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Encyclopedia > Renaissance art
Classicism
series
Classical antiquity
Renaissance Classicism
Age of Enlightenment Classicism
Classicism between the Wars

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Renaissance Classicism was a form of art that removed extraneous detail and showed the world as it was. Classicism door in Olomouc, The Czech Republic Teatr Wielki in Warsaw Church La Madeleine in Paris Classicism, in the arts, refers generally to a high regard for classical antiquity, as setting standards for taste which the classicist seeks to emulate. ... Classical antiquity is a broad term for a long period of cultural history centered on the Mediterranean Sea, which begins roughly with the earliest-recorded Greek poetry of Homer (7th century BC), and continues through the rise of Christianity and the fall of the Western Roman Empire (5th century AD... The Age of Enlightenment (French: Siècle des Lumières, German: Aufklärung) refers to the eighteenth century in European and American philosophy, or the longer period including the Age of Reason. ... Neoclassicism (sometimes rendered as Neo-Classicism or Neo-classicism) is the name given to quite distinct movements in the decorative and visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture. ... The Classical period in Western music occurred from about 1730 through 1820, despite considerable overlap at both ends with preceding and following periods, as is true for all musical eras. ... Classical economics is widely regarded as the first modern school of economic thought. ... Classical physics is physics based on principles developed before the rise of quantum theory, usually including the special theory of relativity and general theory of relativity. ... Neoclassicism (sometimes rendered as Neo-Classicism or Neo-classicism) is the name given to quite distinct movements in the decorative and visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture. ... Neoclassicism in music was a 20th century development, particularly popular in the period between the two World Wars, in which composers drew inspiration from music of the 18th century, though some of the inspiring canon was drawn as much from the Baroque period as the Classical period - for this reason... Great Books refers to a curriculum and a book list. ... Neoclassical ballet is a term describing the ballet style which uses traditional ballet vocabulary, but is generally more expansive than the classical structure allowed. ... Neoclassical economics refers to a general approach (a metatheory) to economics based on supply and demand which depends on individuals (or any economic agent) operating rationally, each seeking to maximize their individual utility or profit by making choices based on available information. ... Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... The Bath, a painting by Mary Cassatt (1844-1926). ...


Renaissance art is lifelike type of art, and many renaissance painters have given their paintings depth, by using perspective.


From Classicism sprang two movements: a countermovement that was extremely anti-classicist, Mannerism, and a later movement that became a sort of exaggerated Classicism on a grand scale portraying power and authority - Baroque. Classicism door in Olomouc, The Czech Republic Teatr Wielki in Warsaw Church La Madeleine in Paris Classicism, in the arts, refers generally to a high regard for classical antiquity, as setting standards for taste which the classicist seeks to emulate. ... A cultural movement is a change in the way a number of different disciplines approach their work. ... Mannerism is the term used to describe the artistic style that arose in mid-16th century. ... Block quote For other uses, see Baroque (disambiguation). ...


Before and during the Reformation, Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, and Michelangelo defined the Classicist art movement. However, a disheartened Michelangelo later introduced Mannerism with the dissonance and anxiety in his The Last Judgment. Mannerism, which (in a way) represented the human soul during the Reformation, defined itself by breaking all the rules. Baroque art entered the scene after the Reformation bringing with it grandeur and normality. It introduced nothing paradoxical and showed only the didactic lesson. Another major contention was the tremendous corruption within the Churchs hierarchy, all the way up to the Bishop of Rome, who appointed individuals to various positions within the Church (bishop, cardinal, etc. ... The Mona Lisa Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci (April 15, 1452 – May 2, 1519) was an Italian polymath: scientist, mathematician, engineer, inventor, anatomist, painter, sculptor, architect, musician, and writer. ... This page is about the artist. ... Michelangelo (full name Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni) (March 6, 1475 - February 18, 1564) was a Renaissance sculptor, architect, painter, and poet. ... Classicism, in the arts, refers generally to a high regard for classical antiquity as setting standards for taste which the classicist seeks to emulate. ... Look up paradox in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The Classicists entered on the heels of an artistic revolution, which was popularly known as the Renaissance and ushered in during the Reformation (da Vinci and Raphael died during the years Martin Luther was ordered to recant). The use of light, shadow, foreshortening, and perspective had been perfected and was at the fingertips of these great artists. Classicism idealized the world as it was and as the artist felt it. Classicism left out the extraneous detail to go for the truth of the matter and emphasize the noble. This style of painting was the first to stress a balance and harmony in art and nature. Furthermore, it was subsidized by the Pope primarily for the painting of his chapel and by the rich Italian families that wanted to have that which the Church had. This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... Raphael was famous for depicting illustrious figures of the Classical past with the features of his Renaissance contemporaries. ... Martin Luther (November 10, 1483 – February 18, 1546) was a German monk,[1] priest, professor, theologian, and church reformer. ... A cube in two-point perspective. ... The current Pope is Benedict XVI (born Joseph Alois Ratzinger), who was elected at the age of 78 on 19 April 2005. ... The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic Church (see terminology below) is the Christian Church in full communion with the Bishop of Rome, currently Pope Benedict XVI. It traces its origins to the original Christian community founded by Jesus Christ and led by the Twelve Apostles, in particular Saint Peter. ...


Da Vinci, even with his unexplainable dissonance, mastered the harmonious in his paintings as he used space to even out The Holy Family with St. Anne and The Madonna of the Rocks. The Last Supper portrays Jesus standing out, not because he is at the center of the painting, but because he represents calm in a chaotic time. The Virgin of the Rocks and Madonna of the Rocks are terms used to describe two different paintings with almost identical compositions. ... The Last Supper by Leonardo da Vinci The Last Supper (in Italian, Il Cenacolo or LUltima Cena) is a painting by Leonardo da Vinci for his patron Duke Lodovico Sforza. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ...


Raphael's The School of Athens borrowed from da Vinci's The Last Supper in its arrangement of characters. However, Raphael chose to show the classical thinkers of Greece and Rome vice da Vinci's Christ and the Twelve. He displayed them modestly, each in a pose that epitomized the individual. Sister Madonna continued such modesty and gave nobility to The Virgin Mary that had never before been seen. The School of Athens is one of the most famous paintings by the Italian renaissance artist Raphael. ... Nickname: The Eternal City Motto: SPQR: Senatus PopulusQue Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban... The Last Supper by Leonardo da Vinci The Last Supper (in Italian, Il Cenacolo or LUltima Cena) is a painting by Leonardo da Vinci for his patron Duke Lodovico Sforza. ... Gabriel delivering the Annunciation to Mary. ...


Michelangelo would be arguably the most powerful of the classists, unintentionally influencing the Mannerist movement with his anxious painting. This talented sculptor, painter, architect, and poet would finish the Sistine Chapel ceiling in less than five years (1508-1512). His painting on this ceiling was an extraordinary accomplishment, portraying the anatomically correct human body in any position. His Holy Family featured more motion in a smaller space, with figures looking almost sculpted, like Greek gods. In 1534, he completed The Last Judgment; at the peak of the Protestant Reformation, this painting displayed the dissonance, anxiety and chaos ripping at the church's fabric. In doing so, it gave rise to an art movement that had already begun to rumble - Mannerism. Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (March 6, 1475 – February 18, 1564), commonly known as Michelangelo, was an Italian Renaissance painter, sculptor, architect, poet and engineer. ... A sculpture is a three-dimensional object, which for the purposes of this article is man-made and selected for special recognition as art. ... Painting by Rembrandt self-portrait Detail from Las Meninas by Diego Velazquez, in which the painter portrayed himself at work For the computer graphics program, see Corel Painter. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... The ceiling of the Sistine Chapel The Sistine Chapel ceiling in Vatican City was painted by Michelangelo during the Italian Renaissance between 1508 and 1512. ... 1508 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1512 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A listing of Greek mythological beings. ... 1534 (MDXXXIV) was a common year in the 16th century. ... An art movement is a tendency or style in art with a specific common philosophy or goal, followed by a group of artists during a restricted period of time, or, at least, with the heyday of the movement more or less strictly so restricted (usually a few months, years or...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Renaissance Art and Architecture - MSN Encarta (1672 words)
The two principal components of Renaissance style are the following: a revival of the classical forms originally developed by the ancient Greeks and Romans, and an intensified concern with secular life—interest in humanism and assertion of the importance of the individual.
The Renaissance period in art history corresponds to the beginning of the great Western age of discovery and exploration, when a general desire developed to examine all aspects of nature and the world.
The Renaissance of the arts coincided with the development of humanism, in which scholars studied and translated philosophical texts.
Mark Harden's Artchive: "Renaissance" (952 words)
Thus, the beginnings of Renaissance art in Italy should be recognizable by seeking out not only those artists who adopted motifs or borrowed models from antiquity, but also those who sought to represent the human figure and the material world more naturalistically than had their predecessors.
He gave to Giotto the credit for the rebirth of art after centuries of barbarism and structured his chronological model like the ages of man, with Giotto and his immediate heirs as representing the infancy of art; Masaccio, Brunelleschi, Donatello and Ghiberti as the experimental youth; and Leonardo, Raphael and Michelangelo as the perfected maturity.
It was not until this period that Italian Renaissance ideals began to spread in a significant way north of the Alps, Durer being the first northern artist to fully assimilate the ideals of the Renaissance into his work.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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