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Encyclopedia > Reims

Coordinates: 49°18′N, 4°2′E Bettina Rheims (born December 18, 1952, Neuilly-sur-Seine, Paris) is a French artist and photographer. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Reims
Place du Parvis and statue of Joan of Arc, in Reims
Location
Coordinates 49°18′N, 4°2′E
Administration
Country France
Region Champagne-Ardenne
Department Marne (sous-préfecture)
Arrondissement Reims
Canton Chief town of 10 cantons
Intercommunality Communauté d'agglomération de Reims (CAR)
Mayor Adeline Hazan (PS)
(2008-2014)
Statistics
Elevation 80–135 m
Land area¹ 46.9 km²
Population²
(1999)
187,206
 - Density 3,990/km² (1999)
Miscellaneous
INSEE/Postal code 51454/ 51100
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.
2 Population sans doubles comptes: single count of residents of multiple communes (e.g. students and military personnel).
France

Reims (alternative English spelling Rheims; pronounced /riːmz/ in English and /ʁɛ̃s/ in French) is a city of the Champagne-Ardenne région of northern France, standing 144 km (89 miles) east-northeast of Paris. It was founded by the Gauls and became a major city during the period of the Roman Empire. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 1692 KB) Reims, France. ... Download high resolution version (1804x1689, 163 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... (Region flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Aube Ardennes Haute-Marne Marne Arrondissements 15 Cantons 146 Communes 1,947 Statistics Land area1 25,606 km² Population (Ranked 18th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... Departments (French: IPA: ) are administrative units of France and many former French colonies, roughly analogous to English counties. ... Marne is a department in north-eastern France named after the Marne River which flows through the department. ... Subprefecture is an administrative level that is below prefecture or province. ... The 100 French departments are divided into 342 arrondissements, which may be translated into English as districts. ... The arrondissement of Reims is an arrondissement of France, located in the Marne département, of the Champagne-Ardenne région. ... The cantons of France are administrative divisions subdividing arrondissements and départements. ... Map of the 36,568 communes of metropolitan France. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Adeline Hazan (born 21 January 1956 in Paris) is a French politician and Member of the European Parliament for the east of France. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... 2014 (MMXIV) will be a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... INSEE is the French abbreviation for the French National Institute for Statistics and Economic Studies (French: Institut National de la Statistique et des Études Économiques). ... Postal codes were introduced in France in 1972, when La Poste introduced automated sorting. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... For other meanings, see Estuary (disambiguation) Río de la Plata estuary An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. ... This page lists English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations, such as and . ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... (Region flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Aube Ardennes Haute-Marne Marne Arrondissements 15 Cantons 146 Communes 1,947 Statistics Land area1 25,606 km² Population (Ranked 18th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ...


Reims played a very important role in French history, as it was the place where the kings of France were crowned. The most famous and cherished of these events was the coronation of Charles VII in the company of Joan of Arc. Thus, the Cathedral of Reims (damaged by the Germans during the First World War but restored since) played the same role in France as Westminster Abbey did in England. It was there that was kept the Holy Ampulla (Sainte Ampoule) containing the Saint Chrême (chrism), which was said to have been brought by a white dove (the Holy Spirit) at the baptism of Clovis in 496, and was used for the anointing, the most important part of the coronation of French kings. The History of France has been divided into a series of separate historical articles navigable through the list to the right. ... Charles VII the Victorious, a. ... For other uses, see Joan of Arc (disambiguation). ... Façade of the Notre-Dame de Reims The Notre-Dame de Reims (Our Lady of Rheims) is the Cathedral of Reims, where the kings of France were once crowned. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The ampulla of Vater is a sphincter (a small muscle) where the common bile duct enters the duodenum. ... Chrism (Greek word literally meaning an anointing), also called Myrrh (Myron), Holy Oil, or Consecrated Oil, is a consecrated oil used in the Oriental Orthodox and Eastern Orthodox churches, in the Assyrian Church of the East, in the Old-Catholic churches, and in Roman Catholic, Anglican and Lutheran churches in... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      In mainstream... This article is about the Christian religious act of Baptism. ... Clovis I (variously spelled Chlodowech or Chlodwig, giving modern French Louis and modern German Ludwig) (c. ... Events Battle of Tolbiac; Clovis I defeats the Alamanni accepts Catholic baptism at Reims. ... To anoint is to grease with perfumed oil, animal fat, or melted butter, a process employed ritually by many religions and races. ... A asses is a ceremony marking the investment of a monarch with regal power through, amongst other symbolic acts, the placement of a crown upon his or her head. ...


Reims is often considered as the capital of Champagne, an old province of France, world-famous for its sparkling wine (Champagne) because it is by far the largest city in the region. Location of the Champagne province in France Champagne is one of the most traditional provinces of France, a region of France that is best known for the production of the sparkling white wine that bears the regions name. ... The kingdom of France was organized into provinces until March 4, 1790, when the establishment of the département system superseded provinces. ... This article is about Champagne, the alcoholic beverage. ...


At the 1999 census, there were 187,206 inhabitants (Rémoises (feminine) and Rémois) in the city of Reims proper (the commune), while there were 291,735 inhabitants in the whole metropolitan area (aire urbaine). The commune is the lowest level of administrative division in the French Republic. ... In France an aire urbaine (literally: urban area) is roughly the equivalent of a US Metropolitan Statistical Area. ...

Contents

Administration

Reims is a sous-préfecture of the Marne département, in the Champagne-Ardenne administrative région. Although Reims is by far the largest commune in both the Champagne-Ardenne region and the Marne department, it is neither the capital nor préfecture of either; Châlons-en-Champagne being the capital and prefecture of both. Subprefecture is an administrative level that is below prefecture or province. ... Marne is a department in north-eastern France named after the Marne River which flows through the department. ... The départements (or departments) are administrative units of France and many former French colonies, roughly analogous to English counties. ... (Region flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Aube Ardennes Haute-Marne Marne Arrondissements 15 Cantons 146 Communes 1,947 Statistics Land area1 25,606 km² Population (Ranked 18th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... France is divided into 26 régions: 21 of these are in the continental part of metropolitan France, one is Corse on the island of Corsica (although strictly speaking Corse is in fact a territorial collectivity, not a région, but is referred to as a région in common... Châlons-en-Champagne is a city and commune in France. ...


Geography

Reims is situated in a plain on the right bank of the Vesle River, a tributary of the Aisne River, and on the canal which connects the Aisne with the Marne River. South and west rise the Montagne de Reims and vine-clad hills. The Vesle is a river of France, mainly crossing the Marne département, including the city of Reims. ... Aisne is a river in France, tributary of the river Oise. ... The Marne is a river in France, a tributary of the Seine in the area east and southeast of Paris. ...


History

For the ecclesiastical history, see Archbishopric of Reims
St. Rémy, Bishop of Reims, begging of Clovis the restitution of the Sacred Vase taken by the Franks in the Pillage of Soissons.--Costumes of the Court of Burgundy in the Fifteenth Century.--Facsimile of a Miniature on a Manuscript of the "History of the Emperors" (Library of the Arsenal).
St. Rémy, Bishop of Reims, begging of Clovis the restitution of the Sacred Vase taken by the Franks in the Pillage of Soissons.--Costumes of the Court of Burgundy in the Fifteenth Century.--Facsimile of a Miniature on a Manuscript of the "History of the Emperors" (Library of the Arsenal).

Before the Roman conquest Reims, as Durocortōrum, was capital of the Remi, from whose name that of the town was subsequently derived. The Rémi made voluntary submission to the Romans, and by their fidelity throughout the various Gallic insurrections secured the special favour of their conquerors. The Archdiocese of Reims was founded (as a diocese) around 250 by St. ... Download high resolution version (1435x1600, 138 KB)St. ... Download high resolution version (1435x1600, 138 KB)St. ... Saint Remigius (French Saint Remi or Saint Rémy), Bishop of Reims, Apostle of the Franks, (ca 437– January 13, 533) effected the conversion to Christianity of Clovis, King of the Franks, at Christmas, 496, one of the turning points in the success of Trinitarian Christianity and a climacteric moment... The Remi were a Belgic tribe of north-eastern Gaul in the 1st century BC. They occupied the northern Champagne plain, on the southern fringes of the Forest of Ardennes, between the rivers Mosa (Meuse) and Matrona (Marne), and along the river valleys of the Aisne and its tributaries the... This article is about the state which existed from the 6th century BC to the 1st century BC. For the state which existed in the 18th century, see Roman Republic (18th century). ... Gallic, derived from the name for the ancient Roman province of Gaul, describes the cultural traditions and national characters of the French speaking nations and regions, as Hispanic does for the Hispanophone world, Anglo-Saxon for the Anglophone, and Lusitanic for the Lusophone. ...


Christianity was established in the town by the middle of the 3rd century, at which period the bishopric was founded. The consul Jovinus, an influential supporter of the new faith, repulsed the barbarians who invaded Champagne in 336; but the Vandals captured the town in 406 and slew St Nicasius, and Attila the Hun afterwards put it to fire and sword. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... // Overview Events 212: Constitutio Antoniniana grants citizenship to all free Roman men 212-216: Baths of Caracalla 230-232: Sassanid dynasty of Persia launches a war to reconquer lost lands in the Roman east 235-284: Crisis of the Third Century shakes Roman Empire 250-538: Kofun era, the first... Jovinus was a Gallo-Roman senator and claimed to be Roman Emperor (411 - 413). ... For the wine region, see Champagne (wine region). ... Events January 18 - Marcus elected pope. ... Vandal and Vandali redirect here. ... Events December 31 - Vandals, Alans and Suebians cross the Rhine, beginning an invasion of Gallia Roman legions in Britain mutiny against the Roman Emperor and select Marcus as new Roman Emperor. ... Saint Nicasius of Rheims ( Saint-Nicaise) (d. ... Attila redirects here. ...


Clovis, after his victory at Soissons (496), was baptized by Rémi, the bishop of Reims, in a ceremony with the oil of the sacred phial which was believed to have been brought from heaven by a dove for the baptism of Clovis and was preserved in the Abbey of Saint-Remi. For centuries the events at the crowning of Clovis I became a symbol used by the monarchy to claim the divine right to rule. Clovis I (variously spelled Chlodowech or Chlodwig, giving modern French Louis and modern German Ludwig) (c. ... Soissons is a town and commune in the Aisne département, Picardie, France, located on the Aisne River, about 60 miles northeast of Paris. ... Events Battle of Tolbiac; Clovis I defeats the Alamanni accepts Catholic baptism at Reims. ... The Abbey of Saint-Remi is an abbey in Reims, France, founded in around AD 1000. ...


Meetings of Pope Stephen II with Pepin the Short, and of Pope Leo III with Charlemagne, took place at Reims; and here Louis the Debonnaire was crowned by Pope Stephen IV. Louis IV gave the town and countship of Reims to the archbishop Artaldus in 940. Louis VII gave the title of duke and peer to William of Champagne, archbishop from 1176 to 1202, and the archbishops of Reims took precedence of the other ecclesiastical peers of the realm. Stephen, elected pope in March of 752 to succeed Pope Zacharias, died of apoplexy three days later, before being consecrated. ... Pepin III (714 - September 24, 768) more often known as Pepin the Short (French, Pépin le Bref; German, Pippin der Kleine), was a King of the Franks (751 - 768). ... Infobox Pope| English name=Leo III| image= | birth_name=Unknown| term_start=December 27, 795 | term_end=June 12, 816| predecessor=Adrian I| successor=Stephen IV| birth_date=Date of birth unknown| birthplace=Rome, Italy| dead=dead|death_date=June 12, 816| deathplace=Place of death unknown| other=Leo}} Pope Leo III (died June 12... For other uses, see Charlemagne (disambiguation). ... Louis the Pious, contemporary depiction from 826 as a miles Christi (soldier of Christ), with a poem of Rabanus Maurus overlaid. ... Stephen IV, (720 – January 24, 772), pope August 1, 768 – January 24, 772, was a native of Sicily. ... Louis IV dOutremer: King of France 936 to 954, member of the Carolingian dynasty. ... Events Births Brian Boru, high king of Ireland Abul-Wafa, iranian mathematician Deaths ar-Radi (Caliph of Baghdad) Athelstan, who was succeeded by his half-brother, Edmund Categories: 940 ... Louis VII the Younger (French: Louis VII le Jeune) (1120 – September 18, 1180) was King of France from 1137 to 1180. ... Guillaume de Blois (1135 – 1202), called Guillaume aux Blanches Mains (William Whitehands), archbishop of Sens (1169 – 1176), archbishop of Rheims (1175 – 1202), and first Peer of France to bear that title, was a son of Theobald the Great, count of Blois and count of Champagne, and Matilda of Carinthia. ... Events May 22 - Murder attempt by the Hashshashin on Saladin near Aleppo Raynald of Chatillon released from prison in Aleppo May 29 - Frederick Barbarossa is defeated in the Battle of Legnano by the Lombard League leading to the pactum Anagninum (the Agreement of Anagni) September 17 - Seljuk Turks defeat Manuel... // Events August 1 - Arthur of Brittany captured in Mirebeau, north of Poitiers Beginning of the Fourth Crusade. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


In the 10th century Reims had become a centre of intellectual culture, Archbishop Adalberon, seconded by the monk Gerbert (afterwards Pope Silvester II), having founded schools where the "liberal arts" were taught. Adalberon was also one of the prime authors of the revolution which put the Capetian dynasty in the place of the Carolingians. As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... Adalberon (died 989) was the archbishop of Reims, chancellor of Kings Lothair and Louis V of France. ... Gerbert of Aurillac, later known as pope Silvester II, (or Sylvester II), (ca. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with House of Capet. ... Also see: France in the Middle Ages. ...


The most important prerogative of the archbishops was the consecration of the kings of France - a privilege which was exercised, except in a few cases, from the time of Philippe II, Auguste to that of Charles X. Louis VII granted the town a communal charter in 1139. The Treaty of Troyes (1420) ceded it to the English, who had made a futile attempt to take it by siege in 1360; but they were expelled on the approach of Joan of Arc, who in 1429 caused Charles VII to be consecrated in the cathedral. A revolt at Reims, caused by the salt tax in 1461, was cruelly repressed by Louis XI. The town sided with the Catholic League (1585), but submitted to Henri IV after the battle of Ivry (1590). Philip II Augustus (French: Philippe Auguste) (21 August 1165 – 14 July 1223) was the King of France from 1180 until his death. ... Charles X (October 9, 1757 – November 6, 1836) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1824 until the French Revolution of 1830, when he abdicated. ... Louis VII the Younger (French: Louis VII le Jeune) (1120 – September 18, 1180) was King of France from 1137 to 1180. ... July 26, Independence of Portugal from the Kingdom of León and Castile declared after the Battle of Ourique against the Almoravids lead by Ali ibn Yusuf: Prince Afonso Henriques becomes Afonso I, King of Portugal, after assembling the first assembly of the estates-general of Portugal at Lamego, where... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Events May 21 - Treaty of Troyes. ... Events October 24 - The Treaty of Brétigny is ratified at Calais, marking the end of the first phase of the Hundred Years War. ... January 10 - Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy, founds the European Order of the Golden Fleece February 12 - Battle of Rouvray (or of the Herrings). English Forces under Sir John Fastolf defend a supply convoy carrying rations to the army of William de la Pole, 4th Earl of Suffolk at... Charles VII the Victorious, a. ... Gabelle was a very unpopular tax on salt in France before 1790. ... Events February 2 - Battle of Mortimers Cross - Yorkist troops led by Edward, Duke of York defeat Lancastrians under Owen Tudor and his son Jasper Tudor, Earl of Pembroke in Wales. ... Louis XI (July 3, 1423 – August 30, 1483), called the Prudent (French: ) and the Universal Spider (Old French: luniverselle aragne) or the Spider King, was the King of France from 1461−83. ... [[The French Catholic League was created by [[Henry of Guise]], in [[1576]] during the [[French Wars of Religion]]. [[Pope Sixtus V]], the [[Jesuits]], [[Catherine de Medici]], and [[Philip II of Spain]] were all members of this intransigent ultra-Catholic party, bent upon extirpating the Protestant [[heresy]] in France once and... 1585 was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. ... Henry IV of France, also Henry III of Navarre (13 December 1553 – 14 May 1610), ruled as King of France from 1589 to 1610 and King of Navarre from 1572 to 1610. ... The Battle of Ivry was fought on March 14, 1590, during the French Wars of Religion. ... Bold text{| align=right cellpadding=3 id=toc style=margin-left: 15px; |- | align=center colspan=2 | Years: 1587 1588 1589 - 1590 - 1591 1592 1593 |-vdsf gno[gldw[pvkijxaiamknn csogfhbvdowkhbfkqhjkhrjkhwgfhbjkpnkfokfgok3pkpk9pjhkt9erktyujkip9kijker9thhrkg9hkitr9gtkih9t0ykltk[u0jo0iey9uhyit90ertyhige9rity9riyh9ujirtyuhjnh-4e9tyigh9thiuy0h8tyh34tu8uy8u8u8u8rtu5y8ru8thu0tru0ut0rhutuh0trhu0hseogtrhr8uyhju8t89er9te9r8fy8shit ass dick bitch fuck | align=center colspan=2 | Decades: 1560s 1570s 1580s - 1590s - 1600s 1610s 1620s |- | align=center | Centuries...


In the foreign invasions of 1814 it was captured and recaptured; in 1870-1871, during the Franco-Prussian War, it was made by the Germans the seat of a governor-general and impoverished by heavy requisitions. Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Combatants Second French Empire North German Confederation allied with South German states (later German Empire) Commanders Napoleon III François Achille Bazaine Patrice de Mac-Mahon, duc de Magenta Otto von Bismarck Helmuth von Moltke the Elder Strength 400,000 at wars beginning 1,200,000 Casualties 150,000...


In 1909, Reims hosted the first international Aviation meet. Major aviation personages such as Glenn Curtiss, Louis Blériot and Louis Paulhan participated. Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Glenn H. Curtiss at the Grande Semaine dAviation in France in 1909 Glenn Hammond Curtiss (May 21, 1878 – July 23, 1930) was an aviation pioneer and founder of the Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company, now part of Curtiss-Wright Corporation. ... Louis Blériot Louis Blériot (July 1, 1872 – August 2, 1936) was a French inventor and engineer, who performed the first flight over a large body of water in a heavier-than-air craft. ... Louis Paulhan (born 1883 Pézenas, died 1963 Saint-Jean-de-Luz), French pilot who in 1910 flew the Le Canard, the worlds first seaplane designed by Henri Fabre. ...


In World War I, the city was greatly damaged. The cathedral was severely damaged by German bombardment and a subsequent fire in 1914. The ruined cathedral became one of the central images of anti-German propaganda produced in France during the war, citing it, along with the ruins of the Cloth Hall at Ypres and the University Library in Louvain, as evidence that German aggression targeted the cultural landmarks of European civilization. After the war, the cathedral was rebuilt from the ruins in the course of the next 40 years. The Palace of Tau, St Jacques Church and the Abbey of St Remi also were protected and restored. The collection of preserved buildings and Roman ruins remains monumentally impressive. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Geography Country Belgium Community Flemish Community Region Flemish Region Province West Flanders Arrondissement Ypres Coordinates , , Area 130. ... The Catholic University of Leuven is the largest and most prominent university in Belgium. ...


During World War II, the town endured some additional damage. It was in Reims, at 2:41 on the morning of May 7, 1945, General Eisenhower and the Allies received the unconditional surrender of the Wehrmacht. The surrender was signed at the Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force (SHAEF) by German Chief-of-Staff General Alfred Jodl, as the representative for Karl Dönitz. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Unconditional surrender refers to a surrender without conditions, except for those provided by international law. ... The straight-armed Balkenkreuz, a stylized version of the Iron Cross, the emblem of the Wehrmacht. ... Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force (abbreviated as SHAEF), was the command headquarters of the commander of Allied forces in North West Europe in 1944 and 1945. ... Alfred Jodl (May 10, 1890 – October 16, 1946) was a German military commander, attaining the position of Chief of the Operations Staff of the Armed Forces High Command (Oberkommando der Wehrmacht, or OKW) during World War II, acting as deputy to Wilhelm Keitel. ... Karl Dönitz (IPA pronunciation:  ) (born 16 September 1891; died 24 December 1980) was a German naval leader, who commanded the German Navy (Kriegsmarine) during the second half of World War II. Dönitz was also President of Germany for 23 days after Adolf Hitlers suicide. ...


Sights

Façade of Notre-Dame de Reims
Façade of Notre-Dame de Reims

Download high resolution version (1704x2272, 1379 KB)Reims cathedral (created by Stephen Bruce on Nov. ... Download high resolution version (1704x2272, 1379 KB)Reims cathedral (created by Stephen Bruce on Nov. ... Façade of the Notre-Dame de Reims The Notre-Dame de Reims (Our Lady of Rheims) is the Cathedral of Reims, where the kings of France were once crowned. ...

Streets and squares

Of its squares, the principal are the Place Royale, with a statue of Louis XV, and the Place Cardinal-Luçon, with an equestrian statue of Joan of Arc. The Rue de Vesle, the chief street, continued under other names, traverses the town from southwest to northwest, passing through the Place Royale. Louis XV (February 15, 1710 – May 10, 1774), ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1715 until his death. ... Image of Joan of Arc, painted between 1450 and 1500 (Centre Historique des Archives Nationales, Paris, AE II 2490). ...


Place Drouet d'Erlon in the city centre is packed with lively restaurants and bars, and several attractive statues and fountains. During the summer it is filled with people sitting outside the many cafés enjoying the summer sun, and in December it has a lively and charming Christmas market.


Roman remains

The oldest monument in Reims is the Porte de Mars ("Mars Gate", so called from a temple to Mars in the neighbourhood), a triumphal arch 108 ft. in length by 43 in height, consisting of three archways flanked by columns. It is popularly supposed to have been erected by the Remi in honour of Augustus when Agrippa made the great roads terminating at the town, but probably belongs to the 3rd or 4th century. The Mars Gate was one of 4 Roman gates to the city walls, which were restored at the time of the Norman Invasion of northern France in the 9th century. Porte de Mars is an ancient Roman triumphal arch in Reims, France. ... Mars was the Roman god of war, the son of Juno and a magical flower (or Jupiter). ... A triumphal arch is a structure in the shape of a monumental archway, usually built to celebrate a victory in war. ... The Remi were a Belgic tribe of north-eastern Gaul in the 1st century BC. They occupied the northern Champagne plain, on the southern fringes of the Forest of Ardennes, between the rivers Mosa (Meuse) and Matrona (Marne), and along the river valleys of the Aisne and its tributaries the... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ... Agrippa may refer to: Menenius Agrippa, a Roman consul in 503 BC. Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa (63–12 BC), Roman statesman and general, friend of Augustus Caesar. ... Not to be confused with Romans road. ... // Overview Events 212: Constitutio Antoniniana grants citizenship to all free Roman men 212-216: Baths of Caracalla 230-232: Sassanid dynasty of Persia launches a war to reconquer lost lands in the Roman east 235-284: Crisis of the Third Century shakes Roman Empire 250-538: Kofun era, the first... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century was that century which lasted from 301 to 400. ... The Brama MÅ‚yÅ„ska in Stargard SzczeciÅ„ski one of two water gates in Europe. ... The defensive wall of Braşov, Romania. ... As a means of recording the passage of time the 9th century was the century that lasted from 801 to 900. ...


In its vicinity a curious mosaic, measuring 36 ft. by 26, with thirty-five medallions representing animals and gladiators, was discovered in 1860. To these remains must be added a Gallo Roman sarcophagus, said to be that of the consul Jovinus (see below) and preserved in the archaeological museum in the cloister of the abbey of Saint-Remi. For other uses, see Gladiator (disambiguation). ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... This article covers the culture of Romanized areas of Gaul. ... The Etruscan Sarcophagus of the Spouses, at the National Etruscan Museum. ... The Abbey of Saint-Remi is an abbey in Reims, France, founded in around AD 1000. ...


Cathedral of Notre-Dame de Reims

Main article: Notre-Dame de Reims

Reims is well known for its cathedral, Notre-Dame de Reims, where the kings of France used to be crowned. The cathedral, was added to the list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 1991, along with the former Abbey of Saint-Remi and the Palace of Tau. Façade of the Notre-Dame de Reims The Notre-Dame de Reims (Our Lady of Rheims) is the Cathedral of Reims, where the kings of France were once crowned. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 600 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,181 × 1,181 pixels, file size: 519 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 600 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,181 × 1,181 pixels, file size: 519 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Derrynaflan Chalice, an 8th or 9th Century chalice, found in County Tipperary, Ireland For other uses, see Chalice A chalice (from Latin calix, cup, borrowed from Greek kalyx, shell, husk) is a goblet intended to hold drink. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Regents: France and French States be merged into this article or section. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... Elabana Falls is in Lamington National Park, part of the Central Eastern Rainforest Reserves World Heritage site in Queensland, Australia. ... The Palace of Tau in Reims. ...


Palace of Tau

The archiepiscopal palace, built between 1498 and 1509, and in part rebuilt in 1675, was occupied by the kings on the occasion of their coronation. The saloon (salle du Tau), where the royal banquet was held, has an immense stone chimney from the 15th century. The chapel of the archiepiscopal palace consists of two storeys, of which the upper still serves as a place of worship. Both the chapel and the salle du Tau are decorated with tapestries of the 17th century, known as the Perpersack tapestries, after the Flemish weaver who executed them. The palace has been opened to the public in 1972 as a museum containing such exhibits as statues formerly displayed by the cathedral, treasures of the cathedral from past centuries, and royal attire from coronations of French kings. 1498 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1509 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1675 (MDCLXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about tapestry the textile. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... Flemings (Dutch: Vlamingen) are inhabitants of Flanders in the widest sense of the term, i. ...


Saint Rémi of Reims Basilica

Façade of Basilica St. Rémi
Façade of Basilica St. Rémi

Saint Rémi Basilica, an easy one-mile walk from the Cathedral of Notre Dame of Reims, is named for the 5th century Saint Rémi who has been the patron saint of the inhabitants of Reims for more than 15 centuries. The basilica is almost equal in size to the cathedral. Adjacent to the basilica is an important abbey, formerly known as the Royal Abbey of St Rémi. The abbey sought to trace its heritage back to St Rémi, while the present abbey building dates back to the 17th and 18th centuries. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,200 × 900 pixels, file size: 194 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,200 × 900 pixels, file size: 194 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Saint Remigius (French Saint Remi or Saint Rémy), Bishop of Reims, Apostle of the Franks, (ca 437– January 13, 533) effected the conversion to Christianity of Clovis, King of the Franks, at Christmas, 496, one of the turning points in the success of Trinitarian Christianity and a climacteric moment... Europe in 450 The 5th century is the period from 401 to 500 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... Saint Remigius (French Saint Remi or Saint Rémy), Bishop of Reims, Apostle of the Franks, (ca 437– January 13, 533) effected the conversion to Christianity of Clovis, King of the Franks, at Christmas, 496, one of the turning points in the success of Trinitarian Christianity and a climacteric moment... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... Look up basilica in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Abbey of Saint-Remi is an abbey in Reims, France, founded in around AD 1000. ...


The St Rémi Basilica dates from the 11th, 12th, 13th and 15th centuries. Most of the church was constructed by the 11th century, with additions made in later centuries. The nave and transepts, Romanesque in style, date mainly from the earliest, the façade of the south transept from the latest of those periods, the choir and apse chapels from the 12th and 13th centuries. More additions were made in the 17th and 19th centuries. The building was greatly damaged in World War I, and was rebuilt from the ruins in the following 40 years through the meticulous restoration work of architect Henri Deneux. It is still the seat of an active Catholic parish holding regular worship services and welcoming pilgrims. It has been classified as an historical monument since 1841 and is one of the pinnacles of the history of art and of the history of France. Links to full descriptions of the elements of a Gothic floorplan are also found at the entry Cathedral diagram. ... Cathedral ground plan. ... South transept of Tournai Cathedral, Belgium, 12th century. ... West façade of the Notre-Dame de Strasbourg Cathedral A facade (or façade) is the exterior of a building – especially the front, but also sometimes the sides and rear. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article is about an architectural feature; for the astronomical term see apsis. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...

Interior of Basilica St. Rémy
Interior of Basilica St. Rémy

The abbey building is now open to the public as the Saint-Rémi Museum. The abbey was closed in the wake of the French Revolution, as all French monasteries were ordered dissolved in February 1790. The museum exhibits at St Rémi include tapestries from the 16th century given by Robert de Lenoncourt, marble capitals from the 4th century AD, furniture, jewellery, pottery, weapons and glasswork from the 6th to 8th century, medieval sculpture, the façade of the 13th century Musicians' House, remnants from an earlier abbey building, and also exhibits of Gallo-Roman arts and crafts and a room of pottery, jewellery, and weapons from Gallic civilization, as well as an exhibit of items from the Palaeolithic to the Neolithic period. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,200 × 900 pixels, file size: 216 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,200 × 900 pixels, file size: 216 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... This article concerns the buildings occupied by monastics. ...


Buried in the monastery are the archbishops of Reims, and several kings and princes.

Carloman (751 - December 4, 771) was a King of the Franks (768 - 771). ... For other uses, see Charlemagne (disambiguation). ... Frederonne (French: Frédérune or Frérone) (887 – 917) was the sister of the Bishop of Châlons-sur-Marne, and the first wife of King Charles III of France, whom she married in 907. ... Charles the Simple or Charles (September 17, 879 - October 7, 929) was a member of the Carolingian dynasty. ... Gerberga of Saxony (c. ... Lothair (941-986), king of France, son of Louis IV, succeeded his father in 954, and was at first under the guardianship of Hugh the Great, duke of the Franks, and then under that of his maternal uncle Bruno, archbishop of Cologne. ... Events Oda the Severe becomes Archbishop of Canterbury Births Charles dOutremer son of Louis IV of France Deaths Categories: 941 ... Events March 2 - Louis V becomes King of the Franks End of the reign of Emperor Kazan of Japan Emperor Ichijo ascends to the throne of Japan Explorer Bjarni Herjólfsson becomes the first inhabitant of the Old World to sight North America Births Deaths March 2 - Lothair, King of... Louis IV dOutremer: King of France 936 to 954, member of the Carolingian dynasty. ...

Forts

In 1874 the construction of a chain of detached forts was begun in the vicinity, Reims being selected as one of the chief defences of the northern approaches of Paris. The ridge of St Thierry is crowned with a fort of the same name, which with the neighbouring work of Chenay closes the west side of the place. To the north the hill of Brimont has three works guarding the Laon railway and the Aisne canal. Farther east, on the old Roman road, lies the Fort de Fresnes. Due east the hills of Arnay are crowned with five large and important works which cover the approaches from the upper Aisne. Forts Pompelle and Montbré close the south-east side, and the Falaise hills on the Paris side are open and unguarded. The perimeter of the defences is not quite 22 miles, and the forts are a mean distance of 6 miles from the centre of the city. Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Fortifications (Latin fortis, strong, and facere, to make) are military constructions designed for defensive warfare. ...


Other buildings

Town hall
Town hall

The Church of St Jacques was built from the 13th to the 16th centuries. A few blocks from the cathedral, it is now surrounded by a vibrant neighborhood of shopping and restaurants. What remains of the Abbey of St. Denis is now a Fine Arts Museum. The old College of the Jesuits is also now a museum. St Maurice (partly rebuilt in 1867), St André, and St Thomas (erected from 1847 to 1853, under the patronage of Cardinal Gousset, now buried within its walls), are of some interest. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1704x2272, 1668 KB) Photo by Magnus Manske File links The following pages link to this file: Reims Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1704x2272, 1668 KB) Photo by Magnus Manske File links The following pages link to this file: Reims Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Thomas-Marie-Joseph Gousset (born at Montigny-les-Charlieu, a village of Franche-Comté, in 1792; died at Reims in 1866) was a French cardinal and theologian. ...


The town hall, erected in the 17th and enlarged in the 19th century, has a pediment with an equestrian statue of Louis XIII, and a tall and elegant campanile. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A campanile (pronounced []) is, especially in Italy, a free-standing bell tower (Italian campana, bell), often adjacent to a church or cathedral. ...


The Surrender Museum is the location where on May 7, 1945, General Eisenhower and the Allies received the unconditional surrender of the Wehrmacht. (see below) is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... The straight-armed Balkenkreuz, a stylized version of the Iron Cross, the emblem of the Wehrmacht. ...

  • see also near Reims : Château de Condé

Southern façade of the Château de Condé Cour dhonneur (partial) The Château de Condé is a private estate in Condé-en-Brie, Aisne, France, set in its park with three-hundred-year-old trees, on the Champagne route and 100 km from Paris; it hides some...

Wine

Reims, along with Épernay and Ay, is one of the centers of Champagne production. Many of the largest Champagne producing houses, known as les grandes marques, have their headquarters in Reims, and most are open for tasting and tours by appointment. Champagne is aged in the many caves and tunnels under Reims, which form a sort-of maze below the city. Carved from chalk, some of these passages were dug by the Romans. Épernay is a town and commune of northern France. ... Ay is a commune of the Marne département in northeastern France. ... This article is about Champagne, the alcoholic beverage. ... The following is a list of the most significant champagne producers. ... For other uses, see Chalk (disambiguation). ...


Sport

Between 1925 and 1969, Reims hosted the Grand Prix de la Marne automobile race at a circuit called Reims-Gueux. The French Grand Prix was held here 14 times, between 1938 and 1966. The Grand Prix de la Marne was a Grand Prix motor racing event staged at a racecourse near the city of Reims in the Marne département of north-east France. ... Juuso Pykälistö driving a Peugeot 206 World Rally Car at the 2003 Swedish rally Racing cars redirects here. ... The circuit of Reims-Gueux as it looked between 1926 and 1951. ... The French Grand Prix (Grand Prix de France) is a race held as part of Fédération Internationale de lAutomobiles annual Formula One automobile racing championships. ...


The football club Stade Reims is based in the town, and is currently playing in Ligue 2, the second tier of French football. Stade Reims was the outstanding team of France in the 1950s and early 1960s and reached the final of the European Cup of Champions twice in that era. Stade de Reims-Champagne is a French association football team from Reims currently playing in Ligue 2, the second tier of French football. ... Ligue 2 is the second division of French football. ... The UEFA Champions League is an annual club football competition organized by the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) for the most successful football clubs in Europe. ...


Notable residents

Reims was the birthplace of:

Jean-Baptiste Colbert Jean-Baptiste Colbert (August 29, 1619 — September 6, 1683) served as the French minister of finance from 1665 to 1683 under the rule of King Louis XIV. He was described by Mme de Sévigné as Le Nord as he was cold and unemotional. ... Events May 13 - Dutch statesman Johan van Oldenbarnevelt is executed in The Hague after having been accused of treason. ... Events June 6 - The Ashmolean Museum opens as the worlds first university museum. ... The new ministry building in Bercy, Paris The Minister of the Economy, Finance and Industry (Ministre de lEconomie, des Finances et de lIndustrie), or Minister of Finances for short, is one of the most prominent positions in the cabinet of France after the Prime Minister. ... Louis XIV redirects here. ... Saint Jean-Baptiste de La Salle (John Baptist de La Salle) (born 30 April 1651 in Reims; died 7 April 1719 in Saint-Yon, Rouen) was a French priest, educational reformer, and founder of an international educational movement, who dedicated more than forty years of his life to the education... // Events January 1 - Charles II crowned King of Scotland in Scone. ... // Events January 23 - The Principality of Liechtenstein is created within the Holy Roman Empire April 25 - Daniel Defoe publishes Robinson Crusoe June 10 - Battle of Glen Shiel Prussia conducts Europes first systematic census Miners in Falun, Sweden find an apparently petrified body of Fet-Mats Israelsson in an unused... For university teachers, see professor. ... Nicolas de Grigny (baptised September 8, 1672 - November 30, 1703) was a French organist and composer. ... Events England, France, Munster and Cologne invade the United Provinces, therefore this name is know as ´het rampjaar´ (the disaster year) in the Netherlands. ... Events February 2 - Earthquake in Aquila, Italy February 4 - In Japan, the 47 samurai commit seppuku (ritual suicide) February 14 - Earthquake in Norcia, Italy April 21 - Company of Quenching of Fire (ie. ... An organist is a musician who plays any type of organ. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... Jean-Baptiste Drouet, comte dErlon (July 29, 1765-January 25, 1844) was a marshal of France and a soldier in Napoleons army, who commanded the French 1st Corps at the battle of Waterloo. ... Year 1765 (MDCCLXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Jan. ... Baton of a modern Marshal of France The Marshal of France (French: Maréchal de France) is a military distinction in contemporary France, not a military rank. ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... Nicolas Eugène Géruzez (January 6, 1799 - May 29, 1865), was a French critic. ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1865 (MDCCLXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Etienne Jules Adolphe Desmier de Saint-Simon, Vicomte dArchiac (September 24, 1802 - December 24, 1868), was a French geologist and paleontologist. ... Year 1802 (MDCCCII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Geologist by Carl Spitzweg A geologist is a contributor to the science of geology, studying the physical structure and processes of the Earth and planets of the solar system (see planetary geology). ... A paleontologist carefully chips rock from a column of dinosaur vertebrae. ... Paul Fort (February 1, 1872 - April 20, 1960) was a French poet. ... Year 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... Henri Marteau (March 31, 1874 - 1934) was a French violinist and composer. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A violinist is an instrumentalist who plays the violin (eg Diana Yukawa). ... Maurice Halbwachs (pronounced: ; Rheims, 11 March 1877 - Buchenwald 16 March 1945) was a French philosopher and sociologist known for developing the concept of collective memory. ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... Sociology is the study of the social lives of humans, groups and societies. ... Roger Caillois (March 3, 1913 - December 21, 1978), was a French intellectual whose idiosyncratic work brought together literary criticism, sociology, and philosophy by focusing on subjects as diverse as gems and the sacred. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Literati redirects here. ... Jean Baudrillard (July 29, 1929 – March 6, 2007) (IPA pronunciation: [1]) was a French cultural theorist, philosopher, political commentator, and photographer. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Culture theory is the branch of anthropology and other related social science disciplines (e. ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... PPDA in his TF1 office © Olivier Roller Patrick Poivre dArvor (real name: Patrick Poivre) (born September 20, 1947) is a French TV journalist and writer. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... Robert Emmanuel Pirès (born October 29, 1973 in Reims, France) is a French international football player, of Portuguese and Asturian descent. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... The FIFA World Cup Trophy, which has been awarded to the world champions since 1974. ... Villarreal Club de Fútbol SAD, usually abbreviated to Villarreal, is a Spanish Primera División football club based in Vila-real, a small town in the province of Castellon. ... Adeline Wuillème (born December 8, 1975 in Reims, Champagne-Ardenne), is a French foil fencer. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Look up Foil in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the sport, which is distinguished from stage fencing and academic fencing (mensur). ... Alternate meaning: Cello web browser A cropped image to show the relative size of a cello to a human (Uncropped Version) The cello (also violoncello or cello) is a stringed instrument and part of the violin family. ...

Affiliations

Reims is twinned with:

Image File history File links Flag_of_Austria. ... This article is about the capital of the Austrian state of Salzburg. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Oche redirects here; in darts the oche is the line from which players must throw. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... Canterbury is a cathedral city in east Kent in South East England and is the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Primate of All England, head of the Church of England and of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Florence (or Firenze, Florentia and Fiorenza) is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany, and of the province of Florence. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Arlington County is an urban county of about 203,000 residents in the Commonwealth of Virginia, in the U.S., directly across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C. [1] Originally part of the District of Columbia, the land now comprising the county was retroceded to Virginia in a July... This article is about the U.S. state. ...

References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Reims

Battle of Reims may refer to: Battle of Reims (356), between the Roman army and the Alemanni. ... The Archdiocese of Reims was founded (as a diocese) around 250 by St. ... Façade of the Notre-Dame de Reims The Notre-Dame de Reims (Our Lady of Rheims) is the Cathedral of Reims, where the kings of France were once crowned. ... Champagne Airlines is an airline based in France. ... Reims Aviation is a French aircraft manufacturer located in the city of Reims currently producing the Reims F406. ... The Champagne Riots of 1911 resulted from a series of problems faced by grape growers in the Champagne area of France. ... French gastronomy France is one of the oldest wine-producing regions of Europe. ... Location of the Champagne province in France The Champagne wine region (archaic English: ) is a historic province within the Champagne administrative province in the northeast of France. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
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Reims is a sous-préfecture of the Marne département, in the Champagne-Ardenne administrative région.
Reims is situated in a plain on the right bank of the Vesle River, a tributary of the Aisne River, and on the canal which connects the Aisne with the Marne River.
In 1874 the construction of a chain of detached forts was begun in the vicinity, Reims being selected as one of the chief defences of the northern approaches of Paris.
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