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Encyclopedia > Renaissance fair
An actress playing the role of Mary Queen of Scots in 2003.
An actress playing the role of Mary Queen of Scots in 2003.

A Renaissance fair, Renaissance faire, or Renaissance festival is an outdoor weekend gathering, open to the public and generally commercial in nature, which emulates an historic period for the amusement of its guests. Some are permanent theme parks, others are short-term events in fairgrounds or the like[1]. Renaissance fairs generally include an abundance of costumed entertainers, musical and theatrical acts, art and handicrafts for sale, and festival food. Some even offer camping, for those who wish to stay more than one day[2]. Most Renaissance fairs are set during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I of England. Some are set earlier, during the reign of Henry VIII, or in other countries, such as France, and some include broader definitions of the Renaissance which include earlier periods, such as the Vikings, or later, such as 18th Century pirates. Renaissance fairs encourage visitors to enter into the spirit of things with costumes and audience participation. All tolerate, and many welcome, fantasy elements such as wizards and elves. Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 1536 pixel, file size: 501 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Living history Renaissance... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 1536 pixel, file size: 501 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Living history Renaissance... Mary I of Scotland; known as Mary, Queen of Scots Mary I of Scotland (Mary Stuart or Stewart) (December 8, 1542 – February 8, 1587), better known as Mary, Queen of Scots, was the ruler of Scotland from December 14, 1542 – July 24, 1567. ... Renaissance fair may refer to: Renaissance fair Renaissance Faire, song by The Byrds, see Younger Than Yesterday. ... This article is about Elizabeth I of England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... “Henry VIII” redirects here. ... The name Viking is a loan from the native Scandinavian term for the Norse seafaring warriors who raided the coasts of Scandinavia, Europe and the British Isles from the late 8th century to the 11th century, the period of European history referred to as the Viking Age. ... Pirates may refer to: A group of people committing any of these activities: Piracy at sea or on a river/lake. ... otheruses|Magician}} The Enchanted Garden of Messer Ansaldo by Marie Spartali Stillman: a magician makes his garden bear fruit and flowers in winter. ... For other uses, see Elf (disambiguation). ...


Chicago journalist Neil Steinberg said (of the Bristol Renaissance Faire), "If theme parks, with their pasteboard main streets, reek of a bland, safe, homogenized, whitebread America, the Renaissance Faire is at the other end of the social spectrum, a whiff of the occult, a flash of danger and a hint of the erotic. Here, they let you throw axes. Here are more beer and bosoms than you'll find in all of Disney World."[3] Neil Steinberg is a news columnist for the Chicago Sun-Times. ... Costumed performers from the 2006 Bristol Renaissance Faire. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The word occult comes from the Latin occultus (clandestine, hidden, secret), referring to knowledge of the hidden.[1] In the medical sense it is used commonly to refer to a structure or process that is hidden, e. ... Eroticism is an aesthetic focus on sexual desire, especially the feelings of anticipation of sexual activity. ... Cinderella Castle, at the center of the Magic Kingdom, is Walt Disney World Resorts most recognizable icon Introduction Owned and operated by The Walt Disney Company, the Walt Disney World Resort in Florida, USA is home to four theme parks, three water parks, several resort hotels and golf courses...

Contents

Characteristics

Jousting knights on horseback perform at the Texas Renaissance Festival.
Jousting knights on horseback perform at the Texas Renaissance Festival.
Costumed performers from the 2006 Bristol Renaissance Faire.
Costumed performers from the 2006 Bristol Renaissance Faire.
"The Lost Boys" performing at the 2005 Georgia Renaissance Festival
"The Lost Boys" performing at the 2005 Georgia Renaissance Festival

Most Renaissance fairs are arranged to represent an imagined village in England during the reign of Elizabeth I, as this period has been generally considered to correspond to the flowering of the English Renaissance. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... “Joust” redirects here. ... The silver Anglia knight, commissioned as a trophy in 1850, intended to represent the Black Prince. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Costumed performers from the 2006 Bristol Renaissance Faire. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 587 KB) Summary Performers at the Georgia Renaissance Festival Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Renaissance Fair Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 587 KB) Summary Performers at the Georgia Renaissance Festival Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Renaissance Fair Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about Elizabeth I of England. ... The English Renaissance was a cultural and artistic movement in England dating from the early 16th century to the early 17th century. ...


In a modern Renaissance festival there are stages or performance areas set up for scheduled shows, such as plays in Shakespearean or commedia dell' arte tradition, as well as anachronistic audience participation comedy routines. Other performances include dancers, magicians, musicians, jugglers, and singers. Between the stages the "streets" are lined with stores ('shoppes') and stalls where independent vendors sell medieval and Renaissance themed handcrafts, clothing, books, and artworks. There are food and beverage vendors, as well as game and ride areas. There are games like Drench-a-Wench and Soak-a-Bloke, which allow a player with a good aim to hit a target and get a fair employee wet. Roller coasters and other elaborate rides are not "period," so they are rarely seen. Renaissance fairs will often include a joust as a main attraction. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Karel Dujardins set his closely-observed scene of a travelling troupes makeshift stage against idealized ruins in the Roman Campagna: dated 1657 (Louvre Museum) Commedia dellarte, (Italian, meaning comedy of professional artists) was a form of improvisational theater which began in the 16th century and was popular until... Look up Anachronism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A typical roller coaster The roller coaster is a popular amusement ride developed for amusement parks and modern theme parks. ... “Joust” redirects here. ...


In addition to the staged performances, a major attraction of Renaissance fairs is the crowds of professional actors who play all sorts of historical figures and roam the fair, interacting with visitors. Visitors are encouraged (but never required) to wear costumes, contributing to the illusion of an actual Renaissance environment. Many of the fair vendors sell or rent costumes for all ages and types. The Renaissance fair subculture's word for these costumed guests is "playtrons", a portmanteau of the words "patron" and "player", and they add a second level of enjoyment to their experience by "getting into the act" as Renaissance Lords and ladies, peasants, pirates, belly dancers, or fantasy characters. A portmanteau (IPA pronunciation: RP, US) is a word or morpheme that fuses two or more words or word parts to give a combined or loaded meaning. ...


Most fairs have an end-of-the-day ritual, a parade or concert where all employees gather and bid farewell to the patrons. For those who work at the fair, the last concert that a festival holds for the season is traditionally an emotional moment.


Renaissance fairs are staged around the United States at different times of the year. Fair vendors, participants and crew often work the "faire circuit", going from event to event as one fair ends and another begins.


An American Phenomenon

Although historical reenactments are by no means exclusive to the United States (for example, the Earl of Eglinton in Scotland sponsored a large tournament as early as 1839)[4], the Renaissance Fair is, arguably, a uniquely American variation on the theme, having as much the flavor of an amusement park combined with a shopping mall as of a historical reenactment. European historical fairs, on the other hand, seem more on the living history museum model, where an actual historic site is peopled by re-enactors whose job it is to explain historical life to modern visitors.[5] American Renaissance fair patrons may be as interested in drinking, eating, shopping, and watching farce as they are in an educational experience. Since the mid-1990s, American-style Renaissance fairs have been spreading into western Canada. Archibald William Montgomerie, 13th Earl of Eglinton and 1st Earl of Winton, (September 29, 1812 - October 4, 1861), was born at Palermo. ... This article is about the country. ... The Eglinton Tournament of 1839 was a reenactment of a medieval joust and revel held in Scotland by Archibald William Montgomerie, thirteenth Earl of Eglinton, widely publicized and open to the public. ... 1839 (MDCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Reenactors of the American Civil War Historical reenactment is an activity in which participants recreate some aspects of a historical event or period. ... The old town (Den gamle by) — an open air museum in the town of Aarhus, Denmark An open air museum is a distinct type of museum exhibiting its collections out-of-doors. ... Look up farce in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


It should be noted however that the first American fair (Agoura, CA) was originally designed by the Living History Center to resemble an actual spring market fair of the period.[citation needed] Many of the original booths were no-charge reenactments of historical activities such as printing presses, and blacksmiths. The first commercial vendors were mostly artisans and food merchants and were required to demonstrate historical accuracy or plausibility for their wares. Whole groups of volunteers were organized into "guilds" to focus on specific reenactment duties (musicians, military, celtic clans, peasants, etc). Both actors and vendors were required to successfully complete workshops in period language/accents, costuming and culture and to stay "in character" while working. Fairs that copied the original frequently did not attempt such historical accuracy[citation needed] and in 1995 new management and economic pressures negatively altered the original fair's historical quality as well.[citation needed]


Spinoffs of Renaissance fairs include fairs set in other time periods, such as Christmas fairs set in Charles Dickens' London. The American approach has apparently been exported back to England; a warehouse-based theme park, "Dickens World", opened in Kent, England, in May of 2007.[6] For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... “Dickens” redirects here. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


History of the fairs in America

Morris dancers entertain Queen Elizabeth, Renaissance Pleasure Faire, Agoura, c. 1986
Morris dancers entertain Queen Elizabeth, Renaissance Pleasure Faire, Agoura, c. 1986
The real thing: Peasant's Fair, German etching c1530 by Daniel Hopfer
The real thing: Peasant's Fair, German etching c1530 by Daniel Hopfer

In post-World War II America, there was a resurgence of interest in medieval and Renaissance culture. In the 1950s, there was a very strong early music revival, and out of that came folk musician and traditionalist John Langstaff. In 1957, Langstaff held "A Christmas Masque of Traditional Revels" in New York City, and the following year another in Washington, DC. A televised version was broadcast on the "Hallmark Hall of Fame" in 1966 which included Dustin Hoffman playing the part of the dragon slain by Saint George, and in 1971 Langstaff established a permanent Christmas Revels in Cambridge, Massachusetts.[7] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Cotswold morris with handkerchiefs A morris dance is a form of English folk dance usually accompanied with music. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Christ Preaching, known as The Hundred Guilder print; etching c1648 by Rembrandt Etching is the process of using strong acid to cut into the unprotected parts of a metal surface to create a design in intaglio in the metal (the original process - in modern manufacturing other chemicals may be used... Daniel Hopfer: Gib Frid - three old women beating a devil on the ground. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... John Langstaff (December 24, 1920 - December 13, 2005) was the founder of the Northeast United States tradition of the Christmas Revels, as well as a respected musician and educator. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Hallmark Hall of Fame is a long running anthology program on American television. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Dustin Lee Hoffman (born August 8, 1937) is a two-time Academy Award-winning, BAFTA-winning, and five-time Golden Globe-winning American method actor. ... Saint-George is a municipality with 695 inhabitants (as of 2003) in the district of Aubonne in the canton of Vaud, Switzerland. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... Revels is a candy product made by Mars, Incorporated. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - City  7. ...


In 1963, schoolteachers Ronald and Phyllis Patterson originated the Renaissance Pleasure Faire as an outgrowth of school projects. The first Faire was held in North Hollywood as a fundraiser for radio station KPFK and drew some 8,000 people for the one-weekend event. The Patterson family's company, Theme Events Limited, and its non-profit affiliate, The Living History Center, are generally credited with developing the Renaissance Faire concept as it exists today.[8] Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... North Hollywood is a district in the San Fernando Valley section of Los Angeles, California. ... KPFK (90. ...


For decades, the Renaissance Pleasure Faire was held in the spring at the Paramount Ranch located in Agoura, CA, and in the fall at the Black Point Forest in Novato, CA. The event showcased a large ensemble of performers, fine artists and craftspeople and crew. These yearly events drew on the rich variety arts movement in Los Angeles, and the explosion of outdoor public events. Interactive environmental theatre and stage shows were overlaid with large scale processions featuring giant puppets and courtly displays. The London-based Reduced Shakespeare Company, San Francisco's i Fratelli Bologna, Tutti Frutti, St. Stupid and the Los Angeles Fools Guild all developed from improvisationally-focused ensembles that initially worked together at the Pleasure Faire. Famous actors who worked at the Pleasure Faire in their youth include Charlie Sheen, Emilio Estevez, Rosanna Arquette and Penn Jillette.[9] Variety arts in China, including tightrope walking, acrobatics, animal acts, and sleight of hand date back at least as far as the Han dynasty (206 B.C.-A.D. 220) and were very popular in the imperial court. ... Participatory theatre is a form of theatre in which the audience interacts with the performers or the presenters. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Reduced Shakespeare Company is a company of actors that performs unsubtle, fast-paced, seemingly highly-improvisational comedies presenting ludicrously condensed versions of huge topics. ... Tutti frutti(commedia dellarte) is a commedia delarte troupe based in the San Francisco Bay area. ... The Fools Guild is a disorganization of individuals who identify with the artistic, spiritual or philosophical nature of The Fool. ... Improvisation is the practice of acting and reacting, of making and creating, in the moment and in response to the stimulus of ones immediate environment. ... Charles Irwin Sheen (born September 3, 1965 as Carlos Irwin Estévez ) is a Golden Globe Award-winning and Emmy-nominated American actor. ... Emilio Estévez (born May 12, 1962) is an American actor, director and writer. ... Rosanna Lauren Arquette (born August 10, 1959) is a Golden Globe-nominated American actress, film director, and film producer. ... Penn Fraser Jillette (born March 5, 1955 in Greenfield, Massachusetts) is an American comedian, illusionist, juggler and writer known for his work with fellow illusionist Teller in the team known as Penn & Teller. ...


Myths and Lore

Belly Dancer from the 2004 New York Renaissance Faire.
Belly Dancer from the 2004 New York Renaissance Faire.
An entertainer at the Scottish Games at Dunsmuir House in Oakland, California.
An entertainer at the Scottish Games at Dunsmuir House in Oakland, California.

The jousting and swordplay on exhibit in most Renaissance fairs is not real. As with professional wrestling, these "fights" are often carefully scripted mock combat. The weapons are real, but the participants are skilled, trained actors and stunt performers. Some jousting troupes, however, do perform real lance passes (using real pine lances). Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1712x2288, 1003 KB)[edit] Summary Photo I took of the 2004 New York Renaissance Faire. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1712x2288, 1003 KB)[edit] Summary Photo I took of the 2004 New York Renaissance Faire. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 387 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (501 × 776 pixel, file size: 144 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 387 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (501 × 776 pixel, file size: 144 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Built in the Neoclassical-Revival architectural style and located in Oakland, California, the 50 acre Dunsmuir House and Gardens Historic Estate is recognized as a National Historic Landmark. ... “Oakland” redirects here. ... “Joust” redirects here. ... Russian Ivan Tourchine and American Weston Kelsey fence in the second round of the Olympic Mens Individual Épée event at the Helliniko Fencing Hall on Aug. ... For the video game, see Pro Wrestling (video game). ... Stuntman refers to any of several types of skilled performers. ...


Although the stocks and pillories displayed in some Renaissance fairs look alarming, they are not actually functional. They are provided for amusing photo opportunities and for entirely fictional stunt acts by professional actors. For other uses, see stock (disambiguation). ... View of the Pillory in the Market-place of Paris in the Sixteenth Century, after a Drawing by an unknown Artist of 1670. ...


All acts at a Renaissance fair usually have years of skill behind them and are highly choreographed, taking weeks of classes and, in some respects, years of practice in order to make it appear as authentic as possible. In historical reenactment, authenticity (sometimes referred to as the A-factor or simply A) is a measure of how close an item, prop, action, weapon, or custom is, to what would actually have been used or done in the time period being depicted. ...


Renaissance fairs have several variant names, many of which use somewhat-incorrect, old-fashioned spellings, such as "faire" or "fayre". The etymology of the word fair comes from the Middle English variant of the Anglo-Franc word "Feyre"[2]. They can also be referred to as "Elizabethan", "Medieval", or "Tudor" fairs (or fayres). "Ren Fair" and "Ren Fest" are popular colloquialisms. Middle English is the name given by historical linguistics to the diverse forms of the English language spoken between the Norman invasion of 1066 and the mid-to-late 15th century, when the Chancery Standard, a form of London-based English, began to become widespread, a process aided by the...


Controversies

Within the Renaissance fair community, there is difference of opinion as to how authentic a fair ought to be. Some feel the fair should be as authentic an experience as possible, to be educational and like European living history museums.[10] Others feel that entertainment is the primary goal. [11] The old town (Den gamle by) — an open air museum in the town of Aarhus, Denmark An open air museum is a distinct type of museum exhibiting its collections out-of-doors. ...


There is regret among some long-term Renaissance fairgoers that the fairs have changed over the years. Many of those who remember the idyllic and transportative nature of the earlier fairs (especially those fairs operating with a non-profit spirit) lament the growth of the fairs as businesses.[citation needed] Once small, intimate gatherings, where nearly everyone knew each other, they have become more like professional theme parks. However, more organized, professional, family-friendly fairs have also attracted a larger, more diverse audience from the population at large.[12] A non-profit organization (often called non-profit org or simply non-profit or not-for-profit) can be seen as an organization that doesnt have a goal to make a profit. ...


Notable fairs

  • The Arizona Renaissance Festival
  • The Bristol Renaissance Faire
  • The Connecticut Renaissance Faire
  • The Georgia Renaissance Festival
  • The Greater St. Louis Renaissance Faire
  • The Kansas City Renaissance Festival
  • The Kentucky Highland Renaissance Festival
  • The Louisiana Renaissance Festival (LARF)
  • The Maryland Renaissance Festival
  • The Michigan Renaissance Festival
  • The Minnesota Renaissance Festival
  • The New York Renaissance Faire
  • The Northern California Renaissance Faire
  • The Ohio Renaissance Festival
  • The Oklahoma Renaissance Faire
  • The Pennsylvania Renaissance Faire
  • The Renaissance Pleasure Faire of Southern California
  • The Scarborough Renaissance Festival
  • The Sterling Renaissance Festival
  • The Texas Renaissance Festival
  • The Wicked Winter Renaissance Faire (WWRF)

Hundreds of other smaller festivals continually spring up (and go under) on a regular basis across America, with attendance from a few hundred to tens of thousands. According to this site [1] The annual Arizona Renaissance Festival is a medieval amusement park, a 12-stage theater, a 30-acre circus, an arts and crafts fair, a jousting tournament and a feast. ... Costumed performers from the 2006 Bristol Renaissance Faire. ... We dont have an article called Maryland Renaissance Festival Start this article Search for Maryland Renaissance Festival in. ... The Michigan Renaissance Festival is an interactive outdoor event which focuses on recreating the look and feel of a fictional village during the latter half of the 16th Century. ... Costumed participants at the 2007 Minnesota Renaissance Festival The Minnesota Renaissance Festival is a Renaissance fair, an interactive outdoor event which focuses on recreating the look and feel of a fictional 16th Century England-like fantasy kingdom. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... The Pennsylvania Renaissance Faire, as of 2007, is in its 27th season. ... The Wicked Winter Renaissance Faire (WWRF) is held annually in Edison, New Jersey. ...


Notes

  1. ^ "State fairgrounds could benefit from fuller calendar", Battle Creek Enquirer, 5 September 2007
  2. ^ See, for example, the Louisiana Renaissance Festival at [1]
  3. ^ Neil Steinberg, "Out of Time, Nearly: Feast of Fools", Chicago Sun-Times, Wednesday, August 15th, 2007, page 23
  4. ^ Mark Girouard, The Return to Camelot: Chivalry and the English Gentleman, Yale University Press, 1981 ISBN 0-300-02739-7
  5. ^ Val Horsler, Living the Past, Weidenfeld & Nicolson, in association with English Heritage, London, England 2003. ISBN 0297 84312 5
  6. ^ "What the Dickens?", "The Guardian", 18 April 2007
  7. ^ John Langstaff's obituary in "The Guardian", UK
  8. ^ Peter Thomas and Richard J. Sneed, The Faire: Photographs and History of the Renaissance Pleasure Faire from 1963 onwards, The Good Book Press, 1987.
  9. ^ Peter Thomas and Richard J. Sneed, The Faire: Photographs and History of the Renaissance Pleasure Faire from 1963 onwards, The Good Book Press, 1987.
  10. ^ "Bristol Renaissance Faire organizers strive for authenticity," according to the Chicago Heights "Star" at "Bristol Renaissance Faire for more than kings, queens" on August 23, 2007
  11. ^ Richard Shapiro, who founded what later became the Bristol Renaissance Faire, said he favors entertainment. “We were so authentic back then it was almost painful” ("King Richard’s Faire brings a Renaissance revival" at projo.com, the Providence Journal online, August 30, 2007)
  12. ^ " Renaissance Faire: for rogues, wenches AND families", by Dawn Sagario, "Des Moines Register", August 30, 2007

Neil Steinberg is a news columnist for the Chicago Sun-Times. ... The Chicago Sun-Times is an American daily newspaper published in Chicago. ... Yale University Press is a book publisher founded in 1908. ... The Good Book Press was a fine press book publisher, founded in 1977 by Peter and Donna Thomas of Santa Cruz, California. ... The Good Book Press was a fine press book publisher, founded in 1977 by Peter and Donna Thomas of Santa Cruz, California. ... Costumed performers from the 2006 Bristol Renaissance Faire. ...

See also

2003 reenactment of the Battle of Grunwald Infantry of the Teutonic Order on the march during the 2006 recreation of the battle of Grunwald Polish heavy infantry assaulting a single Teutonic bombard Medieval reenactment is a form of historical reenactment that focuses on re-enacting European history in the period... “Joust” redirects here. ... The Society for Creative Anachronism (usually shortened to SCA) is a historical reenactment and living history group approximating mainly pre-17th century Western European history and culture. ... Juggling can refer to all forms of artful or skillful object manipulation. ... For other uses of Jester, see Jester (disambiguation). ... For the 18th century American form of music and performance known as minstrelsy, see minstrel show. ...

External links

  • Mike Bonk's Directorie - index of over 200 operating renaissance festivals around the world.
  • Renaissance Festival Podcast - Weekly podcast of Renaissance festival music and entertainment
  • www.RenaissanceFestival.com - Largest online forum community of Renaissance festivals and faires.
  • Renaissance Faire World - a virtual Renaissance Festival.
  • Renaissance festival books. 253 digitised Renaissance festival books -- from actual festivals held during the Renaissance -- selected from over 2,000 in the British Library's collection.

  Results from FactBites:
 
2007 Moscow Renaissance Fair (34th annual) (80 words)
The Moscow Renaissance Fair is a two-day celebration of spring with live entertainment, food, and crafts for kids and adults of all ages.
Listen to KUOI-FM's live coverage of the Main Stage during the fair.
The Moscow Renaissance Fair is directed by a private, non-profit community group and is the only self-sustaining festival of its kind in the region.
Renaissance Fair - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2922 words)
Most Renaissance Fairs are arranged to represent an imagined village in England during the reign of Elizabeth I, as this period is generally considered to correspond to the flowering of the English Renaissance (most especially because this was the time of Shakespeare).
The Georgia Renaissance Festival, near Atlanta, is the largest in the Southeast and began in 1986 as a spring festival.
The Pennsylvania Renaissance Faire, as of 2006, was in its 26th season.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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