FACTOID # 17: Though Rhode Island is the smallest state in total area, it has the longest official name: The State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Reprobation" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Reprobation
Calvinism
John Calvin

Background
Christianity
St. Augustine
The Reformation
... From [1], in the public domain This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... John Calvin (July 10, 1509 – May 27, 1564) was an important French Christian theologian during the Protestant Reformation and is the namesake of the system of Christian theology called Calvinism. ... Christianity is a monotheistic religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as recounted in the New Testament. ... Aurelius Augustinus, Augustine of Hippo, or Saint Augustine (November 13, 354–August 28, 430) was one of the most important figures in the development of Western Christianity. ... The Protestant Reformation was a movement which emerged in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Catholic Church in Western Europe. ...

Distinctives
Calvin's Institutes
Five Solas
Five Points (TULIP)
Regulative principle
Confessions of faith Institutes of the Christian Religion is John Calvins seminal work on Protestant theology. ... The Five Solas are five Latin phrases (or slogans) that emerged during the Protestant Reformation and summarize the Reformers basic beliefs and emphasis in contradistinction to the teaching of the Roman Catholic Church of the day. ... Calvinist theology is in the English-speaking world often identified in the popular mind as the so-called five points of Calvinism, which are a summation of the judgments (or canons) rendered by the Synod of Dordt and which were published in the Quinquarticular Controversy as a point-by-point... The regulative principle of worship is a Christian theological doctrine teaching that the public worship of God should include those and only those elements that are instituted, commanded, or appointed by command or example in the Bible; that God institutes in Scripture everything he requires for worship in the Church... The Reformed churches express their consensus of faith in various creeds. ...

Influences
Theodore Beza
Synod of Dort
Puritan theology
Jonathan Edwards
Princeton theologians
Karl Barth
To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... xxx cciiiox The Synod of Dort was a National Synod held in Dordrecht in 1618/19, by the Dutch Reformed Church, in order to settle a serious controversy in the Dutch churches initiated by the rise of Arminianism. ... The Puritans were members of a group of radical Protestants which developed in England after the Reformation. ... Jonathan Edwards (October 5, 1703- March 22, 1758) was a colonial American Congregational preacher and theologian. ... The Princeton theology is a tradition of conservative, Christian, Reformed and Presbyterian theology at Princeton Seminary, in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Karl Barth on the cover of TIME magazine Karl Barth (May 10, 1886–December 10, 1968) (pronounced Bart) was the most influential Reformed Christian theologian since John Calvin. ...

Churches
Reformed
Presbyterian
Congregationalist
Reformed Baptist
Primitive Baptist
The Reformed churches are a group of Christian Protestant denominations historically related by a similar Zwinglian or Calvinist system of doctrine but organisationally independent. ... Presbyterianism is a form of Protestant Christianity, primarily in the Reformed branch of Christendom, as well as a particular form of church government. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... The name Reformed Baptist does not refer to a distinct denomination but instead is a description of the churchs theological leaning. ... Primitive Baptists are a group of Baptists that have an historical connection to the missionary / anti-missionary controversy that divided Baptists of America in the early part of the 19th century. ...

Peoples
Afrikaner Calvinists
Huguenots
Pilgrims
Puritans
Afrikaner Calvinism is a unique cultural development that combined the Calvinist religion with the political aspirations of the white Afrikaans speaking people of South Africa. ... In the 16th and 17th centuries, the name of Huguenots came to apply to members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France, or historically as the French Calvinists. ... Pilgrims Going to Church by George Henry Boughton (1867) The Pilgrims were a group of English religious separatists who sailed from Europe to North America in the early 17th century, in search of a home where they could freely practice their style of religion. ... The Puritans were originally members of a group of English Protestants seeking purity — further reforms or even separation from the established church — during the Protestant Reformation. ...

Reprobation, in Christian theology, is a corollary to the Calvinist doctrine of unconditional election which derives that since (in this view) some of mankind (the elect) are predestined by God for salvation, the remainder are necessarily pre-ordained to damnation, i.e. reprobation. In Calvinist terminology, the non-elect are often referred to as the reprobate. Similarly, when a sinner is so hardened as to feel no remorse or misgiving of conscience, it is considered as a sign of reprobation. It has been suggested that Christian theological controversy be merged into this article or section. ... ... The Calvinist doctrine of predestination, is the religious doctrine of double predestination, particular to Calvinism. ... // Religious In some forms of Western Christian belief, damnation to hell is the punishment of God for persons with unredeemed sin. ...


The word reprobation is from the Latin reprobatus, to disallow; which in turn is from the prefix re and the verb probare, to prove. Look up prefix in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Contents


Introduction to the Calvinist doctrine of Reprobation

Moreover, Holy Scripture most especially highlights this eternal and undeserved grace of our election and brings it out more clearly for us, in that it further bears witness that not all people have been chosen but that some have not been chosen or have been passed by in God's eternal election-- those, that is, concerning whom God, on the basis of his entirely free, most just, irreproachable, and unchangeable good pleasure, made the following decision: to leave them in the common misery into which, by their own fault, they have plunged themselves; not to grant them saving faith and the grace of conversion; but finally to condemn and eternally punish them (having been left in their own ways and under his just judgment), not only for their unbelief but also for all their other sins, in order to display his justice. And this is the decision of reprobation, which does not at all make God the author of sin (a blasphemous thought!) but rather its fearful, irreproachable, just judge and avenger.
  • As explained by Loraine Boettner, The Reformed Doctrine of Predestination (Eerdmans, 1932). Copyright not renewed -- Public Domain.
The doctrine of absolute Predestination of course logically holds that some are foreordained to death as truly as others are foreordained to life. The very terms “elect” and “election” imply the terms “non-elect” and “reprobation.” When some are chosen out others are left not chosen. The high privileges and glorious destiny of the former are not shared with the latter. This, too, is of God. We believe that from all eternity God has intended to leave some of Adam’s posterity in their sins, and that the decisive factor in the life of each is to be found only in God’s will. As Mozley has said, the whole race after the fall was “one mass of perdition,” and “it pleased God of His sovereign mercy to rescue some and to leave others where they were; to raise some to glory, giving them such grace as necessarily qualified them for it, and abandon the rest, from whom He withheld such grace, to eternal punishment.”
The chief difficulty with the doctrine of Election of course arises in regard to the unsaved; and the Scriptures have given us no extended explanation of their state. Since the mission of Jesus in the world was to save the world rather than to judge it, this side of the matter is less dwelt upon.
In all of the Reformed creeds in which the doctrine of Reprobation is dealt with at all it is treated as an essential part of the doctrine of Predestination. The Westminster Confession, after stating the doctrine of election, adds: “The rest of mankind, God was pleased, according to the inscrutable counsel of His own will, whereby He extendeth or withholdeth mercy as He pleaseth, for the glory of His sovereign power over His creatures, to pass by, and to ordain them to dishonor and wrath for their sin, to the praise of His glorious justice.”

The Canons of Dort, or Canons of Dordrecht, formally titled The Decision of the Synod of Dort on the Five Main Points of Doctrine in Dispute in the Netherlands, is the judgment of the National Synod held in the Dutch city of Dordrecht in 1618 / 19. ... Loraine Boettner (1901-03-07 to 1990-01-03) was an American theologian who wrote books on Predestination, Roman Catholicism, the Trinity, Postmillennialism and Reformed Theology. ... Predestination is a religious idea, under which the relationship between the beginning of things and the destiny of things is discussed. ... The Calvinist doctrine of predestination, is the religious doctrine of double predestination, particular to Calvinism. ... The Westminster Confession of Faith is the chief doctrinal product of the Protestant Westminster Assembly. ...

Further development

The term "double predestination" has been used to refer to the dual concepts of election and reprobation in Reformed theology, for which see under Predestination (Calvinism). This is largely a pejorative term which leads to misconceptions of the Calvinist (or Reformed) doctrine. It has been used as a synonym for a symmetrical view of predestination which sees election and reprobation being worked out in an equally parallel mode of divine operation. The Calvinist doctrine of predestination, is the religious doctrine sometimes referred to as double predestination. The term double predestination is usually used in a disparaging way to refer to the Calvinist belief that God has not only appointed the eternal destiny of some to salvation (Unconditional election), but by necessary...


The distortion of double predestination suggests a parallelism of foreordination and predestination by means of a positive symmetry, which may be called a positive-positive view of predestination. This is, God positively and actively intervenes in the lives of the elect to bring them to salvation; and in the same way God positively and actively intervenes in the life of the reprobate to bring him to sin.


This distortion makes God the author of sin who punishes a person for doing what God monergistically and irresistibly moves man to do. This is not the Reformed view of predestination, but a gross and inexcusable caricature of the doctrine. Such a view may be identified with what is often loosely described as hyper-Calvinism and involves a radical form of supralapsarianism. Such a view of predestination has been virtually universally and monolithically rejected by Reformed thinkers. Hyper-Calvinism is an eccentric theological position that historically arose from within the Calvinist tradition among the early English Particular Baptists in the mid 1700s. ...


The classic position of Reformed theology views predestination as double in that it involves both election and reprobation but not symmetrical with respect to the mode of divine activity. A strict parallelism of operation is denied. Rather predestination is viewed in terms of a positive-negative relationship.


In the Reformed view God from all eternity decrees some to election and positively intervenes in their lives to work regeneration and faith by a monergistic work of grace. To the non-elect God withholds this monergistic work of grace, passing them by and leaving them to themselves. He does not monergistically work sin or unbelief in their lives. Thus, the mode of operation in the lives of the elect is not parallel with that operation in the lives of the reprobate. God works regeneration monergistically but never sin.

Adapted excerpt from Double Predestination by R. C. Sproul

Opposition to the doctrine

Many Christians have been concerned over the idea of reprobation. John Wesley, founder of the Methodist movement, had grave reservations over the Calvinist view, largely due to his commitment to Arminian theology. To Wesley, any concept of reprobation (which he viewed as predestination to damnation) was irreconcilable with the loving nature of God. Wesley strongly rejected the theory of unconditional election because he felt that, "...it necessarily implies unconditional reprobation. Find out any election which does not imply reprobation, and I will gladly agree to it" (Works, Vol. X, p. 211). John Wesley (June 17, 1703–March 2, 1791) was an 18th-century Anglican clergyman and Christian theologian who was an early leader in the Methodist movement. ... The Methodist movement is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... // For the Armenian nationality, see Armenia or the Armenian language. ... The Calvinist doctrine of predestination, is the religious doctrine of double predestination, particular to Calvinism. ...


Wesley preached several sermons and published several essays opposing reprobation. Despite the opposition of fellow Methodist leader George Whitefield, who supported a more Calvinistic approach to theology, Wesley's views have dominated Methodism, which still rejects reprobation. George Whitefield was a minister in the Church of England and one of the leaders of the Methodist movement. ...


Like the concept of original sin, also the concept of reprobation creates numerous problems and logical and conceptual conflicts, besides also being, as Wesley pointed out, irreconcibly contradictory with the concept of God being Love. These problems have been attempted to be averted in many ways: Michelangelos painting of the original sin (the Fall) According to Christian tradition, Original sin describes the condition of sinfulness (lack of holiness) into which human beings are hereditarily born. ...

* God is Love only to His own elect (doctrine of limited atonement). To everyone else he is Holy Wrath. This explanation, popular in Calvinism, is however a post hoc ergo propter hoc claim (see logical fallacies).
* God does not sentence anyone in damnation, but humans themselves decide to reject salvation (single predestination). This explanation, popular in Lutheranism, suffers from the problem of the concept of predestination itself, and God's omniscience: humans cannot decidedly reject salvation, since by default they are totally depraved by nature according to the doctrine of original sin.
* God is not Love at all, but a cosmic bully (Gnosticism). That means God is to be respected only for fear and not for love, or that the God Christianity worships, is actually an evil demiurge, and Christ came to liberate men from the grip of the demiurge. That would imply the whole traditional Christianity is a false doctrine.
* God makes the reprobated people sinners in the beginning and makes them to commit sins in order that he gets to condemn them in Hell. The conclusion is that God is source of the sin and therefore evil. While this claim is valid in Gnosticism, it is contradictory against all Christian denominations.
* God does not oblige on human concepts of justice and fairness. While this can be considered a straw man, if that claim was true, it would mean God is arbitrary and irrational, which is against all Christian denominations' doctrines.
* God is above the human logic. This is an argument from ignorance.
* God has allowed the Fall to happen and has as punishment reprobated everyone, but He saves some people from eternal damnation by Jesus's atonement, and lets the other perish. This is in conflict with John 3:16.
* God punishes justly the whole mankind from its mutiny against God. Given to assumed omnipotence of God, such foolish attempt to mutiny would have been doomed from beginning. But if an omnipotent being punishes mortals from an useless attempt, it would imply God being an utterly paranoid being. While this is in line with Old Testament image of God, most Christian denominations reject this concept.
* Those who are reprobated are not reprobated because of the sins they have committed; they commit sins because they have been reprobated. This was suggested by St. Augustine. Logically that is cum hoc ergo propter hoc fallacy. If this claim was true, the conclusion would be that God wills some people to be evil and commit sins; ergo God is evil and injust, and the reprobated cannot be held responsible of their actions.

Limited atonement (or definite atonement or particular redemption) is a controversial doctrine in Christian theology which is particularly associated with Calvinism and is one of the so-called five points of Calvinism. ... Post hoc ergo propter hoc is Latin for after this, therefore because of this. ... A logical fallacy is an error in logical argument which is independent of the truth of the premises. ... Predestination is a religious idea, under which the relationship between the beginning of things and the destiny of things is discussed. ... Mr wadawits smells Luthers seal Lutheranism is a Christian tradition based upon the main theological insights of Martin Luther. ... Total depravity (also called total inability and total corruption) is a theological doctrine that derives from the Augustinian doctrine of original sin and is advocated in many Protestant confessions of faith and catechisms, including those of Lutheranism,1 Anglicanism and Methodism,2 and especially Calvinism. ... Michelangelos painting of the original sin (the Fall) According to Christian tradition, Original sin describes the condition of sinfulness (lack of holiness) into which human beings are hereditarily born. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... It has been suggested that Nebro be merged into this article or section. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The straw man fallacy is a rhetorical technique (also classified as a logical fallacy) based on misrepresentation of an opponents position. ... The argument from ignorance, also known as argumentum ad ignorantiam or argument by lack of imagination, is a logical fallacy in which it is claimed that that a premise is true only because it has not been proven false, or that a premise is false only because it has not... Paranoid redirects here. ... Correlation implies causation, also known as cum hoc ergo propter hoc (Latin for with this, therefore because of this) and false cause, is a logical fallacy by which two events that occur together are claimed to be cause and effect. ...

See also

Predestination is a religious idea, under which the relationship between the beginning of things and the destiny of things is discussed. ... The Calvinist doctrine of predestination, is the religious doctrine sometimes referred to as double predestination. The term double predestination is usually used in a disparaging way to refer to the Calvinist belief that God has not only appointed the eternal destiny of some to salvation (Unconditional election), but by necessary... The Calvinist doctrine of predestination, is the religious doctrine of double predestination, particular to Calvinism. ...

External links

Pro

Con


  Results from FactBites:
 
Reprobation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1294 words)
Reprobation, in Christian theology, is a corollary to the Calvinist doctrine of unconditional election which derives that since (in this view) some of mankind (the elect) are predestined by God for salvation, the remainder are necessarily pre-ordained to damnation, i.e.
The word reprobation is from the Latin reprobatus, to disallow; which in turn is from the prefix re and the verb probare, to prove.
In all of the Reformed creeds in which the doctrine of Reprobation is dealt with at all it is treated as an essential part of the doctrine of Predestination.
http://www.TraditionalCatholic.net (5734 words)
The counterpart of the predestination of the good is the reprobation of the wicked, or the eternal decree of God to cast all men into hell of whom He foresaw that they would die in the state of sin as his enemies.
This plan of Divine reprobation may be conceived either as absolute and unconditional or as hypothetical and conditional, according as we consider it as dependent on, or independent of, the infallible foreknowledge of sin, the real reason of reprobation.
For the primary intention of the Epistle to the Romans is to insist on the gratuity of the vocation to Christianity and to reject the Jewish presumption that the possession of the Mosaic Law and the carnal descent from Abraham gave to the Jews an essential preference over the heathens.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m