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Encyclopedia > Religious significance of Jerusalem

Jerusalem
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The city of Jerusalem, located in modern-day Israel, is significant in a number of religious traditions, including the Abrahamic religions Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Image File history File links Jerusalem_Municipality_Emblem. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Jerusalem_icon_small2. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... This article explores the different names of Jerusalem and their linguistic natures, etc. ... Main article: Jerusalem This article chronicles the history of Jerusalem. ... 1800 BCE - The Jebusites build the wall Jebus (Jerusalem). ... Neighborhoods Baaka German Colony Greek Colony Katamonim Old Katamon Ramot Rekhavia Qiriat HaYovel Talbieh Talpiot Beit Khanina French Hill Neve Yaaqov Old City Jewish Quarter Western Wall The Cardo Muslim Quarter Temple Mount, site of the former Temple in Jerusalem Dome of the Rock Al Aqsa Mosque Armenian... The Old City of Jerusalem is an approximately one square kilometer area of the modern day Israeli city of Jerusalem. ... There are eight (nine) gates in Jerusalems Old City Walls. ... Founded around 3000 BCE, the Old City of Jerusalem is divided into Muslim, Christian, Jewish, and Armenian quarters. ... This is the list of Mayors of Jerusalem. ... Main article: Religious significance of Jerusalem Jerusalem has been the holiest city in Judaism and the spiritual homeland of the Jewish people since the 10th century BCE.[1] Jerusalem has long been embedded into Jewish religious consciousness. ... For Christians, Jerusalems place in the life of Jesus gives it great importance, in addition to its place in the Old Testament, the Hebrew Bible, as described above. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The modern Knesset building, Israels parliament, in Jerusalem Frontal view of The Supreme Court building All the branches of Israeli government (Presidential, Legislative, Judicial, and Administrative) are seated in Jerusalem. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... Map showing the prevalence of Abrahamic (purple) and Dharmic (yellow) religions in each country. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Islam (Arabic:  ) is a monotheistic religion based upon the teachings of Muhammad, a 7th century Arab religious and political figure. ...

Contents

Jerusalem in Judaism

Main article: Jerusalem in Judaism
Jews worship at the Western Wall
Jews worship at the Western Wall

Jerusalem has been the holiest city in Judaism and the spiritual homeland of the Jewish people since the 10th century BCE.[1] Jerusalem has long been embedded into Jewish religious consciousness. Jews have studied and personalized the struggle by King David to capture Jerusalem and his desire to build the Jewish temple there, as described in the Book of Samuel and the Book of Psalms. Many of King David's yearnings about Jerusalem have been adapted into popular prayers and songs. Main article: Religious significance of Jerusalem Jerusalem has been the holiest city in Judaism and the spiritual homeland of the Jewish people since the 10th century BCE.[1] Jerusalem has long been embedded into Jewish religious consciousness. ... Download high resolution version (3008x2000, 1013 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (3008x2000, 1013 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Western Wall by night “Wailing Wall” redirects here. ... Nineteenth century plaque, with Jerusalem occupying the upper right quadrant, Hebron beneath it, the Jordan River running top to bottom, Safed in the top left quadrant, and Tiberias beneath it. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... (Redirected from 10th century BCE) (11th century BC - 10th century BC - 9th century BC - other centuries) (1000s BC - 990s BC - 980s BC - 970s BC - 960s BC - 950s BC - 940s BC - 930s BC - 920s BC - 910s BC - 900s BC - other decades) (3rd millennium BC - 2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC) Events... This page is about the Biblical king David. ... Jewish temple: Jewish temple or The Jewish Temple, may refer to the original two ancient Jewish Temples in Jerusalem. ... The Books of Samuel, also referred to as [The Book of] Samuel (Hebrew: שְׁמוּאֵל), are (two) books in the Hebrew Bible (Judaisms Tanakh and originally writtten in Hebrew) and the Old Testament of Christianity. ... Psalms (Tehilim תהילים, in Hebrew) is a book of the Hebrew Bible or Tanakh, and of the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. ...


Jerusalem appears in the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible) 669 times and Zion (which usually means Jerusalem, sometimes the Land of Israel) appears 154 times. The first section, the Torah, only mentions Moriah, the mountain range believed to be the location of the binding of Isaac and the Temple Mount in Jerusalem, and in later parts of the Tanakh the city is written explicitly. The Tanakh (or Old Testament), is a text sacred to both Judaism and Christianity. In Judaism it is considered the Written Law, the basis for the Oral Law (Mishnah, Talmud and Shulkhan Arukh) studied, practiced and treasured by Jews and Judaism for three millennia.[2] The Talmud elaborates in great depth the Jewish connection with the city. Tanakh (Hebrew: ‎) (also Tanach, IPA: or , or Tenak, is an acronym that identifies the Hebrew Bible. ... 11th century manuscript of the Hebrew Bible with Targum This article is about the term Hebrew Bible. For the Hebrew Bible itself, see Tanakh (Jewish term) or Old Testament (Christian term). ... Zion (Hebrew: צִיּוֹן, tziyyon; Tiberian vocalization: tsiyyôn; transliterated Zion or Sion) is a term that most often designates the Land of Israel and its capital Jerusalem. ... Kingdom of Israel: Early ancient historical Israel — land in pink is the approximate area under direct central royal administration during the United Monarchy. ... Tora redirects here. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and make it more accessible to a general audience, this article may require cleanup. ... Sacrifice by Robert Sherman (1983). ... The Temple Mount as it appears today. ... Tanakh (Hebrew: ‎) (also Tanach, IPA: or , or Tenak, is an acronym that identifies the Hebrew Bible. ... Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Torah, (תורה) is a Hebrew word meaning teaching, instruction, or especially Law. ... An oral law is a code of conduct in use in a given culture, religion or other regroupement, by which a body of rules of human behaviour is transmitted by oral tradition and effectively respected, or the single rule that is orally transmitted. ... The Mishnah (Hebrew משנה, repetition) is a major source of rabbinic Judaisms religious texts. ... The first page of the Vilna Edition of the Babylonian Talmud, Tractate Berachot, folio 2a The Talmud (Hebrew: תלמוד) is a record of rabbinic discussions pertaining to Jewish law, ethics, customs and history. ... The Shulkhan Arukh (Hebrew: Prepared Table), by Rabbi Yosef Karo is considered the most authoritative compilation of Jewish law since the Talmud. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Jerusalem in Christianity

For Christians, Jerusalem's place in the life of Jesus gives it great importance, in addition to its place in the Old Testament, the Hebrew Bible, as described above. For Christians, Jerusalems place in the life of Jesus gives it great importance, in addition to its place in the Old Testament, the Hebrew Bible, as described above. ... Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh. ... 11th century manuscript of the Hebrew Bible with Targum This article is about the term Hebrew Bible. For the Hebrew Bible itself, see Tanakh (Jewish term) or Old Testament (Christian term). ...

Main entrance to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre
Main entrance to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre

Jerusalem is the place where Jesus was brought as a child, to be 'presented' at the Temple (Luke 2:22) and to attend festivals (Luke 2:41). According to the Gospels, Jesus preached and healed in Jerusalem, especially in the Temple courts. There is also an account of Jesus' 'cleansing' of the Temple, chasing various traders out of the sacred precincts (Mark 11:15). At the end of each of the Gospels, there are accounts of Jesus' Last Supper in an 'upper room' in Jerusalem, his arrest in Gethsemane, his trial, his crucifixion at Golgotha, his burial nearby and his resurrection and ascension. Main entrance Church of the Holy Sepulchre Taken with Nikon D100, Jerusalem Easter Sunday 27/03/2005 by Wayne McLean (jgritz) Let me know if you want to use it, and credit by Wayne McLean (Jgritz) File links The following pages link to this file: Church of the Holy Sepulchre... Main entrance Church of the Holy Sepulchre Taken with Nikon D100, Jerusalem Easter Sunday 27/03/2005 by Wayne McLean (jgritz) Let me know if you want to use it, and credit by Wayne McLean (Jgritz) File links The following pages link to this file: Church of the Holy Sepulchre... Main Entrance to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. ... A drawing of Ezekiels Visionary Temple from the Book of Ezekiel 40-47 The Temple in Jerusalem or Holy Temple (Hebrew: בית המקדש, transliterated Bet HaMikdash) was located on the Temple Mount (Har HaBayit) in the old city of Jerusalem. ... The Gospel of Luke is the third and longest of the four canonical Gospels of the New Testament, which tell the story of Jesus life, death, and resurrection. ... For other uses, see Gospel (disambiguation). ... The Gospel of Mark (anonymous[1] but ascribed to Mark the Evangelist) is a Gospel of the New Testament. ... The Last Supper in Milan (1498), by Leonardo da Vinci According to the Gospels, the Last Supper (also called Lords Supper) was the last meal Jesus shared with his apostles before his death. ... The Garden of Gethsemane. ... Calvary (Golgotha) was the hill outside Jerusalem on which Jesus was crucified. ... The resurrection of Jesus is an event in the New Testament in which God raised him from the dead[1] after his death by crucifixion. ... General understanding of the Christian doctrine of Ascension holds that Jesus bodily ascended to heaven in the presence of his apostles, following his resurrection. ...


In Christianity, the Jewish connection with the city is considered as the account of God's relationship with His chosen people - the original covenant - and the essential prelude to the events narrated in the New Testament, including both universal commandments (e.g. the Ten Commandments) and obsolete or Judaism-specific ones. Covenant, in its most general sense, is a solemn and bilateral promise to do or not do something specified. ... John 21:1 Jesus Appears to His Disciples--Alessandro Mantovani: the Vatican, Rome. ... This 1768 parchment (612x502 mm) by Jekuthiel Sofer emulated the 1675 Decalogue at Amsterdam Esnoga synagogue. ... Supersessionism (sometimes referred to as replacement theology by its critics) is a belief that Christianity is the fulfillment and continuation of the Old Testament, and that Jews who deny that Jesus is the Messiah are not being faithful to the revelation that God has given them, and they therefore fall...


In medieval Christian thought, Jerusalem was considered to be the center of the world (Latin: umbilicus mundi, Greek: Omphalos), and was so represented in the so-called T and O maps. Byzantine hymns speak of the Cross being "planted in the center of the earth," and the imagery is tied to the concept of the Death and resurrection of Jesus being for the benefit of all mankind. earliest printed example of a classical T and O map (by Guntherus Ziner, Augsburg, 1472), illustrating the first page of chapter XIV of the Etymologiae. ... The death and resurrection of Jesus are two events in the New Testament in which Jesus is crucified on one day (the Day of Preparation, i. ...


Jerusalem in Islam

Main article: Jerusalem in Islam
Al-Aqsa Mosque
Al-Aqsa Mosque

Jerusalem has played a great role in Islam. It is the location of the Al-Aqsa Mosque, considered by many Muslims to be the third holiest site. Also in particular: This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Download high resolution version (1600x1050, 195 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1600x1050, 195 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... For other uses, see Al-aqsa (disambiguation). ... While the Al-Aqsa mosque is by and large considered the third holiest site by Muslims, this view is not universal[citation needed]. Other Muslim sites put forward as the third holiest include: // [edit] Imam Ali Mosque, Iraq It is commonly reported in the worlds media that the Imam Ali...

  • It is strongly associated with people regarded as Prophets of Islam - in particular, David, Solomon, and Jesus;
  • It was the first qibla (direction of prayer) in Islam, before the Kaaba in Mecca;
  • Muhammad is believed to have been taken by the flying steed Buraq to visit Jerusalem, where he prayed, and then to visit heaven, in a single night in the year 620. The Qur'anic verse (17:1) is interpreted by all widely used tafsirs (commentaries) as referring to this journey, with the term "the farthest Mosque" (al-masjid al-Aqsa) which lies in the Noble Sanctuary in Jerusalem today.

Prophets of Islam are human beings who are regarded by Muslims to be prophets. ... David and Goliath by Caravaggio, c. ... King Solomon Latin name (Hebrew: שְׁלֹמֹה, (Shelomo) (Shlomo pronounced with Yiddish accent)Standard Tiberian ; Arabic: سليمان, Sulayman; all essentially meaning peace) is a figure described in Middle Eastern scriptures as a wise ruler of an empire centred on the united Kingdom of Israel. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Facing the Qibla at a prayer in Damascus The geometrical calculation of Qibla Qibla () is an Arabic word for the direction that should be faced when a Muslim prays. ... The Kaaba (Arabic: ) , also known as (), ( ‎ The Primordial House), or ( The Sacred House), is a large cuboidal building located inside the mosque known as al-Masjid al-Haram in Mecca. ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... For other persons named Muhammad, see Muhammad (name). ... Buraq, mistakenly described as Mohammeds horse, was a creature described as being part griffin, eagle and horse. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Events Medina is converted to Islam. ... This article or section seems to contain too many quotations for an encyclopedia entry. ... Surat Al-Isra (Arabic: سورة الإسراء ) (ie The Night Journey) is the 17th sura of the Quran . ... A tafsir ( (Arabic: تفسير) tafsÄ«r, Arabic explanation) is Quranic exegesis or commentary. ... For other uses, see Al-aqsa (disambiguation). ... The Temple Mount or Noble Sanctuary (Hebrew: הר הבית Har HaBayit, Arabic: الحرم الشريف Al-Haram As-Sharif), is a hotly contested religious site in the old city of Jerusalem. ...

Jerusalem in Mandaeism

In Mandaeism (an ancient Gnostic-like non-Christian religion, once significant in numbers but now a small group found primarily in parts of southern Iran and Iraq) Jerusalem is considered a city of wickedness, dedicated to the god of Judaism, whom they call Adunay (Adonai) or Yurba (possibly YHWH) and consider to be an evil spirit. According to Sidra d-Yahia 54, Jerusalem is "the stronghold that Adunay built ... [he] brought to it falsehood in plenty, and it meant persecution against my tarmidia (Manda d-Hiia's disciples)." In the Ginza Rba (15.11), it is said to have come into being as a result of the incestuous union of the seven planets with their evil mother Ruha d-Qudsha, who "left lewdness, perversion, and fornication in it. They said: 'Whoever lives in the city of Jerusalem will not mention the name of God.'" (Elsewhere, however, it more prosaically says the city was built by Solomon.) However, Yahya (John the Baptist), an important figure in the religion, is said to have been born there. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Mandaeism or Mandaeanism (Mandaic: mandaiuta) is a blanket term for the religion of the Mandaeans (Classical Mandaic mandaiia, Neo-Mandaic Mandeyānā) who are the followers of Mendā d-Heyyi (Mandaic manda Knowledge of Life). Mandaeism is a monotheistic religion practiced primarily in southern Iraq and the Iranian province of... Gnosticism is a blanket term for various religions and sects most prominent in the first few centuries A.D. General characteristics The word gnosticism comes from the Greek word for knowledge, gnosis (γνῶσις), referring to the idea that there is special, hidden mysticism (esoteric knowledge... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... At the bottom of the hands, the two letters on each hand combine to form יהוה (YHVH), the name of God. ... The Tetragrammaton in Phoenician (1100 BC to 300 CE), Aramaic (10th Century BC to 0) and modern Hebrew scripts. ... Ginza Rba (in Mandaic, which translates into The Great Treasure) or Siddra Rba (The Great Book) is one of many holy scriptures of the Mandaean religion. ... The eight planets and three dwarf planets of the Solar System. ... In Aramaic, Ruhâ d-Qudshâ (רוחא דקודשא in square script; ܪܘܚܐ ܕܩܘܕܫܐ in Syriac script) means the spirit of holiness (corresponding to Hebrew רוח הקודש Ruah haqodesh). ... The word lust means sexual desire (this meaning is sometimes metaphorically extended to other forms of desire, e. ... Perversion is a term and concept describing those types of human behavior that are perceived to be a deviation from what is considered to be orthodox or normal. ... Fornication is a term which refers to sexual intercourse between consenting unmarried partners. ... King Solomon Latin name (Hebrew: שְׁלֹמֹה, (Shelomo) (Shlomo pronounced with Yiddish accent)Standard Tiberian ; Arabic: سليمان, Sulayman; all essentially meaning peace) is a figure described in Middle Eastern scriptures as a wise ruler of an empire centred on the united Kingdom of Israel. ... For the hip-hop producer with the same name, see John the Baptist (producer). ...


Notes

  1. ^ Since the 10th century BCE:
    • "Israel was first forged into a unified nation from Jerusalem some three thousand years ago, when King David seized the crown and united the twelve tribes from this city... For a thousand years Jerusalem was the seat of Jewish sovereignty, the household site of kings, the location of its legislative councils and courts. In exile, the Jewish nation came to be identified with the city that had been the site of its ancient capital. Jews, wherever they were, prayed for its restoration." Roger Friedland, Richard D. Hecht. To Rule Jerusalem, University of California Press, 2000, p. 8. ISBN 0520220927
    • "The Jewish bond to Jerusalem was never broken. For three millennia, Jerusalem has been the center of the Jewish faith, retaining its symbolic value throughout the generations." Jerusalem- the Holy City, Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs, February 23, 2003. Accessed March 24, 2007.
    • "The centrality of Jerusalem to Judaism is so strong that even secular Jews express their devotion and attachment to the city and cannot conceive of a modern State of Israel without it... For Jews Jerusalem is sacred simply because it exists... Though Jerusalem's sacred character goes back three millenia...". Leslie J. Hoppe. The Holy City:Jerusalem in the theology of the Old Testament, Liturgical Press, 2000, p. 6. ISBN 0814650813
    • "Ever since King David made Jerusalem the capital of Israel 3,000 years ago, the city has played a central role in Jewish existence." Mitchell Geoffrey Bard, The Complete Idiot's Guide to the Middle East Conflict, Alpha Books, 2002, p. 330. ISBN 0028644107
    • "For Jews the city has been the pre-eminent focus of their spiritual, cultural, and national life throughout three millenia." Yossi Feintuch, U.S. Policy on Jerusalem, Greenwood Publishing Group, 1987, p. 1. ISBN 0313257000
    • "Jerusalem became the center of the Jewish people some 3,000 years ago" Moshe Maʻoz, Sari Nusseibeh, Jerusalem: Points of Friction - And Beyond, Brill Academic Publishers, 2000, p. 1. ISBN 9041188436
    • "The Jewish people are inextricably bound to the city of Jerusalem. No other city has played such a dominant role in the history, politics, culture, religion, national life and consciousness of a people as has Jerusalem in the life of Jewry and Judaism. Since King David established the city as the capital of the Jewish state circa 1000 BCE, it has served as the symbol and most profound expression of the Jewish people's identity as a nation." Basic Facts you should know: Jerusalem, Anti-Defamation League, 2007. Accessed March 28, 2007.
  2. ^ List of Jewish prayers and blessings

February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... March 24 is the 83rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (84th in leap years). ... The Anti-Defamation League (or ADL) is an advocacy group founded by Bnai Brith in the United States whose stated aim is to stop, by appeals to reason and conscience and, if necessary, by appeals to law, the defamation of the Jewish people. ... March 28 is the 87th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (88th in leap years). ... Listed below are some Hebrew prayers and blessings that are part of Judaism that are recited by many Jews. ...

References

  • Ali, Abdullah Yusuf (1991). The Holy Quran. Medina: King Fahd Holy Qur-an Printing Complex. 

 
 

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