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Encyclopedia > Relax (song)
"Relax"
"Relax" cover
Single by Frankie Goes to Hollywood
from the album Welcome to the Pleasuredome
B-side(s) One September Monday / Ferry 'Cross The Mersey
Released 24 October 1983
Format vinyl record (7" & 12"), Cassette single
Recorded 1983
Genre Dance, New Wave
Label ZTT
Writer(s) Gill, Johnson, Nash, O'Tool
Producer(s) Trevor Horn
Chart positions
  • #1 (UK)
  • #10 (US)
Frankie Goes to Hollywood singles chronology
Two Tribes

"Relax" is the title track of the first single by Frankie Goes to Hollywood, released in the UK by ZTT Records in October 1983 (see 1983 in music). The song was later included on the album Welcome to the Pleasuredome. Download high resolution version (701x700, 25 KB)Relax File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A collection of various CD singles In music, a single is a short recording of one or more separate tracks. ... Frankie Goes to Hollywood (FGTH) was one of the most controversial and commercially successful UK new wave acts of the early 1980s. ... In recorded music, the terms A-side and B-side refer to the two sides of 7 inch vinyl records on which singles were released beginning in the 1950s. ... October 24 is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 68 days remaining. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A gramophone record, (also phonograph record - often simply record) is an analog sound recording medium: a flat disc rotating at a constant angular velocity, with inscribed spiral grooves in which a stylus or needle rides. ... Insert from the Winter cassette single by Tori Amos The cassette single was a music recording format that debuted in the 80s. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A music genre is a category (or genre) of pieces of music that share a certain style or basic musical language (van der Merwe 1989, p. ... For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... ZTT Records is a record label founded in 1983 by NME journalist Paul Morley, record producer Trevor Horn, producer/engineer Gary Langan and businesswoman Jill Sinclair. ... A songwriter is someone who writes the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... Trevor Charles Horn, born July 15, 1949 in Durham, England, is a British pop music record producer, songwriter and musician. ... A record chart, also known as a music chart, is a method of ranking music according to popularity during a given period of time. ... Frankie Goes to Hollywood (FGTH) was one of the most controversial and commercially successful UK new wave acts of the early 1980s. ... Two Tribes is the title track of the second single by Frankie Goes To Hollywood, released in the UK by ZTT Records in May 1984 (see 1984 in music). ... Frankie Goes to Hollywood (FGTH) was one of the most controversial and commercially successful UK new wave acts of the early 1980s. ... ZTT Records is a record label founded in 1983 by NME journalist Paul Morley, record producer Trevor Horn, producer/engineer Gary Langan and businesswoman Jill Sinclair. ... See also: 1982 in music, other events of 1983, 1984 in music, 1980s in music and the list of years in music // Events The most long-term influential release of 1983 is probably Head over Heels by the Cocteau Twins, which sold poorly upon its initial release. ...


Although fairly inauspicious upon initial release, "Relax" finally reached number one in the UK singles chart on January 24 1984, ultimately becoming one of the most controversial and most commercially successful records of the entire decade. The single eventually sold a reported 1.91 million copies in the UK alone, making it the seventh best-selling UK single of all time (as of May 2006). Following the release of the group's second single, "Two Tribes", "Relax" rallied from a declining UK chart position during June 1984 to climb back up the UK charts and re-attain number two spot behind "Two Tribes" at number one, representing simultaneous chart success by a single act unprecedented since the early 1960s. This is a list of the number one singles on the UK Singles Chart, during the 1980s. ... 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Two Tribes is the title track of the second single by Frankie Goes To Hollywood, released in the UK by ZTT Records in May 1984 (see 1984 in music). ...


Upon release in the USA in late 1984, "Relax" repeated its slow UK progress, reaching number 67 upon initial release, but eventually reaching number 10 in March 1985[1]

Contents

Controversy

"Relax" was initially a fairly unregarded single on the fledgling ZTT label, troubling the lower reaches of the UK Top 50 throughout the latter end of 1983. However, it crucially proved to have somewhat unique staying power, never dropping more than a couple of chart places one week before leaping forward ten places the next. In the absence at this stage of any discernible marketing hyperbole, the record appeared to make its way entirely upon its own merits into the lower reaches of the Top Forty by January 1984.


At this point, several events seem to have conspired simultaneously to help propel "Relax" to notoriety:

  • "Relax" was at number 35 in the first UK charts of 1984.
  • On Thursday January 5, Frankie Goes to Hollywood performed "Relax" on the BBC flagship TV chart show, Top Of The Pops.
  • By January 10, "Relax" had risen to number 6 in the UK singles chart.
  • On Wednesday January 11 1984, Radio 1 disc jockey Mike Read publicly expressed his distaste for both the record's suggestive sleeve (designed by Yvonne Gilbert) and its evocative lyrics as expressed thereon, and he immediately flexed his radio muscles in effecting a very public, albeit rather personal, ban on the single, not knowing that the BBC had just decided that the song was not to be played on the BBC anyway.

The record sleeve, of course, did advise: Top of the Pops, also known as TOTP, is a long-running British music chart television programme, made and broadcast by the BBC. It was originally shown each week, mostly on BBC One, from 1 January 1964 to 30 July 2006. ... For other meanings of DJ, see DJ (disambiguation). ... Mike Read (born March 1, 1951) is an award-winning broadcaster from the UK, renowned for his work on both radio and television. ...


"Relax, don't do it, when you want to suck it to it, Relax don't do it, when you want to come."

  • Belatedly backing up their key - if somewhat easily flustered - breakfast DJ, BBC Radio had instigated a complete and utter corporation ban on the single a reported two days later (although certain prominent night-time BBC shows - including those of Kid Jensen and John Peel - would continue to play the record, as they saw fit, throughout 1984).[2]
  • The now-banned "Relax" was number 2 behind "Pipes of Peace" in the charts by 17 January.
  • "Relax" hit the number one spot on 24 January - during which time, the BBC Radio ban had extended to Top of the Pops as well, which was reduced to showing a still picture of the group during their climactic Number One announcement, before airing a performance by a distinctly non-Number One artiste.

This went on for the five weeks that "Relax" was at number one. The single remained on the charts for a record consecutive forty-two weeks. It would rise up from a declining chart position to number two during the UK summer of 1984 whilst Frankie's follow-up single "Two Tribes" held the UK number one spot. David Kid Jensen (*July 4, 1950 in Victoria, British Columbia) is a Canadian-born British radio DJ. // After beginning his career in his home country at the age of sixteen, joined Radio Luxembourg at the age of eighteen in 1968. ... Autobiography John Robert Parker Ravenscroft, OBE (30 August 1939 – 25 October 2004), known professionally as John Peel, was an English disc jockey, radio presenter, and journalist. ... Pipes of Peace is a song written by Paul McCartney, which was first released on his album also called Pipes of Peace on 31 October 1983. ... Two Tribes is the title track of the second single by Frankie Goes To Hollywood, released in the UK by ZTT Records in May 1984 (see 1984 in music). ...


The ban became an embarrassment for the BBC, especially given that UK commercial radio stations were still playing the song. Later in 1984 the ban was lifted and "Relax" featured on both the Christmas Day edition of Top of the Pops and Radio 1's rundown of the best-selling singles of the year.

The Top of the Pops still image used while "Relax" was number one.
The Top of the Pops still image used while "Relax" was number one.

Image File history File linksMetadata FGTH_TOTP.jpg‎ Image used to illustrate the group concerned and the broadcaster involved. ... Image File history File linksMetadata FGTH_TOTP.jpg‎ Image used to illustrate the group concerned and the broadcaster involved. ...

Legacy

"Relax" came at a time that arguably made it a controversial success for all the right reasons. By 1984, banned pop singles were virtually the pop historian's domain. The steady chart progress of "Relax" had shown that it was first-class pop entertainment for its time, and yet it had taken little more than an excitable ZTT publicist and a minor BBC DJ to secure a ban that - lucrative or not - would have been unthinkable just a week earlier.


The ban obviously - in hindsight - harmed the single's sales not one iota. In hindsight, one might say that the mystery of a band the public could not see on Top of the Pops would obviously have enhanced sales to some degree. The proof is surely to be seen in "Relax"'s virtual global success during 1984.


However, this was 1984. This was a time when an airwaves ban meant nothing certain at all. A single riding high at number 6 in 1984 could, on the face of it, do without an interfering DJ's input. Certainly, the BBC did not instigate a ban in the hope of enhancing the record's chances.


"Relax" appeared to represent a crossroads between overt titilation and the admonishing ban from the institution.


Original 1983-84 Mixes

Relax "The Last Seven Inches"
Relax "The Last Seven Inches"

Although the 7-inch version of the single remained unchanged throughout its initial release (a mix generally known as "Relax (Move)"), promotional 7-inch records featuring a substantially different mix of "Relax" (entitled either "The Last Seven Inches" or "Warp Mix" due to the fact it is a compilation of other versions) were the subject of a limited 1984 release. Image File history File linksMetadata Relax_Last_Seven_Inches. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Relax_Last_Seven_Inches. ... A collection of various CD singles In music, a single is a short recording of one or more separate tracks. ...

Three principal 12-inch remixes of "Relax" were eventually created by producer Trevor Horn: Image File history File links Relax_(The_Last_Seven_Inches)_-_ZTAS1DJ.ogg‎ Frankie Goes to Hollywood, Relax (The Last Seven Inches) - ZTAS1DJ This is a sample from a copyrighted musical recording. ... Software development stages In computer programming, development stage terminology expresses how the development of a piece of software has progressed and how much further development it may require. ... (Redirected from 12 inch) The 12-inch single gramophone record gained popularity with the advent of disco music in the 1970s. ... Trevor Charles Horn, born July 15, 1949 in Durham, England, is a British pop music record producer, songwriter and musician. ...

One of the reasons we did all the remixes was that the initial 12-inch version of 'Relax' contained something called 'The Sex Mix', which was 16 minutes long and didn't even contain a song. It was really Holly Johnson just jamming, as well as a bunch of samples of the group jumping in the swimming pool and me sort of making disgusting noises by dropping stuff into buckets of water! We got so many complaints about it -- particularly from gay clubs, who found it offensive -- that we cut it in half and reduced it down to eight minutes, by taking out some of the slightly more offensive parts [this became the "New York Mix"]. Then we got another load of complaints, because the single version wasn't on the 12-inch -- I didn't see the point in this at the time, but I was eventually put straight about it.[3] Holly Johnson (born William Johnson on February 9, 1960 in Liverpool) is best known as the lead singer of British pop group Frankie Goes to Hollywood. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ...

Horn attested that visits to New York's Paradise Garage club led to the creation of the final "Relax (U.S. Mix)", which ultimately replaced the original "Sex Mix"/"New York Mix" releases: Image File history File links Relax_(16_Minute_Sex_Mix)_-_12ZTAS1. ... Software development stages In computer programming, development stage terminology expresses how the development of a piece of software has progressed and how much further development it may require. ... NY redirects here. ... The former home of the Paradise Garage on King Street. ...

It was only when I went to this club and heard the sort of things they were playing that I really understood about 12-inch remixes. Although I myself had already had a couple of big 12-inch hits, I'd never heard them being played on a big sound system, and so I then went back and mixed 'Relax' again and that was the version which sold a couple of million over here [in the UK].[3]

Relax picture 12" disk
Relax picture 12" disk

The original 12-inch version of "Relax", labeled "Sex Mix", ran for over sixteen minutes, and is broadly as described by Horn above. The subsequent "New York Mix" was an 8-minute-plus edit of the "Sex Mix", and can only be distinguished by having 12ISZTAS1 etched on the vinyl. The final 12-inch mix, containing no elements from the foregoing versions, was designated the "U.S. Mix", and ran for approximately seven minutes twenty seconds. This was the most commonly available 12-inch version of "Relax" during its worldwide 1984 chart success. Image File history File linksMetadata Relax_Picture_disk. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Relax_Picture_disk. ...

The UK cassette single featured as the title track a unique amalgam of excerpts from the "Sex Mix", "U.S. Mix" , "Move" and an instrumental version of "Move". Image File history File links Relax_New_York_Mix. ... Software development stages In computer programming, development stage terminology expresses how the development of a piece of software has progressed and how much further development it may require. ... Insert from the Winter cassette single by Tori Amos The cassette single was a music recording format that debuted in the 80s. ...

Since virtually all of the UK "Relax" 12-inch singles were labeled "Sex Mix", a method of differentiating between versions by reference to the record's matrix numbers necessarily became de rigeur for collectors of Frankie Goes to Hollywood releases (and ultimately collectors of ZTT records in general). Image File history File links Relax_Cassette_version. ... Software development stages In computer programming, development stage terminology expresses how the development of a piece of software has progressed and how much further development it may require. ... Matrix numbers. ... Look up de rigueur in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


"Relax (Come Fighting)" was the version of the song included on the Welcome to the Pleasuredome album. This is ostensibly a variant of the 7-inch "Move" mix, but readily distinguishable from it in many ways, of which the most obvious are the fade-in (virtually no fade-in and the vocal is always central on the album track), plus a prominent reverbed-kick-drum sound during the introduction and third sung chorus (completely missing from the album version). The "Come Fighting" version also shares with the later "1993 Classic Mix" reissue (which is almost identical to the album version) a certain post-production sheen (greater stereo separation of parts, more strategic uses of reverb, etc.) that is absent from the original 1983 7-inch single mix.


The original airing of Relax on The Tube, before the band were signed to ZTT, featured another verse that was edited from all the released versions, "In heaven everything is fine, you've got yours and I've got mine", presumably removed as it was taken directly from the David Lynch film Eraserhead. The Tube may refer to: The London Underground Television generally The Tube (London Underground TV series), an ITV/Sky programme featuring the work of staff on the London Underground The Tube (TV series), a former Channel 4 (UK) music programme The Tube (TV channel), US music video channel The Port... Eraserhead (released in France as The Labyrinth Man) is a 1977 film written and directed by David Lynch. ...

Image File history File links Relax_Demo_tape. ... Software development stages In computer programming, development stage terminology expresses how the development of a piece of software has progressed and how much further development it may require. ...

B-sides

The 7-inch featured "One September Monday", an interview between ZTT's Paul Morley, Holly Johnson and Paul Rutherford. During the interview, Holly revealed that the group's name derived from a page of the New Yorker magazine, headlined "Frankie Goes to Hollywood" and featuring Frank Sinatra "getting mobbed by teenyboppers". Paul Morley Paul Morley (born March 26, 1957 in Stockport, Cheshire) is an English music journalist, who wrote for the New Musical Express from 1977 to 1983, during one of its most successful and relatively notorious periods, and has since written for a wide number of publications. ... Paul Rutherford (born December 8, 1959 in Liverpool, England) was the backing vocalist and dancer with 1980s pop band Frankie Goes To Hollywood (FGTH), one of the groups two openly gay singers. ... The New Yorker is an American magazine that publishes reportage, criticism, essays, cartoons, poetry and fiction. ... Francis Albert Sinatra (December 12, 1915 – May 14, 1998) was an American singer and Academy Award-winning actor, often cited as the finest male American popular song vocalist of the 20th century. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


On all of the original 12-inch releases, the B-side featured a cover of "Ferry 'Cross The Mersey", followed by a brief dialogue involving Rutherford attempting to sign on, and an acapella version of the title track's chorus, segueing into an instrumental version of "Relax", known as "From Soft To Hard". "From Soft To Hard" has the same structure as the 7-inch "Move" mix, but is not simply an instrumental of this mix. The film and soundtrack album of 1965 is one of the more uncommon artefacts of Merseybeat, shown very rarely on TV and never issued on video The title song is more famous nowadays and has charted twice. ... Unemployment benefits are payments made by governments to unemployed people. ...


The UK cassette single included "Ferry 'Cross The Mersey" and interview sections not included on "One September Monday".


Videos

It has been attested that Trevor Horn first contemplated signing Frankie Goes to Hollywood after seeing their appearance on the UK Channel Four show The Tube in February 1983, performing an early version of "Relax". It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Channel Four Television Corporation. ... Screenshot of The Tubes neon sign trademark The Tube was an innovative United Kingdom pop/rock music television programme, which ran for 5 series, from 1982 until 1987. ...


The first official video for "Relax", directed by Bernard Rose which was set in a S&M themed gay nightclub, was allegedly banned by MTV and the BBC, prompting the recording of a second video (director unknown) in early 1984, featuring the group performing with the help of "laser beams". However, after the second video was made the song was banned completely by the BBC, meaning that neither video was ever broadcast on any BBC music programmes. Bernard Rose, born in London, England on August 4, 1960, is a film director famous for his direction in the 1992 horror cult classic, Candyman. ... Flogging demonstration at Folsom Street Fair 2004. ... A gay Nightclub, also known as a gay club or gay bar (and occasionally queer bar, Lesbian bar, dyke bar, boy bar) is, like other nightclubs, an entertainment venue that usually does its primary business after dark. ... MTV (Music Television) is an American cable television network headquartered in New York City. ... This article is an overview article about the Crown chartered British Broadcasting Corporation formed in 1927. ...


"Relax" in pop culture

  • The song is featured prominently in the movie Body Double, where the video is recreated with the film's star wandering around the set.
  • In Zoolander, Jacobim Mugatu (aka Jacob Moogberg, played by Will Ferrell) was a fictional member of Frankie Goes to Hollywood, ousted from the band before the release of "Relax". The song features prominently in the denouement of the film, in which both the original version and a cover version by Powerman 5000 are used. Limp Bizkit also wrote a song entitled "Relax" for Zoolander, but the version was never formally released and only a low quality version can be found on the web.
  • The song is used in the first Police Academy movie.
  • In The Wedding Singer, the Russian-immigrant catering chef sports a "RELAX" t-shirt, which is perhaps a culture-shock joke, in that the shirts had become passé by 1985, when the movie is set.
  • In the long-form video, Jazzin' for Blue Jean (1984), directed by Julien Temple and featuring David Bowie, Bowie's character, Vic, tries to impress a girl by taking her to a concert. When deciding what to wear he tries on a "Frankie Say Relax" T-shirt and then changes his mind, saying to himself "I'm not advertising Frankie anymore until they tell us who he is".
  • In the Friends episode "The One With The Tiny T-Shirt", Ross and Rachel argue over possession of a vintage "Frankie Say Relax" t-shirt.
  • In an episode of Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends called "Who Let The Dogs In?", Bloo makes reference to the song by saying "Yeah, Frankie says relax."
  • The song "Mope" by Bloodhound Gang samples the song. When the sample is used during the music video, two men engage in suggestive acts.
  • Richard Cheese and Lounge Against the Machine covered the song in a Lounge style on his 2002 album Tuxicity.
  • Haitian gang members in Grand Theft Auto: Vice City are seen wearing "Relax" t-shirts and the song itself appears in the game Grand Theft Auto: Vice City Stories.
  • The Club 69 Doomsday mix of the song plays in a rave scene in the film Interstate 60.
  • In an episode of The Simpsons entitled "Strong Arms of the Ma", Marge gains large muscles, and when she tries to get Homer out of Moe's, several Men try to give Marge a hard time. She picks up the jukebox in the tavern and starts slugging several men. Each time as Marge hits them, it plays a different song. The first is Pat Benatar's "Love Is a Battlefield" the second is Etta James' "At Last", the last was "Relax". In another episode entitled "Homer the Smithers", Waylon Smithers is seen in what is clearly a gay nightclub with a large number of men conga-dancing to "Relax". Also, in an another episode entitled, "Bye Bye Nerdie", a boy on the school bus with an orthodontic headgear is wearing a T-shirt that reads "Frankie Says: Relax."
  • In episode 8, season 1 of Venture Bros, "Ghosts of the Sargasso", one of the pirates is wearing a "Relax" t-shirt.
  • British puppet show Spitting Image parodied this song in a music video featuring Holly Johnson singing "Remix, release it, see the money flow" - in reference the remixes which were not common before this time, and derrived - via a common use of the Hee Bee Gee Bees - from a Radio Active sketch of Frankie Goes to the Bank in the same vein.
  • The Phish song "Frankie Says" contains the word "relax" throughout the song.

Body Double is a 1984 film by Brian De Palma. ... Zoolander is a 2001 film based on a pair of short films directed by Russell Bates and written by Drake Sather and Ben Stiller for the VH1 Fashion Awards television show in 1996 and 1997. ... John William Will Ferrell (born July 16, 1967 [1]) is an Emmy and Golden Globe nominated American comedian, impressionist and actor who first established himself as a cast member of Saturday Night Live. ... Powerman 5000 frequently referred to as PM5K, are a Boston-based alternative metal band formed in 1989. ... Police Academy is a long-running series of comedy films, the first six of which were made in the 1980s. ... The Wedding Singer is a 1998 romantic comedy film written by Tim Herlihy and directed by Frank Coraci that stars Adam Sandler as Robbie Hart, a wedding singer, and Drew Barrymore as Julia Sullivan, the object of his affections. ... Jazzin for Blue Jean was a 21-minute short film featuring David Bowie and directed by Julien Temple. ... Julien Temple is an English film, documentary and music video director. ... David Bowie (born David Robert Jones on 8 January 1947) is an English Grammy Winning singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, actor, producer, arranger and audio engineer whose work spans five decades. ... Friends. ... Fosters Home for Imaginary Friends is an Emmy award-winning, American animated television series created and produced at Cartoon Network Studios by animator Craig McCracken, who also created The Powerpuff Girls. ... Blooregard Q. Kazoo or Bloo for short, is the fictional main character from the television show Fosters Home for Imaginary Friends. ... Frankie Foster Frances Frankie Foster is a fictional character in Fosters Home for Imaginary Friends. ... Mope is a song by The Bloodhound Gang off their 1999 album Hooray for Boobies. ... The Bloodhound Gang is an American rock/hip-hop band with a punk-influenced sound. ... Richard Cheese & Lounge Against the Machine are a cover band and comedy act based in Los Angeles, California. ... The term lounge can refer to: a living room in a private house, a public waiting area, provided with seating, as in a hotel or airport an Airline lounge is a private waiting area offered by airlines to pecial customers or to those who pay an extra fee lounge music... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Tuxicity is the second album from Richard Cheese and Lounge Against the Machine, released October 1, 2002. ... Grand Theft Auto: Vice City (released in October 2002) is the fourth video game in the hit Grand Theft Auto series. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Strong Arms of The Ma is the true 300th episode of The Simpsons. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Love is a Battlefield was a single from Pat Benatars album Live From Earth, which was popular in 1983. ... Etta James (born Jamesetta Hawkins January 25, 1938 in Los Angeles, California) is an American Blues, R&B and Gospel singer. ... Homer the Smithers is the seventeenth episode of The Simpsons seventh season. ... Waylon J. Smithers, Jr. ... Bye Bye Nerdie is the sixteenth episode of the twelfth season of The Simpsons. ... The Venture Bros. ... Spitting Image was a satirical puppet show that ran on the United Kingdoms ITV television network from 1984 to 1996. ... Hee Bee Gee Bees were a pop group formed initially to parody the Bee Gees towards the close of their sequence of high-pitched, disco-style hits. ... Radio Active was a radio comedy programme, broadcast on BBC Radio 4 during the 1980s. ... This article is about a rock band; for deceptive e-mail practices, see Phishing. ...

Tracklisting

All discographical information pertains to original UK releases only. "Relax" written by Peter Gill/Johnson/Mark O'Toole, "One September Monday" credited to Gill/Johnson/Brian Nash/O'Toole/Rutherford. "Ferry 'Cross The Mersey" written by Gerry Marsden. Peter Gill (born March 8, 1964, Liverpool, England), known by the nickname Pedro or Ped, was the drummer with 1980s pop band Frankie Goes To Hollywood (FGTH). ... Mark OToole (born January 6, 1964 in Liverpool, England) was the bass guitarist for 1980s pop band Frankie Goes To Hollywood (FGTH). ... Brian Nash (born May 20, 1963 in Liverpool, England) was the guitarist for 1980s pop band Frankie Goes To Hollywood. ... Gerry Marsden (born Gerard Marsden, on September 24, 1942 in Liverpool, England) is an English musician and television personality, most known for being leader of the British Invasion band Gerry & the Pacemakers. ...

  • 7" single (ZTAS 1)
    1. "Relax (move)" (3:52)
    2. "One September Monday" (4:47)
  • 12" single (12 ZTAS 1)
    1. "Relax (sex mix)" (16:24)
    2. "Ferry 'Cross The Mersey" (4:03)
    3. "Relax (from soft to hard)" (4:21)
  • 2nd 12" single (matrix number 12ISZTAS 1)
    1. "Relax (New York mix)" (8:20)
    2. "Ferry 'Cross The Mersey" (4:03)
    3. "Relax (from soft to hard)" (4:21)
  • 3rd 12" single (12 ZTAS 1)
    1. "Relax (U.S. mix)" (7:20)
    2. "Ferry 'Cross The Mersey" (4:03)
    3. "Relax (from soft to hard)" (4:21)
  • Cassingle (CTIS 102)
    "From Soft To Hard - From Dry To Moist"
    1. "The Party Trick (acting dumb)"
    2. "The Special Act (adapted from the sex mix)"
    3. "The US Mix (come dancing)"
    4. "The Single (the act)"
    5. "Later On (from One September Monday)"
    6. "Ferry Across The Mersey (...and here I'll stay)"

Reissues

The title track has periodically been reissued as a single, utilising remixes by contemporary DJs that have tended on the whole to bear little comparison to the spirit of the originals.


Notes

  1. ^ "Relax, Two Tribes, Welcome to the Pleasuredome & More", Epinions, June 7 2005.
  2. ^ "'Banned' Frankie tops chart", October 6 2000.
  3. ^ a b "From ABC to ZTT", Sound On Sound, August 1994.
Preceded by
"Pipes Of Peace" by Paul McCartney
UK number one single
January 22, 1984
Succeeded by
"99 Red Balloons" by Nena

  Results from FactBites:
 
Relax (song) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2126 words)
The now-banned "Relax" was number 2 behind "Pipes of Peace" in the charts by 15 January.
Since virtually all of the UK "Relax" 12-inch singles were labeled "Sex Mix", a method of differentiating between versions by reference to the record's matrix numbers necessarily became de rigeur for collectors of Frankie Goes To Hollywood releases (and ultimately collectors of ZTT records in general).
The song features prominently in the denouement of the film, in which both the original version and a cover version by Powerman 5000 are used.
Smash (album) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (290 words)
The album was a large hit among fans of punk, pop-punk, metal, and grunge, marking the band's crossover appeal.
The first track, "Time to Relax", contains 25 seconds of spoken words and was not featured on the cassette version of the album.
A part of the song Change The World, later to be on Ixnay On The Hombre, is heard.
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