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Encyclopedia > Religious toleration
The cross of the war memorial and a menorah for Hanukkah coexist in Oxford.
The cross of the war memorial and a menorah for Hanukkah coexist in Oxford.

Religious toleration is the condition of accepting or permitting others' religious beliefs and practices which disagree with one's own. Front page of Religious Tolerance. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1168x1760, 313 KB) Summary The cross of the war memorial and a menorah for Hanukkah coexist in Oxford. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1168x1760, 313 KB) Summary The cross of the war memorial and a menorah for Hanukkah coexist in Oxford. ... A reliquary in the form of an ornate Christian Cross Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope... This memorial in England lists the names of soldiers who died in the First World War. ... This article is about the seven branched candelabrum used in the Temple in Jerusalem. ... Grand Rabbi Israel Abraham Portugal of Skulen Hasidism lighting Hanukkah lights Hanukkah (‎, also spellled Chanukah), also known as the Festival of Lights, is an eight-day Jewish holiday beginning on the 25th day of the month of Kislev, which may fall anytime from late November to late December. ... This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ... Various Religious symbols, including (first row) Christian, Jewish, Hindu, Bahai, (second row) Islamic, tribal, Taoist, Shinto (third row) Buddhist, Sikh, Hindu, Jain, (fourth row) Ayyavazhi, Triple Goddess, Maltese cross, pre-Christian Slavonic Religion is the adherence to codified beliefs and rituals that generally involve a faith in a spiritual...


In a country with a state religion, toleration means that the government permits religious practices of other sects besides the state religion, and does not persecute believers in other faiths. Historically, toleration has been a contentious issue within many religions as well as between one religion and another. At issue is not merely whether other faiths should be permitted, but also whether a ruler who is a believer may practice or permit tolerance. In the Middle Ages, toleration of Judaism was a contentious issue throughout Christendom. Today, there are concerns about toleration of Christianity in Islamic states (see also dhimmi). South America Europe Middle East Africa Asia Oceania Demography of religions by country Full list of articles on religion by country Religion Portal         Nations with state religions:  Buddhism  Islam  Shia Islam  Sunni Islam  Orthodox Christianity  Protestantism  Roman Catholic Church A state religion (also called an official religion, established church... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This T-and-O map, which abstracts the known world to a cross inscribed within an orb, remakes geography in the service of Christian iconography. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... This article is about Islamic religious law. ... This article is about dhimmi in the context of Islamic law. ...


For individuals, religious toleration generally means an attitude of acceptance towards other people's religions. It does not mean that one views other religions as equally true; merely that others have the right to hold and practice their beliefs. Proselytism can be a contentious issue; it can be regarded as an offense against the validity of others' religions, or as an expression of one's own faith. Proselytism is the practice of attempting to convert people to another opinion, usually another religion. ...

Contents

Timeline

Events November 29 - Antioch struck by an earthquake. ... “Cyrus” redirects here. ... The Cyrus Cylinder. ... Events By Place Roman Empire May 5 - Galerius issues his Edict of Toleration, ending persecution of Christians in his part of the Roman Empire. ... Galerius Maximianus (c. ... February - Wtf is up mah cracka??. Constantine issues the Edict of Milan, ending all persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire. ... The Edict of Milan was a letter that proclaimed religious toleration in the Roman Empire. ... For other uses, see Constantine I (disambiguation). ... Aureus of Licinius, celebrating his tenth year of reign and the fifth year of his son Licinius (on the obverse). ... Events March 16 - Massacre and mass-suicide of the Jews of York, England prompted by Crusaders and Richard Malebys kill 150-500 Jews in Cliffords Tower June 10 - Third Crusade: Frederick I Barbarossa drowned in the Saleph River while leading an army to Jerusalem. ... This article is about the person. ... Yassa, alternatively Yasa or Yasaq, is a written code of laws created by Genghis Khan. ... Events January 5 - Great fire in Eindhoven, Netherlands. ... Sebastian Castellio. ... Events January 11 - Austrian nobility is granted Freedom of religion. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian II. His Coat of Arms Maximilian II, Holy Roman Emperor of the Habsburg dynasty (July 31, 1527 – October 12, 1576) was king of Bohemia from 1562, king of Hungary from 1563 and emperor of the Holy Roman Empire from 1564 until his death. ... Year 1573 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Warsaw Confederation (January 28, 1573) was an important event in the history of Poland, and is considered as the beginning of religious freedom in Poland The religious tolerance in Poland had much longer tradition and was de facto policy during the reign of the recently deceased king Sigismund II... Events January 7 - Boris Godunov seizes the throne of Russia following the death of his brother-in-law, Tsar Feodor I. April 13 - Edict of Nantes - Henry IV of France grants French Huguenots equal rights with Catholics. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Henry IV of France, also Henry III of Navarre (13 December 1553 – 14 May 1610), ruled as King of France from 1589 to 1610 and King of Navarre from 1572 to 1610. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... From the 16th to the 18th century the name Huguenot was applied to a member of the Protestant Reformed Church of France, historically known as the French Calvinists. ... // Events April 4 – King of Spain signs an edit of expulsion of all moriscos from Spain April 9 – Spain recognizes Dutch independence May 23 - Official ratification of the Second Charter of Virginia. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Holy Roman Emperor Rudolf II Rudolf II Habsburg was an emperor of the Holy Roman Empire, king of Bohemia, and king of Hungary. ... Flag of Bohemia Bohemia (Czech: ; German: ) is a historical region in central Europe, occupying the western and middle thirds of the Czech Republic. ... Events January 8 - Miles Sindercombe, would-be-assassin of Oliver Cromwell, and his group are captured in London February - Admiral Robert Blake defeats the Spanish West Indian Fleet in a battle over the seizure of Jamaica. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the settlement in present-day New York City. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... Catholic Emancipation was a process in Great Britain and Ireland in the late 18th century and early 19th century which involved reducing and removing many of the restrictions on Roman Catholics which had been introduced by the Act of Uniformity, the Test Acts and the Penal Laws. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (abbreviated UDHR) is an advisory declaration adopted by the United Nations General Assembly (A/RES/217, 10 December 1948 at Palais de Chaillot, Paris). ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Second Vatican Council, or Vatican II, was an Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church opened under Pope John XXIII in 1962 and closed under Pope Paul VI in 1965. ... Dignitatis Humanæ is the Second Vatican Councils Declaration on Religious Freedom. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A Day of Prayer is a day allocated to prayer, either by leaders of religions or the general public, for a specific purpose. ... This article is about the Italian town. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... //   (Russian: IPA: ) is politics of maximal openness, transparency of activity of all official (governmental) institutes, and freedom of information. ... Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev[1] (Russian: , IPA: ; born 2 March 1931) is a Russian politician. ...

Criticism

Main article: Religious intolerance

Contemporary authors such as Sam Harris, Richard Dawkins, Christopher Hitchens and Daniel C. Dennett have all written about the potential social hazards of allowing religious beliefs to go unchallenged. In The End of Faith, Sam Harris notes that we are unwilling, as a society, to tolerate unjustified beliefs in, for example, architecture. He asserts that we should be similarly unwilling to tolerate unjustified beliefs about morality, spirituality, politics, and the origin of humanity. In his preface to The God Delusion, Richard Dawkins says, "If this book works as I intend, religious readers who open it will be atheists when they put it down."[13] Religious intolerance is either intolerance motivated by ones own religious beliefs or intolerance against anothers religious beliefs or practices. ... For other persons named Sam Harris, see Sam Harris (disambiguation). ... Clinton Richard Dawkins, FRS (born March 26, 1941) is a British ethologist, evolutionary biologist and popular science writer who holds the Charles Simonyi Chair for the Public Understanding of Science at the University of Oxford. ... Christopher Eric Hitchens (born April 13, 1949) is a British-American author, journalist and literary critic. ... Daniel Clement Dennett (born March 28, 1942) is an American philosopher. ... Sam Harris began writing The End of Faith in what he has described as a period of collective grief and stupefaction following the September 11, 2001 attacks. ... A preface is an introduction to a book written by the author of the book. ... The God Delusion is a book by British biologist Richard Dawkins, Professor for the Public Understanding of Science at the University of Oxford. ...


See also

The Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen guarantees freedom of religion, as long as religious activities do not infringe on public order in ways detrimental to society. ... The status of religious freedom around the world varies from country to country. ... South America Europe Middle East Africa Asia Oceania Demography of religions by country Full list of articles on religion by country Religion Portal         Nations with state religions:  Buddhism  Islam  Shia Islam  Sunni Islam  Orthodox Christianity  Protestantism  Roman Catholic Church A state religion (also called an official religion, established church... This article is about religious pluralism. ... The term national church is usually a reference to a church organization in Christianity that claims pastoral jurisdiction over a nation. ... It has been suggested that Laïcité be merged into this article or section. ... State atheism is the official rejection of religion in all forms by a government in favor of atheism. ... “Tolerance” redirects here. ... Religious intolerance is either intolerance motivated by ones own religious beliefs or intolerance against anothers religious beliefs or practices. ... Front page of Religious Tolerance. ...

Further reading

  • Barzilai, Gad (2007). Law and Religion. Ashgate. ISBN 978-0-7546-2494-3. 
  • Beneke, Chris (September 2006). Beyond Toleration: The Religious Origins of American Pluralism. Oxford University Press, USA. ISBN 0-19-530555-8. 
  • Coffey, John (2000). Persecution and Toleration in Protestant England, 1558-1689 (in English). Longman Publishing Group. ISBN 0-582-30465-2. 
  • Curry, Thomas J. (1989-12-19). Church and State in America to the Passage of the First Amendment. Oxford University Press; Reprint edition (December 19, 1989). ISBN 0-19-505181-5. 
  • (2000) in Grell, Ole Peter, and Roy Porter: Toleration in Enlightenment Europe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0521651967. 
  • Hamilton, Marci A. (2005-06-17). God vs. the Gavel : Religion and the Rule of Law, Edward R. Becker (Foreword, Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-85304-4. 
  • Hanson, Charles P. (1998). Necessary Virtue: The Pragmatic Origins of Religious Liberty in New England. University Press of Virginia. ISBN 0813917948. 
  • Kaplan, Benjamin J. (2007). Divided by Faith: Religious Conflict and the Practice of Toleration in Early Modern Europe. Belknap Press. ISBN 0674024303. 
  • (December 1997) in Laursen, John Christian and Nederman, Cary: Beyond the Persecuting Society: Religious Toleration Before the Enlightenment. University of Pennsylvania Press (December 1997). ISBN 0-8122-3331-X. 
  • Murphy, Andrew R. (July 2001). Conscience and Community: Revisiting Toleration and Religious Dissent in Early Modern England and America. Pennsylvania State University Press. ISBN 0-271-02105-5. 
  • Walsham, Alexandra (September 2006). Charitable Hatred: Tolerance and Intolerance in England, 1500-1700. Manchester University Press. ISBN 0719052394. 
  • Zagorin, Perez (2003). How the Idea of Religious Toleration Came to the West. Princeton University Press. ISBN 0-691-12142-7. 

References

  1. ^ British Museum, The Cyrus Cylinder, retrieved 01 June 2007
  2. ^ "Valerius Maximianus Galerius", Karl Hoeber, Catholic Encyclopedia 1909 Ed, retrieved 01 June 2007.[1]
  3. ^ "Constantine I", Encyclopedia Britannica 1911 Ed. retrieved 01 June 2007. [2]
  4. ^ "Johann Brenz" Encyclopedia Britannica 1911 Ed. retrieved 01 June 2007.[3]
  5. ^ "Toleration--Exercitium Religionis Privatum", Walter Grossman, Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 40, No. 1 (Jan. - Mar., 1979), pp. 129-134, retrieved 01 June 2007.[4]
  6. ^ "The Confederation of Warsaw of 28th of January 1573, UNESCO, retrieved 01 June 2007. [5]
  7. ^ "Edict of Nantes", Encyclopedia Britannica 15th Edition, retrieved 01 June 2007. [6]
  8. ^ "Rudolph II", Encyclopedia Britannica 15 Edition, retrieved 01 June 2007.[7]
  9. ^ "The Universal Declaration of Human Rights", United Nations 1948, retrieved 01 June 2007.[8]
  10. ^ "Dignitatis Humanae", Decree on Religious Freedom, 1965, retrieved 01 June 2007.[9]
  11. ^ "ADDRESS OF JOHN PAUL II TO THE REPRESENTATIVES OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCHES AND ECCLESIAL COMMUNITIES AND OF THE WORLD RELIGIONS" 1986, retrieved 01 June 2007.[10]
  12. ^ "Russia", Encyclopedia Britannica 15th edition, retrieved 01 June 2007.[11]
  13. ^ Dawkins, Richard. Preface The God Delusion.

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Religious toleration

  Results from FactBites:
 
Religious toleration - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (574 words)
Religious toleration is the condition of accepting or permitting others' religious beliefs and practices which disagree with one's own.
In a country with a state religion, toleration means that the government permits religious practices of other sects besides the state religion, and does not persecute believers in other faiths.
In the Middle Ages, toleration of Judaism was a contentious issue throughout Christendom.
United Arab Emirates (3793 words)
There are no reports that these holidays negatively affect other religious groups because of their religious affiliation; however, all residents and visitors are required by law during Ramadan to publicly respect and abide by some of the behavior restrictions imposed on Muslims, they are forbidden to eat, drink, or smoke publicly during fasting hours.
Religious instruction in non-Muslim religions is not permitted in public schools; however, religious groups may conduct religious instruction for their members on their religious compounds.
Non-Muslim religious leaders from inside and outside of the country regularly refer to it as one of the most liberal and broadminded countries in the region in terms of governmental and societal attitudes toward allowing all persons to practice their faiths freely.
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