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Encyclopedia > Republic of Taiwan
A flag for the proposed independent Taiwan designed in the mid-1990s.
A flag for the proposed independent Taiwan designed in the mid-1990s.

The Republic of Taiwan (Traditional Chinese: 臺灣共和國; Simplified Chinese: 台湾共和国; Pinyin: Táiwān Gònghégúo; Pe̍h-oē-jī: Tâi-oân Kiōng-hô-kok) is a goal of increasing supporters of Taiwan independence in creating a Taiwanese state unambiguously separate from China, covering (at most) the areas currently controlled by the Republic of China (i.e., Taiwan, Penghu, Quemoy and Matsu Islands). In this sense, sometimes the State of Taiwan (臺灣國; Táiwān Gúo; Tâi-oân Kok) is used to avoid prejudging a republican polity. Image File history File links Flag_of_Taiwan_proposed_1996. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Taiwan_proposed_1996. ... The 1996 proposal for the flag of the Republic of Taiwan, designed by the Rev. ... Traditional Chinese characters are one of two standard character sets of printed contemporary Chinese written language. ... Simplified Chinese characters (Simplified Chinese: 简体字; Traditional Chinese: 簡體字; pinyin: jiÇŽntǐzì; also called 简化字/簡化字, jiÇŽnhuàzì) are one of two standard character sets of printed contemporary Chinese written language. ... Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: 汉语拼音; Traditional Chinese: 漢語拼音; Hanyu Pinyin: , lit. ... Pe̍h-oÄ“-jÄ« (POJ) (Chinese: 白話字; pinyin: ) is an orthography in the Latin alphabet created and introduced to Taiwan by Presbyterian missionaries in the 19th century. ... Taiwan independence (Traditional Chinese: 台灣獨立; Pinyin: , Pe̍h-oÄ“-jÄ«: Tâi-oân To̍k-li̍p; abbreviated to 台獨, Táidú, Tâi-to̍k) is a political movement whose goal is primarily to create an independent and sovereign Republic of Taiwan (out of the lands currently administered by the... National motto: None Official language Mandarin Chinese Capital and largest city Taipei President Chen Shui-bian Vice President Annette Lu Premier Su Tseng-chang Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 138th 35,980 km² 2. ... The Pescadores Islands (Chinese: 澎湖群島; Wade-Giles: Peng-hu; Pinyin: Pénghú, from Portuguese, fishermen) are an archipelago in the Taiwan Strait. ... Quemoy, Kinmen, or Chinmen (金門, pinyin: Jīnmén, POJ: Kim-mn̂g) (pop. ... The Matsu Islands (馬祖列島 or less frequently, 馬祖群島 Pinyin: MÇŽzÇ”) are a minor archipelago of 19 islands and islets in the Taiwan Strait administered as Lienchiang County (連江 Pinyin: Liánjiāng), Fukien Province of the Republic of China (ROC, now based on Taiwan). ...


Historically the creation of a state by this name from Japan-ruled Taiwan was also a goal of the Taiwanese Communist Party of the late 1920s. Unlike current formulations and in line with the thinking of Comintern, such a state would be a proletarian one. The Taiwanese Communist Party (Japanese: 台湾共産党; Traditional Chinese: 台灣共產黨, Taiwanese: Tâi-oân Kiōng-sán-tóng, pinyin: Táiwān Gòngchǎndǎng) was a revolutionary organization active in Japan-ruled Taiwan. ... The 1920s were a decade sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually applied to America. ... The Comintern (from Russian Коммунистический Интернационал (Kommunisticheskiy Internatsional) – Communist International), also known as the Third International, was an independent international Communist organization founded in March 1919 by Vladmir Lenin, Leon Trotsky and the Russian Communist Party (bolshevik), which intended to fight by all available means, including armed force, for the overthrow of... The proletariat (from Latin proles, offspring) is a term used to identify a lower social class; a member of such a class is called a proletarian. ...


In the 1950s a Republic of Taiwan Provisional Government was set up in Japan. Liao Wen-yih was nominally the President. At one time it held quasi-official relations with the newly independent Indonesia. This was possible mainly through the connections between Sukarno and the Provisional Government's Southeast Asian liaison, Chen Chih-hsiung, who had assisted in that colony's independence movement. // Events and trends This map shows two essential global spheres during the Cold War in 1959. ... Sukarno Sukarno (June 6, 1901 – June 21, 1970) was the first President of Indonesia. ... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ...


Since then several scholars have drafted various versions of a constitution, as both political statement or vision and as intellectual exercise. Most of these drafts favor a bicameral parliamentary rather than presidential system. In at least one such draft, seats in the upper house would be divided equally among Taiwan's established ethnicities. In the 1980s the Chinese Nationalist government considered publication of these ideas criminal. In the most dramatic case, it decided to arrest the pro-independence publisher Cheng Nan-jung for publishing a version in his Tang-wai magazine, Liberty Era Weekly (自由時代週刊). Rather than giving himself up, Cheng self-immolated in protest. In government, bicameralism is the practice of having two legislative or parliamentary chambers. ... Insert non-formatted text hereInsert non-formatted text here:This article is about the legislative institution. ... The 1980s decade refers to the years from 1980 to 1989, inclusive. ... The Chinese Nationalist Party (Traditional Chinese: 中國國民黨; Simplified Chinese: 中国国民党; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung-kuo Kuo-min-tang; Tongyong Pinyin: Jhōngguó GuómíndÇŽng), commonly known as the Kuomintang (KMT), is a conservative political party currently active in the Republic of China (ROC) on Taiwan. ... Cheng Nan-jung (Chinese: 鄭南榕; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Cheng Nan-jung; POJ: Tēⁿ Lâm-iông, b. ... The Tangwai (黨外; pinyin: dăng wài; literally, outside the party) movement was a political movement in the Republic of China on Taiwan in the mid-1970s and early 1980s. ... Thích Quảng Đức pictured during his self-immolation. ...


Other campaigns and tactics toward such a State have included soliciting designs from the public for a new national flag (see image) and anthem. More recently the Taiwan Name Rectification Campaign (台灣正名運動) has played an active role. More traditional independentists, however, have criticized name rectification as merely a superficial tactic devoid of the larger vision inherent in the Republic of Taiwan agenda. The tricolour flag of France A flag is a piece of coloured cloth flown from a pole or mast, usually for purposes of signalling or identification. ... An anthem is a choral composition to an English religious text sung in church services. ...


Initially, the Taiwanese Independence movement began as an attempt to overthrow the Republic of China government and replace it with a native Republic of Taiwan government. This was because the ruling party of ROC, the Kuomintang, was at first consisted essentially of mainland Chinese who fled to Taiwan at the end of the civil war in 1949. However, as economic successes overshadowed political concerns, and with the mainland Chinese gradually blending with the Taiwanese locals, the general population became more and more receptive towards the "alien" government. The impressively rapid process of democratization in the late 1980s and early 1990s by and large ended as the Taiwanese localization movement. Combatants Chinese Nationalist Party Chinese Communist Party Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Mao Zedong Strength 3,600,000 circa June 1948 2,800,000 circa June 1948 The Chinese Civil War (Traditional Chinese: 國共内戰; Simplified Chinese: 国共内战; Pinyin: guógòng neìzhàn; literally Nationalist-Communist Civil War) was a conflict in...


While democracy developed within Taiwan, abroad the situation had turned against the Republic of China government. Following its repulsion from the United Nations and severing of diplomatic relationships with the United States, Taiwan became increasingly isolated. In response to this situation, a modern movement for a Republic of Taiwan evolved from the original independence movement. The new movement claims that the current situation of Taiwan being ruled by a government officially named the Republic of China creates confusion internationally with China, and is the principle obstacle in preventing Taiwan from becoming a normal nation, in the sense of participating in international organizations such as the United Nations. Taiwan had been forced to participate in international affairs under such obscure names as "Chinese Taipei" and the "Separate Customs Territory of Taiwan, Penghu, Kimmen, and Matsu". Curiously, South Africa once referred to Taiwan as the "Republic of Taiwan" when Lee Teng-hui visited there as the President of R.O.C..[1] National motto: None Official language Mandarin Chinese Capital and largest city Taipei President Chen Shui-bian Vice President Annette Lu Premier Su Tseng-chang Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 138th 35,980 km² 2. ... Lee Teng-hui (Traditional Chinese: 李登輝; Simplified Chinese: 李登辉; Pinyin: ) born January 15, 1923) is a politician in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The Office of the President of the Republic of China is located in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ...


Opponents of a Republic of Taiwan claim that rejecting the name Republic of China would almost certainly trigger a war with the People's Republic of China and it is un-necessary since Republic of China is already one independent state. Independence advocates counter this in saying that unless international support is achieved Taiwan can never be truly safe from an increasingly militant mainland China, and that foreign powers are hardly likely to pledge support if Taiwan itself does not demonstrate a resolve. National motto: None Official language Mandarin Chinese Capital and largest city Taipei President Chen Shui-bian Vice President Annette Lu Premier Su Tseng-chang Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 138th 35,980 km² 2. ... National motto: None Official language Mandarin Chinese Capital and largest city Taipei President Chen Shui-bian Vice President Annette Lu Premier Su Tseng-chang Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 138th 35,980 km² 2. ...


The creation of a Republic of Taiwan is formally the goal of the Taiwan Solidarity Union and former President Lee Teng-hui. Although the ruling Democratic Progressive Party was originally also an advocate for both the idea of the Republic of Taiwan and Taiwan independence, as it took power the DPP has tried taking a middle line in which a sovereign, independent Taiwan is identified with the Republic of China and its symbols. The Pan-Blue Coalition tends to oppose the idea of a Republic of Taiwan and Taiwan independence, but most support a sovereign Republic of China which is currently separate from the People's Republic of China. The Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU) (Traditional Chinese: 台灣團結聯盟, pinyin: Táiwān túanjíe líanméng) is a political party in Taiwan (Republic of China) which advocates Taiwan independence. ... The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Chinese: 民主進步黨; abbrev. ... Taiwan independence (Traditional Chinese: 台灣獨立; Pinyin: , Pe̍h-oē-jī: Tâi-oân To̍k-li̍p; abbreviated to 台獨, Táidú, Tâi-to̍k) is a political movement whose goal is primarily to create an independent and sovereign Republic of Taiwan (out of the lands currently administered by the... The Pan-Blue Coalition (Traditional Chinese: 泛藍聯盟; Simplified Chinese: 泛蓝联盟; Hanyu Pinyin: ), or Pan-Blue Force (Traditional Chinese: 泛藍軍; Simplified Chinese: 泛蓝军; Hanyu Pinyin: ), is a political coalition in Taiwan, consisting of the Kuomintang (KMT), the People First Party (PFP), and the smaller New Party (CNP). ...


While many believe the formal declaration of a Republic of Taiwan would likely trigger a military response from the People's Republic of China, some among the independentists believe such a response would be ineffective with or without subsequent involvement by the United States.


References

  1. ^ Su Tseng-chang "Speak Out Loudly "We Are Taiwan"." Democratic Progressive Party website. 3 Jun. 1994, 21:22 UTC. 11 Dec. 2005. <http://www.dpp.org.tw/news/common/ProductDetail.asp?prd_id=3068>

Su Tseng-chang (蘇貞昌, pinyin: Sū Zhēnchāng; born July 28, 1947) is a Taiwanese politician of the Democratic Progressive Party. ... The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Chinese: 民主進步黨; abbrev. ...

See also

Flag of the Republic of China Politics of the Republic of China (Taiwan)  
Constitution of the Republic of China - Three Principles of the People
———
President - Vice President - Premier
Executive Yuan | Legislative Yuan | Judicial Yuan | Control Yuan | Examination Yuan
———
Political parties | Elections
Pan-Blue Coalition: Kuomintang | People First Party | New Party
Pan-Green Coalition: Democratic Progressive Party | Taiwan Solidarity Union
———
Political status | Legal status | Taiwan independence | Chinese reunification

  Results from FactBites:
 
Republic of Taiwan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (855 words)
The Republic of Taiwan (Traditional Chinese: 臺灣共和國; Simplified Chinese: 台湾共和国; Pinyin: Táiwān Gònghégúo; Pe̍h-oē-jī: Tâi-oân Kiōng-hô-kok) is a goal of increasing supporters of Taiwan independence in creating a Taiwanese state unambiguously separate from China, covering (at most) the areas currently controlled by the Republic of China (i.e., Taiwan, Penghu, Quemoy and Matsu Islands).
The new movement claims that the current situation of Taiwan being ruled by a government officially named the Republic of China creates confusion internationally with China, and is the principle obstacle in preventing Taiwan from becoming a normal nation, in the sense of participating in international organizations such as the United Nations.
The creation of a Republic of Taiwan is formally the goal of the Taiwan Solidarity Union and former President Lee Teng-hui.
Republic of China - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (8133 words)
The Republic of China was a founding member of the United Nations and held China's seat on the Security Council until 1971, when it was expelled by General Assembly Resolution 2758 and replaced in all UN organs with the government of the People's Republic of China.
Taiwan has become a major investor in Mainland China, Thailand, Indonesia, the Philippines, Malaysia, and Vietnam; although there are no direct transportation links between China and Taiwan, it is estimated at least some 50,000 Taiwanese businesses and 1,000,000 businesspeople and their dependents are established in Mainland China.
Taiwan's mainstream culture is primarily derived from traditional Chinese culture, with significant influences also from Japanese and American cultures, especially in the areas of politics and architecture.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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