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Encyclopedia > Remembrance Day
Remembrance Day
Remembrance Day
Poppy worn on lapel
Official name Remembrance Day
Also called Poppy Day, Armistice Day
Observed by Commonwealth of Nations
Significance Commemorates Commonwealth war dead
Date November 11
Observances Parades, silences
Related to Veterans Day
Holidays Portal

Remembrance Day also known as Poppy Day, Armistice Day (the event it commemorates), or Veterans Day in the United States is a day to commemorate the sacrifices of members of the armed forces and of civilians in times of war, specifically since the First World War. It is observed on 11 November to recall the end of World War I on that date in 1918. The day was specifically dedicated by King George V, on 7 November 1919, to the observance of members of the armed forces who were killed during war; this was possibly done upon the suggestion of Edward George Honey to Wellesley Tudor Pole, who established two ceremonial periods of remembrance based on events in 1917.[1][2] Armistice Day Celebrations in Toronto, Canada - 1918 Armistice Day is the anniversary of the official end of World War I, November 11, 1918. ... The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2008. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For Veterans Day in the United Kingdom, see Veterans Day UK. President Eisenhower signs HR7786, officially changing Armistice Day to Veterans Day. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Armistice Day Celebrations in Toronto, Canada - 1918 Armistice Day is the anniversary of the official end of World War I, November 11, 1918. ... For Veterans Day in the United Kingdom, see Veterans Day UK. President Eisenhower signs HR7786, officially changing Armistice Day to Veterans Day. ... -1... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Edward George Honey (1885 — 1922) was an Australian soldier and journalist who is often credited with having conceived the idea of a moment of silence on Armistice Day (now known as Remembrance Day). ... Wellesley Tudor Pole is an intriguing figure crossing from the world before the World Wars to well after and played particular roles in various ways through the period as well as authoring several books detailing many aspects of what he had seen and done across the years. ...

Contents

Observance in the Commonwealth

Remembrance Day, London, 2006.

Common British, Canadian, South African, and ANZAC traditions include two minutes of silence at the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month (11:00 am, 11 November), as that marks the time (in the United Kingdom) when armistice became effective. Remembrance Day is a day to commemorate the sacrifices that soldiers all over the world made, and is celebrated in different countries, in different ways. Image File history File links Remembrance_march. ... Image File history File links Remembrance_march. ... Anzac Day is commemorated by Australia and New Zealand on 25 April every year to remember members of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) who landed at Gallipoli in Turkey during World War I. Anzac Day is also a public holiday in the Cook Islands, Niue, Samoa and... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A white flag is traditionally used to represent a truce. ...


The Service of Remembrance in many Commonwealth countries generally includes the playing of the "Last Post," followed by the requisite two minutes of silence, followed again by the playing of "Reveille" (or, more commonly, "The Rouse"), and finished by a recitation of the "Ode of Remembrance." The "Scottish Bagpiper's Lament", "O Valiant Hearts", "I Vow to Thee, My Country" and "And did those feet in ancient time" are often played during the service. Services also include wreaths laid to honour the fallen, a blessing, and National Anthems.[3] The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2008. ... Last Post is a bugle call used at military funerals and ceremonies commemorating those who have fallen in war. ... Reveille (British and Canadian English: ; American English: ) is most often associated with the military; it is chiefly used to wake military personnel at sunrise. ... The Rouse is a bugle call is most often associated with the military in Commonwealth countries. ... The Ode of Remembrance is an ode taken from Laurence Binyons For the Fallen, which was first published in September 1914 to honour the fat people of the First World War. ... Flowers of the Forest is a Scottish folk song lamenting the deaths of James IV, many of his nobles, and over 10,000 men - the titular Flowers of the Forest - at the Battle of Flodden Field in northern England in 1513, a significant event in the history of Scotland. ... I Vow to Thee, My Country is an British patriotic song and Anglican hymn. ... “Jerusalem (song)” redirects here. ...


Australia

In Australia Remembrance Day is always observed on 11 November, although the day is not a public holiday. Services are held at 11am at war memorials in suburbs and towns across the two countries, at which the "Last Post" is played by a bugler and a one-minute silence is observed. In recent decades, however, Remembrance Day has been partly eclipsed by ANZAC Day (25 April) as the national day of war commemoration. The Australian Broadcasting Corporation will delay its 11AM radio news bulletin in favour of two minutes silence and the playing of the Last Post. is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Anzac Day is commemorated by Australia and New Zealand on 25 April every year to remember members of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) who landed at Gallipoli in Turkey during World War I. Anzac Day is also a public holiday in the Cook Islands, Niue, Samoa and... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Bermuda

Remembrance Day Parade, Hamilton, Bermuda, 1991.
Remembrance Day Parade, Hamilton, Bermuda, 1991.

In Bermuda, which sent the first colonial volunteer unit to the Western Front in 1915, and which had more people per capita in uniform during the Second World War than any other part of the Empire, Remembrance Day is still an important holiday. The parade in Hamilton had historically been a large and colourful one, as contingents from the Royal Navy, British Regular Army, the local Territorial units, the Canadian Forces, the US Army, Air Force, and Navy, and various cadet corps and other services were all contributed at one time or another to march with the veterans. Since the closing of British, Canadian, and American bases in 1995, the parade has barely grown smaller. In addition to the ceremony held in the City of Hamilton on Remembrance Day itself, marching to the Cenotaph (a smaller replica of the one in London), where wreathes are lain and orations made, a smaller military parade is also held in St. George's on the nearest Sunday to Remembrance Day. Image File history File links Rembrance_Day_Parade_Bermuda. ... Image File history File links Rembrance_Day_Parade_Bermuda. ... Western Front was a term used during the First and Second World Wars to describe the contested armed frontier between lands controlled by Germany to the East and the Allies to the West. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... City Hall in Hamilton. ... St. ...


Canada

In Canada, Remembrance Day is a holiday for federal government employees; for private business, provincial governments, and schools, its status varies by province: in Western Canada and Atlantic Canada, it is a general holiday; in Ontario and Quebec, it is not, although corporations that are federally registered may make the day a full holiday, or instead, designate a provincially-recognized holiday on a different day. The Government of Canada is the federal government of Canada. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ...

Poppies are laid on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier on Remembrance Day in Ottawa.
Poppies are laid on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier on Remembrance Day in Ottawa.

The official national ceremonies are held at the National War Memorial in Ottawa, presided over by the Governor General of Canada, any members of the Canadian Royal Family, the Prime Minister, and other dignitaries, to the observance of the public. Typically, these events begin with the tolling of the Carillon in the Peace Tower, during which serving members of the Canadian Forces arrive at Confederation Square, followed by the Ottawa diplomatic corps, Ministers of the Crown, special guests, the Royal Canadian Legion (RCL), the vice-regal party, and, if present, the royal party. Before the start of the ceremony, four armed sentries and three sentinels – two flag sentinels and one nursing sister – are posted at the foot of the cenotaph. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Canadian Tomb of the Unknown Soldier is located at the National War Memorial in Confederation Square, Ottawa. ... -1... The National War Memorial Canadas National War Memorial is located in Confederation Square in Ottawa, the nations capital. ... -1... The Governor General of Canada (French (feminine): Gouverneure générale du Canada, or (masculine): Gouverneur général du Canada) is the vice-regal representative in Canada of the Canadian monarch, who is the head of state. ... This article is about the monarchy of Canada, one of sixteen that share a common monarch; for information about this constitutional relationship, the other Commonwealth realm monarchies, and other relevant articles, see Commonwealth realm; for information on the reigning monarch, see Elizabeth II. Queen of Canada redirects here. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. ... The Peace Tower in view on Parliament Hill The Peace Tower at night For other uses, see Peace Tower (disambiguation). ... The Canadian Forces (CF) (French: Forces canadiennes (FC)) are the unified armed forces of Canada, governed by the National Defence Act, which states: The Canadian Forces are the armed forces of Her Majesty raised by Canada and consist of one Service called the Canadian Armed Forces. ... The diplomatic corps or corps diplomatique is the collective body of foreign diplomats accredited to a particular country or body. ... A minister or a secretary is a politician who heads a government ministry or department (e. ... -1... A viceroy is a royal official who governs a country or province in the name of and as representative of the monarch. ... General Orders for Sentries is the official title of a set of rules governing military guard duty. ...


The arrival of the Governor General is announced by a trumpeter sounding the "Still," whereupon the viceroy is met by the Dominion President of the RCL and escorted to a dais to receive the Vice-Regal Salute, after which the national anthem, "O Canada," is then played. The moment of remembrance begins with the bugling of "Last Post" immediately before 11:00 am, at which time the gun salute fires and the bells of the Peace Tower toll the hour. Another gun salute signals the end of the two minutes of silence, and cues the playing of a lament, and then the bugling of "The Rouse." A flypast of Canadian Air Command craft then occurs at the start of a 21 gun salute, upon the completion of which a choir sings "In Flanders Fields." The various parties then lay their wreaths at the base of the memorial; one wreath is set by the Silver Cross Mother, the most recent recipient of the Memorial Cross, on behalf of all mothers who lost children in any of Canada's armed conflicts. The royal and/or vice-regal group return to the dias to receive the playing of the Royal Anthem of Canada, "God Save the Queen," prior to the assembled Armed Forces personnel and veterans performing a March Past in front of the royal and/or viceregal persons, bringing about the end of the official ceremonies.[4] A tradition of paying more personal tribute to the sacrifice of those who have served and lost their lives in defence of the country has emerged since erection of the The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at the War Memorial in 2000. After the official ceremony the general public pay their respects by placing their poppies atop the Tomb. The Governor General of Canada (French (feminine): Gouverneure générale du Canada, or (masculine): Gouverneur général du Canada) is the vice-regal representative in Canada of the Canadian monarch, who is the head of state. ... A viceroy is a royal official who governs a country or province in the name of and as representative of the monarch. ... Dais (French dais, estrade, Italian predella), originally a part of the floor at the end of a medieval hall, raised a step above the rest of the building. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that evokes and eulogizes the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a countrys government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... For other uses, see O Canada (disambiguation). ... Last Post is a bugle call used at military funerals and ceremonies commemorating those who have fallen in war. ... A lament or lamentation is a song or poem expressing grief, regret or mourning. ... The Rouse is a bugle call is most often associated with the military in Commonwealth countries. ... The Red Arrows and Concorde conclude a special flypast over Buckingham Palace on 4 June, 2002 celebrating the Queens Golden Jubilee. ... A gun salute being fired by members of the The 21-gun salute is a ceremonial military honour performed when 21 rounds are fired from a cannon, rifle, or other form of firearm. ... A small portion of In Flanders Fields appeared alongside McCraes portrait on a Canadian stamp of 1968, issued to commemorate a half-century since his death. ... A Silver Cross Mother is chosen each year by the Royal Canadian Legion to lay a wreath during the Remembrance Day ceremony at the National War Memorial in Ottawa on behalf of all mothers who have lost children in the service of their country. ... The Memorial Cross (often known as the Silver Cross) is a Canadian medal awarded to the mother, widow, or next of kin of any member of the Canadian Forces who loses his life in active service, including peacekeeping, and other such international operations. ... A royal anthem is a patriotic song, much like a national anthem that recognizes the nations monarch. ... For the song by the Sex Pistols, see God Save the Queen (Sex Pistols song). ... A march, as a musical genre, is a piece of music with a strong regular rhythm which in origin was expressly written for marching to and most frequently performed by a military band. ... The Canadian Tomb of the Unknown Soldier is located at the National War Memorial in Confederation Square, Ottawa. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ...

The military Remembrance Day parade in Ottawa.
The military Remembrance Day parade in Ottawa.

Similar ceremonies take place in provincial capitals across the country, officiated by the relevant Lieutenant Governor, as well as in other cities, towns, and even hotels or corporate headquarters. Schools will usually hold special assemblies for the first half of the day, or on the school day prior, with various presentations concerning the remembrance of the war dead. The largest indoor ceremonies are believed to be held in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, with over 7,000 gathering in Credit Union Centre.[5]-1... In Canada, the lieutenant-governor (often without a hyphen[1], pronounced ), in French lieutenant-gouverneur/lieutenant-gouverneure (always with a hyphen), is the Canadian Monarchs, or Crowns, representative in a province, much as the Governor General is her representative at the national level. ... Credit Union Centre, formerly known as Saskatchewan Place or SaskPlace, is an arena located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. ...


New Zealand

New Zealand recognises the day as Armistice Day; events and ceremonies are similar to those in Australia. Armistice Day Celebrations in Toronto, Canada - 1918 Armistice Day is the anniversary of the official end of World War I, November 11, 1918. ...


Papua New Guinea

In Papua New Guinea, New Guinea marks Remembrance Day.[6]


South Africa

In South Africa, the day is not a public holiday. Commemoration ceremonies are usually held on the following Sunday, at which, as with Australia and Britain, the "Last Post" is played by a bugler followed by the observation of a two-minute silence. The two biggest commemoration ceremonies to mark the event in South Africa are held in Johannesburg, at the Cenotaph (where it has been held for 84 consecutive years), and at the War Memorial at the Union Buildings in Pretoria. This article is about the city in South Africa. ... The Union Buildings are situated on Meintjies Kop, Pretoria, and form the official seat of the South African government. ... Motto: Praestantia Praevaleat Pretoria (May Pretoria Be Pre-eminent In Excellence) Country Province Established 1855 Area  - Total 1,644 km² (634. ...


United Kingdom

Memorials outside London's Westminster Abbey for Remembrance Day, 2002.
Memorials outside London's Westminster Abbey for Remembrance Day, 2002.

In the United Kingdom, although two minutes of silence is observed on 11 November itself, the main observance is on the second Sunday of November, Remembrance Sunday. Ceremonies are held at local war memorials, usually organised by local branches of the Royal British Legion – an association for ex-servicemen. Typically, poppy wreaths are laid by representatives of the Crown, the armed forces, and local civic leaders, as well as by local organisations including ex-servicemen organisations, cadet forces, the Scouts, Guides, Boys' Brigade, St John Ambulance and the Salvation Army. The start and end of the silence is often also marked by the firing of a cannon. A minute's or two minutes' silence is also frequently incorporated into church services, and even everyday locations such as supermarkets and banks may invite their customers and staff to fall silent at 11:00 am.[7] Image File history File links Westminsterabbeypoppies. ... Image File history File links Westminsterabbeypoppies. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... In the United Kingdom, Remembrance Sunday is the second Sunday of November, the Sunday nearest to 11 November (Remembrance Day), which is the anniversary of the end of the hostilities of the First World War at 11 a. ... This memorial in England lists the names of soldiers who died in the First World War. ... Categories: Stub | British Army | Royal Air Force | Royal Navy ... This article refers to the general definition of cadet. ... It has been suggested that Gimmie 5 be merged into this article or section. ... Girlguiding UK is the national Guiding organisation of the United Kingdom. ... The Boys Brigade emblem The Boys Brigade (BB) is the worlds first uniformed youth organization. ... St. ... Shield of The Salvation Army The Salvation Army is a non-military evangelical Christian organisation. ... For the architectural structure, see Church (building). ...


The main national commemoration is held at Whitehall, in Central London, for dignitaries, the public, and ceremonial detachments from the armed forces and civilian uniformed services such as the Merchant Navy, Her Majesty's Coastguard, etc. Members of the British Royal Family walk through the Foreign and Commonwealth Office towards the cenotaph, assembling to the right of the monument to wait for Big Ben to strike 11:00 am, and for the King's Troop, Royal Horse Artillery at Horse Guards Parade, to fire the cannon marking the commencement of the 2 minutes of silence. Following this, "The Last Post" is played by the buglers of the Royal Marines. "The Rouse" is then played by the trumpeters of the Royal Air Force, after which, to Beethoven's "Death March," wreaths are laid by attendees in the following order: the Queen; senior members of the Royal Family attending in military uniform; the Prime Minister; the leaders of the major political parties from all parts of the United Kingdom; Commonwealth High Commissioners to London, on behalf of their respective nations; the Foreign Secretary, on behalf of the British Dependencies; the Chief of the Defence Staff; the First Sea Lord; the Chief of the General Staff; the Chief of the Air Staff; representatives of the merchant navy and Fishing Fleets and the merchant air service. Junior members of the Royal Family usually watch the service from the balcony of the Foreign Office. The service is generally conducted by the Bishop of London, with a choir from the Chapels Royal, in the presence of representatives of all major faiths in the United Kingdom. Before the marching commences, the members of the Royal Family and public sing the national anthem before the Royal Delegation lead out after the main service. Whitehall, London, looking south towards the Houses of Parliament. ... Central London is a much-used but unofficial and vaguely defined term for the most inner part of London, the capital of England. ... Her Majestys Coastguard is the agency of the government of the United Kingdom concerned with co-ordinating rescue at sea. ... Members of the Royal Family, during the lifetime of the late Queen Mother, on the balcony of Buckingham Palace after the Trooping the Colour ceremony. ... The Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Whitehall, seen from St. ... The Clock Tower, colloquially known as Big Ben (a name that correctly refers to the main bell) Big Ben redirects here. ... The Royal Horse Artillery (RHA) is a corps in the British Army. ... Horse Guards Parade, London Horse Guards Parade is a large parade ground off Whitehall in central London. ... The Royal Marines (RM) are the marines and amphibious infantry of the United Kingdom and, along with the Royal Navy and Royal Fleet Auxiliary, form the Naval Service [2]. They are also the United Kingdoms amphibious force and specialists in mountain and Arctic warfare. ... “Beethoven” redirects here. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2008. ... High Commissioner is the title of various high-ranking, special executive positions held by a commission of appointment. ... The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (commonly referred to as Foreign Secretary) is a member of the British Government responsible for relations with foreign countries, heading the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (often called simply the Foreign Office). ... A United Kingdom overseas territory (formerly known as a dependent territory or earlier as a crown colony) is a territory that is under the sovereignty and formal control of the United Kingdom but is not part of the United Kingdom proper (almost exclusively Great Britain and Northern Ireland). ... The Chief of the Defence Staff (CDS) is the professional head of the British Armed Forces. ... Sir Jonathon Band, the current First Sea Lord The First Sea Lord is the professional head of the Royal Navy and the whole Naval Service. ... Chief of the General Staff (CGS) has been the title of the professional head of the British Army since 1964. ... The Chief of the Air Staffs command flag, the Royal Air Force Ensign The Chief of the Air Staff is the professional head of the Royal Air Force and a member of both the Chiefs of Staff Committee and the Air Force Board. ... A container ship // Water transport redirects here. ... The Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Whitehall, seen from St. ... Arms of the Bishop of London The Bishop of London is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of London in the Province of Canterbury. ... The Chapel Royal did not originally refer to a building but an establishment in the Royal Household. ...


Members of the Metropolitan Police Cadets and British Army Cadets join in with the marching, alongside paramedics from St. John Ambulance and the London Ambulance Service, and conflict veterans from WW1, WW2, the Falklands, Kosovo, Bosnia, Northern Ireland and the ongoing conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. After the service, there is a parade of veterans, who also lay wreaths at the foot of the Cenotaph as they pass, and a salute is taken by a member of the Royal Family at Horse Guards Parade. // Traditionally young people from the age of 16 could apply to join a Police Force as a full time and paid Police cadet (if that Force operated such a scheme), the Police Cadets were seen as a precussor to joining the Police at 19, although there was no compulsion for... The Army Cadet Force (ACF) is a British cadet force that is sponsored by the British Army. ... The Star of Life, a globally recognized symbol for Emergency medical services. ... St John Ambulance vehicle in a London street. ... The London Ambulance Service (LAS) is the largest ambulance service in the world that does not directly charge its patients for its services. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Belligerents Argentina United Kingdom Commanders President Leopoldo Galtieri Vice-Admiral Juan Lombardo Brigadier-General Ernesto Crespo Brigade-General Mario Menéndez Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher Admiral Sir John Fieldhouse Rear-Admiral John “Sandy” Woodward Major-General Jeremy Moore Casualties and losses 649 killed 1,068 wounded 11,313 taken prisoner... The term Kosovo War or Kosovo Conflict is often used to describe two sequential and at times parallel armed conflicts (a civil war followed by an international war) in the southern Serbian province called Kosovo (officially Kosovo and Metohia), part of the former Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. ... Combatants  Bosnia and Herzegovina Volunteers from Islamic countries Croatian Community of Herzeg-Bosnia  Croatia Volunteers from Western Europe  Republika Srpska  Yugoslavia Various paramilitary units from FR Yugoslavia Volunteers from Eastern Europe Commanders Alija Izetbegović (President of Bosnia and Herzegovina) Sefer Halilović (Army chief of staff 1992-1993) Rasim Delić (Army... For other uses, see Troubles (disambiguation) and Trouble. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Outside the Commonwealth

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

United States

Veterans Day is commemorated in the United States on 11 November, and is both a federal holiday and a state holiday in all states. However, the function of the observance elsewhere is more closely matched by Memorial Day in May. In the United States, and some other allied nations, 11 November was formerly known as Armistice Day; in the United States it was given its new name after the end of World War II. Most schools, particularly more middle and high schools than some elementary schools, throughout the U.S. usually hold assemblies on a school day prior, with various presentations recognizing teachers and staff members who served in one of the five branches of the United States Armed Forces, as well as remembering the U.S. troops who died in past and present wars, and some patriotic music by a school choir, band and/or orchestra, including songs from a musical used as a tribute to the troops (e.g. "Bring Him Home" from Les Misérables). For Veterans Day in the United Kingdom, see Veterans Day UK. President Eisenhower signs HR7786, officially changing Armistice Day to Veterans Day. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the holiday in the United States. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Armistice Day Celebrations in Toronto, Canada - 1918 Armistice Day is the anniversary of the official end of World War I, November 11, 1918. ... Middle school and junior high school cover a period of education that straddles primary education and secondary education and serve as a bridge between them. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... Primary or elementary education is the first years of formal, structured education that occurs during childhood. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ... Les Misérables (pronunciation ), colloquially known as Les Mis, is a musical composed in 1980 by French composer Claude-Michel Schönberg on a libretto by Alain Boublil. ...


Germany

In Germany, Armistice or Remembrance Day is unknown. Public memory of World War I in Germany is generally scarce. Moreover, 11 November would be seen as an inappropriate date for such a holiday, as it traditionally marks the beginning of the German carnival. However, Volkstrauertag is commemorated. Originally this was on the fifth Sunday before Easter, but since 1952, has been celebrated two Sundays before the beginning of Advent. It has never been celebrated in the church since both the major German churches have their own festivals for commemorating the dead (All Souls Day in the case of the Roman Catholic church, Ewigkeitssonntag, or "Eternity Sunday" in the case of the Lutheran church. Both festivals also fall in November.)[citations needed] is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Carnival (disambiguation). ... The Volkstrauertag (people mourning day) is a public holiday in Germany. ... μ This article is about the Christian season. ... All Souls Day by William Bouguereau All Souls Day (formally, Commemoratio omnium Fidelium Defunctorum or Commemoration of all the Faithful Departed), also called Defuncts Day in Mexico and Belgium, is the day set apart for the commemoration of the faithful departed. ... -1...


Anglican and Roman Catholics

For Anglican and Roman Catholic Christians, there is a coincidental but appropriate overlap of Remembrance Day with the feast of St. Martin of Tours, a saint famous for putting aside his life as a soldier and turning to the peace-filled life of a monk. Statues or images associated with St. Martin are for this reason sometimes used as symbols of Remembrance Day in religious contexts (e.g., the Anglican Cathedral of Montreal). The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Topics in Christianity Preaching Prayer Ecumenism Relation to other religions Movements Music Liturgy Calendar Symbols Art Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... St. ...


Poppies

Wreaths of artificial poppies used as a symbol of remembrance.
Wreaths of artificial poppies used as a symbol of remembrance.
Poppies are sold every year as an act of remembrance to fallen soldiers at war.
Poppies are sold every year as an act of remembrance to fallen soldiers at war.

The poppy's significance to Remembrance Day is a result of Canadian military physician John McCrae's poem In Flanders Fields. The poppy emblem was chosen because of the poppies that bloomed across some of the worst battlefields of Flanders in World War I, their red colour an appropriate symbol for the bloodshed of trench warfare. A Frenchwoman, Anna E. Guérin, introduced the widely used artificial poppies given out today. Some people choose to wear white poppies, which emphasises a desire for peaceful alternatives to military action. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x853, 175 KB) Wreaths constructed with artificial poppies used as a symbol of remembrance. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x853, 175 KB) Wreaths constructed with artificial poppies used as a symbol of remembrance. ... Binomial name L. The Corn Poppy, Field Poppy, Flanders Poppy, or Red Poppy is the wild poppy of agricultural cultivation—Papaver rhoeas. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1233x1600, 322 KB) Remembrance Poppy, WW2 section - Australian War Memorial, Canberra File links The following pages link to this file: Remembrance Day Wikipedia:Featured picture candidates Remembrance Wikipedia:Featured picture candidates/Poppy ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1233x1600, 322 KB) Remembrance Poppy, WW2 section - Australian War Memorial, Canberra File links The following pages link to this file: Remembrance Day Wikipedia:Featured picture candidates Remembrance Wikipedia:Featured picture candidates/Poppy ... This article is about the plant. ... Lieutenant Colonel John Alexander McCrae Lieutenant Colonel John Alexander McCrae, MD (November 30, 1872 – January 28, 1918) was a Canadian poet, physician, author, artist and soldier during World War I and a surgeon during the battle of Ypres. ... A small portion of In Flanders Fields appeared alongside McCraes portrait on a Canadian stamp of 1968, issued to commemorate a half-century since his death. ... For other uses, see Flanders (disambiguation). ... {{subst:empty template|}} {{Copyviocore |url= |month = {{subst:CURRENTMONTHNAME}} |day = {{subst:CURRENTDAY}} |year = {{subst:CURRENTYEAR}} |time = {{subst:CURRENTTIME}} |timestamp = {{subst:CURRENTTIMESTAMP}}}} Trench warfare is a form of warfare where both combatants have fortified positions and fighting lines are static. ... photo of a White Poppy, the remembrance badge from the Peace Pledge Union The White Poppy is used as a symbol of peace, worn as an alternative to the red poppy for Remembrance Day. ...


Canada

In Canadian tradition, the poppy is worn by many members of society during the two weeks prior to November 11. Until 1996, poppies were made by disabled veterans in Canada, but they have since been made by a private contractor.[8] is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


United Kingdom

In England, Wales, and Northern Ireland the poppies are the flat Earl Haig variety with a leaf. Wearers require a separate pin to attach the poppy to their clothing. Because the poppy honours soldiers in the British Army, in Northern Ireland it is worn primarily by members of the Unionist community. For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... The title Earl Haig was created in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1919 for Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig. ...


Poppy variations

In Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Scotland the poppies are curled at the petals with no leaf. The Canadian poppies consist of two pieces and a pin to attach them to clothing. The head portion of the pin is bent at an angle in a simple unusual design that requires a unique machine at manufacturing. For many years the centre of the Canadian poppy was both black and green (from two small concentric circles made of felt - the outer was green and the inner was black); current designs are black only. This article is about the country. ... Main articles: History of Canada, Timeline of Canadian history Canada has been inhabited by aboriginal peoples (known in Canada as First Nations) for at least 40,000 years. ...


In Sri Lanka in the inter-war years, there were rival sales of yellow Suriya (portia tree) flowers by the Suriya-Mal Movement on Remembrance Day, since funds from poppy sales were not used for Sri Lankan ex-service personnel but were repatriated to Britain. However, nowadays poppy sales are used for indigenous ex-service personnel who have been disabled in the ongoing civil war. Binomial name Thespesia populnea (L.) Sol ex Correa The Portia tree (Thespesia populnea; Family Malvaceae) is a small tree or arborescent shrub 5-10 (-20) m high that is pantropical in littoral environments, although probably native only to the Old World. ... The Suriya-Mal Movement was formed in British ruled Ceylon (Sri Lanka) to sell Suriya (Portia tree) flowers on Poppy Day for the benefit of Sri Lankan ex-servicemen. ... Ex-service is a British term which refers to those who have served in the British Empire or Commonwealth Armed Forces. ... Combatants Military of Sri Lanka Indian Peace Keeping Force Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam Commanders Junius Richard Jayawardene (1983-89) Ranasinghe Premadasa (1989-93) Dingiri Banda Wijetunge (1993-94) Chandrika Kumaratunga (1994-2005) Mahinda Rajapaksa (2005-present) Velupillai Prabhakaran (1983-present) Strength 111,000[1] 11,000[1] The Sri...


Name

"Remembrance Day" is the primary designation for the day in many Commonwealth countries such as Australia and Canada. However, "Armistice Day" also remains, often to differentiate the event from Remembrance Sunday, and is the primary designation used in New Zealand and France. The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2008. ... Armistice Day Celebrations in Toronto, Canada - 1918 Armistice Day is the anniversary of the official end of World War I, November 11, 1918. ... In the United Kingdom, Remembrance Sunday is the second Sunday of November, the Sunday nearest to 11 November (Remembrance Day), which is the anniversary of the end of the hostilities of the First World War at 11 a. ...


"Poppy Day" is also a popular term used, particularly in Malta and South Africa. Veterans Day also falls upon this day in the United States, yet many other allied nations have quite different Veterans Days. For Veterans Day in the United Kingdom, see Veterans Day UK. President Eisenhower signs HR7786, officially changing Armistice Day to Veterans Day. ...


See also

Front page of the New York Times on Armistice Day, 11 November 1918 The armistice treaty between the Allies and Germany was signed in a railway carriage in Compiègne Forest on November 11, 1918, and marked the end of the First World War on the Western Front. ... Hari Pahlawan (Malay: Heroes Day) is a Malaysian Rememberance Day which is celebrated on 31 July every year before Hari Merdeka on 31 August. ... For Veterans Day in the United Kingdom, see Veterans Day UK. President Eisenhower signs HR7786, officially changing Armistice Day to Veterans Day. ... The British tomb of The Unknown Warrior holds an unidentified British soldier killed on a European battlefield during World War I. He was buried in Westminster Abbey, London on November 11, 1920, the earliest such tomb honoring the unknown dead of World War I. Even the battlefield the Warrior came... In the United Kingdom, Remembrance Sunday is the second Sunday of November, the Sunday nearest to 11 November (Remembrance Day), which is the anniversary of the end of the hostilities of the First World War at 11 a. ... A small portion of In Flanders Fields appeared alongside McCraes portrait on a Canadian stamp of 1968, issued to commemorate a half-century since his death. ... -1... The Veterans Bill of Rights is a bill of rights in Canada for veterans of the Canadian Forces and Royal Canadian Mounted Police. ... Returned & Services League of Australia or Australian Returned Soldiers and Sailors Imperial League was formed in 1916 and renamed to the current name in 1965. ... see also Haig Homes The Haig Fund (more properly the Earl Haig Fund) is a charity set up after World War I to assist ex-servicemen. ... The Royal New Zealand Returned and Services Association Inc, often referred to as the Returned Services Association, RSA or the RNZRSA, is a voluntary ex-service organisation, dedicated to the welfare of veterans. ... Anzac Day is commemorated by Australia and New Zealand on 25 April every year to remember members of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) who landed at Gallipoli in Turkey during World War I. Anzac Day is also a public holiday in the Cook Islands, Niue, Samoa and... Lest We Forget is a phrase popularised in 1887, by Rudyard Kipling; it formed the refrain of his poem Recessional. ... The Remembrance Day bombing, also known as the Enniskillen bombing or the Poppy Day massacre,[1][2] refers to a bomb explosion in the County Fermanagh town of Enniskillen, Northern Ireland which was undertaken by the Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA). ... Armistice Day Celebrations in Toronto, Canada - 1918 Armistice Day is the anniversary of the official end of World War I, November 11, 1918. ... photo of a White Poppy, the remembrance badge from the Peace Pledge Union The White Poppy is used as a symbol of peace, worn as an alternative to the red poppy for Remembrance Day. ... The Volkstrauertag (people mourning day) is a public holiday in Germany. ... Collective memory is a term coined by Maurice Halbwachs, separating the notion from the individual memory. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Remembrance Day (Canada)
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Remembrance Day (United Kingdom)
  • The History of Poppy Day
  • Video record of Remembrance day rituals 2005 in South London
  • The Poppy Appeal

Notes

  1. ^ The Remembrance Ceremony. rsa.org.nz. Retrieved on 7 November 2006.
  2. ^ The Lamplighter Movement. networkoflight.org. Retrieved on 7 November 2006.
  3. ^ A Guide to Commemorative Services - Veterans Affairs Canada
  4. ^ Royal Canadian Legion: National Remembrance Day Ceremony 2007
  5. ^ French, Janet. "First Nations vets remember at Wanuskewin", StarPhoenix, 2007-11-13. Retrieved on 2007-11-13. 
  6. ^ Papua New Guinea marks Remembrance Day. Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved on 11 November 2007.
  7. ^ War dead remembered. BBC. Retrieved on 5 August 2007.
  8. ^ THE ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION - Poppy & Remembrance » All About the Poppy

6. "The Origin of the Two Minutes of Silence,"in Our Empire, vol. VI, no 8, 1931, p. 27. Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


References

  • Royal New Zealand Returned and Services Association
  • Commemoration - Red poppies
  • Royal Canadian Legion
  • Returned & Services League of Australia

 
 

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