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Encyclopedia > Rent (musical)

This article is about the 1996 Broadway musical. For the 2005 film, see Rent (film); for other uses, see Rent. This article is about the 2005 film. ... Rent can refer to: Renting, a system of payment for the temporary use of something owned by someone else. ...

Rent
Original Broadway Window card
Music Jonathan Larson
Lyrics Jonathan Larson
Book Jonathan Larson
Based upon Giacomo Puccini's Opera
La bohème
Productions 1996 New York Theatre Workshop
1996 Broadway
1996 and 1997 North American tours
1998 West End
1998 Australian
2001 U.K. Tour
2003 U.K. Tour
2003 West End
2007 South African tour
2007 West End
Major productions worldwide
Awards Pulitzer Prize for Drama
Tony Award for Best Musical
Tony Award for Best Book
Tony Award for Best Score
Drama Desk Outstanding Musical
Drama Desk for Outstanding Book

Rent is a rock musical, with music and lyrics by Jonathan Larson[1] inspired by Giacomo Puccini's opera La Bohème. It tells the story of a group of impoverished young artists and musicians struggling to survive and create in New York's Lower East Side in the thriving days of the Bohemian East Village, under the shadow of AIDS. Jonathan Larson (February 4, 1960 – January 25, 1996) was an American Tony Award-winning composer and playwright who lived in New York City and authored musicals, including Rent and Tick, Tick. ... Jonathan Larson (February 4, 1960 – January 25, 1996) was an American Tony Award-winning composer and playwright who lived in New York City and authored musicals, including Rent and Tick, Tick. ... Jonathan Larson (February 4, 1960 – January 25, 1996) was an American Tony Award-winning composer and playwright who lived in New York City and authored musicals, including Rent and Tick, Tick. ... Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini (December 22, 1858 – November 29, 1924) was an Italian composer whose operas, including La bohème, Tosca, and Madama Butterfly, are among the most frequently performed in the standard repertoire. ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see La bohème (disambiguation). ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... The New York Theatre Workshop (NYTW) is a non-profit off-Broadway theater in New York City. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theater combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, England, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland. Along with New Yorks Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is the sixth-largest country in the world, the only country to occupy an entire continent, and the largest in the region of Australasia/Oceania. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, England, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland. Along with New Yorks Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, England, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland. Along with New Yorks Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre... The Pulitzer Prize for Drama was first awarded in 1918. ... // 1940s 1949 Kiss Me, Kate - Music and lyrics by Cole Porter, book by Bella and Samuel Spewack. ... The Tony Award for Best Book of a Musical is the Tony awarded to the librettist(s) of the musical. ... The Tony Award for Best Original Score is the Tony Award given to the composers and lyricists of the best original score written for a musical in that year. ... Created in 1955, the Drama Desk Award was created to recognize Off-Broadway and Off-Off-Broadway shows in addition to Broadway shows. ... Created in 1955, the Drama Desk Award was created to recognize Off-Broadway and Off-Off-Broadway shows in addition to Broadway shows. ... A rock opera or rock musical is a musical production in the form of an opera or a musical in a modern rock and roll style rather than more traditional forms. ... Jonathan Larson (February 4, 1960 – January 25, 1996) was an American Tony Award-winning composer and playwright who lived in New York City and authored musicals, including Rent and Tick, Tick. ... Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini (December 22, 1858 – November 29, 1924) was an Italian composer whose operas, including La bohème, Tosca, and Madama Butterfly, are among the most frequently performed in the standard repertoire. ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see La bohème (disambiguation). ... Categories: Manhattan neighborhoods | Stub ... Looking south from 6th Street down Second Avenue, one of the main thoroughfares through the East Village. ... For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ...


Rent, which won a Tony Award for Best Musical and a Pulitzer Prize, among other awards, was one of the first Broadway musicals to feature homosexual, bisexual characters. In addition, its cast was unusually ethnically diverse. Rent brought controversial topics to a traditionally conservative medium, and it helped to increase the popularity of musical theater amongst the younger generation.[2] "Rent speaks to Generation X the way that the musical Hair spoke to the baby boomers or those who grew up in the 1960s, calling it "a rock opera for our time, a Hair for the 90s."[3] The Antoinette Perry Awards for Excellence in Theatre, more commonly known as the Tony Awards, recognize achievement in live American theatre and are presented by the American Theatre Wing and The Broadway League [1] at an annual ceremony in New York City. ... The Pulitzer Prizes for 1996 were announced on ?, 1996. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Since its coinage, the word homosexuality has acquired multiple meanings. ... Bisexual redirects here. ... For other uses, see Generation X (disambiguation). ... This article is about the musical. ... A baby boom is defined as a period of increased birth rates relative to surrounding generations. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from the beginning of 1960 to the end of 1969. ...


The musical was first seen at the New York Theatre Workshop in 1994. On January 26, 1996, Rent opened in New York City off-broadway before moving to Broadway's Nederlander Theatre on April 29, 1996.[4] Rent has been successful on Broadway, where it had critical acclaim and word-of-mouth popularity. With more than 4,300 performances, it is the seventh-longest-running Broadway show,[5] and the production has grossed over $280 million.[6] It became the second-longest-running musical currently on Broadway, eight years behind The Phantom of the Opera, when Beauty and the Beast ended its run on July 29, 2007. After a 12 year run, the Broadway production of Rent will close on September 7, 2008 (which is a 3-month extension from the originally announced closing date).[7] The New York Theatre Workshop (NYTW) is a non-profit off-Broadway theater in New York City. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Off-Broadway plays or musicals are performed in New York City in smaller theatres than Broadway, but larger than Off-Off-Broadway, productions. ... The Nederlander Theatre is a Broadway theatre. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... The Phantom of the Opera is a musical based on the novel The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Leroux. ... For other uses, see Beauty and the Beast (disambiguation). ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 2005, Rent was also adapted into a motion picture that features most of the original cast members. Certain plot elements were changed slightly, and some of the songs were changed to spoken dialogue. This movie features Rosario Dawson as Mimi and Tracie Thoms as Joanne. The original Mimi, Daphne Rubin-Vega was pregnant at the time they were making the movie. The original Joanne, Fredi Walker was actually offered the role, but thought she was too old to play the part. This article is about the 2005 film. ... Rosario Dawson (born May 9, 1979) is an American actress and singer. ... Tracie Thoms (born August 19, 1975) is an American television, film, and stage actress. ... Press photo of Daphne Rubin-Vega at the tenth anniversary performance of Rent Daphne Rubin-Vega (born November 18, 1969 in Panama City, Panama), also known simply as Daphne, is a dance music singer and actress. ... Fredi Walker is an American actress. ...

Contents

Concept

In 1988, playwright Billy Aronson wanted to create "a musical based on Puccini's La Bohème, in which the luscious splendor of Puccini's world would be replaced with the coarseness and noise of modern New York."[8] In 1989 Jonathan Larson, a 29-year-old composer, began collaborating with Aronson on this project, and the two composed a few songs together, including "Santa Fe", "Rent", and "I Should Tell You". Larson made the suggestion to set the play in the East Village, the artsy avant-garde neighborhood of Manhattan down the street from his Greenwich Village apartment, and also came up with the show's ultimate title (a decision that Aronson was unhappy with, at least until Larson pointed out that "rent" also means torn apart). In 1991, he asked Aronson if he could use Aronson's original concept and make Rent his own. Larson had ambitious expectations for Rent; his ultimate dream was to write a rock opera "to bring musical theater to the MTV generation."[9] Aronson and Larson made an agreement that if the show went to Broadway, Aronson would share in the proceeds.[9] Giacomo Puccini Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini (December 22, 1858 – November 29, 1924) is regarded as one of the great operatic composers of the late 19th and early 20th century. ... For other uses, see La bohème (disambiguation). ... Jonathan Larson (February 4, 1960 – January 25, 1996) was an American Tony Award-winning composer and playwright who lived in New York City and authored musicals, including Rent and Tick, Tick. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... Looking south from 6th Street down Second Avenue, one of the main thoroughfares through the East Village. ... A work similar to Marcel Duchamps Fountain Avant garde (written avant-garde) is a French phrase, one of many French phrases used by English speakers. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... The Washington Square Arch Greenwich Village (IPA pronunciation: ), also called simply the Village, is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City named after Greenwich, London. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Jonathan Larson focused on composing Rent in the early 1990s, waiting tables at the Moondance Diner to support himself. Over the course of seven years, Larson wrote hundreds of songs and made many drastic changes to the show, which in its final incarnation contained 42 songs. In the fall of 1992, Larson approached James Nicola, artistic director of the New York Theatre Workshop, with a tape and copy of Rent's script. When Rent had its first staged reading at the New York Theatre Workshop in March 1993, it became evident that despite its very promising material and moving musical numbers, many structural problems needed to be addressed including its cumbersome length and overly complex plot.[9] The New York Theatre Workshop (NYTW) is a non-profit off-Broadway theater in New York City. ...


As of 1994, the New York Theatre Workshop version of Rent featured songs that never made it to the final version, such as "You'll Get Over It", the predecessor of "Tango: Maureen," featuring Mark and Maureen; "Female to Female A & B," featuring Maureen and Joanne; and "Real Estate", a number where Benny tries to convince Mark to become a real estate agent and drop his photography. This workshop version of Rent starred Anthony Rapp as Mark, Daphne Rubin-Vega as Mimi, and Gilles Chaisson in the same ensemble role he played in the eventual Broadway production. Anthony Dean Rapp (b. ... Press photo of Daphne Rubin-Vega at the tenth anniversary performance of Rent Daphne Rubin-Vega (born November 18, 1969 in Panama City, Panama), also known simply as Daphne, is a dance music singer and actress. ...


Larson continued to work on Rent, gradually reworking its flaws and staging more workshop productions. In 1996, after the musical's final dress rehearsal, Larson enjoyed his first newspaper interview with theater critic Ben Brantley of The New York Times who gave Rent a glowing review, calling it an "exhilarating, landmark rock opera" with a "glittering, inventive score" that "shimmers with hope for the future of the American musical."[10] Larson would not live to see Rent's true success; he died from an undiagnosed aortic aneurysm (believed to have resulted from Marfan syndrome) in the early morning of January 25, 1996, just a few hours after his first interview. Ben Brantley (born October 30, 1954) is the chief theater critic of the New York Times. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... An aortic aneurysm is a general term for any swelling (dilatation or aneurysm) of the aorta, usually representing an underlying weakness in the wall of the aorta at that location. ... Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder of the connective tissue characterized by disproportionately long limbs, long thin fingers, a typically tall stature, and a predisposition to cardiovascular abnormalities, specifically those affecting the heart valves and aorta. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...


The first preview of Rent was canceled and instead, friends and family gathered at the theater where the actors performed a sing-through of Rent in Larson's memory. [9] The show premiered as planned and quickly became the hottest ticket in town, popularity fueled by its genuinely raw material, relevant subject matter, enthusiastic reviews, and the recent death of its composer. The show proved extremely successful during its off-Broadway run, selling out all its shows at the 150-seat New York Theatre Workshop.[4] Due to such overwhelming popularity and a need for a larger theater, Rent moved to Broadway's previously derelict Nederlander Theatre on 41st Street on April 29, 1996.[4] Off-Broadway plays or musicals are performed in New York City in smaller theatres than Broadway, but larger than Off-Off-Broadway, productions. ... The Nederlander Theatre is a Broadway theatre. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...


Sources and inspiration

Larson's inspiration for Rent's content came from several different sources. Many of the characters and plot elements are drawn directly from Giacomo Puccini's opera La bohème, the world premiere of which was in 1896—100 years before Rent's premiere.[8] La bohème was also about the lives of poor young artists. Tuberculosis, the plague of Puccini's opera, is replaced by AIDS in Rent; 1800s Paris is replaced by New York's East Village in the late 1980s. The names and identities of Rent's characters also heavily reflect Puccini's original characters, though they are not all direct adaptations. For example, Joanne in Rent is an amalgamation of both Marcello and Alcindoro in Bohème: Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini (December 22, 1858 – November 29, 1924) was an Italian composer whose operas, including La bohème, Tosca, and Madama Butterfly, are among the most frequently performed in the standard repertoire. ... For other uses, see La bohème (disambiguation). ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or Tuberculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... Looking south from 6th Street down Second Avenue, one of the main thoroughfares through the East Village. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989, also called The Eighties. The decade saw social, economic and general upheaval as wealth, production and western culture migrated to new industrializing economies. ...

Character in La bohème Character in Rent (musical)
Mimi, a seamstress with tuberculosis Mimi Marquez, an exotic dancer with HIV
Rodolfo, a poet Roger Davis, a musician who is HIV positive
Marcello, a painter Mark Cohen, a filmmaker
Musetta, a singer Maureen Johnson, a bisexual performance artist
Schaunard, a musician Angel Dumott Schunard, a cross-dressing percussionist with AIDS
Colline, a philosopher Tom Collins, a homosexual philosophy professor and Anarchist philosopher with AIDS
Alcindoro, a state councilor Joanne Jefferson, a lawyer and a lesbian (Also partially based on Marcello)
Benoit, a landlord Benjamin 'Benny' Coffin III, also a landlord

Other examples of parallels between Larson's and Puccini's work include Larson's song "Light My Candle", which is nearly identical to the first scene between Mimi and Rodolfo in La bohème, "Musetta's Waltz", a melody taken directly from Puccini's opera, and "Goodbye Love", a long, painful piece that reflects a confrontation and parting between characters in both Puccini's and Larson's work.[11] The song "Quando M'en Vo' Soletta" from La bohème is also referenced in the first verse of "Take Me or Leave Me," when Maureen describes the way people stare when she walks in the street. "Musetta's Waltz" is also directly referred to in "Rent." For other uses, see La bohème (disambiguation). ... Anarchist redirects here. ...


Rent is also a somewhat autobiographical work, as Larson incorporated many elements of his life into his show. Larson lived in New York for many years as a starving artist with an uncertain future. He sacrificed a life of stability for his art, and shared many of the same hopes and fears as his characters. Like his characters he endured poor living conditions, and some of these conditions (e.g. illegal wood-burning stove, bathtub in the middle of his kitchen, broken buzzer (his guests had to call from the pay phone across the street and he would throw down the keys, as in "Rent") made their way into the play.[12]


The line, "I'm more man than you'll ever be... and more woman than you'll ever get!," attributed to Angel Dumott Schunard at his funeral, was previously used by the character Hollywood Montrose, who appeared in the films Mannequin (1987) and Mannequin: On the Move (1991). Like Angel, Hollywood is a flamboyantly homosexual man who performs a song and dance number and sometimes wears women's clothing; however, the line was originally in the movie Car Wash (film) (1976) as delivered by Antonio Fargas, a flamboyant homosexual cross dresser. Hollywood Montrose is a fictional character played by Meshach Taylor in the 1987 romantic comedy film Mannequin. ... For the earlier film, see Mannequin (1937 film). ... For other uses, see Car wash (disambiguation). ...


The earliest concepts of the characters differ largely from the finished products. Everyone except Mark had AIDS, including the lesbians; Maureen was a serious, angry character who played off Oedipus in her performance piece instead of Hey Diddle Diddle; Mark was, at one point, a painter instead of a filmmaker; Roger was named Ralph and wrote musical plays; Angel was a jazz philosopher, while Collins was a street performer; Angel and Collins were both originally described as Caucasian; and Benny had a somewhat enlarged role in the story, taking part in songs like "Real Estate", which was later cut.[13] This article is about same-sex desire and sexuality among women. ... For other uses, see Oedipus (disambiguation). ... Hey Diddle Diddle is a nursery rhyme. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ...


Many actual locations and events are included in, or are the inspiration for, elements of the musical. The Life Café, where the "La Vie Boheme" numbers are set, is an actual restaurant in the East Village of New York City.[14][15] The riot at the end of the first act is based on the East Village conflicts of the late 1980s that arose as a result of the city-imposed curfew in Tompkins Square Park.[15] The Life Cafe is a restaurant in the Alphabet City district of New York City. ... Tompkins Square Park is a 10. ...


"Will I?", a song which takes place during a Life Support meeting and expresses the pain and fear of living a life with AIDS, was inspired by a real event. Larson attended a meeting of Friends in Deed, an organization that helps people deal with illness and grief and the other emotions, much like Life Support. After that first time, Larson attended the meetings regularly. The people present at the Life Support meeting in the show, such as Gordon, Ali, and Pam carry the names of Larson's friends who died of AIDS. In the Broadway show, the names of the characters in that particular scene (they introduce themselves) are changed nightly to honor the friends of the cast members who are suffering from/have died of AIDS. [16] During one meeting, a man stood up and said that he was not afraid of dying. He did, however, say that there was one thing he was afraid of: Would he lose his dignity? From this question stemmed the first line in the single stanza of this song.[citation needed] For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ...


The scene and song "Life Support" was also based on Friends in Deed, as well as on Gordon, Pam, and Ali. Originally, the members of Life Support had a solid block of the "forget regret" refrain, and they talked about remembering love. When Jonathan's HIV+ positive friends heard this scene, they told him that having AIDS wasn't so easy to accept: it made you angry and resentful too, and the song didn't match that. Jonathan then added a part where Gordon says that he has a problem with this "credo...my T-cells are low, I regret that news, okay?" Paul, the leader of the meeting, replies, "Okay...but, Gordon, how do you feel today?" Gordon admits that he's feeling the best he's felt all year. Paul asks, "Then why choose fear?" Gordon says, "I'm a New Yorker. Fear's my life."


In her 1998 book Stagestruck: Theater, AIDS, and the Marketing of Gay America, author Sarah Schulman claims that plot elements from Rent were lifted from her 1990 book People in Trouble. In an interview, she said, "The gay part of Rent is basically the plot of my novel." Schulman claims that upon reading her novel, Larson stole her ideas and altered them to make them more consumer-oriented and "gay friendly" in order to turn the best profit.[17] Sarah Miriam Schulman (born July 28, 1958, in New York City) is an American novelist, historian and playwright. ...


Lynn Thomson is a dramaturge who was hired by the New York Theatre Workshop to help rework Jonathan Larson’s musical Rent. She claims that between early May and the end of October of 1995 with Larson as principal author and Thomson as secondary author they co-wrote what they designated as the October 1995 "new version" of Rent. She sued the estate for forty million dollars, seeking 16 percent of royalties from the show. She claimed she had written a significant portion of the lyrics and the libretto.


In August 1998 the case was settled outside of court with the Jonathan Larson estate. The settlement addressed claims of Lynn Thomson regarding credit, royalties and other issues concerning the rewriting of Rent. The terms of the settlement were confidential and not to be disclosed by either side as pursuant to a court order.[18]


Musical Numbers

Act 1
  • Tune Up #1 - Mark and Roger
  • Voice Mail #1 - Mark's Mother
  • Tune Up #2 - Mark, Roger, Collins, and Benny
  • Rent - Company
  • You Okay Honey? - Angel, Collins, and Man on Street
  • Tune Up #3 - Mark and Roger
  • One Song Glory - Roger
  • Light My Candle - Mimi and Roger
  • Voice Mail #2 - Mr. and Mrs. Jefferson
  • Today 4 U - Collins, Roger, Mark, and Angel
  • You'll See - Benny, Mark, Roger, Collins, and Angel
  • Tango: Maureen - Joanne and Mark
  • Life Support - Company
  • Out Tonight - Mimi
  • Another Day - Mimi, Roger, and Company
  • Will I? - Company
  • On The Street - Company
  • Santa Fe - Collins, Angel, and Mark
  • I'll Cover You - Angel and Collins
  • We're Okay - Joanne
  • Christmas Bells - Company
  • Over The Moon - Maureen
  • La Vie Boheme A - Company
  • I Should Tell You - Mimi and Roger
  • La Vie Boheme B - Company
Act 2
  • Seasons Of Love - Company
  • Happy New Year - Mark, Roger, Mimi, Collins, Angel, Maureen, and Joanne
  • Voice Mail #3 - Mark's Mother and Alexi Darling
  • Happy New Year B - Mark, Roger, Mimi, Collins, Angel, Maureen, Joanne, and Benny
  • Take Me Or Leave Me - Maureen and Joanne
  • Seasons Of Love B - Company
  • Without You - Roger and Mimi
  • Voice Mail #4 - Alexi Darling
  • Contact - Company
  • I'll Cover You (Reprise) - Collins and Company
  • Halloween - Mark
  • Goodbye Love - Mark, Roger, Mimi, Collins, Maureen, Joanne, and Benny
  • What You Own - Roger & Mark
  • Voice Mail #5 - Roger's Mother, Mimi's Mother, Mr. Jefferson, and Mark's Mother
  • Finale - Company
  • Your Eyes - Roger
  • Finale B - Company

La Vie Bohème (French: the Bohemian life) is a song in the musical Rent. ... La Vie Bohème (French: the Bohemian life) is a song in the musical Rent. ...

Synopsis

Rent at David Nederlander Theatre in Manhattan, New York City
Rent at David Nederlander Theatre in Manhattan, New York City

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1152x864, 299 KB) Summary Rent in David Nederlander theater in Manhattan Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1152x864, 299 KB) Summary Rent in David Nederlander theater in Manhattan Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...

Act I

Pre-show, the stage is visible to the audience as stagehands, musicians etc. informally move about the stage, preparing for the performance. The show begins as Mark Cohen, a filmmaker and the narrator of the show, begins shooting an unscripted documentary about his friends on Christmas Eve in his loft, turning the camera on his roommate Roger Davis, a songwriter coming off of "half a year of withdrawal" who is picking up his guitar for the first time in a year ("Tune Up #1"). Mark's mother interrupts with a call from the suburbs; she reassures Mark after his performance artist girlfriend Maureen Johnson dumped him for a woman, and says that his family will miss him at home for Christmas ("Voice Mail #1"). Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... Nativity of the Lord redirects here. ... Look up Loft in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Withdrawal, also known as withdrawal syndrome, refers to the characteristic signs and symptoms that appear when a drug that causes physical dependence is regularly used for a long time and then suddenly discontinued or decreased in dosage. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ...


Outside, their friend Tom Collins, a former professor of philosophy, comes to visit them but is jumped by thugs and lies bleeding on the street. Meanwhile, their former friend Benjamin Coffin III (Benny), who married wealthy Alison Grey of Westport (who the rest of the cast refer to disparagingly as "Muffy") and bought Mark and Roger's apartment building and the lot next door, calls and breaks his promise to let them live in the apartment for free. He asks for the rent, which he knows they do not have ("Tune Up #2"). The power to Mark and Roger's apartment shuts off, and they vent their frustrations about being broke artists unable to pay the rent and unable to find inspiration for their art. Meanwhile, Joanne Jefferson, a Harvard-educated lawyer and Maureen's new girlfriend, is working on the sound system for Maureen's performance protesting Benny's plan to develop the lot where many homeless people are currently living, when the sound system blows. Maureen calls Mark to fix the sound system for her against Joanne's wishes, and Mark agrees to help against his better judgment. Mark and Roger decide to rebel against Benny and refuse to pay their rent ("Rent"). For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... Location in Connecticut Coordinates: NECTA Bridgeport-Stamford Region South Western Region Incorporated 1835 Government  - Type Representative town meeting  - First selectman Gordon F. Joseloff  - Town meeting moderator Alice H. Shelton Area  - City 86. ...


Back on the street, Angel Dumount Schunard, a street drummer, spots Collins and comes to his aid; later, they leave the alley together to tend to Collins's wounds ("You Okay Honey"?). They are instantly attracted to one another and quickly discover that they both have AIDS. Meanwhile, Mark asks Roger to come to Maureen's show or dinner that night in an effort to get him out of the house, but Roger declines. Mark reminds Roger to take his AZT, revealing that Roger is HIV positive. He also reveals that Roger's girlfriend, April, committed suicide after finding out that they were both HIV-positive, probably from using contaminated needles ("Tune Up #3"). For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ... Zidovudine (INN) or azidothymidine (AZT) (also called ZDV) is an antiretroviral drug, the first one approved for treatment of HIV. It is also sold under the names Retrovir® and Retrovis®, and as an ingredient in Combivir® and Trizivir®. It is an analog of thymidine. ... The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a frequently mutating retrovirus that attacks the human immune system and which has been shown to cause acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). ... For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ...


After Mark leaves, Roger sings about his desperate need to write one great song to make his mark on the world before he dies of AIDS ("One Song Glory"). He hears a knock on his door and answers it to find Mimi Marquez, a nineteen-year-old junkie and S&M dancer at the Cat Scratch Club. She lives in the apartment downstairs and asks Roger to light a candle for her because her electricity and heat have also been shut off. Mimi also needs the candle to prepare her heroin, which she drops inside the loft and then employs as means to flirt with Roger. There is mutual attraction, but Roger is hesitant as this is his first romantic situation since April's death ("Light My Candle") In Maureen and Joanne's loft, Joanne's parents call about legal and family matters, but she is not home to hear it ("Voice Mail #2"). Flogging demonstration at Folsom Street Fair 2004. ...


Collins finally reaches to Mark and Roger's apartment, bearing booze and groceries. He introduces Angel in full and gorgeous drag, flashing a large stack of money. Mark inquires about the money, and Angel explains that a wealthy woman paid him to play his drums outside her neighbor's apartment to drive the yappy Akita (named Evita) that lived there into jumping off a window ledge ("Today 4 U"). (The audience finds out later that the Akita belonged to Benny's wife.) Benny arrives and tells Mark and Roger that he will guarantee that they can live in the apartment rent-free if they convince Maureen to cancel her protest ("You'll See"). Mark refuses. After Benny leaves, Angel and Collins invite Mark and Roger to attend Life Support, a local HIV support group meeting. Roger declines, but Mark assures them he will come after he fixes Maureen's sound equipment. ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ... ‹ The template below (Mind-body interventions) is being considered for deletion. ...


Mark arrives at the lot and meets Joanne. After initial distrust, they agree that dating Maureen, a self-absorbed flirtatious diva, is like dancing an exasperatingly complicated tango, and the two reluctantly discover that they can be friends ("Tango: Maureen"). After fixing the sound system, Mark joins Collins and Angel at the Life Support meeting, where members share their thoughts and fears about living with AIDS. Gordon, a member of the group who has found out his T-cells are low, voices his hurt and anger at the news and explains that while afraid of what lies ahead, he tries to accept it "because reason says/I should have died/three years ago..." Roger echoes this last refrain.("Life Support"). Meanwhile, Mimi returns to Roger's apartment and playfully asks him to take her out ("Out Tonight"). For other senses of this word, see diva (disambiguation). ... A couple dances Argentine Tango. ... T cells are a subset of lymphocytes that play a large role in the immune response. ...


Roger is terrified of caring about Mimi because she is a heroin addict, which led to Roger's own HIV infection, and because he knows he does not have long to live and does not want Mimi to feel the loss he felt for April. Roger yells at her to leave. Mimi gently urges Roger to forget past regrets, saying that there is "no day but today." However, he refuses to listen and drives her out of his apartment ("Another Day"). At the Life Support meeting, Steve, another member questions the coming end as everyone sings of the fear and uncertantiy of his or her life. ("Will I?"). Roger changes his mind and leaves the loft at last.


After leaving Life Support, Mark saves a homeless bag lady from being beaten by a police officer, only to be reprimanded by her for being a pretentious artist ("On The Street"). As they walk away contemplating her response, Collins fantasizes about living in an idealized Santa Fe, where the climate and the people are much warmer ("Santa Fe"). Mark leaves, promising that he will try to convince Roger to go to Maureen's show. Collins and Angel realize that they've fallen in love and officially become a couple ("I'll Cover You"). Meanwhile, Joanne juggling phones, is getting ready for the protest and her upcoming legal case ("We're Okay"). Mark yells at Roger for not giving Mimi a chance at love. On the street, Roger apologizes to Mimi and invites her to the protest and the dinner party afterwards, and she accepts. Meanwhile, Maureen, Joanne, the riot police and Benny prepare for the protest in different ways, and Angel buys Collins a new coat to replace the one the muggers stole from him ("Christmas Bells"). Nickname: Location in Santa Fe County, New Mexico Coordinates: , Country State County Santa Fe Founded ca. ...


Everyone attends Maureen's performance, a thinly veiled criticism of Benny through a metaphor involving a cow and a bulldog, riffing on "Hey Diddle Diddle" ("Over The Moon"). The protest ends in a riot that Mark catches on camera. A local news station purchases his footage. Afterwards, the group goes to the Life Cafe, where they spot Benny and his investor, Mr. Grey, who is also Benny's father-in-law. Benny criticizes the protest and the group's Bohemian lifestyle, declaring that Bohemia is dead. Mark gets up and delivers a mock eulogy for Bohemia, and all the bohemians in the café rise up and celebrate La Vie Boheme, ("the bohemian life"), joyfully paying tribute to everything they love about life while dancing on the tables, driving Benny and his investor from the café. The Life Cafe is a restaurant in the Alphabet City district of New York City. ... For other uses, see Bohemian (disambiguation). ... Look up eulogy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... La Vie Bohème (French: the Bohemian life) is a song in the musical Rent. ...


It is revealed that Benny and Mimi used to be in a relationship that ended three months earlier when Benny confronts Mimi about Roger. Joanne catches Maureen kissing another woman and angrily stalks off ("La Vie Boheme"). Mimi's beeper goes off reminding her to take her AZT, and Roger and Mimi discover that they are both HIV-positive. They talk openly for the first time and despite their uncertainties and fears, they finally take the plunge into starting a relationship ('I Should Tell You"). Joanne comes back to break up with Maureen, and informs everyone that the homeless are refusing to leave the lot despite police presence. This news sparks a new round of joyful revelry ("La Vie Boheme B"). The act closes as Mimi and Roger share a small kiss. La Vie Boheme B (French: the bohemian life) is a song in the musical RENT. This is the second part of this song (the first is La Vie Boheme)and it ends the first act of the show. ...


Act II

Cast of Rent performing "Seasons of Love" at Broadway on Broadway, 2005.
Cast of Rent performing "Seasons of Love" at Broadway on Broadway, 2005.

The act opens with an entr'acte in which the cast sings about the various ways one can measure a year, ultimately deciding to measure in love ("Seasons of Love"). Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1762x438, 599 KB) Summary I took this picture at Broadway on Broadway, 2005. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1762x438, 599 KB) Summary I took this picture at Broadway on Broadway, 2005. ...


Mimi, Mark, and Roger's building has been padlocked because of Maureen's protest. On New Year's Eve, Roger, Mark and Mimi try to break into their building. Mimi optimistically makes a New Year's resolution to give up her heroin addiction and go back to school. Joanne and Maureen decide to try for a relationship again, and all the couples are happy together. Collins and Angel make an appearance as James Bond and Pussy Galore, and Angel brings a blowtorch. For other articles with similar names, see New Year (disambiguation). ... A New Years Resolution is a commitment that an individual makes to a project or a habit, often a lifestyle change that is generally interpreted as advantageous. ... For other uses, see Heroin (disambiguation). ... This article is about the spy series. ... Pussy Galore is a character from the Goldfinger novel and feature film. ...


Mark, Maureen, and Joanne scale the fire escape and break in through a window, while the others use Angel's blowtorch to break down the door ("Happy New Year A"). They discover that the power has returned in their absence and that Alexi Darling of Buzzline, a tabloid newsmagazine, had seen Mark's footage of the riot and has left a message on Mark's answering machine offering him a contract ("Voice Mail #3"). All the friends enter the apartment celebrating the new year, but Benny shows up, prematurely ending the festivities. Benny asks Mark to film him offering a rent-free contract, but the friends accuse him of trying to get good press. Incensed, Benny maliciously implies that Mimi showed up at his place and "convinced" him to rethink the financial situation, while Mimi denies everything. Roger becomes extremely upset and renounces their relationship, but Angel convinces everyone to calm down and make a New Year's resolution to always remain friends. Roger and Mimi make up, but Mimi is still upset and sneaks off to buy heroin ("Happy New Year B"). This article is about the newspaper size. ... A newsmagazine, sometimes called news magazine, is a usually weekly magazine featuring articles on current events. ...


On Valentine's Day, Maureen and Joanne have a fight while rehearsing for a new protest, and break up again ("Take Me or Leave Me"). In the spring as both relationships and Angel's health deteriorates, the cast poses the question, "How do you measure a last year on earth?" ("Seasons of Love B"). Mimi comes home late again after secretly buying drugs, causing Roger to believe that she is cheating on him with Benny. Roger jealously storms out, and Mimi sings about life without him. All the while, Collins continues tries to nurse Angel back to health. All the couples reconcile because they realize the emptiness in living alone ("Without You"). Alexi keeps calling Mark to try to convince him to join Buzzline ("Voice Mail #4").


The scene turns to a bed containing all the couples, with the implication that they are all having sex (Mark is absent), which quickly transforms into a frustrating and awkward situation for all of them. However, for Collins and Angel, the bed is both a place for sexual contact and a place where Angel, embodied in a release of sexual and bodily energy, dies from AIDS ("Contact"). Collins is heartbroken, and at Angel's funeral, he declares his undying love. The others take part in the funeral, mourning the loss of such a close friend ("I'll Cover You (Reprise)"). Mark expresses his fear of being the only one left surviving when the rest of his friends die of AIDS, and finally accepts Alexi's job offer ("Halloween"). Everyone leaves the funeral, and Roger reveals that he is leaving New York for Santa Fe, which sparks an argument about commitment between both couples, with Mark and Benny desperately trying to restore calm. Collins arrives and admonishes the entire group, quietly shaming them for making such a scene at the funeral of a man who only believed in love. It has been suggested that Duration of sexual intercourse be merged into this article or section. ... Nickname: Location in Santa Fe County, New Mexico Coordinates: , Country State County Santa Fe Founded ca. ...


Maureen and Joanne make up again, but Mimi leaves with Benny after Roger shuns her. When Roger prepares to leave, he gets into a fight with Mark. Roger accuses Mark of living a fake life by hiding in his work, and Mark accuses Roger of running away because he is afraid of watching Mimi die. When Roger leaves the apartment, he is horrified to find a clearly weak Mimi, who had come to say goodbye, standing outside the door. He realizes that she overheard everything. She is visibly shaken and bids Roger a tearful goodbye, as Roger runs away determined to find his song. Finding a distraught Mimi, Mark suggests that she enroll at a rehabilitation clinic, which Benny offers to pay for ("Goodbye Love").Collins is unable to pay for Angel's funeral, and Benny foots the bill for that, too, revealing that he knew that Angel had killed his dog, whom he never liked. He, Collins and Mark reconcile.


In Santa Fe, Roger cannot forget Mimi; back in New York, Mark, working for Buzzline, remembers Angel and his overall joy in life and love. They both suddenly have an artistic epiphany, as Roger finally finds his song in Mimi and Mark finds his film in Angel's memory. Roger returns to New York just in time for Christmas and Mark quits Buzzline to work on his own film. ("What You Own") On Christmas Eve, everyone's parents call to try to find his or her children but nobody is home ("Voice Mail #5"). Mark is preparing to show his finished documentary. Roger is ecstatic about finding his song. No one, however, has been able to find Mimi. Collins arrives with money, revealing that he rigged a nearby ATM to dispense free cash with the PIN "A-N-G-E-L". Suddenly, Maureen and Joanne arrive, calling for help. They bring in Mimi, who is sick and delirious from living on the streets in the dead of winter. Roger is frantic and Collins calls 9-1-1 but is put on hold. Mimi and Roger finally clear up their misunderstandings, and Mimi tells Roger that she loves him ("Finale A"). Knowing that time is short, Roger asks Mimi to listen to the song that he had been working on all year, a song inspired by her ("Your Eyes'). This article is about a feeling, for other meanings see epiphany (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... Cash machine redirects here. ... This article is about the emergency telephone number. ...


As he finishes his song to Mimi and finally tells her that he has always loved her, they kiss. Mimi goes limp and Roger, in tears, believes her to be dead. Suddenly Mimi revives, saying that she was heading into a warm, white light and that Angel was there, telling her to turn back and listen to Roger's song. She and Roger embrace, and everyone is touched and relieved as they are reminded of the fleetingness of life and reaffirm that there is "no day but today" ("Finale B"). At the same time, Mark screens his documentary on the walls of the Theater.[19]


Characters

  • Mark Cohen, a struggling documentary filmmaker, the narrator of the show and the person who creates a final movie which details his friends' lives and journeys throughout the story. Ex-Boyfriend of Maureen. Roommate of Roger.
  • Roger Davis, an HIV infected musician who is recovering from heroin addiction; his girlfriend April killed herself after finding out she had HIV; Mark's roommate and Mimi's love interest.
  • Tom Collins, a gay philosophy teacher and anarchist with AIDS; friend and former roommate of Roger, Mark, Benny, and Maureen; Angel's lover.
  • Mimi Marquez, an HIV-positive exotic dancer and heroin junkie; Roger's love interest who used to be involved with "Benny" Coffin III.
  • Angel Dumott Schunard, a gay drag queen street percussionist/musician with AIDS; Collins' lover.
  • Joanne Jefferson, an Ivy League-educated lawyer; Maureen's lover; lesbian.
  • Maureen Johnson, a bisexual performance artist; Joanne's girlfriend; Mark's ex-girlfriend.
  • Benjamin "Benny" Coffin III, landlord of Mark, Roger and Mimi's apartment building; ex-roommate of Mark, Collins, Roger, and Maureen. Now married to Alison Grey of the Westport Greys and thus considered a yuppie sell-out.

The Narrator is the entity within a story that tells the story to the reader. ... Species Human immunodeficiency virus 1 Human immunodeficiency virus 2 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, a condition in humans in which the immune system begins to fail, leading to life-threatening opportunistic infections). ... For other uses, see Heroin (disambiguation). ... This article is about the concept of addiction. ... GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For university teachers, see professor. ... Anarchist redirects here. ... GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... Drag artist Lypsinka. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... In human sexuality, bisexuality describes a man or woman having a sexual orientation to persons of either or both sexes (a man or woman who sexually likes both sexes; people who are sexually and/or romantically attracted to both males and females). ... This article is about Performance art. ... A landlord, is the owner of a house, apartment, condominium, or real estate which is rented or leased to an individual or business, who is called the tenant. ... Yuppies (young urban professionals, young up and coming professionals or less commonly young upwardly-mobile professionals[1]) is a market segment whose consumers are characterized as self-reliant, financially secure individualists. ...

Productions

North American tours

There have been three very successful United States national tours. The "Angel Tour" and the "Benny Tour" launched soon after the Broadway production opened. More recently, the non-Equity tour started its run. There was also a Canadian tour (often referred to as the "Collins Tour"). The Actors Equity Association, commonly referred to as Actors Equity, is an American labor union formed in New York City in 1913 by 112 actors working in the professional theatre. ...


The Angel tour began in November 1996 in Boston. It then went on to St. Paul, Minnesota, Washington, DC, Chicago (where Anthony Rapp temporarily joined the cast), Detroit, Cleveland, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Salt Lake City, Denver, and Los Angeles (where Daphne Rubin Vega temporarily joined the cast), before finishing in San Francisco in September, 1999. Cast members appearing in the Angel Cast included Simone, Manley Pope, Mark Lull, Keely Snelson, Evan Fifer, Christian Anderson, Carrie Hamilton, Amy Spanger, Cheri Smith, Julie Danao, Sylvia MacCalla, Kamilah Martin, Dan Robbins, Luther Creek, Kristoffer Cusick, Tony Vincent, and Shaun Earl. Carrie Hamilton (December 5, 1963 in New York City - January 20, 2002, in Los Angeles) was an American actress, singer, and playwright. ...


The Benny Tour began in May 1997 in Los Angeles. It originally featured Neil Patrick Harris in the role of Mark Cohen. The Benny tour generally played shorter stops and often smaller markets than the Angel Tour did. Cast members appearing in the Benny Cast included Curtis Cregan, Keely Snelson, d'Monroe, Mark Lull, and Wilson Cruz. Neil Patrick Harris (born June 15, 1973) is an Emmy-nominated American actor. ... Curtis Cregan is an American actor. ... DMonroe is an American musical theatre actor who has also appeared in a number of television productions. ... Wilson Cruz (born December 27, 1973, in Brooklyn, New York, USA) is an openly gay Puerto Rican-American actor. ...

Production history

In addition to the Broadway production and North American tours, Rent has been performed around the world. Countries that have had productions include Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Belgium, The Netherlands, Ireland, United Kingdom, France, Austria, Germany, Switzerland, Portugal, Spain, Italy, Estonia, Hungary, Poland, Slovakia, Greece, Canada, United States of America, Mexico, Panama, Bolivia, Brazil, Argentina, Russia, Israel, China, Hong Kong, South Korea, Taiwan, Japan, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, South Africa, Australia, Guam, and New Zealand. North American redirects here. ... Motto: Je Maintiendrai (Dutch: Ik zal handhaven, English: I Shall Uphold) Anthem: Wilhelmus van Nassouwe Capital Amsterdam1 Largest city Amsterdam Official language(s) Dutch2 Government Parliamentary democracy Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Beatrix  - Prime minister Jan Peter Balkenende Independence Eighty Years War   - Declared July 26, 1581   - Recognised January 30, 1648 (by Spain... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized...


It has been performed in twenty-two languages: Danish, Finnish, Icelandic, Norwegian, Swedish, Dutch, English, French, German, Portuguese, Spanish, Italian, Estonian, Hungarian, Polish, Slovak, Greek, Russian, Hebrew, Mandarin Chinese, Korean, and Japanese.

Tenth Anniversary production

On April 24, 2006, the original Broadway cast reunited for a one-night-only performance of the musical at the Nederlander Theatre. This performance raised over $2,000,000 for the Jonathan Larson Performing Arts Foundation, Friends in Deed, and the New York Theatre Workshop. Former cast members were invited back and many from prior tours and former Broadway cast members appeared, performing an alternate version of "Seasons of Love" as the finale of the performance.[20] is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Jonathan Larson Performing Arts Foundation is a foundation started by the family and friends of Jonathan Larson, composer of the musical Rent. ... The New York Theatre Workshop (NYTW) is a non-profit off-Broadway theater in New York City. ...

Rent - School Edition

In 2007, a modified edition of Rent was made available to five non-professional acting groups in the United States for production. Billed as Rent - School Edition, this version omits the song "Contact", and eliminates the coarse language of the original.[21]


There were four test shows of the Rent- School Edition. Including test shows, Shorewood High School in Shorewood, WI became the first high school to perform the musical in 2006. However, West Aurora High School in Aurora, Illinois became the first high school to officially buy the rights to the performance in late 2007.[22] West Aurora High School, or WAHS, is a public four-year high school located in Aurora, Illinois, a western suburb of Chicago, Illinois, in the United States. ... The Paramount Theatre under renovation, downtown Aurora. ...

Rent Remixed

On October 16, 2007, the production Rent Remixed opened at the Duke of York's Theatre in London's West End. Kylie’s creative director, William Baker, put the show together. This production has been modernized for 2007. The cast includes Oliver Thornton (Mark), Luke Evans (Roger), Craig Stien (Benny), Leon Lopez (Collins), Francesca Jackson (Joanne), Jay Webb (Angel), Siobhán Donaghy (Mimi), Denise Van Outen (Maureen) and lydia Perrow. The ensemble consists of Ruth Augilera, Lewis Griffiths, C.J. Johnson, Antony Luperi, Earl Perkins, Jamie Sampson, and Philippa Stefani. However, following a throat infection[23], Van Outen was forced to cancel several performances, and the role of Maureen was played by C.J. Johnson. From December 24, 2007, the role of Maureen will be played by former EastEnders actress Jessie Wallace.[24] The production has received generally bad reviews. The Guardian gave it 1/5 stars "They call this "Rent Remixed". I'd dub it "Rent Reduced", in that the late Jonathan Larson's reworking of La Bohème, while never a great musical, has been turned into a grisly, synthetic, pseudo pop concert with no particular roots or identity. " [25] Although initially booking until April 5, 2008, the production closed on February 2, 2008. A European tour may follow.[26] is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Duke of Yorks Theatre in London, UK, opened on 10 September 1892 with Wedding Eve, was built for Frank Wyatt and his wife, Violet Melnotte. ... Siobhán Donaghy (born 14 June 1984 in London), is an English singer songwriter. ... Denise van Outen (born May 27, 1974, Basildon, Essex, England, UK) is a British television hostess and stage actress. ... Albert Square in the 1980s. ... Jessie Wallace (born Karen Wallace on September 25, 1971) is a British actress who trained at the The Poor School. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...

The cast of the 2008 Australian production
Australian Cast

The Australian cast featured Justin Smith, as Mark, Rodger Corser as Roger, Opell Ross as Angel and Australian ARIA Award winner Christine Anu as Mimi. The tour wrapped in Melbourne in 1999. Justin Smith is an Australian actor, best known for his role as barrister Josh Bornstein in the ABC mini-series Bastard Boys. ... Rodger Corser played photographer Adam Logan in Australian television series Last Man Standing. ... Christine Anu (born 1970) is an Australian pop singer from Cairns, Queensland. ...

Australian Cast 2007

The Australian cast of the Perth production featured Anthony Callea, as Mark, Tim Campbell, as Roger, Jaya Henderson as Mimi, Courtney Act as Angel, Shai Yammanne as Tom Collins, Sharon Wisniewski as Joanne, Andrew Conaghan as Benny and Nikki Webster as Maureen. Anthony Cosmo Callea (born December 13, 1982 in Melbourne to Italian parents) is an ARIA Award winning Australian singer and was the runner-up in the 2004 season of Australian Idol. ... Tim Campbell may refer to: Tim Campbell (born 1975), Australian actor, plays the role of Dan Baker in Home and Away. ... Courtney Acts Idol publicity shot. ... Nikki Webster (born April 30, 1987) is an Australian pop performer. ...

Australian Cast 2008

A new production is due to open in Sydney for a limited season. The cast includes Penny Horsfield as Maureen, Lloyd Harvey as Collins, Brad Dylan as Angel and pop/soul sensation Carmen Smith as Mimi. www.rentthemusical.com.au

2009 National Tour

Rent stars Adam Pascal and Anthony Rapp will reprise their original Broadway (and film) roles in a 2009 national tour of the Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winning Jonathan Larson musical, which will launch in January 2009. Also starring in the production will be Mark Lull and Evan Fifer. After having a reprise performance in the summer of 2007 they signed in to be part of the great 2009 tour.


Cultural impact

Rent has gathered a huge following of fans that refer to themselves as "RENT-heads." The name originally referred to people who would camp out at the Nederlander Theater for hours in advance for the discounted $20 rush tickets to each show, though it generally refers to anyone who has an obsession with/love of the show. These rush tickets are discounted tickets to seats in the first two rows of the theater reserved for sale by lottery two hours prior to each show.[27] Many other Broadway shows have followed Rent's example and now also offer cheaper tickets in efforts to make Broadway theater accessible to more people who would otherwise be unable to afford the ticket prices. A RENT-head or RENThead is someone who is obsessed with or at least a very big fan of the musical RENT (capitalization is optional). ...


The song "Seasons of Love" became a somewhat successful pop song and is often performed on its own.


Pop culture references

References to Rent or parodies of it have been included in a wide variety of media. On television, series such as The Simpsons,[28] Family Guy,[29] Friends,[30] Will and Grace,[31] Scrubs,[32] and Felicity[33] have incorporated references to the show. Simpsons redirects here. ... Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ... This article is about the television show. ... Will & Grace is an American television situation comedy focusing on Will Truman, a gay attorney and his best friend Grace Adler, a straight Jewish woman who runs her own interior design firm. ... For other uses see Scrubs Scrubs is an Emmy and Peabody Award-winning American situation comedy/comedy-drama that premiered on October 2, 2001, on NBC. It was created by Bill Lawrence and is produced by ABC Studios (previously known as Touchstone Television). ... Felicity is a Golden Globe-winning American primetime television drama produced by Touchstone Television and Imagine Television for The WB network. ...


Some examples in film are Team America: World Police, which has a character having a lead in Lease, a Broadway musical parody of Rent (where the performers sing the finale song "Everyone has AIDS!");[34] a character in Hedwig and the Angry Inch wears a Rent t-shirt and speaks of his aspiration to play the role of Angel.[35] Recent movie Knocked Up refers to Rent in the scene where the child in the car wants to listen to the soundtrack on the car stereo. The film The 40-Year-Old Virgin features a scene in which Dave jokes that Cal must be gay because he has seen Rent three times. Team America: World Police Team America: World Police is a 2004 movie by Trey Parker and Matt Stone, the creators of the Comedy Central television program South Park. ... Knocked Up is an American romantic comedy film written, co-produced, and directed by Judd Apatow was released in 2007. ... The 40-Year-Old Virgin is a 2005 comedy film, written by Judd Apatow and co-written by Steve Carell, though it featured a great deal of improvised dialogue. ...


The off-Broadway musical Forbidden Broadway Strikes Back includes parodies of Rent songs such as "Rant" (Rent), "Ouch! They're Tight" (Out Tonight), "Season of Hype" (Seasons of Love), "Too Gay 4 U (Too Het'ro 4 Me)" (Today 4 U), "Pretty Voices Singing" (Christmas Bells) and "This Ain't Boheme" (La Vie Boheme).[36] Forbidden Broadway Strikes Back! is a version of Forbidden Broadway created by Gerard Alessandrini. ...


During an episode of Family Guy, Lois is directing a production of The King and I. Peter doesn't want the production to turn out bad and states that if wanted a bad production, they should have done RENT.


Casts

Original Broadway cast

The original Broadway cast of Rent was as follows:[37]

Notable replacements

Rent has often included cast members that are well-known actors, actresses, and pop performers—but not for performing in stage musicals. Some of these, and other notable cast replacements, are listed here.[citation needed] Anthony Dean Rapp (b. ... Adam Pascal Adam Pascal (born October 25, 1970) is an American actor, best known for being the first to play the role of Roger Davis in the Jonathan Larson musical Rent on Broadway. ... Press photo of Daphne Rubin-Vega at the tenth anniversary performance of Rent Daphne Rubin-Vega (born November 18, 1969 in Panama City, Panama), also known simply as Daphne, is a dance music singer and actress. ... Jesse Lamont Martin (born Jesse Lamont Watkins, January 18, 1969) is an American theatre, film, and television actor, best known for his roles as Tom Collins in Rent and as Detective Ed Green in the NBC series Law & Order. ... Wilson Jermaine Heredia is an American actor of Dominican descent, best known for winning the 1996 Tony Award for Best Featured Actor in a Musical for his portrayal of Angel Dumott Schunard in the musical Rent. ... Idina Menzel (born Idina Kim Mentzel on May 30, 1971 in New York City) is a Tony Award-winning American actress, singer and songwriter who is best known for her performances in Wicked and Rent. ... Fredi Walker is an American actress. ... Taye Diggs (born Scott Diggs on January 2, 1971 in Rochester, New York[1]) is an American theatre, film and television actor. ...

Joseph Anthony Fatone, Jr. ... Neil Patrick Harris (born June 15, 1973) is an Emmy-nominated American actor. ... Adam Rickett is well known British pop singer (more an TV series actor now) who has a career of singing, acting and modeling. ... Norbert Leo Butz is an American stage actor. ... Melanie Janine Brown (born May 29, 1975 in Leeds) (aka Mel B) is an English pop singer and songwriter turned actress and television personality best known as one of the members of the girl band the Spice Girls, one of the most successful female groups of all time. ... Tamyra Monica Gray (born July 26, 1979 in Takoma Park, Maryland) is an American actress and singer, best known for her rise to fame as one of the finalists on the first season of the reality television program American Idol in 2002. ... Categories: Stub | Soap opera actors ... Michael McElroys Broadway Inspirational Voices Album A New Beginning Michael McElroy (born 1967) is an American musical theatre actor, singer and music director. ... Anwar Farid Robinson (born April 21, 1979) is an American singer/songwriter/musician who was the 7th place finalist on the fourth season of American Idol. ... Jai Rodriguez (born June 22, 1979 in Brentwood, New York) is an actor and musician best known as the culture guide on the Bravo networks Emmy-winning American reality television program Queer Eye for the Straight Guy. ... Wilson Cruz (born December 27, 1973, in Brooklyn, New York, USA) is an openly gay Puerto Rican-American actor. ... Denise van Outen (born May 27, 1974, Basildon, Essex, England, UK) is a British television hostess and stage actress. ... Jessie Wallace (born Karen Wallace on September 25, 1971) is a British actress who trained at the The Poor School. ...

Broadway closing

On January 16, 2008 the production's website announced that the musical would end its 12-year run on June 1, 2008.[38] No reason was announced, but, according to League of American Theaters and Producers, ticket sales were down, and box office figures showed that the production was playing at approximately fifty-percent capacity.[38] However, the run of Rent at the Nederlander Theatre has been extended through September 7, 2008[39] Over the course of the production's 12-year engagement, there will have been a total of about 5,000 performances, making Rent the seventh-longest-running Broadway show in history,[5] with a production gross of over $280 million.[6] is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...


Recordings

Main article: Rent (albums)

A recording of the original Broadway cast is available on DreamWorks, which contains most of the musical material in the show on a double-disc "complete recording" collection with a remixed version of the song "Seasons of Love" featuring Stevie Wonder.[40] It also contains a single-disc "best of" highlights.[41] Rent Original Broadway Cast Recording Disc One: Tune Up #1 - Anthony Rapp, Adam Pascal Voice Mail #1 - Kristen Lee Kelly Tune Up #2 - Anthony Rapp, Adam Pascal Rent - Anthony Rapp, Adam Pascal, Daphne Rubin-Vega, Jesse L. Martin, Wilson Jermaine Heredia, Idina Menzel, Fredi Walker, Taye Diggs You Okay Honey... Seasons of Love is the most celebrated song from the Broadway musical Rent, written and composed by Jonathan Larson. ... Stevie Wonder (born Stevland Hardaway Judkins on May 13, 1950, name later changed to Stevland Hardaway Morris)[1] is an American singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and record producer. ...


Movie adaptation

Main article: Rent (film)

Rent was adapted into a movie directed by Chris Columbus with a screenplay by Stephen Chbosky. With the exception of Mimi and Joanne, the original Broadway cast members reprised the principal roles. For the film, Rosario Dawson appeared in the role of Mimi, the role Daphne Rubin-Vega originated on Broadway; Tracie Thoms was cast as Joanne, originally played by Fredi Walker. The roles were re-cast because Rubin-Vega was pregnant and Walker felt she was too old for the part. Released on November 23, 2005, the film remained in the box office top ten for three weeks. This article is about the 2005 film. ... Chris Columbus (born in Spangler, Pennsylvania, on September 10, 1958) is an American filmmaker. ... The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky Stephen Chbosky (born January 25, 1970) is an American author, editor, screenwriter, and film director. ... Rosario Dawson (born May 9, 1979) is an American actress and singer. ... Tracie Thoms (born August 19, 1975) is an American television, film, and stage actress. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Awards

Tony Awards

Rent was nominated for ten Tony Awards in 1996 and won four:[42][43] What is popularly called the Tony Award® but is formally the Antoinette Perry Award is an annual American award celebrating achievements in theater, including musical theater. ...

Won
Other nominations

// 1940s 1949 Kiss Me, Kate - Music and lyrics by Cole Porter, book by Bella and Samuel Spewack. ... The Tony Award for Best Book of a Musical is the Tony awarded to the librettist(s) of the musical. ... Jonathan Larson (February 4, 1960 – January 25, 1996) was an American Tony Award-winning composer and playwright who lived in New York City and authored musicals, including Rent and Tick, Tick. ... The Tony Award for Best Original Score is the Tony Award given to the composers and lyricists of the best original score written for a musical in that year. ... Jonathan Larson (February 4, 1960 – January 25, 1996) was an American Tony Award-winning composer and playwright who lived in New York City and authored musicals, including Rent and Tick, Tick. ... The Tony Award for Best Performance by a Featured Actor in a Musical is awarded to the actor who is voted the best non-starring actor in a musical, whether a new production or a revival. ... Wilson Jermaine Heredia is an American actor of Dominican descent, best known for winning the 1996 Tony Award for Best Featured Actor in a Musical for his portrayal of Angel Dumott Schunard in the musical Rent. ... The Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Musical is awarded to the actor who was voted as the best actor in a musical play, whether a new production or a revival. ... Adam Pascal Adam Pascal (born October 25, 1970) is an American actor, best known for being the first to play the role of Roger Davis in the Jonathan Larson musical Rent on Broadway. ... The Tony Award for Best Actress in a Musical is awarded to the actress who was voted as the best actress in a musical, whether a new production or a revival. ... Press photo of Daphne Rubin-Vega at the tenth anniversary performance of Rent Daphne Rubin-Vega (born November 18, 1969 in Panama City, Panama), also known simply as Daphne, is a dance music singer and actress. ... The Tony Award for Best Performance by a Featured Actress in a Musical is awarded to the actress who is voted the best non-starring actress in a musical, whether a new production or a revival. ... Idina Menzel (born Idina Kim Mentzel on May 30, 1971 in New York City) is a Tony Award-winning American actress, singer and songwriter who is best known for her performances in Wicked and Rent. ... The Tony Award for Best Lighting Design of a Musical has been given since 1970. ... The Tony award for Choreography has been awarded since 1947. ... The Tony Award for Best Direction of a Musical has been given since 1960. ...

Additional awards

Rent was also nominated for the following awards; it won all but four of the nominations:[44]

Won
  • 1996 Pulitzer Prize for Drama
  • 1996 Drama Desk Award Outstanding Musical
  • 1996 Drama Desk Award Outstanding Book
  • 1996 Drama Desk Award Outstanding Featured Actor in a Musical: Wilson Jermaine Heredia
  • 1996 Drama Desk Award Outstanding Orchestrations: Steve Skinner
  • 1996 Drama Desk Award Outstanding Lyrics
  • 1996 Drama Desk Award Outstanding Music
  • 1996 Theater World Award for Outstanding New Talent: Adam Pascal
  • 1996 Theater World Award for Outstanding New Talent: Daphne Rubin-Vega
  • 1996 New York Drama Critics Circle Award for Best Musical
  • 1996 Outer Critics Circle Award for Best Off-Broadway Musical
  • 1996 Drama League Award for Best Musical
  • 1996 Obie Award for Outstanding Book, Music, and Lyrics
  • 1996 Obie Award for Outstanding Direction: Michael Greif
  • 1996 Obie Award for Outstanding Ensemble Performance
Other nominations
  • 1996 Drama Desk Award Outstanding Actor in a Musical: Adam Pascal
  • 1996 Drama Desk Award Outstanding Actress in a Musical: Daphne Rubin-Vega
  • 1996 Drama Desk Award Outstanding Director of a Musical: Michael Greif
  • 1996 Drama Desk Award Outstanding Costume Design: Angela Wendt

The Pulitzer Prize for Drama was first awarded in 1918. ... Created in 1955, the Drama Desk Award was created to recognize Off-Broadway and Off-Off-Broadway shows in addition to Broadway shows. ... The Theatre World Award, first awarded for the 1945-46 season, is an American honor given annually to actors and actresses in recognition of an outstanding New York City stage debut performance. ... The New York Drama Critics Circle is comprised of nineteen drama critics from daily newspapers, magazines, and wire services based in the New York City metropolitan area. ... Begun during the 1949-1950 theater season, the Outer Critics Circle Awards are presented annually for theatrical achievements both on and Off-Broadway. ... Created in 1935, the Drama League Awards honor distinguished productions and performances both on Broadway and Off-Broadway, in addition to recognizing exemplary career achievements in theatre, musical theatre, and directing. ... The Obie Awards, short for Off-Broadway Theater Awards, are annual awards bestowed by the newspaper The Village Voice on theater artists performing in New York City. ...

References

  1. ^ Larson, Jonathan; Interviews and text: McDonnell, Evelyn, with Silberger, Katherine (1997). Rent. New York, New York: HarperEntertainment / HarperCollins. ISBN 0-688-15437-9. 
  2. ^ {{cite journal | author=Marks, Peter| title=Looking on Broadway For Ramshackle Home | journal=The New York Times | year=February 26, 1996| page=Section C page 9| url=http://select.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=F20616FD3A5D0C758EDDAB0894DE494D81&n=Top%2fReference%2fTimes%20Topics%2fOrganizations%2fN%2fNew%20York%20Theater%20Workshop}
  3. ^ "The Birth of a Theatrical Comet" (March 17 1996). The New York Times. 
  4. ^ a b c Larson, Jonathan; Interviews and text: McDonnell, Evelyn, with Silberger, Katherine (1997). Rent ("Glory"). New York, New York: HarperEntertainment / HarperCollins, 54–64. ISBN 0-688-15437-9. 
  5. ^ a b Hernandez, Ernio (2007-01-10). Long Runs on Broadway. Celebrity Buzz: Insider Info. Playbill, Inc.. Retrieved on 2007-01-10.
  6. ^ a b Time Magazine, March 10, 2008 issue, p. 66
  7. ^ playbill article, March 26, 2008
  8. ^ a b Larson, Jonathan; Interviews and text: McDonnell, Evelyn, with Silberger, Katherine (1997). Rent ("Leap of Faith"). New York, New York: HarperEntertainment / HarperCollins, 18–37. ISBN 0-688-15437-9. 
  9. ^ a b c d Tommasini, Anthony (1996-03-17). "The Seven-Year Odyssey That Led to Rent". The New York Times. 
  10. ^ Ben Brantley, "Rock Opera A la 'Boheme' And 'Hair'," The New York Times, 14 February 1996.
  11. ^ Puccini, Giacomo. La bohème —Libretto in English. Kernkonzepte: Impresario.
  12. ^ Beals, Gregory (May 13 1996). "The World of Rent". Newsweek CXXVII (20).  (Abstract)
  13. ^ SiteforRent.com accessed April 15, 2007.
  14. ^ Ben Lerman; Andrew Jacobs (2005, 1998). Making Rent; A Spell for Alphabet City. Life Press. Life Cafe. Retrieved on 2007-01-05.
  15. ^ a b Larson, Jonathan; Interviews and text: McDonnell, Evelyn, with Silberger, Katherine (1997). Rent ("Connection"). New York, New York: HarperEntertainment / HarperCollins, 138–141. ISBN 0-688-15437-9. 
  16. ^ Larson, Jonathan; Interviews and text: McDonnell, Evelyn, with Silberger, Katherine (1997). Rent ("Leap of Faith: Friends in Deed"). New York, New York: HarperEntertainment / HarperCollins, 21. ISBN 0-688-15437-9. 
  17. ^ Thomas, June (November 23, 2005). Sarah Schulman: The Lesbian Writer Rent Ripped Off. Interrogation: Interviews with a Point. Washington Post.Newsweek Interactive Co. LLC. Retrieved on 2006-11-30.
  18. ^ The Rent Lawsuit Transcript Website. Dramaturgy.net (1998). Retrieved on 2008-01-01.
  19. ^ Larson, Jonathan; Interviews and text: McDonnell, Evelyn, with Silberger, Katherine (1997). Rent (no day but today). New York, New York: HarperEntertainment / HarperCollins, 188–189. ISBN 0-688-15437-9. 
  20. ^ Jones, Kenneth (March 30 2006). Rent's 10th Anniversary Celebration Will Reunite Past Bohemians, for Three Good Causes. Playbill, Inc.. Retrieved on November 30 2006
  21. ^ Deyoung, Bill (June 30 2007). With 'Rent,' local theater finally fulfills promise. Scripps Treasure Coast Newspapers. Retrieved on 2007-07-02.
  22. ^ Gillers, H: "West is officially the first high school in the U.S. to perform the 1996 Jonathan Larson musical". The Beacon News, 2008
  23. ^ - Denise Van Outen gives costar laryngitis after lesbian kiss - Now Magazine, 2007
  24. ^ Jessie Wallace joins cast of RENT - IndieLondon, 2007
  25. ^ Rent | Theatre story | Guardian Unlimited Arts
  26. ^ Playbill News: New London Production of Rent to Close in February 2008
  27. ^ Riedel, Michael (March 3, 1997). "Every Day a 'Rent' Party: hardcore fans of the hit musical form a squatters camp at the box office".  New York Daily News [1]
  28. ^ "The Simpsons Archive: The Simpsons Song Lyrics", accessed July 21, 2006.
  29. ^ "Planet Family Guy: Subtitle Script", accessed July 21, 2006.
  30. ^ Transcript of The One with the Dirty Girl, accessed July 21, 2006.
  31. ^ "The Unsinkable Mommy Adler," accessed July 21, 2006.
  32. ^ [2] accessed March 12, 2007.
  33. ^ "The Depths" accessed October 14, 2006.
  34. ^ Murray, Rebecca, "'Team America: World Police' Movie Review," accessed July 21, 2006.
  35. ^ Hedwig and the Angry Inch, accessed July 21, 2006.
  36. ^ "Forbidden Broadway Strikes Back!: Another Unoriginal Cast Recording, Volume 4 (1996 New York Cast)", accessed July 21, 2006.
  37. ^ Larson, Jonathan; Interviews and text: McDonnell, Evelyn, with Silberger, Katherine (1997). Rent ("The Libretto")). New York, New York: HarperEntertainment / HarperCollins, 66. ISBN 0-688-15437-9. 
  38. ^ a b Campbell, Robert; Vicki Allen (editor). "Long-running Broadway musical Rent to close / Entertainment / Reuters", Reuters, 2008-1-16. Retrieved on 2008-01-16. 
  39. ^ BroadwayWorld announcement of the three-month extension of the run
  40. ^ Rent (1996 Original Broadway Cast) (August 27 1996). New York, New York. Dreamworks. Retrieved on November 30, 2006
  41. ^ The Best of Rent: Highlights From The Original Cast Album (1996 Original Broadway Cast) (September 7, 1999). New York, New York. Dreamworks. Retrieved on November 30 2006
  42. ^ The Official Website of the American Theatre Wing's Tony Awards. IBM Corp., Tony Award Productions. Retrieved on November 30 2006.
  43. ^ Past Winners Search. The Official Website of the American Theatre Wing's Tony Awards. IBM Corp., Tony Award Productions. Retrieved on November 30 2006. (Search on Year "1996" and Show Title "Rent".)
  44. ^ Rent the Musical on Broadway and on National Tour. Retrieved on December 1, 2006.

Jonathan Larson (February 4, 1960 – January 25, 1996) was an American Tony Award-winning composer and playwright who lived in New York City and authored musicals, including Rent and Tick, Tick. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jonathan Larson (February 4, 1960 – January 25, 1996) was an American Tony Award-winning composer and playwright who lived in New York City and authored musicals, including Rent and Tick, Tick. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Jonathan Larson (February 4, 1960 – January 25, 1996) was an American Tony Award-winning composer and playwright who lived in New York City and authored musicals, including Rent and Tick, Tick. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini (December 22, 1858 – November 29, 1924) was an Italian composer whose operas, including La bohème, Tosca, and Madama Butterfly, are among the most frequently performed in the standard repertoire. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jonathan Larson (February 4, 1960 – January 25, 1996) was an American Tony Award-winning composer and playwright who lived in New York City and authored musicals, including Rent and Tick, Tick. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... Jonathan Larson (February 4, 1960 – January 25, 1996) was an American Tony Award-winning composer and playwright who lived in New York City and authored musicals, including Rent and Tick, Tick. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jonathan Larson (February 4, 1960 – January 25, 1996) was an American Tony Award-winning composer and playwright who lived in New York City and authored musicals, including Rent and Tick, Tick. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jonathan Larson (February 4, 1960 – January 25, 1996) was an American Tony Award-winning composer and playwright who lived in New York City and authored musicals, including Rent and Tick, Tick. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Awards
Preceded by
The Young Man From Atlanta
by Horton Foote
Pulitzer Prize for Drama
1996
Succeeded by
No Award Given in 1997. How I Learned to Drive by Paula Vogel won award in 1998
Preceded by
Sunset Boulevard
Tony Award for Best Musical
1996
Succeeded by
Titanic
Preceded by
Sunset Boulevard
by Andrew Lloyd Webber, Don Black and Christopher Hampton
Tony Award for Best Original Score
1996
by Jonathan Larson
Succeeded by
Titanic
by Maury Yeston
Preceded by
Sunset Boulevard
by Don Black and Christopher Hampton
Tony Award for Best Book of a Musical
1996
by Jonathan Larson
Succeeded by
Titanic
by Peter Stone
The Black Crook (1866), considered by some historians to be the first musical[1] Musical theatre is a form of theatre combining music, songs, spoken dialogue and dance. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Off-Broadway plays or musicals are performed in New York City in smaller theatres than Broadway, but larger than Off-Off-Broadway, productions. ... Off-Off-Broadway refers to theatrical productions including plays, musicals or performance art pieces performed in New York City in smaller theatres than Broadway productions or off-Broadway productions. ... West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, England, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland. Along with New Yorks Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Rent (musical) (121 words)
Rent is a Tony- and Pulitzer Prize-winning musical, based upon the opera "La Boheme," opening in New York City in 1996.
The musical centers around a group of impoverished young artists and musicians struggling to survive in New York's Alphabet City neighborhood under the shadow of AIDS.
The musical was conceived by Jonathan Larson[?], a 35-year-old composer who died from an undiagnosed dissecting aortic aneurysm[?] the night before the musical made its Off-Broadway debut.
Rent (musical) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5250 words)
Rent is a Tony and Pulitzer Prize-winning rock musical, with lyrics and music by Jonathan Larson.
Rent is considered revolutionary for bringing controversial topics and counterculture to a traditionally conservative medium, and is credited with increasing the popularity of musical theater in the younger generation.
Rent was enormously successful on Broadway, enjoying both critical acclaim and word-of-mouth popularity, recently celebrating its 10th anniversary on April 24, 2006, with a special performance by its entire original cast.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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