer and Republican party politician from Waynesburg, Pennsylvania. ... List of Pennsylvania Governors The office of Pennsylvania governor was created by the states Constitution of 1790. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... Walter Edge Walter Evans Edge (November 20, 1873–October 29, 1956) was an American politician. ... The Governor of New Jersey is the chief executive of the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ... John Dennis Profumo, CBE (30 January 1915 – 10 March 2006), often called Jack Profumo, was a British politician and the central figure in the Profumo Affair of 1963, which caused severe damage to the Conservative government of Harold Macmillan and is held to have contributed to its defeat the following... The secretary of war in cabinet position was Henry Knox. ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The Profumo Affair was a political scandal of 1963 in the United Kingdom. ... 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... Charles André Joseph Marie de Gaulle ( ) (22 November 1890 – 9 November 1970), in France commonly referred to as Général de Gaulle, was a French military leader and statesman. ... The President of France, known officially as the President of the Republic (Président de la République in French), is Frances elected Head of State. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... Spiro Theodore Agnew, born Spiro Anagnostopoulos (November 9, 1918–September 17, 1996), was the thirty-ninth Vice President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1973 under President Richard M. Nixon. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Minor parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal • • The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of succession... Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (July 8, 1908 - January 26, 1979) was a Governor of New York and the 41st Vice President of the United States of America from December 19, 1974 to January 20, 1977. ... This is a list of the Governors of New York. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1969 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... The Watergate building. ... Willy Brandt, born Herbert Ernst Karl Frahm (December 18, 1913 - October 8, 1992) was a German politician, Chancellor of West Germany 1969 – 1974, and leader of the Social Democratic Party of Germany (SPD) 1964 – 1987. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Cearbhall Ó Dálaigh (12 February 1911 – 21 March 1978) (pronounced karol o dawl-ie) served as fifth President of Ireland, from 1974 to 1976. ... The President of Ireland (Irish: Uachtarán na hÉireann) is the head of state of the Republic of Ireland. ... Government Buildings in Dublin. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Trudeau redirects here. ... Stephen Harper is the current Prime Minister of Canada. ... This article is about the year. ... Richard Edward Geoffrey Howe, Baron Howe of Aberavon, CH, PC, QC (born 20 December 1926), usually known until 1992 as Sir Geoffrey Howe, is a senior British Conservative politician. ... The office of Deputy Prime Minister is one that has only existed occasionally in the history of the United Kingdom. ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of a cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (born 13 October 1925) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1979 to 1990. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (born 13 October 1925) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1979 to 1990. ... The Prime Minister is in practice the most important political office in the United Kingdom. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Albert Reynolds (born November 3, 1932), was the eighth Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland, serving one term in office from 1992 until 1994. ... The Minister for Finance is the senior minister at the Department of Finance (An Roinn Airgeadais) in the Irish Government. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... Martin Brian Mulroney, PC, CC, GOQ, LLD (born March 20, 1939), was the eighteenth Prime Minister of Canada from September 17, 1984, to June 25, 1993 and was leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada from 1983 to 1993. ... Stephen Harper is the current Prime Minister of Canada. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... Morihiro Hosokawa Morihiro Hosokawa (細川 è­·ç…• Hosokawa Morihiro, b. ... The Prime Minister of Japan (内閣総理大臣 Naikaku sōri daijin) is the usual English-language term used for the head of government of Japan, although the literal translation of the Japanese name for the office is Prime Minister of the Cabinet. ... Tsutomu Hata (羽田 孜 Hata Tsutomu, b. ... The Prime Minister of Japan (内閣総理大臣 Naikaku sōri daijin) is the usual English-language term used for the head of government of Japan, although the literal translation of the Japanese name for the office is Prime Minister of the Cabinet. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir John Major, KG, CH (born 29 March 1943) is an English politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1990 to 1997. ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of a cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative & Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), and the largest in terms of public membership. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Merge with Fife Symington III. John Fife Symington III (born August 12, 1945 in New York City) was the Republican governor of the U.S. state of Arizona from 1991 until his resignation in 1997. ... This is a list of Governors of Arizona: See also Governors of Arizona Territory Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Arizona ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Old Farts by the Sometimes-United Nations. ... Yeltsin redirects here. ... The President of Russia (ru: Президент России) is the highest position within the Government of Russia. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... In politics, Governor of Texas is the title given to the chief executive of the state of Texas. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1969 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... Christine Todd Christie Whitman (born September 26, 1946) is an American Republican politician and author, who served as the 50th Governor of New Jersey and was the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency in the administration of President George W. Bush. ... The Governor of New Jersey is the chief executive of the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... Mikhail Saakashvili briefing the press at UN headquarters Mikhail Saakashvili (Georgian: მიხეილ სააკაშვილი) (born December 21, 1967, in Tbilisi) is a Georgian jurist and politician and the current President of Georgia. ... Thomas Joseph Ridge (born August 26, 1945) is a U.S. political figure who served as a member of the United States House of Representatives (1983–1995), Governor of Pennsylvania (1995 – 2001), Assistant to the President for Homeland Security (2001–2003), and the first United States Secretary of Homeland Security... List of Pennsylvania Governors The office of Pennsylvania governor was created by the states Constitution of 1790. ... The Right Honourable Henry McLeish (born June 15, 1948) is a Scottish politician. ... The term First Minister refers to the leader of a cabinet United Kingdom In the United Kingdom, the term First Minister was once used interchangeably with Prime Minister, as in Winston Churchills famous line: I did not become Her Majestys First Minister so that I might oversee the... Motto: , traditionally rendered in Scots as Wha daur meddle wi me?[1] and in English as No one provokes me with impunity. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Rt Hon. ... The Leader of the House of Commons is a member of the Cabinet of the United Kingdom who is responsible for arranging government business in the House of Commons. ... The title of Foreign Secretary has been traditionally used to refer to the British Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs. ... For other uses of the term, see Iraq war (disambiguation) The 2003 invasion of Iraq (also called the 2nd or 3rd Persian Gulf War) began on March 20, 2003, when forces belonging primarily to the United States and the United Kingdom invaded Iraq without the explicit backing of the United... Clare Short (born 15 February 1946) is a British politician. ... The goal of international development is to alleviate poverty among citizens of developing countries. ... Christine Todd Christie Whitman (born September 26, 1946) is an American Republican politician and author, who served as the 50th Governor of New Jersey and was the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency in the administration of President George W. Bush. ... The Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency is the head of the United States federal governments Environmental Protection Agency, and is thus responsible for enforcing the nations Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, as well as numerous other environmental statutes. ... Eduard Amvrosiyevich Shevardnadze (Georgian: ედუარდ შევარდნაძე, Russian: Эдуа́рд Амвро́сьевич Шевардна́&#1076... The President of Georgia (ge: საქართველოს პრეზიდენტი) is the head of the state of Georgia. ... Mahathir bin Mohamad (born December 20, 1925 in Alor Star, Kedah) was the Prime Minister of Malaysia from July 16, 1981 to 2003. ... The Prime Minister of Malaysia is the indirectly elected head of government of Malaysia. ... Freddy Mbuyamu Ilankir Matungulu was born in Lubembo, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) on 1 April 1955. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Joseph Jacques Jean Chrétien, usually known as Jean Chrétien, PC, QC, BA, LLL, LLD (born January 11, 1934), served as the twentieth Prime Minister of Canada from November 4, 1993 to December 12, 2003. ... Stephen Harper is the current Prime Minister of Canada. ... George Tenet George John Tenet (born January 5, 1953) is Distinguished Professor in the Practice of Diplomacy at Georgetown University and former United States Director of Central Intelligence. ... The Office of Director of Central Intelligence (DCI) was established on January 23rd 1946 with Adm. ... For other uses of the term, see Iraq war (disambiguation) The 2003 invasion of Iraq (also called the 2nd or 3rd Persian Gulf War) began on March 20, 2003, when forces belonging primarily to the United States and the United Kingdom invaded Iraq without the explicit backing of the United... James E. Jim McGreevey (born August 6, 1957) is an American politician from the Democratic Party. ... The Governor of New Jersey is the chief executive of the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Carlos Diego Mesa Gisbert (born August 12, 1953) was the President of Bolivia from October 17, 2003 until his resignation on June 6, 2005. ... The President of Bolivia is the head of state of Bolivia. ... The National Congress (Spanish: Congreso Nacional) is the national legislature of Bolivia, based in the capital of La Paz. ... Thomas Dale Tom DeLay (born April 8, 1947) is a former member of the United States House of Representatives from Sugar Land, Texas, the former House Majority Leader, and a prominent member of the Republican Party. ... The Majority Leader of the United States House of Representatives acts as the leader of the party that has a majority control of the seats in the house (currently at least 218 of the 435 seats). ... What may be Americas most common name crossing all races. ... New FEMA seal The Federal Emergency Management Agency, or FEMA, is an agency of the United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) within the Emergency Preparedness and Response Directorate. ... // Emergency management (or disaster management) is the discipline dealing with and avoiding risks. ... Lowest pressure 902 mbar (hPa; 26. ... Greg Sorbara (born September 4, 1946 in Toronto, Ontario) is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... The finance minister is a cabinet position in a government. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Official languages English Flower White Trillium Tree Eastern White Pine Bird Common Loon Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 106 24 Area Total... The Rt Hon. ... In several countries, Secretary of State is a senior government position. ... The Department for Work and Pensions is a department of the Government of the United Kingdom, created on June 8, 2001 from the merger of the Employment part of the Department for Education and Employment and the Department of Social Security. ... Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the UK Labour Party, and Member of the UK Parliament for the constituency of Sedgefield in North East England. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rt. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party in the United Kingdom. ... Functional group of an alcohol molecule. ... This article needs cleanup. ... His Highness Prince Lavaka Ata Ulukalala, (born 12 July 1959, third son of King Taufaahau Tupou IV), is a former Prime Minister of Tonga. ... List of Prime Ministers of Tonga: HRH Crown Prince Tevita Unga (1876–1880) Shirley W. Baker (1880–1890) Hon. ... Places where monarchies maintain rule appear in blue. ... Politics of Tonga takes place in a framework of a constitutional monarchy, whereby the King has the executive power. ... Porter Goss Porter Johnston Goss (born November 26, 1938) is an American politician and the current Director of the Central Intelligence Agency . ... Director of the Central Intelligence Agency (D/CIA) serves as the head of the Central Intelligence Agency, which is part of the United States Intelligence Community. ... Ayaan Hirsi Ali Ayaan Hirsi Ali ( ), born Ayaan Hirsi Magan 13 November 1969 [1] in Mogadishu, Somalia, is a Dutch feminist and politician, daughter of Hirsi Magan Isse. ... The Tweede Kamer (second chamber) is the lower house of the Staten-Generaal, the parliament in the Netherlands. ... The States-General (Staten-Generaal) is the parliament of the Netherlands. ... The United States Secretary of Defense is the head of the United States Department of Defense, concerned with the armed services and The Secretary is appointed by the President with the approval of the Senate, and is a member of the Cabinet. ... Donald Henry Rumsfeld (born July 9, 1932, Evanston, Illinois) is the 21st and current United States Secretary of Defense. ...

External Links

  • Resigning: The Right Way

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Resignation Letter (971 words)
Your resignation does affect the company, and it may seem to be "company business," but using stationery that the company has paid for in order to tender a resignation is simply poor form.
The choice to resign may or may not be an easy decision, but once you have made this decision, understand the potential consequences.
Upon resignation from your current employer, it may be time to collect letters of recommendation from those in authority who can attest to your skills, achievements and contributions to the organization.
Resignation Letters eBook (354 words)
Your resignation letter is vital to your future success.
Resign from a job in which you are not valued or appreciated
Resign from a job because of a personality clash or conflict of values
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m