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Encyclopedia > Regional geography
Geography
History of geography

Regional geography is a study of regions throughout the world in order to understand or define the unique characteristics of a particular region which consists of natural as well as human elements. Attention is paid also to regionalization which covers the proper techniques of space delineation into regions. This article explores the history of geography. ... See also Age of Sail. ... Environmental determinism, also known as climatic determinism, is the view that the physical environment, rather than social conditions, determines culture. ... The quantitative revolution was one of the four major turning points in the history of geography (the other three being regional geography, environmental determinism and critical geography). ... The critical geography is one of the four major turning points in the history of geography (the other three being environmental determinism, regional geography and quantitative revolution). ... Ortelius world map 1570 File links The following pages link to this file: Abraham Ortelius Wikipedia:WikiProject Maps/World Categories: NowCommons | Author died more than 100 years ago public domain images ... In politics, regionalisation is a process of dividing a political entity — typically a country — into smaller regions, and transferring power from the central government to the regions. ... Look up Region in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Regional geography is also considered as a certain approach to study in geographical sciences (similar to quantitative geography or bunch of critical geographies). This approach to study was prevailing during the second half of the 19th and the first half of the 20th century also known as a period of prevailing regional geography paradigm when regional geography took the central position in geographical sciences. It was later criticised for its descriptiveness and the lack of theory (regional geography as an empirical approach of geographical sciences). Massive criticism was leveled against this approach in the fifties and during the quantitative revolution. Main critics were Kimble[1] and Schaefer[2]. The quantitative revolution was one of the four major turning points in the history of geography (the other three being regional geography, environmental determinism and critical geography). ... The critical geography is one of the four major turning points in the history of geography (the other three being environmental determinism, regional geography and quantitative revolution). ... The quantitative revolution was one of the four major turning points in the history of geography (the other three being regional geography, environmental determinism and critical geography). ... Fred K. Schaefer (Berlin, 7 July 1904 - USA, 6 June 1953) was a geographer. ...


Regional geography paradigm has had impact on many geographical sciences (see regional economic geography or regional geomorphology). Todays regional geography is still thought in some universities as study of the major regions of the world, such as Northern and Latin America, Europe, and Asia and their countries. In addition, the notion of a city-regional approach to the study of geography gained some credence in the mid-1990s after works by people such as Saskia Sassen, it was however heavily criticized by Peter Storper. Economic geography is the study of the location, distribution and spatial organisation of economic activities across the Earth. ... Surface of the Earth Geomorphology is the study of landforms, including their origin and evolution, and the processes that shape them. ... Saskia Sassen Saskia Sassen (born January 5th in 1949 at The Hague, in The Netherlands) is an American sociologist and economist noted for her analyses of globalization and international human migration. ...


Notable regional geographers were Alfred Hettner from Germany with his concept of chorology, Vidal de la Blache from France with the possibilism approach (possibilism as a softer notion of environmental determinism) and United States geographer Richard Hartshorne with his areal differenciation concept. Alfred Hettner ( August 6, 1859, Dresden - August 31, 1941, Heidelberg) was a German geographer. ... Chorology (from Greek khoros place) can mean the study of the causal relations between geographical phenomena occurring within a particular region the study of the spatial distribution of organisms. ... Paul Vidal de la Blache (1845-1918) was a French geographer considered to be the father of the French School of Geopolitics. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Environmental determinism, also known as climatic determinism, is the view that the physical environment, rather than social conditions, determines culture. ... Richard Hartshorne (1899-1992), was a prominent American geographer. ...


Some geographers have also attempted to reintroduce a certain amount of regionalism since the 1980s. These involve a complex definition of regions and their interactions with other scales [3]. Look up Region in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Spatial scale provides a shorthand form for discussing relative lengths, areas, distances and sizes. ...

World map exhibiting a common interpretation of Oceania; other interpretations may vary. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... World map showing the location of Asia. ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... North America North America is a continent [1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... The Pacific Ocean (from the Latin name Mare Pacificum, peaceful sea, bestowed upon it by the Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan) is the largest of the Earths oceanic subdivisions. ... The Pacific Ocean (from the Latin name Mare Pacificum, peaceful sea, bestowed upon it by the Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan) is the largest of the Earths oceanic subdivisions. ... The Atlantic Ocean forms a component of the all-encompassing World Ocean and is directly linked to the Arctic Ocean, the Pacific Ocean, the Indian Ocean, and the Southern Ocean. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Southern Ocean, also known as the Antarctic Ocean or South Polar Ocean, is the ocean completely in Earths southern hemisphere encircling Antarctica, comprising the southernmost waters of the World Ocean south of 60° S latitude. ... The Arctic Ocean, located in the northern hemisphere and mostly in the Arctic north polar region, is the smallest of the worlds five major oceanic divisions and the shallowest. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... “West Indian” redirects here. ... Map of Central Asia showing three sets of possible boundaries for the region Central Asia located as a region of the world Central Asia is a vast landlocked region of Asia. ... Geographic East Asia. ... Regions of Asia:  Northern Asia  Central Asia  Western Asia  Southern Asia  Eastern Asia  Southeastern Asia North Asia or Northern Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... Map of South Asia (see note on Kashmir). ... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Australasia Australasia is a term variably used to describe a region of Oceania: Australia, New Zealand, and neighbouring islands in the Pacific Ocean. ... Map showing Melanesia. ... Carving from the ridgepole of a Māori house, ca 1840 Polynesia (from Greek: πολύς many, νῆσος island) is a large grouping of over 1,000 islands scattered over the central and southern Pacific Ocean. ... For other uses, see Central America (disambiguation). ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... Northern America is a name for the parts of North America besides Mexico when Mexico is considered as Latin America. ... World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World consisting of the continents of North America[1], Central America and South America with their associated islands and regions. ...  Central Africa  Middle Africa (UN subregion)  Central African Federation (defunct) Central Africa is a core region of the African continent often considered to include: Burundi Central African Republic Chad Democratic Republic of the Congo Rwanda Middle Africa (as used by the United Nations when categorising geographic subregions) is an analogous...  Eastern Africa (UN subregion)  East African Community  Central African Federation (defunct)  geographic, including above East Africa or Eastern Africa is the easternmost region of the African continent, variably defined by geography or geopolitics. ... North Africa is the Mediterranean, northernmost region of the African continent, separated by the Sahara from Sub-Saharan Africa. ... Categories: Africa geography stubs | Southern Africa ...  Western Africa (UN subregion)  Maghreb[1] West Africa or Western Africa is the westernmost region of the African continent. ... Central Europe The Alpine Countries and the Visegrád Group (Political map, 2004) Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ... Pre-1989 division between the West (grey) and Eastern Bloc (orange) superimposed on current national boundaries: Russia (dark orange), other countries of the former USSR (medium orange),members of the Warsaw pact (light orange), and other former Communist regimes not aligned with Moscow (lightest orange). ... Northern Europe is marked in dark blue Northern Europe is a name of the northern part of the European continent. ... Southern Europe is a region of the European continent. ... The borders of Western Europe were largely defined by the Cold War. ...

References

  1. ^ Kimble, G.H.T. (1951): The Inadequacy of the Regional Concept, London Essays in Geography, edts. L.D.Stamp and S.W.Wooldridge, pp. 1951-174.
  2. ^ Schaefer, F.K. (1953): Exceptionalism in Geography: A Methodological Examination, A.A.A.G., vol. 43, pp. 226-245.
  3. ^ MacLeod, Gordon and Jones, Martin (2001): Renewing The Geography of Regions. Environment and Planning D 16(9) pp669-695

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Encyclopedia: Regional-geography (2248 words)
Geography is the scientific study of the locational and spatial variation in both physical and human phenomena on Earth.
By the 18th century, geography had become recognized as a discrete discipline and became part of a typical university curriculum in Europe (especially Paris and Berlin), although not the in United Kingdom where geography was generally taught as a sub-discipline of other subjects.
Regional Science comprises the body of knowledge in which the spatial dimension plays a fundamental role, such as regional economics, resource management, location theory, urban and regional planning, transportation and communication, human geography, population distribution, landscape ecology, and environmental quality.
Geography - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1861 words)
Geography is the study of the locational and spatial variation of both natural and human phenomena on Earth.
Human geography is a branch of geography that focuses on the study of patterns and processes that shape human interaction with various environments.
While the major focus of human geography is not the physical landscape of the Earth (see Physical geography) it is hardly possible to discuss human geography without referring to the physical landscape on which human activities are being played out, and environmental geography is emerging as a link between the two.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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