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Encyclopedia > Remaster

Remaster (and its derivations, frequently found in the phrases digitally remastered or digital remastering) is a word and concept that became most popular in the digital audio age, although the "mastering" process has existed since recording began. The measure of its success depends on only three things: 1. The skill and experience of the Mastering Engineer. 2. To a lesser extent, the tools used to do the job. 3. The quality of the original source material. Frequently trumpeted with regard to CD and DVD releases, remastering has become a powerful buzzword in multimedia industries, and it generally implies some sort of enhancement of sound and picture to a previous, existing product (frequently designed to encourage people to buy a new version of something they already own). For example, the reissue boom that began in the mid-nineties saw remastered versions of the back-catalogues of The Who, The Byrds and others, while remastered editions of first-generation DVD releases are similarly bestsellers. Despite its status as an industry buzzword, however, remastering actually refers to a fairly distinct process, one which does not inherently include the notion of a positive upgrade. A music mastering engineer is one skilled in the practice of taking audio (typically musical content) thats been previously mixed in either the analog or digital domain as mono, stereo, or multichannel formats and preparing it for use in distribution, whether by physical media such as a CD, or... CD may stand for: Compact Disc Canadian Forces Decoration Cash Dispenser (at least used in Japan) CD LPMud Driver Centrum-Demokraterne (Centre Democrats of Denmark) Certificate of Deposit ÄŒeské Dráhy (Czech Railways) Chad (NATO country code) Chalmers Datorförening (computer club of the Chalmers University of Technology) a 1960s... Size comparison: A 12 cm Sony DVD+RW and a 19 cm Dixon Ticonderoga pencil. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A reissue or re-release is the new or repeated issue of an item. ... The Who are an English rock band that first formed in 1964, and grew to be considered one of the greatest[1] and most influential[2] bands in the world. ... The Byrds (formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1964) were an American rock band. ...

Contents

Mastering

For more details on this topic, see Audio mastering.

To properly understand what is meant by remastering, it is helpful to explain the meaning of mastering. Audio mastering will be explained, but video/film mastering is similar. Mastering, a form of audio post-production, is the process of preparing and transferring recorded audio from a source containing the final mix to a data storage device (the master); the source from which all copies will be produced (via methods such as pressing, duplication or replication). ...


A master is the recording which is duplicated into other formats i.e. LP records, CDs, DVDs etc.. Problematically, several different levels of masters often exist for any one audio release. As an example, examine the way a typical music album from the 1960s was created. Musicians and vocalists were recorded on multi-track tape. This tape was mixed to create a stereo or mono master. A further master tape would likely be created from this original master recording consisting of equalization and other adjustments to the audio. More master recordings would be duplicated from the equalized master for regional copying purposes. Pressing masters for vinyl recordings would be created. Obviously, master is a fairly loose term, one that can be used for many stages of the recording process, however, all vinyl records would derive from one of the master recordings. Historical records of events have been made for thousands of years in one form or another. ... An album or record album is a collection of related audio or music tracks distributed to the public. ... Compact audio cassette Magnetic tape is a non-volatile storage medium consisting of a magnetic coating on a thin plastic strip. ... Audio mixing is used in sound recording, audio editing and sound systems to balance the relative volume and frequency content of a number of sound sources. ... This article is about the spacecraft and the mission. ... Label for 1. ... For information about computer bandwidth management, see Equalization (computing). ... A gramophone record, (also vinyl record, phonograph record, LP record, or simply record) is an analogue sound recording medium consisting of a flat disc with an inscribed modulated spiral groove. ...


Thus, mastering refers to the process of creating a master. This might be as simple as copying a tape for further duplication purposes, or might include the actual equalization and processing steps used to fine-tune material for release. The latter example usually requires the work of mastering engineers.


With the advent of digital recording in the late 1970s, many mastering ideas changed. Previously, creating new masters meant incurring an analogue generational loss; in other words, copying a tape to a tape meant reducing the signal-to-noise ratio, or how much "music" was on the tape versus how much "noise" (tape hiss, static, etc.) Although noise reduction techniques exist, they also increase other audio distortions such as azimuth shift, wow and flutter, print through and stereo image shift. With digital recording, masters could be created and duplicated without incurring the usual generational loss. As CDs were a digital format, digital masters created from original analog recordings became a necessity. In digital recording, the analog signal of a motion-picture/sound is converted into a stream of discrete numbers, representing the changes in air pressure (chroma and luminace values in case of video) through time; thus making an abstract template for the original sound. ... An analog or analogue signal is an allergy continuous in both time and amplitude. ... Signal-to-noise ratio (often abbreviated SNR or S/N) is an electrical engineering concept defined as the ratio of a signal power to the noise power corrupting the signal. ... Tape hiss is the high frequency noise present on analogue magnetic tape recordings caused by the size of the magnetic particles used to make the tape. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... Wow is a relatively slow form of flutter (pitch variation) which can affect both gramophone records and audio cassettes. ... Flutter: In electronics, rapid variation of signal parameters, such as amplitude, phase, and frequency. ... CDS may refer to: // Content delivery system is a computer-based system, often web-based for collecting and coordinating electronic documents and communications in Avionics, CDS means Cockpit display system, which is another term for Glass cockpit. ... A digital system is one that uses discrete values (often electrical voltages), especially those representable as binary numbers, or non-numeric symbols such as letters or icons, for input, processing, transmission, storage, or display, rather than a continuous spectrum of values (ie, as in an analog system). ...


Remastering

Remastering is, at its core, the process of creating a new master for an album, movie, or any other creation. It tends to nowadays specifically refer to the process of porting a creation from one medium to another, but this is not always the case. For example, a vinyl LP originally pressed from a worn-out copy tape many tape generations removed from the "original" master recording could be remastered and re-pressed from a better condition tape. A gramophone record, (also phonograph record - often simply record) is an analog sound recording medium: a flat disc rotating at a constant angular velocity, with inscribed spiral grooves in which a stylus or needle rides. ...


Here buzz-speak and practical application collide. In actuality, all CDs created from analogue sources are technically digitally remastered. The process of creating a digital transfer of an analogue tape re-masters the material in the digital domain, even if nothing "special"--no equalization, compression, or other processing--is done to the material. CDS may refer to: // Content delivery system is a computer-based system, often web-based for collecting and coordinating electronic documents and communications in Avionics, CDS means Cockpit display system, which is another term for Glass cockpit. ... For information about computer bandwidth management, see Equalization (computing). ... Audio level compression, also called dynamic range compression, volume compression, compression, limiting, or DRC (often seen in DVD player settings) is a process that manipulates the dynamic range of an audio signal. ...


Ideally, because of their high resolution, a CD or DVD (or other) release should come from the best source possible, with the most care taken during its transfer. This does not always happen. The earliest days of the CD era found record companies using whatever tapes they had lying around to create their CDs, with frequently underwhelming results. An nth-generation tape equalized for vinyl frequency response might be deemed perfectly acceptable by a record company, and (importantly) might be much easier to locate than the "original" source master. Additionally, the earliest days of the CD era found digital technology in its infancy, which also aided often poor sounding digital transfers marked by dropouts, underutilization of Signal-To-Noise Ratio, etc. The earliest days of the DVD era were hardly any different, with early DVD copies of movies frequently being produced from worn prints, with low bitrates and muffled audio. When the first CD remasters turned out to bestsellers--see, for example, the box set boom--companies soon realized that new editions of bare-bones back catalogue items could compete with new releases as a source of revenue. Back catalogue values skyrocketed, and today it is not unusual to see expanded and remastered editions of fairly modern albums (e.g. "New Miserable Experience" by the Gin Blossoms). For information about computer bandwidth management, see Equalization (computing). ... CD may stand for: Compact Disc Canadian Forces Decoration Cash Dispenser (at least used in Japan) CD LPMud Driver Centrum-Demokraterne (Centre Democrats of Denmark) Certificate of Deposit ÄŒeské Dráhy (Czech Railways) Chad (NATO country code) Chalmers Datorförening (computer club of the Chalmers University of Technology) a 1960s... A digital system is one that uses discrete values (often electrical voltages), especially those representable as binary numbers, or non-numeric symbols such as letters or icons, for input, processing, transmission, storage, or display, rather than a continuous spectrum of values (ie, as in an analog system). ... Signal-to-noise ratio (often abbreviated SNR or S/N) is an electrical engineering concept defined as the ratio of a signal power to the noise power corrupting the signal. ... Size comparison: A 12 cm Sony DVD+RW and a 19 cm Dixon Ticonderoga pencil. ... Size comparison: A 12 cm Sony DVD+RW and a 19 cm Dixon Ticonderoga pencil. ... For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as... CD may stand for: Compact Disc Canadian Forces Decoration Cash Dispenser (at least used in Japan) CD LPMud Driver Centrum-Demokraterne (Centre Democrats of Denmark) Certificate of Deposit ÄŒeské Dráhy (Czech Railways) Chad (NATO country code) Chalmers Datorförening (computer club of the Chalmers University of Technology) a 1960s... A box set (sometimes referred to as a boxed set) is one or more musical recordings, films, television programs, or other collection of related things that are contained in a box. ...


Theoretically, digital remastering should solve some of these problems. Original master tapes, or something close to them, can be used to make CD releases. Better processing choices can be used. Better prints can be utilized, with sound elements remixed to 5.1 and obvious print flaws digitally corrected. The modern era gives content providers almost unlimited ways to touch up, doctor, and "improve" their creations and products, and as each release promises improved sound, video, extras and others, producers hope these upgrades will entice consumers into making a purchase.


Criticism

While digitally remastering films or audio does generally improve their visual and/or sound quality, it is not always appreciated by everyone. Some argue that remastering something from the early 1980s, for instance, is better than a mastering of a recorded medium from the early 1990s. These people may also argue that the remixing of elements of an original recording may hinder the remastered one. A couple of the reasons for remastering engineers to remix elements of a recording include a first-time stereo mix of a particular song where previous releases were only in mono and/or fake stereo (a.k.a. "electronic rechanneling" or simply "rechanneling"), and another being the fact that the original mixdown tape having been damaged and discarded after heavy use. In particular, modern-day heavy use of processes like dynamic range compression and noise reduction may have actually sparked disappointment in the eyes of many fans against many current remixes like The Who's Live at Leeds Deluxe. Those opposed also argue that unless the original recording has been seen, they may also be unaware whether or not there has been considerable update. A remix is an alternative version of a song, different from the original version. ... A remix is an alternative version of a song, different from the original version. ... Label for 2. ... Label for 1. ... In synthesizers, capable of sounding two voices, or notes, at a time. ... Dynamic range compression also called DRC (often seen in DVD player settings), audio level compression, volume compression, compression, or limiting, is a process that manipulates the dynamic range of an audio signal. ... Noise reduction is the process of removing noise from a signal. ... The Who are an English rock band that first formed in 1964, and grew to be considered one of the greatest[1] and most influential[2] bands in the world. ... Live at Leeds (1970) is The Whos first live album, and indeed is their only live album that was released while the band was still recording and performing regularly. ...


Also many remastered CDs from the late 1990s onwards have become casualties of the loudness war, where the average volume of the recording is pushed ever higher at the expense of dynamic range. The phrase loudness war (or loudness race) refers to the music industrys tendency to record, produce and broadcast music at progressively increasing levels of loudness to create a sound that stands out from others. ...


See also

Reefer Madness was issued in a Special Addiction as a reference to the cult films ironic appeal. ...

References

External links

  • Movie Review Query Engine Movie/DVD review meta-site
  • Steve Hoffman's WebsiteWebsite about remastering engineer Steve Hoffman
  • EROCK Remastering Professional remastering services

  Results from FactBites:
 
Remaster - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1125 words)
Remaster (and its derivations, frequently found in the phrases digitally remastered or digital remastering) is a word and concept that emerged out of the digital age, although it had existed before then.
A couple of the reasons for remastering engineers to remix elements of a recording include a first-time stereo mix of a particular song where previous releases were only in mono and/or fake stereo (a.k.a.
Also many remastered CDs from the late 1990s onwards have become casualties of the loudness war, where the average volume of the recording is pushed ever higher at the expense of dynamic range.
Dave Hopkins: The Band Remasters (5466 words)
In addition, material from liner notes or gatefold sleeves which was inexplicably omitted from the previous CD versions of these albums has thankfully returned, including the "Next of Kin" photo, the interior Stage Fright photo, and the lyrics to Cahoots.
The B-side version was in mono, but we now have a remastered stereo mix which pans guitar and organ into the left channel, piano and drums to the right.
With a very different feel-and a different lead vocalist-from the live cuts included on Before the Flood and Watkins Glen, this heretofore unknown studio version of "Endless Highway" dates from the Cahoots sessions, but was rejected for the album (according to Robbie Robertson's comments in the liner notes) because it didn't fit thematically.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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