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Encyclopedia > Republic of Texas
Republic of Texas

1836 – 1845
Flag Coat of arms
Flag Seal
Capital Washington-on-the-Brazos
Harrisburg
Galveston
Velasco
Columbia
Houston
Austin
Language(s) English (de facto)

Spanish, French, German and Native American languages regionally Republic of Texas logo used in some of their documents and Web sites The Republic of Texas is an independence movement that claims that the annexation of Texas by the United States was illegal and that Texas remains an independent nation under occupation. ... This article is about the country in North America. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mexico_(1823-1864,_1867-1968). ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Image File history File links US_flag_28_stars. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Texas. ... Republic of Texas Seal This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Flag of Texas The flag of Texas is defined by law as follows: The flag is known as the Lone Star Flag (giving Texas its nickname of the Lone Star State). This flag was introduced to the Congress of the Republic of Texas on December 28, 1838, by Senator William... Image File history File links Location_of_Republic_of_Texas. ... Throughout the world there are many cities that were once national capitals but no longer have that status because the country ceased to exist, the capital was moved, or the capital city was renamed. ... Categories: Texas stub | Texas history | Texas state parks ... Harrisburg was founded before 1825 on the east shore of the Buffalo Bayou in present-day Harris County, Texas, on land belonging to John Richardson Harris. ... Galveston redirects here. ... Founded in 1831, Velasco, TX is situated on the east side of the Brazos River in southeast Texas. ... Houston redirects here. ... Austin is the capital of the U.S. state of Texas and the seat of Travis County. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... Native American languages are the indigenous languages of the Americas, spoken by Native Americans from the southern tip of South America to Alaska and Greenland. ...

Government Republic
President1
 - 1836-1838 Sam Houston
 - 1838-1841 Mirabeau B. Lamar
 - 1841-1844 Sam Houston
 - 1844-1845 Anson Jones
Vice President1
 - 1836-1838 Mirabeau B. Lamar
 - 1838-1841 David G. Burnet
 - 1841-1844 Edward Burleson
 - 1844-1845 Kenneth L. Anderson
History
 - Independence March 2, 1836
 - Annexation December 29, 1845
 - Transfer of power February 19, 1846
Area
 - 1840 1,007,935 km² (389,166 sq mi)
Population
 - 1840 est. 70,000 
     Density 0.1 /km²  (0.2 /sq mi)
Currency Republic of Texas Dollar ($)
1Interim period (16 Mar-22 Oct 1836): President: David G. Burnet, Vice President Lorenzo de Zavala

The Republic of Texas was a sovereign state in North America between the United States and Mexico that existed from 1836 to 1845. Formed as a break-away republic from Mexico by the Texas Revolution, the nation claimed borders that encompassed an area that included all of the present U.S. state of Texas, as well as parts of present-day New Mexico, Oklahoma, Kansas, Colorado, and Wyoming based upon the Treaties of Velasco between the newly created Texas republic and Mexico. The eastern boundary with the United States was defined by the Adams-Onís Treaty between the United States and Spain, in 1819. Its southern and western-most boundary with Mexico was under dispute throughout the existence of the Republic, with Texas claiming that the boundary was the Rio Grande, and Mexico claiming the Nueces River as the boundary. This dispute would later become a trigger for the Mexican–American War, after the annexation of Texas. Look up republic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Categories: Texas history | Texas politicians | People from Texas ... Samuel Houston (March 2, 1793–July 26, 1863) was a 19th century American statesman, politician and soldier. ... Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar (August 16, 1798 – December 19, 1859) was the third president of the Republic of Texas, following David G. Burnet (1836 as interim president) and Sam Houston. ... Samuel Houston (March 2, 1793–July 26, 1863) was a 19th century American statesman, politician and soldier. ... Anson Jones (January 20, 1798 – January 9, 1858) was a doctor, businessman, congressman, and the last president of the Republic of Texas, sometimes called the Architect of Annexation. ... The Vice Presidents of the Republic of Texas (1836-1846) were elected by the people of Texas during the period of the Republic of Texas. ... Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar (August 16, 1798 – December 19, 1859) was the third president of the Republic of Texas, following David G. Burnet (1836 as interim president) and Sam Houston. ... David G. Burnet David Gouverneur Burnet (April 14, 1788 - 1870) was the president of the interim government of the Republic of Texas during 1836. ... Edward Burleson (December 15, 1798–December 26, 1851) was a soldier, general, and statesman in the state of Missouri, the Republic of Texas, and later the U.S. state of Texas. ... Kenneth Lewis Anderson (September 11, 1805-July 3, 1845), was a lawyer and a well known ass-hole! He was born in Hillsborough, North Carolina, where he worked as a shoemaker at an early age. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Republic of Texas The Texas Annexation of 1845 was the voluntary annexation of the Republic of Texas by the United States of America as Texas, the 28th state. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... This is a list of the countries of the world sorted by area. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... March 16 is the 75th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (76th in Leap years). ... October 22 is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 70 days remaining. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... David G. Burnet David Gouverneur Burnet (April 14, 1788 - 1870) was the president of the interim government of the Republic of Texas during 1836. ... Lorenzo de Zavala (October 3, 1788 – November 16, 1836) was a 19th-century Mexican politician. ... “Sovereign” redirects here. ... For other uses, see State (disambiguation). ... North American redirects here. ... Combatants Texas Mexico Commanders Stephen F. Austin Sam Houston Antonio López de Santa Anna Martin Perfecto de Cos Strength c. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Largest metro area Albuquerque metropolitan area Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... The Treaties of Velasco were two treaties signed at Velasco, Texas, on 14 May 1836 between Antonio López de Santa Anna of Mexico and the Republic of Texas, in the aftermath of the Battle of San Jacinto (21 April 1836). ... Map showing results of the Adams-Onís Treaty. ... “Río Bravo” redirects here. ... Map of the Nueces River and associated watershed The Nueces River is a river in the U.S. state of Texas, approximately 315 mi (507 km) long. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 25,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 AWOL: 9,200+ 25,000... Republic of Texas The Texas Annexation of 1845 was the voluntary annexation of the Republic of Texas by the United States of America as Texas, the 28th state. ...

Contents

Historical context

Main article: Texas Revolution

Texas was not the only Mexican state to secede from Mexico and declare independence. The Mexican states of Coahuila, Nuevo Leon, and Tamaulipas would also withdraw themselves from Mexico and would form their own short-lived federal republic called the Republic of the Rio Grande with Laredo as the capital, which is in the present-day State of Texas. The Mexican state of Yucatán also seceded and formed the Republic of Yucatán. Several other states also went into open rebellion including San Luis Potosí, Querétaro, Durango, Guanajuato, Michoacán, Jalisco and Zacatecas. However, the context of the Texas rebellion was different from the other Mexican states/provinces attempting to declare independence. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Combatants Texas Mexico Commanders Stephen F. Austin Sam Houston Antonio López de Santa Anna Martin Perfecto de Cos Strength c. ... Coahuila (formal name: Coahuila de Zaragoza) is one of Mexicos 31 component states. ... Other Mexican States Capital Monterrey Other major cities Area 64,924 km² Ranked 13th Population (2000 census) 3,826,240 Ranked 9th Governor (2003-09) José Natividad González Parás (PRI/PVEM) Federal Deputies (11) PRI/PVEM = 10 PAN = 1 Federal Senators PAN = 2 PRI = 1 ISO 3166-2 Postal abbr. ... Tamaulipas is a state in the northeast of Mexico. ... Flag Capital Laredo¹ Language(s) Spanish Government Republic President Jesús de Cárdenas History  - Established January 17, 1840  - Disestablished November 6, 1840 Area 300,000 km² Currency Peso ¹ Later moved to Guerrero, Tamaulipas, and in March 1840 to Victoria, Texas until disestablishment. ... Nickname: Location of Laredo in Texas Coordinates: , Country State County Webb Settled 1755 Government  - Type Mayor / City Manager  - Mayor Raul G. Salinas  - City Manager Carlos R. Villarreal Area  - City 84. ... ... Location within Mexico Country Capital Municipalities 106 Government  - Governor Ivonne Ortega Pacheco PRI  - Federal Deputies PAN: 4 PRI: 1  - Federal Senators Hugo Laviada (PAN) Alfredo Rodríguez (PAN) Cleominio Zoreda (PRI) Area Ranked 20th  - State 38,402 km²  (14,827. ... Flag of the Republic of Yucatán The Republic of Yucatán existed from 1825 until 1846. ... The Mexican state of San Luis Potosí has an area of 62,848 km² (24,266 mi²). It is in the north-central part of the Mexican republic, bordered by the states of Jalisco, Guanajuato, Querétaro, Hidalgo, Veracruz, Tamaulipas, Nuevo León, Coahuila, and Zacatecas. ... Querétaro (formal name: Querétaro Arteaga) is a state in central Mexico. ... Durango (IPA pronunciation ) is one of the constituent states of Mexico. ... Guanajuato is a state in the central highlands of Mexico. ... Location within Mexico Country Capital Municipalities 113 Government  - Governor Lazaro Cardenas Batel (PRD)  - Federal Deputies PRD: 8 PAN: 4  - Federal Senators Jesús Garibay García (PRD) Silvano Aureoles Conejo (PRD) Marko A. Cortés (PAN) Area Ranked 16th  - Total 59,928 km² (23,138. ... Location within Mexico Country Capital Municipalities 126 Largest City Guadalajara Government  - Governor Emilio González Márquez (PAN)  - Federal Deputies PAN: 18 PRI: 1  - Federal Senators Eva Contreras (PAN) Héctor Pérez (PAN) Ramiro Hernández (PRI) Area Ranked 6th  - State 30,534. ... Zacatecas is one of the 31 constituent states of Mexico. ...


The Texas rebellion was conducted mainly by white American immigrants known as anglos, not all of whom were legal immigrants. Mainly because of this fact, Texas was also the only former Mexican state to entertain the idea of joining the United States entirely of its own volition. Texas was also the only seceding Mexican state to retain its independence from Mexico. Look up anglo in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


All the Mexican states that revolted, including Texas, were upset with President Antonio López de Santa Anna over abolishing the Mexican Constitution of 1824, dissolving the Mexican Congress and changing the structure of the Mexican government from a federal one to a centralized one. In fact, Yucatán, in its declaration of independence, expressed its desire to re-accede to the Mexican Union if federalism was re-established. Antonio de Padua María Severino López de Santa Anna y Pérez de Lebrón (February 21, 1794 – June 21, 1876), often known as Santa Anna, was a Mexican political leader who greatly influenced early Mexican and Spanish politics and government, first fighting against the independence from Spain... The 1824 Constitution was the first full constitution adopted by the Mexican Republic. ...


The Texas voters had elected a congress of 14 senators and 29 representatives in September 1836. The Constitution of the Republic of Texas allowed the first president to serve for only two years. It set a three year term for all later presidents. The 1836 Constitution of the Republic of Texas was written between the fall of the Alamo and Sam Houstons stunning victory at San Jacinto. ...


Statehood

A map of Mexico, 1835-1846.
A map of Mexico, 1835-1846.

On February 28, 1845, the U.S. Congress passed a bill that would authorize the United States to annex the Republic of Texas. On March 1, U.S. President John Tyler signed the bill. The legislation set the date for annexation for December 29 of the same year. Faced with imminent American annexation of Texas, Charles Elliot and Alphonse de Saliny, the British and French ministers to Texas, were dispatched to Mexico City by their governments. Meeting together with Mexico's foreign secretary, they signed a "Diplomatic Act" in which Mexico offered to recognize an independent Texas, with boundaries that would be determined with French and British mediation. Texas President Anson Jones forwarded both offers to a specially elected convention meeting at Austin, and the American proposal was accepted with only one dissenting vote. The Mexican proposal was never put to a vote. Following the previous decree of President Jones, the proposal was then put to a national vote. is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Congress in Joint Session. ... Republic of Texas The Texas Annexation of 1845 was the voluntary annexation of the Republic of Texas by the United States of America as Texas, the 28th state. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... John Tyler, Jr. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


On October 13, 1845 a large majority of voters in the Republic approved both the American offer and the proposed constitution that specifically endorsed slavery and the slave trade. This constitution was later accepted by the U.S. Congress, making Texas a U.S. state on the same day annexation took effect, December 29, 1845 (therefore bypassing a territorial phase)[1]. One of the motivations for annexation (besides the primary one of desiring to be united with their perceived Anglo-American ethno-cultural brethren of the United States and their Anglo-American brethren of "the South" regional-cultural) was that the Texas government had incurred huge debts which the United States agreed to assume upon annexation. In 1852, in return for this assumption of debt, a large portion of Texas-claimed territory, now parts of Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, and Wyoming, was ceded to the Federal government. is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Slave redirects here. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Largest metro area Albuquerque metropolitan area Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ...


The annexation resolution has been the topic of some incorrect historical beliefs—one that remains is that the resolution granted Texas the explicit right to secede from the Union. This was a right argued by some to be implicitly held by all states at the time, up until the conclusion of the Civil War. The resolution did include two unique provisions: first, it said that up to four additional states could be created from Texas' territory, with the consent of the State of Texas. The resolution did not include any special exceptions to the provisions of the US Constitution regarding statehood. The right to create these possible new states was not "reserved" for Texas, as is sometimes stated. [2]. Second, Texas did not have to surrender its public lands to the federal government. While Texas did cede all territory outside of its current area to the federal government in 1850, it did not cede any public lands within its current boundaries. This means that generally, the only lands owned by the federal government within Texas have actually been purchased by the government. This also means that the state government has control over oil reserves which were later used to fund the state's public university system. In addition, the state's control over offshore oil reserves in Texas runs out to 3 leagues (10.357 miles, 16.668 km) rather than three miles (4.828 km) as with other states [3]. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


Presidents and vice presidents

Presidents and Vice Presidents of the Republic of Texas with election results
From To President Vice president Presidential
candidates
Pres.
votes
Vice pres.
candidates
V.P.
votes
16 March 1836 22 October 1836 David G. Burnet
(interim)
Lorenzo de Zavala
(interim)
     
22 October 1836 10 December 1838 Sam Houston Mirabeau B. Lamar Sam Houston
Henry Smith
Stephen F. Austin
5119
743
587
Mirabeau B. Lamar  
10 December 1838 13 December 1841 Mirabeau B. Lamar David G. Burnet Mirabeau B. Lamar
Robert Wilson
6995
252
David G. Burnet  
13 December 1841 9 December 1844 Sam Houston Edward Burleson Sam Houston
David G. Burnet
7915
3619
Edward Burleson
Memucan Hunt
6141
4336
9 December 1844 19 February 1846 Anson Jones Kenneth L. Anderson Anson Jones
Edward Burleson
__
__
Kenneth L. Anderson  

is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... David G. Burnet David Gouverneur Burnet (April 14, 1788 - 1870) was the president of the interim government of the Republic of Texas during 1836. ... Lorenzo de Zavala (October 3, 1788 – November 16, 1836) was a 19th-century Mexican politician. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Samuel Houston (March 2, 1793–July 26, 1863) was a 19th century American statesman, politician and soldier. ... Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar (August 16, 1798 – December 19, 1859) was the third president of the Republic of Texas, following David G. Burnet (1836 as interim president) and Sam Houston. ... Henry Smith (1788–1851), first American-born Governor of the Mexican territory of Texas, 1835–1836, and briefly presided over the revolution there. ... Stephen F. Austin Stephen Fuller Austin (November 3, 1793 – December 27, 1836), known as the Father of Texas, led the second and ultimately successful colonization of the region by the United States. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar (August 16, 1798 – December 19, 1859) was the third president of the Republic of Texas, following David G. Burnet (1836 as interim president) and Sam Houston. ... David G. Burnet David Gouverneur Burnet (April 14, 1788 - 1870) was the president of the interim government of the Republic of Texas during 1836. ... Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar (August 16, 1798 – December 19, 1859) was the third president of the Republic of Texas, following David G. Burnet (1836 as interim president) and Sam Houston. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... Samuel Houston (March 2, 1793–July 26, 1863) was a 19th century American statesman, politician and soldier. ... Edward Burleson (December 15, 1798–December 26, 1851) was a soldier, general, and statesman in the state of Missouri, the Republic of Texas, and later the U.S. state of Texas. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Anson Jones (January 20, 1798 – January 9, 1858) was a doctor, businessman, congressman, and the last president of the Republic of Texas, sometimes called the Architect of Annexation. ... Kenneth Lewis Anderson (September 11, 1805-July 3, 1845), was a lawyer and a well known ass-hole! He was born in Hillsborough, North Carolina, where he worked as a shoemaker at an early age. ...

Notable figures of the republic

Stephen F. Austin, known as the "Father of Texas"
Stephen F. Austin, known as the "Father of Texas"

Stephen F. Austin Image taken from http://www. ... Stephen F. Austin Image taken from http://www. ... Stephen F. Austin Stephen Fuller Austin (November 3, 1793 – December 27, 1836), known as the Father of Texas, led the second and ultimately successful colonization of the region by the United States. ... Stephen F. Austin Stephen Fuller Austin (November 3, 1793 – December 27, 1836), known as the Father of Texas, led the second and ultimately successful colonization of the region by the United States. ... General Barnard Elliott Bee Jr. ... James Bowie James Bowie (probably April 10, 1796 - March 6, 1836), aka Jim Bowie, was a nineteenth century pioneer and soldier who took a prominent part in the Texas Revolution and was killed at the Battle of the Alamo. ... Edward Burleson (December 15, 1798–December 26, 1851) was a soldier, general, and statesman in the state of Missouri, the Republic of Texas, and later the U.S. state of Texas. ... David G. Burnet David Gouverneur Burnet (April 14, 1788 - 1870) was the president of the interim government of the Republic of Texas during 1836. ... Colonel David Crockett (August 17, 1786 – March 6, 1836) was a celebrated 19th-century American folk hero, frontiersman, soldier and politician; usually referred to as Davy Crockett and by the popular title King of the Wild Frontier. He represented Tennessee in the U.S. House of Representatives, served in the... Lorenzo de Zavala (October 3, 1788 – November 16, 1836) was a 19th-century Mexican politician. ... James Pinckney Henderson (March 31, 1808 - June 4, 1858) was a United States and Republic of Texas lawyer, politician, soldier, and the first Governor of the State of Texas. ... Samuel Houston (March 2, 1793–July 26, 1863) was a 19th century American statesman, politician and soldier. ... Robert Anderson Irion (July 7, 1804 - March 2, 1861) was a physician, surveyor and Secretary of State of Texas under Sam Houstons first presidency of the Republic of Texas. ... Albert Sidney Johnston Albert Sidney Johnston (February 2, 1803 – April 6, 1862) was a career U.S. Army officer and a Confederate general during the American Civil War. ... Anson Jones (January 20, 1798 – January 9, 1858) was a doctor, businessman, congressman, and the last president of the Republic of Texas, sometimes called the Architect of Annexation. ... Samuel Augustus Maverick (July 23, 1803–September 2, 1870) was a Texas lawyer, politician, and land baron. ... Mary Ann Adams Maverick (March 16, 1818-February 24, 1898), was an early Texas pioneer and author of memoirs which form an important source of information on daily life in and around San Antonio during the Republic of Texas through Civil War periods. ... Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar (August 16, 1798 – December 19, 1859) was the third president of the Republic of Texas, following David G. Burnet (1836 as interim president) and Sam Houston. ... Jose Antonio Navarro (February 27, 1795 - January 13, 1871) was a Texas statesman, revolutionary, and politician. ... James Clinton Neill (1790–1845) was a 19th Century soldier and politician, most noted for his role in the Texas Revolution and the early defense of the Alamo. ... William Beck Ochiltree (October 18, 1811-December 27, 1867), was a pioneer settler, judge, and legislator in Texas. ... Thomas Jefferson Rusk Thomas Jefferson Rusk December 5,1803 - July 29,1857; was a U.S. political figure and a Senator from Texas from 1846 until his suicide. ... Juan Nepomuceno Seguin (1806-1890) was a Tejano hero of the Texas Revolution. ... Dr. Ashbel Smith of Texas Ashbel Smith (August 13, 1805 - January 21, 1886) was a pioneer physician, diplomat and official of the Republic of Texas, Confederate officer and first President of the Board of Regents of the University of Texas. ... William Travis William Barret Travis (August 1 or 9, 1809 – March 6, 1836) was a 19th Century lawyer and soldier. ... Isaac Van Zandt (July 10, 1813 - October 11, 1847) Van Zandt was a national then state leader in Texas. ... Judge Edwin Waller (November 4, 1800-January 3, 1881) was an entrepreneur, signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence, the first mayor of Austin, Texas and the designer of its downtown grid plan. ... William Harris Wharton (1802–1839) was an early colonist and political leader and orator in Texas. ... Judge Robert McAlpin Williamson Robert McAlpin Williamson (1804? – December 22, 1859) was a Republic of Texas Supreme Court Justice, state lawmaker and Texas Ranger. ...

See also

Texas Portal 

Image File history File links This image, including all photography and graphics used in it, was taken and created by myself, Shem Daimwood. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The history of Texas (as part of the United States) began in 1845, but settlement of the region dates back to the end of the Upper Paleolithic Period, around 10,000 BC. Its history has been shaped by being part of six independent countries: Spain, France, Mexico, the Republic of... Flag Capital Laredo¹ Language(s) Spanish Government Republic President Jesús de Cárdenas History  - Established January 17, 1840  - Disestablished November 6, 1840 Area 300,000 km² Currency Peso ¹ Later moved to Guerrero, Tamaulipas, and in March 1840 to Victoria, Texas until disestablishment. ... Location within Mexico Country Capital Municipalities 106 Government  - Governor Ivonne Ortega Pacheco PRI  - Federal Deputies PAN: 4 PRI: 1  - Federal Senators Hugo Laviada (PAN) Alfredo Rodríguez (PAN) Cleominio Zoreda (PRI) Area Ranked 20th  - State 38,402 km²  (14,827. ... A Texas Legation (a type of embassy) was maintained by the Republic of Texas in Washington D.C., London, and Paris from 1836 through 1845. ... The French Legation now serves as a period museum and host to a variety of community events. ... The Texas Navy was the official navy of the Republic of Texas. ...

Notes

References

The Handbook of Texas (ISBN 0-87611-151-7) is a comprehensive encyclopedia of Texas geography, history, and historical persons published jointly by the Texas State Historical Association (TSHA) and the General Libraries at the University of Texas at Austin. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Republic of Texas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1504 words)
The Republic of Texas was a short-lived country in North America between the United States and Mexico that existed from 1836 to 1845.
Its southern and western-most boundary with Mexico was under dispute throughout the lifetime of the Republic, with Texas claiming that the boundary was the Rio Grande and Mexico claiming the Nueces River as the boundary.
Texas claimed the Rio Grande as its southern and western limit, according to the Treaties of Velasco of May 1836.
Republic of Texas (group) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1226 words)
The Republic of Texas is an independence movement that claims that the annexation of Texas by the United States was illegal and that Texas remains an independent nation under occupation.
The Texas capitol still bears the Seal of the Republic on the floor of the Rotunda (Although the seals of Spain, France, Mexico, and the United States, the other nations that Texas has been under, are also there) in a capitol that is taller than the U.S. capitol, and made out of native pink granite.
Texas was made a state by Joint Acts of Congress [1], a move that has no standing between nations under international law, nor under the US or Texas Constitutions at the time.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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