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Encyclopedia > Regent

Regent, from the Latin, a person selected to administer a state because the ruler is a minor or is not present or debilitated. Thus, the common use is for an acting deputy governor. The Oxford English Dictionary defines the term as "A person appointed to administer a State because the monarch is a minor, is absent or is incapacitated." Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Oxford English Dictionary print set The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP), and is generally regarded as the most comprehensive and scholarly dictionary of the English language. ...


In a monarchy, a regent usually governs due to the actual monarch's absence, incapacity or minority, and may also be elected to rule during the sede vacante when the royal line has died out. This was the case in Finland and Hungary, where the royal line was considered extinct in the aftermath of World War I. In Iceland, the regent represented the King of Denmark as sovereign of Iceland until the country became a republic in 1944. Sede vacante is the vacancy of the episcopal see of a particular church in the Canon law of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Combatants Allied Powers: Russian Empire France British Empire Italy United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary German Empire Ottoman Empire Bulgaria Commanders Nicholas II Aleksei Brusilov Georges Clemenceau Joseph Joffre Ferdinand Foch Herbert Henry Asquith Douglas Haig John Jellicoe Victor Emmanuel III Luigi Cadorna Armando Diaz Woodrow Wilson John Pershing Franz... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1944 calendar). ...


In San Marino, an ancient independent miniature republic surrounded within Italy, the "Captains Regent", or Capitani Reggenti, are two officials elected annually as joint heads of state and of government.


In the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (1569-1795), kings were elective, which often led to a fairly long interregnum. In the interim, it was the Polish Roman Catholic Primate who served as the regent, termed the "interrex" (Latin: ruler "between kings," as in ancient Rome). Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Events January 11 - First recorded lottery in England. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Election of Michal Korybut Wisniowiecki as king of Poland at Wola, outside Warsaw ( 1669). ... An interregnum is a period between monarchs, between popes of the Roman Catholic Church, emperors of Holy Roman Empire, polish kings (elective monarchy) or between consuls of the Roman Republic. ... Catholic Patriarchal (non cardinal) coat of arms Primate (from the Latin Primus, first) is a title or rank bestowed on some bishops in certain Christian churches. ... Interrex or inter-rex (Latin; plural, interreges) was literally a ruler between kings. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ...

Contents

Regents in various Monarchies

It should be noted that those who held a regency briefly, for example during surgery, are not necessarily listed, particularly if they performed no official acts; this list is also not complete. The list includes some figures who acted as regent, even if they did not themselves hold the title of regent. A cardiothoracic surgeon performs a mitral valve replacement at the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center. ...


Anhalt

Prince Aribert of Anhalt, (Aribert Joseph Alexander), (18 June 1866 - 24 December 1933) was a Prince of the German duchy of Anhalt. ...

Baden

Grand Duke Friedrich I of Baden, painting by Hans Thoma Grand Duke Friedrich I of Baden (Frederick Wilhelm Ludwig) (September 9, 1826 – September 28, 1907) was the sixth Grand Duke of Baden from 1856 to 1907. ... ...

Bavaria

Prince Luitpold of Bavaria (12 March 1821—12 December 1912) was a Bavarian prince of the House of Wittelsbach. ... Ludwig (Louis) II, King of Bavaria, Ludwig Friedrich Wilhelm; sometimes known in English as Mad King Ludwig and as the Märchenkönig (Fairy-tale King) in German. ... Postcard photograph from 1916 of King Ottos body in repose. ... Ludwig III of Bavaria Ludwig III, HM Ludwig III Leopold Joseph Maria Aloys Alfred King of Bavaria, (7 January 1845 - 18 October 1921) was briefly Prince Regent of Bavaria and was the last King of Bavaria from 1913 to 1918. ... Postcard photograph from 1916 of King Ottos body in repose. ...

Belgium

Erasme Louis Surlet de Chokier (November 27, 1769 - August 7, 1839), born in Gingelom, was a Belgian politician and before the accession of Leopold I to the Belgian throne, was the first regent of Belgium. ... Leopold I 1831 (MDCCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Prince Charles, Charles Théodore Henri Antoine Meinrad, Count of Flanders, Prince of Belgium (October 10, 1903—June 1, 1983), was the second son of King Albert I of Belgium and Queen Elizabeth. ...

Brunswick

George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 29 January 1820 until his death. ... George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 29 January 1820 until his death. ... Charles II, Duke of Brunswick (German Karl; 30 October 1804, Brunswick – 18 August 1873, Geneva), Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, ruled the Duchy of Brunswick from 1815 until 1830. ... Prince (Friedrich Wilhelm Nikolaus) Albrecht of Prussia (8 May 1837-13 September 1906) was a Prussian general field marshal and, from 1885, regent of the Duchy of Brunswick. ... 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) is a leap year starting on Tuesday (click on link to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Prince Ernst August (II) of Hanover, 3rd Duke of Cumberland (1878-1919) and Crown Prince of Hanover (1851-1866), Ernst August Wilhelm Adolf Georg Friedrich (21 September 1845-14 November 1923), was the eldest child and only son of King George V of Hanover and his wife, Princess Marie of... Duke Johann Albrecht Duke Johann Albrecht Ernst Konstantin Friedrich Heinrich of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (8 December 1857-16 February 1920) was the regent of the Grand Duchy of Mecklenburg-Schwerin from 1897-1901 and the Duchy of Brunswick from 1907-1913. ...

Bulgaria

  • Stefan Stambolov, during the absence of Prince Alexander Battenberg from the Bulgarian throne between 28 August 1886 and 3 September 1886 and the vacancy of the throne between 7 September 1886 and 14 August 1887.
  • Prince Kyril of Preslav, during the minority of his dead brother (Boris III)'s son, Simeon II (1943 to 1944).

A statue of Stefan N. Stambolov in his birthplace Veliko Turnovo Stefan Nikolov Stambolov (Bulgarian: Стефан Николов Стамболов) (January 31, 1854 - July 6, 1895) was a Bulgarian revolutionary and statesman. ... His Royal Highness Kyril Prince of Preslav (November 17, 1895 - February 1, 1945) was the second son of Ferdinand I of Bulgaria and his first wife Marie Louise of Bourbon-Parma. ... Tsar Boris III of Bulgaria, (photographed in 1933) Tsar Boris III of Bulgaria (January 30, 1894 – August 28, 1943), originally Boris Klemens Robert Maria Pius Ludwig Stanislaus Xaver, son of Ferdinand I, came to the throne in 1918 upon the abdication of his father, following Bulgarias defeat in World... Simeon Saxe-Coburg-Gotha as Prime Minister of Bulgaria Tsar Simeon II of Bulgaria (born June 16, 1937) was the last Tsar of Bulgaria from 1943 to 1946, and was Prime Minister of Bulgaria from 2001 until August 2005. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1943 calendar). ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1944 calendar). ...

China

Empress Dowager (Chinese, Korean and Japanese: 皇太后; Chinese pinyin Húang Tài Hòu, Korean pronunciation: Hwang Tae Hu, Japanese pronunciation: Kōtaigō) was title given to the mother of a Chinese emperor. ... The title Grand Empress Dowager (simplified and traditional Chinese: 太皇太后, pinyin tai4 huang2 tai4 hou4) was given to the grandmother or a woman from the grandmother generation of the Chinese dynastic ruler. ... Dorgon (多爾袞 duo1 er3 gun3) (November 17, 1612 - December 31, 1650), also known as Hošoi Mergen Cin Wang (和碩睿親王), was a Manchu prince in the early Qing dynasty. ... Events March 29 - Swedish colonists establish first settlement in Delaware, called New Sweden. ... // Events June 23 - Claimant King Charles II of England, Scotland and Ireland arrives in Scotland, the only of the three Kingdoms that has accepted him as ruler. ... The Shunzhi Emperor (March 15, 1638–February 5, 1661?) was the second emperor of the Manchu Qing dynasty, and the first Qing emperor to rule over China proper from 1644 to 1661. ... Sonin, (?-1667) also known as Soni (Manchu: ; Chinese: 索尼), was a senior regent during Chinese Emperor Kang Xis minority in the Qing Dynasty. ... A regent during the early reign of Chinese Emperor Kang Xi who was put to death by Oboi. ... Ebilun was an assistant minister appointed by the Chinese Emperor Shunzhi for his successor, Emperor Kang Xi during the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911). ... Oboi (Manchu: ; Chinese: ; pinyin: ) (?-1669) was a great Manchu warrior of the Bordered Yellow Banner from the GÅ«walgiya clan. ... The Kangxi Emperor (Chinese: ; Pinyin: KāngxÄ«; Wade-Giles: Kang-hsi; May 4, 1654 – December 20, 1722) was the fourth Emperor of the Manchu Qing dynasty, and the second Qing emperor to rule over all of China, from 1661 to 1722. ... The Empress Dowager Cixi (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Tzu-Hsi Huang Tai-hou) (November 29, 1835 – November 15, 1908), popularly known in China as the West Dowager Empress (Chinese: 西太后), the Nala Empress Dowager (Chinese: 那拉太后) and officially known posthumously as Empress Xiao Qin Xian (Chinese: 孝欽顯皇后), was a powerful and... The Tong Zhi Emperor, born Zai Chun (April 27, 1856–January 12, 1875) was the tenth emperor of the Manchu Qing Dynasty, and the eighth Qing emperor to rule over China, from 1861 to 1875. ... The Guangxu Emperor (August 14, 1871–November 14, 1908), born Zaitian (載湉), was the tenth emperor of the Manchu Qing dynasty, and the ninth Qing emperor to rule over China. ... 2nd Prince Chun The 2nd prince Chun (醇親王) (February 12, 1883 - February 3, 1951) was born Zaifeng (Chinese: 載灃; Wade-Giles: Tsai-feng), of the Manchu Aisin-Gioro clan (the Qing imperial family ruling over China). ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... PÇ”yí (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ) (February 7, 1906–October 17, 1967) of the Manchu Aisin-Gioro ruling family was the last Emperor of China between 1908 and 1924 (ruling emperor between 1908 and 1912, and non-ruling emperor between 1912 and 1924), the twelfth emperor of the Qing Dynasty...

Egypt

Carved sphinx with face of Hatshepsut, Cairo Museum Maatkare Hatshepsut (c. ... Thutmose III (also written as Tuthmosis III; called Manahpi(r)ya in the Amarna letters) (? - 1426 BC), was Pharaoh of Egypt in the Eighteenth Dynasty. ... Prince Mohammed Ali Tewfik (November 9, 1875 - March 18, 1955) was the Heir Presumptive of Egypt from 1892-99 and 1936-1952. ... Farouk of Egypt King Farouk of Egypt (February 11, 1920 – March 18, 1965) was the penultimate King of Egypt, succeeding his father, Fuad I, in 1936. ... Prince Muhammad Abdul Moneim (February 20, 1899 - December 1, 1979) served as chairman of the Council of Egyptian Regency, from 26 July 1952 to 18 June 1953, after which time, Major General Muhammad Naguib took power, ending the rule of Monarch government installed by the British Empire. ... King Fuad II of Egypt and the Sudan (Ahmed Fuad) (Arabic: الملك أحمد فؤاد الثاني) was born on 16 January 1952. ...

England

William Longchamp (died 1197), chancellor of England and bishop of Ely, entered public life at the close of Henry IIs reign as official to the kings son Geoffrey, for the archdeaconry of Rouen. ... Richard I (8 September 1157 – 6 April 1199) was King of England from 1189 to 1199. ... William Marshall, from his tomb effigy in Temple Church, London. ... Hubert de Burgh (~1165 - May 12, 1243) was Earl of Kent, Justiciar of England and Ireland, and one of the most influential men in England during the reigns of John and Henry III. De Burgh came from a minor gentry family about which little is known. ... Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was crowned King of England in 1216, despite being less than ten years of age. ... Henry Plantagenet, 3rd Earl of Leicester (1281 – September 22, 1345) was an English nobleman, one of the principals behind the deposition of Edward II. He was the younger son of Blanche of Artois and Edmund Crouchback, 1st Earl of Lancaster, Earl of Leicester, who was a son of Henry III... Edward III (13 November 1312 – 21 June 1377) was one of the most successful English kings of medieval times. ... John of Lancaster, Duke of Bedford also known as John Platagenet (June 20, 1389 - September 14, 1435) was the fourth son of King Henry IV of England by Mary de Bohun, and acted as regent for his nephew, King Henry VI of England. ... Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester (1390 - February 23, 1447) was the fifth son of King Henry IV of England by his first wife, Mary de Bohun. ... Henry VI (December 6, 1421 – May 21, 1471) was King of England from 1422 to 1461 (though with a Regent until 1437) and then from 1470 to 1471, and King of France from 1422 to 1453. ... Richard, Duke of York (21 September 1411 – 30 December 1460) was a member of the English royal family, who served in senior positions in France at the end of the Hundred Years War, and in England during Henry VIs madness. ... Richard III (2 October 1452 – 22 August 1485) was King of England from 1483 until his death. ... Edward V (4 November 1470 – 1483?) was the King of England from 9 April 1483 until his deposition two months later. ... Edward Seymour Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset (c. ... Edward VI (12 October 1537 – 6 July 1553) became King of England, King of France (in practice only the town and surrounding district of Calais) and Ireland on 28 January 1547, and coronated on 20 February, at just nine years of age. ... John Dudley (1501-August 22/August 23, 1553) was a Tudor nobleman and politician, executed for high treason by Queen Mary I of England. ...

Finland

After the abdication of Nicholas II of Russia, the throne of the Grand Duke of Finland was vacant and according to the constitution of 1772, a regent was installed by the Finnish Parliament during the first two years of Finnish independence, before the country was declared a republic. Nicholas II of Russia (May 18, 1868–July 17, 1918)[1] (Russian: , Nikolay II) was the last Emperor of Russia, King of Poland,[2] and Grand Duke of Finland. ... Grand Duke of Finland, more correctly Grand Prince of Finland, (Finnish: Suomen suuriruhtinas, Swedish: Storfurste av Finland) was a title in use, sometimes sporadically, between 1584 and 1808. ... The Eduskunta in Finnish, or the Riksdag in Swedish, is the parliament of Finland. ... For other uses, see Republic (disambiguation). ...

Pehr Evind Svinhufvud af Qvalstad (December 15, 1861 – February 29, 1944) was the President of Finland from 1931 to 1937. ... This article is about the Finnish statesman and Commander-in-Chief. ...

France

Princess Anne of Kiev or Anna Yaroslavna (b. ... Baldwin V of Flanders (d. ... Philip I (French: Philippe Ier) (May 23, 1052 – July 29, 1108) was King of France from 1060 to 1108. ... Suger of Saint-Denis on a medieval window Suger (c. ... Louis VII the Younger (French: Louis VII le Jeune) (1120 – September 18, 1180) was King of France from 1137 to 1180. ... Philip II Augustus (French: Philippe II Auguste) (August 21, 1165 – July 14, 1223), was King of France from 1180 to 1223. ... Blanche of Castile (March 4, 1188 – November 26, 1252), wife of Louis VIII of France. ... Louis IX of France, as painted by El Greco in the 16th Century. ... Blanche of Castile (March 4, 1188 – November 26, 1252), wife of Louis VIII of France. ... Alphonse, Count of Toulouse and of Poitiers (November 11, 1220 – August 21, 1271). ... Philippe III Philip III the Bold ( French: Philippe III le Hardi) (April 3, 1245 – October 5, 1285) reigned as King of France from 1270 to 1285. ... Philip V the Tall (French: Philippe V le Long) (1293 - January 3, 1322) was King of France from 1316 to 1322, a member of the Capetian dynasty. ... Louis X of France Louis X the Quarreller, also called the Headstrong or the Stubborn, (French: Louis X le Hutin, Spanish: Luis el Obstinado) (October 4, 1289 – June 5, 1316), King of France from 1314 to 1316, was a member of the Capetian Dynasty. ... John I the Posthumous (French: Jean Ier le Posthume) (November 15, 1316 – November 20, 1316) was King of France for the five days he lived. ... Philip VI of France Philip VI of Valois (French: Philippe VI de Valois; 1293 – August 22, 1350) was the King of France from 1328 to his death, and Count of Anjou, Maine, and Valois 1325–1328. ... Charles IV the Fair (French: Charles IV le Bel) (1294 – February 1, 1328), a member of the Capetian Dynasty, reigned as King of France from 1322 to 1328. ... Charles V the Wise (French: Charles V le Sage) (January 31, 1338 – September 16, 1380) was king of France from 1364 to 1380 and a member of the Valois Dynasty. ... Louis I of Anjou (July 23, 1339, Château de Vincennes, – September 20, 1384, Biselia) was the second son of King John II of France and Bonne of Luxembourg. ... Charles VI Charles VI the Well-Beloved, later known as the Mad (French: Charles VI le Bien-Aimé, later known as le Fol) (December 3, 1368 – October 21, 1422) was a King of France (1380 – 1422) and a member of the Valois Dynasty. ... Louis II of Bourbon, called the Good (Latin translation of elitios) (1337 – 1410, Montlucon) was the third Duke of Bourbon. ... Charles VI Charles VI the Well-Beloved, later known as the Mad (French: Charles VI le Bien-Aimé, later known as le Fol) (December 3, 1368 – October 21, 1422) was a King of France (1380 – 1422) and a member of the Valois Dynasty. ... Louis II of Bourbon, called the Good (Latin translation of elitios) (1337 – 1410, Montlucon) was the third Duke of Bourbon. ... John of Valois, the Magnificent, (November 30, 1340 – March 15, 1416) was Duke of Berry and Auvergne and Count of Poitiers and Montpensier. ... Isabeau de Bavière (also Isabella of Bavaria-Ingolstadt) (about 1369 – September 24, 1435) was a Queen Consort of France (1385 - 1422) after marrying Charles VI of France, a member of the Valois Dynasty, on July 17, 1385. ... Henry V of England (16 September 1387 – 31 August 1422) was one of the great warrior kings of the Middle Ages. ... Charles VII the Victorious, a. ... John of Lancaster, Duke of Bedford also known as John Platagenet (June 20, 1389 - September 14, 1435) was the fourth son of King Henry IV of England by Mary de Bohun, and acted as regent for his nephew, King Henry VI of England. ... Henry VI (December 6, 1421 – May 21, 1471) was King of England from 1422 to 1461 (though with a Regent until 1437) and then from 1470 to 1471, and King of France from 1422 to 1453. ... Charles VII the Victorious, a. ... Anne de Beaujeu Anne of France (or Anne of Beaujeu) (Genappe, April 1461 – 14 November 1522, Chantelle), was the daughter of Louis XI, King of France and his second queen consort, Charlotte of Savoy. ... Peter II of Bourbon (1438 – 1503) was Duke of Bourbon and Auvergne from 1488 to his death, following his elder brothers John II and Charles II, Archbishop of Lyon. ... Charles VIII the Affable (French: Charles VIII lAffable) (June 30, 1470 – April 7, 1498) was King of France from 1483 to his death. ... Louise of Savoy Louise of Savoy (September 11, 1476 – September 22, 1531) was the mother of Francis I of France. ... Francis I (François Ier in French) (September 12, 1494 – March 31, 1547), called the Father and Restorer of Letters (le Père et Restaurateur des Lettres), was crowned King of France in 1515 in the cathedral at Reims and reigned until 1547. ... Louise of Savoy Louise of Savoy (September 11, 1476 – September 22, 1531) was the mother of Francis I of France. ... Francis I (François Ier in French) (September 12, 1494 – March 31, 1547), called the Father and Restorer of Letters (le Père et Restaurateur des Lettres), was crowned King of France in 1515 in the cathedral at Reims and reigned until 1547. ... Catherine de Medici, c. ... Henry II (French: Henri II) (March 31, 1519 – July 10, 1559), a member of the Valois Dynasty, was King of France from March 31, 1547, until his death. ... Charles IX (June 27, 1550 – May 30, 1574) was born Charles-Maximilien, the son of King Henri II of France and Catherine de Medici. ... Henry III (French: Henri III; September 19, 1551 – August 2, 1589), born Alexandre-Édouard, was a member of the Valois Dynasty, King of France from May 30, 1574 until his death. ... Portrait of Marie de Medici. ... Louis XIII (September 27, 1601 - May 14, 1643), called the Just (French: le Juste), was King of France from 1610 to 1643. ... Anne of Austria by Peter Paul Rubens, c. ... Sun King redirects here. ... Philippe of Orléans Philippe II, Duke of Orléans, Philippe Charles (August 2, 1674 - December 2, 1723) called Duke of Chartres (1674-1701), and then Duke of Orléans (1701-1723) was Regent of France from 1715 to 1723. ... Louis XV of France (February 15, 1710 – May 10, 1774), the Beloved (French: le Bien-Aimé), was King of France from 1715 until his death. ... Régence is the French word for (and root of the English word) regency (see that article). ... The English Regency, or simply the Regency, is a name given to the period from 1811 to 1820 in the history of England. ... Louis XVIII (November 17, 1755 - September 16, 1824) was King of France and Navarre from 1814 (although he declared that he considered his reign to have begun in 1795) until his death in 1824, with a brief break in 1815 due to Napoleons return in the Hundred Days. ... Louis XVII of France (March 27, 1785 – June 8, 1795), from birth to 1789 known as Louis-Charles, Duke of Normandy; then from 1789 to 1791 as Louis-Charles, Dauphin of Viennois; and from 1791 to 1793 as Louis-Charles, Prince Royal of France, was the son of King Louis... Louis XVI of France Louis XVI (23 August 1754 – 21 January 1793) was King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then King of the French from 1791 to 1792. ... Maria Eugenia Ignacia Augustina Palafox de Guzmán Portocarrero y Kirkpatrick, 9th Countess de Teba, aka Eugenia de Montijo (May 5, 1826 - July 11, 1920) was Empress of France (1853-1871). ... Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte (April 20, 1808 - January 9, 1873) was the son of King Louis Bonaparte and Queen Hortense de Beauharnais; both monarchs of the French puppet state, the Kingdom of Holland. ...

Greece

  • Archbishop Damaskinos (1944-1946) On behalf of the king till his return.
  • George Papadopoulos (1972) self proclaimed; (position combined with the premiership). Due to king's exile after a failed royal counter coup.

Statue of Archbishop Damaskinos near the Athens Cathedral. ... Georgios Papadopoulos in the standard poster issued by the dictatorship government. ...

Hanover

George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 29 January 1820 until his death. ... George III (George William Frederick) (4 June 1738 – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until 1 January 1801, and thereafter United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death. ...

Hesse-Kassel

  • Electoral Prince Frederick William (1831-1847), due ot the incapacity of his father, Elector William II

Hungary

Andrew II (Hungarian: András or Endre, Slovak: Ondrej) (c. ... Ladislaus III (1201-1205) was king of Hungary from 1204 to 1205. ... John Hunyadi, as imagined by a 17th century artist John Hunyadi (Medieval Latin: Ioannes Corvinus, German: Johann Hunyadi; Hungarian: Hunyadi János, Romanian: Iancu or Ioan de Hunedoara) (c. ... Ladislaus, king of Bohemia Ladislaus the Posthumous (22 February 1440 – 23 November 1457), Archduke, king of Hungary as László V; king of Bohemia as Ladislav; duke of Austria, the only son of Albert II, Holy Roman Emperor, and of Elizabeth, daughter of Emperor Sigismund, was born at Komarom four... Events January 24 - Matthias I Corvinus becomes king of Hungary Foundation of Magdalen College, University of Oxford George of Podebrady becomes king of Bohemia Pope Pius II becomes pope Turks sack the Acropolis Births February 15 - Ivan the Young, Ruler of Tver (d. ... Matthias Corvinus (Mátyás in Hungarian), (February 23, 1443 (?) - April 6, 1490) was one of the greatest Kings of Hungary, ruling between 1458 and 1490. ... Lajos Kossuth Lajos Louis Kossuth (Monok, September 19, 1802–Turin, March 20, 1894) was a Hungarian lawyer, politician and Regent-President of the Kingdom of Hungary in 1849. ... In 1848, the Austrian Empire under the Habsburgs was confronted with the combined effect of economic, social class, and nationalities conflicts. ... Miklós Horthy de Nagybánya, Duke of Szeged and Otranto (Hungarian: Vitéz* nagybányai Horthy Miklós, Szeged és Otranto hercege; Kenderes, June 18, 1868 – Estoril, February 9, 1957) was a Hungarian Admiral and statesman and served as the Regent of Hungary from March 1, 1920 until October...

Iceland

Sveinn Björnsson (27 February 1881 – 25 January 1952) became a member of Reykjavik town council in 1912 and was its president in 1918-20. ...

Japan

The Fujiwara clan (藤原) was a clan of regents who monopolized the title of Sekkan, Sessho and Kampaku. ... In Japan, the Sesshō (摂政) was a title given to a regent who was named to assist an emperor when the emperor was still a child, before the coming of age, or female. ... The Hōjō clan (北条氏) in the history of Japan was a family of regents of the Kamakura Shogunate. ... Shikken (執権) was the regent of the shogun in the Kamakura shogunate in Japan. ... This wooden Kongorikishi statue was created during the Kamakura shogunate during 14th century Japan. ... Prince Regent (or Prince Regnant, as a direct borrowing from French language) is a prince who rules a country instead of a sovereign, e. ... Hirohito (Japanese: ) (April 29, 1901 – January 7, 1989) was the 124th Emperor of Japan according to the traditional order of succession, reigning from 1926 to 1989. ... Emperor Taisho (大正天皇 Taishō Tennō) (August 31, 1879 – December 25, 1926), whose given name was Yoshihito (嘉仁), was the 123rd imperial ruler of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession, from 1912 until his death in 1926. ... Prince Regent (or Prince Regnant, as a direct borrowing from French language) is a prince who rules a country instead of a sovereign, e. ... HIH Crown Prince Naruhito His Imperial Highness Crown Prince Naruhito (徳仁), Kōtaishi denka (皇太子殿下), (born at Togu Palace, Tokyo February 23, 1960) is the eldest son of His Majesty Emperor Akihito and Her Majesty Empress Michiko. ... Akihito () (born December 23, 1933) is the current Emperor ) of Japan, the 125th person to hold that title, according to the traditional order of succession. ...

Korea

The Daewon-gun, or properly Heungseon Daewon-gun, (1820–1898) was the regent of Joseon during much of the later 19th century. ... Gojong, the Emperor Gwangmu (광무제 光武帝 gwang mu je) (8 September 1852–21 January 1919) was the twenty-sixth king and first emperor of the Korean Joseon Dynasty. ...

Liechtenstein

His Serene Highness Hereditary Prince Alois Philipp Maria von und zu Liechtenstein (born 11 June 1968) has been Regent of Liechtenstein (Stellvertreter des Fürsten) since 15 August 2004. ... August 15 is the 227th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (228th in leap years), with 138 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Lippe

  • Prince Adolf of Schaumburg-Lippe (1895-1897), due to the incapacity of his cousin, Prince Alexander
  • Count Ernst of Lippe-Biesterfeld (1897-1904), for the same reason
  • Count Leopold of Lippe-Biesterfeld (1904-1905), for the same reason

Luxembourg

Grand Duke Adolphe of Luxembourg, Adolph Wilhelm August Karl Friedrich of Nassau-Weilburg (July 24, 1817 – November 17, 1905) was the last Duke of Nassau, and the fourth Grand Duke of Luxembourg. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (99th in leap years). ... 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... May 3 is the 123rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (124th in leap years). ... 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... November 4 is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 57 days remaining. ... 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar). ... November 23 is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 38 days remaining. ... 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar). ... William III, King of the Netherlands and Grand Duke of Luxembourg (William Alexander Paul Frederick Louis of Orange-Nassau) (February 17, 1817 – November 23, 1890) was King of the Netherlands and Grand Duke of Luxembourg (1849–1890). ... Marie Anne, Grand Duchess of Luxembourg, (Maria Ana de Braganca of Portugal) (Schloss Bronnbach 13 July 1861 - New York 31 July 1942) was Grand Duchess consort of Luxembourg and its Regent. ... Grand Duke William IV of Luxembourg, Guillaume Alexandre (April 22, 1852 – February 25, 1912) was the eldest child of Grand Duke Adolphe of Luxembourg. ... November 19 is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... February 25 is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Marie-Adélaïde, Grand Duchess of Luxembourg, Marie-Adélaïde Thérèse Hilda Wilhelmine (June 14, 1894 – January 24, 1924) was a daughter of Grand Duke Guillaume IV of Luxembourg. ... February 25 is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... June 18 is the 169th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (170th in leap years), with 196 days remaining. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

Mecklenburg-Schwerin

  • Duke Johann Albrecht of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (1897-1901), due to the minority of his nephew, Grand Duke Friedrich Franz IV

Duke Johann Albrecht Duke Johann Albrecht Ernst Konstantin Friedrich Heinrich of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (8 December 1857-16 February 1920) was the regent of the Grand Duchy of Mecklenburg-Schwerin from 1897-1901 and the Duchy of Brunswick from 1907-1913. ... Friedrich Franz IV, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (9 April 1882-17 November 1945) was the last Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin He was born in Palermo the son of Friedrich Franz III, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Grand Duchess Anastasia Mikhailovna of Russia. ...

Mecklenburg-Strelitz

  • Friedrich Franz IV, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (1918), due to the near extinction of the Mecklenburg-Strelitz line.

Friedrich Franz IV, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (9 April 1882-17 November 1945) was the last Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin He was born in Palermo the son of Friedrich Franz III, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Grand Duchess Anastasia Mikhailovna of Russia. ...

Monaco

Albert II, Sovereign Prince of Monaco (Albert Alexandre Louis Pierre Grimaldi; born March 14, 1958), styled His Serene Highness The Sovereign Prince of Monaco, is the head of the House of Grimaldi and the current ruler of the Principality of Monaco. ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (91st in Leap years), with 275 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 6 is the 96th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (97th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Albert II, Sovereign Prince of Monaco (Albert Alexandre Louis Pierre Grimaldi; born March 14, 1958), styled His Serene Highness The Sovereign Prince of Monaco, is the head of the House of Grimaldi and the current ruler of the Principality of Monaco. ...

Netherlands

Adelheid Emma Wilhelmina Theresia (August 2, 1858 - March 20, 1934) was Queen Consort to William III of the Netherlands from 1879 to 1890, Queen Regent from 1890 to 1898, and Queen Mother from 1890 to 1934 The future Queen Emma of the Netherlands was born in Arolsen (Germany) on 2... For other uses, see Wilhelmina (disambiguation). ...

Norway

Sigillum ad causas for Magnus II of Sweden Magnus II Ericson, Magnus VII of Norway, (1316 – December 1, 1377), King of Sweden, Norway, and Terra Scania, son of Duke Eric Magnusson of Sweden and Ingeborg, daughter of Haakon V of Norway. ... Haakon VI Magnusson (appr. ... Crown Prince Haakon of Norway (born Haakon Magnus on July 20, 1973 in Oslo). ... November 25 is the 329th (in leap years the 330th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 12 is the 102nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (103rd in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 29 is the 88th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (89th in leap years). ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Harald V, King of Norway, (born February 21, 1937), a title he assumed upon his fathers death on January 17, 1991. ...

Parma

  • Louise of Artois (1854-1859), during the minority of her son Robert I.

Robert I of Parma. ...

Prussia

Wilhelm I of Germany (March 22, 1797 – March 9, 1888), German Emperor (Kaiser), ruled January 18, 1871 – 9 March 1888 and King of Prussia, ruled 2 January 1861 – 9 March 1888. ... Photograph of Frederick King Frederick William IV of Prussia (October 15, 1795 - January 2, 1861), the eldest son and successor of Frederick William III of Prussia, reigned as King of Prussia from 1840 to 1861. ...

Romania

His Life Prince Nicholas of Romania (1903-1978) was the second son of King Ferdinand and Queen Marie of Romania. ... Miron Cristea (20 July 1868, Topliţa - 6 March 1939, Cannes) was the first patriarch of the Romanian Orthodox Church and Prime Minister of Romania for about a year (11 February 1938-6 March 1939). ... King Michael I of the Romanians (born October 25, 1921), Prince of Hohenzollern[1][2][3], reigned as King of the Romanians (in Romanian Maiestatea Sa Mihai I Regele Românilor or Majestatea Sa Mihai I Regele Românilor) from July 20, 1927 to June 8, 1930, and again from...

Saxe-Coburg and Gotha

  • Prince Ernst of Hohenlohe-Langenburg (1900-1905), during the minority of his cousin Duke Charles Edward

Carl Eduard, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (Charles Edward George Albert Leopold) (19 July 1884 – 28 March 1954) was the last reigning Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha from 30 July 1900 to 14 November 1918. ...

Saxe-Meiningen

  • Luise Eleonore of Hohenlohe (1803-1821), during the minority of her son, Duke Bernard II

Saxe-Weimar

Anna Amalia Duchess of Saxe-Weimar and Saxe-Eisenach (October 24, 1739–April 10, 1807) was an influential cultural force in Weimar, Saxe-Weimar, Holy Roman Empire, and regent of the states of Saxe-Weimar and Saxe-Eisenach from 1759 to 1775. ... Carl August (3 September 1757 - 14 June 1828) was the duke of Saxe-Weimar from 1758, duke of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach from its creation in 1809, and grand-duke from 1815 until his death. ...

Scotland

Margaret (1283–1290), known as the Maid of Norway, is traditionally considered to have been Queen of Scots from 1286 until her death although she never came to Scotland and was never inaugurated at Scone. ... William Wallace William Wallace (c. ... King John as depicted in the 1562 Forman Armorial, produced for Mary, Queen of Scots. ... Thomas Randolph, 1st Earl of Moray (d. ... David II (March 5, 1324 – February 22, 1371) king of Scotland, son of King Robert the Bruce by his second wife, Elizabeth de Burgh (d. ... Domhnall II of Mar (c. ... Robert Stewart or Stuart, 1st Duke of Albany (c. ... Robert II (March 2, 1316 – April 19, 1390), king of Scotland, called the Steward, a title that gave the name to the House of Stewart (or Stuart). ... Robert III (circa 1340 – April 4, 1406), king of Scotland (reigned 1390 - 1406), the eldest son of King Robert II by his mistress, Elizabeth Mure, became legitimised with the formal marriage of his parents about 1349. ... Robert Stewart or Stuart, 1st Duke of Albany (c. ... James I (December 10, 1394 – February 21, 1437) reigned as King of Scots from April 4, 1406 until February 21, 1437. ... Murdoch Stewart, 2nd Duke of Albany (1362 – 24 May 1425) was a Scottish nobleman who inherited the Dukedom of Albany in 1420, but was convicted and executed for treason five years later. ... Archibald Douglas (1390–26 June 1439), was a Scottish nobleman, son of Archibald Douglas, 4th Earl of Douglas and Joan Moray. ... James II of Scotland (October 16, 1430 – August 3, 1460) was king of Scotland from 1437 to 1460. ... Alexander Livingston may refer to: Alexander Livingston, 5th Lord Livingston (died 1550) Alexander Livingston, 1st Earl of Linlithgow (died 1623) Alexander Livingston, 2nd Earl of Linlithgow (died 1650) See also Alexander Livingstone Category: ... For other persons named William Douglas, see William Douglas (disambiguation). ... Queen consort of Scotland Mary of Gueldres (c. ... James III of Scotland (1451/ 1452 – June 11, 1488), son of James II and Mary of Gueldres, created Duke of Rothesay at birth, king of Scotland from 1460 to 1488. ... The seal of Bishop Kennedy. ... Gilbert Kennedy, 1st Lord Kennedy (b. ... Robert Boyd (d. ... Sir Patrick Hepburn of Dunsyre, 1st Lord Hailes (d. ... James IV (March 17, 1473-September 9, 1513) - King of Scots from 1488 to 1513. ... Margaret Tudor (29 November 1489–October 1541) was the eldest of the two daughters of Henry VII of England and Elizabeth of York, and the elder sister of Henry VIII. In 1503 she married James IV, king of Scotland, thus becoming the mother of James V and grandmother of Mary... James V (April 10, 1512 – December 14, 1542) was king of Scotland (September 9, 1513 – December 14, 1542). ... John Stewart, 2nd Duke of Albany (1481–1536) was a son of Alexander Stewart, 1st Duke of Albany and a grandson of King James II of Scotland. ... James V (April 10, 1512 – December 14, 1542) was king of Scotland (September 9, 1513 – December 14, 1542). ... This article needs cleanup. ... James Beaton, or Bethune (1473-1539), was a Scottish church leader, the uncle of Cardinal David Beaton. ... James Hamilton, 2nd Earl of Arran (c. ... Mary, Queen of Scots redirects here. ... Marie de Guise (in English, Mary of Guise) (November 22, 1515 – June 1560) was the Queen Consort of James V of Scotland and the mother of Mary, Queen of Scots. ... Mary, Queen of Scots redirects here. ... James Stewart, 1st Earl of Moray (c. ... James VI and I (James Stuart) (June 19, 1566 – March 27, 1625) was King of Scots, King of England, and King of Ireland and was the first to style himself King of Great Britain. ... Matthew Stewart (1516-1571) was the 4th Earl of Lennox, and leader of the Catholic nobility in Scotland. ... John Erskine, 1st Earl of Mar (died 29 OCtober 1572), regent of Scotland, was a son of John, 5th Lord Erskine (d. ... James Douglas, 4th Earl of Morton (c. ...

Spain

Francisco Jimenez de Cisneros (1436 - November 8, 1517) was a Spanish cardinal and statesman. ... Maria Christina of Austria, Queen of Spain Maria Christina, Princess Imperia and Archduchess of Austria, Princess Royal of Hungary and Bohemia (Maria Christina Désirée Henriette Felicitas Rainiera von Habsburg-Lothringen, 21 July 1858–6 February 1929) was the second Queen consort of King Alfonso XII of Spain and... Alfonso XIII of Spain (May 17, 1886 – February 28, 1941), King of Spain, posthumous son of Alfonso XII of Spain, was proclaimed King at his birth. ... Francisco Paulino Hermenegildo Teódulo Franco y Bahamonde Salgado Pardo (4 December 1892 – 20 November or possibly 19 November[1] 1975), abbreviated “Francisco Franco y Bahamonde” and commonly known as “Generalísimo Francisco Franco” (pron. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without...

Sweden

Charles VIII of Sweden, Charles I of Norway, a. ... Eric of Pomerania, Erik af Pommern (Danish title), Erik av Pommern (Erik III) (Norwegian title) or Erik av Pommern (Eric XIII) (Swedish title), was adopted by Margaret I of Denmark and became king of Norway (1389-1442), of Denmark (1412-1439), and of Sweden and the Kalmar Union (1396-1439). ... Jöns Bengtsson (Oxenstierna), (1417 – 1467) Swedish clergyman and regent of Sweden, under the Kalmar Union, in 1457, shared with Erik Axelsson (Tott), and alone 1465-1466. ... Charles VIII of Sweden, Charles I of Norway, a. ... Kettil Karlsson (Vasa) (1433 - August 11, 1465) was a Swedish clergyman and regent of Sweden under the Kalmar Union from February 1464 to August 1465, interluded by a six month interregnum of king Charles VIII of Sweden. ... Christian I of Denmark (1426 – 1481), Danish monarch and union king of Denmark (1448 – 1481), Norway (1450 – 1481) and Sweden (1457 – 1464), under the Kalmar Union. ... Erik Axelsson Tott, (1415-1481) Swedish statesman and regent of Sweden, under the Kalmar Union, in 1457, shared with Jöns Bengtsson (Oxenstierna), and alone 1466-1467. ... Sten Sture the Elder (Sten Sture den äldre; 1440–1503) was a Swedish statesman and regent of Sweden during the Union of Kalmar (1470–1497 and 1501–1503). ... The Kalmar Union flag. ... Erik Trolle (died 1530), elected regent of Sweden, under the Kalmar Union, in 1512. ... Sten Sture the Younger, or Sten Sture den yngre, Swedish statesman and regent of Sweden, under the Kalmar Union, 1512 - February 5, 1520. ... Gustav I of Sweden, commonly known as Gustav Vasa, but originally known as Gustav Eriksson (May 12, 1496 – September 29, 1560) was King of Sweden from 1523 until his death. ... Charles IX (Karl IX) (October 4, 1550 – October 30, 1611), was King of Sweden from 1604 until his death. ... Reign in Poland From September 18, 1587 until April 19, 1632 Reign in Sweden From November 17, 1592 until July 24, 1599 Elected in Poland On September 18, 1587 in Wola, today suburb of Warsaw, Poland Coronation in Poland On December 27, 1587 in the Wawel Cathedral, Kraków, Poland... Count Axel Gustafsson Oxenstierna   listen? or Oxenstjerna (June 16, 1583 - August 28, 1654), Lord High Chancellor of Sweden, was born at FÃ¥nö in Uplandia, and received his education with his brothers at the universities of Rostock, Jena and Wittenberg. ... Christina (Kristina) (December 8, 1626 – April 19, 1689), later known as Maria Christina Alexandra and sometimes Count Dohna, was Queen regnant of Sweden from 1632 to 1654. ... Hedwig Eleonora of Holstein-Gottorp, queen of Sweden. ... Charles XI (Karl XI) (November 24, 1655 – April 5, 1697) was King of Sweden from 1660 until his death. ... Hedwig Eleonora of Holstein-Gottorp, queen of Sweden. ... Carl XII, Karl XII or Carolus Rex, (June 17, 1682 – November 30, 1718), the Alexander of the North, nicknamed in Turkish as DemirbaÅŸ Åžarl (Charles the Habitué), was a King of Sweden from 1697 until his death in 1718. ... Charles XIII (Swe: Karl XIII) (October 7, 1748 - February 5, 1818), was King of Sweden from 1809 and King of Norway (where he was known as Carl II) from 1814 until his death. ... Gustav IV Adolf (November 1, 1778 – February 7, 1837), was King of Sweden from 1792 until his abdication in 1809. ... Charles XIV John (Swedish: Carl XIV Johan), born Jean-Baptiste Bernadotte (January 26, 1763 – March 8, 1844) was King of Sweden and Norway (where he was known as Carl III Johan) from 1818 until his death. ... Charles XIII (Swe: Karl XIII) (October 7, 1748 - February 5, 1818), was King of Sweden from 1809 and King of Norway (where he was known as Carl II) from 1814 until his death. ...

United Kingdom

Main article: Regency Acts

The Regency Acts are Acts of the British Parliament passed at various points in time, to provide a regent if the British monarch were to be incapacited or in minority (under the age of 18). ... George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 29 January 1820 until his death. ... Prince Regent (or Prince Regnant, as a direct borrowing from French language) is a prince who rules a country instead of a sovereign, e. ... George III (George William Frederick) (4 June 1738 – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until 1 January 1801, and thereafter United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death. ...

Waldeck

  • Emma of Anhalt-Bernburg-Schaumburg-Hoym (1845-1852), during the minority of her son, Prince George Victor

Other uses

Occasionally, the term regent refers to positions lower than the ruler of a country.

  • In the Dutch republic of the United Provinces, the members of the ruling class, not formally hereditary but de facto patricians, were known collectively as regenten (the Dutch plural for regent)
  • In the Dutch East Indies, a regent was a native prince allowed to rule de facto colonized 'state' as a regentschap (see that term). Consequently, in the successor state of Indonesia, the term regent is used in English to mean a bupati or local government official.
  • Also used in private spheres, for instance, some university managers in North America are called regents, or the members of certain governing bodies of lofty institutions, such as the national banks, in France and (imitating) Belgium.
  • Again in Belgium and France, but far lower on the social ladder, (Régént in French; or in Dutch) Regent is the official title of a secondary school teacher of the lower years (equivalent to junior high school), who does not require a college degree but is trained solely for education in a specialized écôle normale = normal school.
  • A management board for a college or university; this is commonly stated as: "Board of Regents".

The Dutch East Indies, or Netherlands East Indies, (Dutch: Nederlands-Indië) was the name of the colonies set up by the Dutch East India Company, which came under administration of the Netherlands during the 19th century (see Indonesia). ... REGENTSCHAP is the Dutch word for Regency, in the sense of the (term of) office of a Regent. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... A Board of governors is usually the governing board of a public entity. ...

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Encyclopedia: Regent (231 words)
In Iceland, the regent represented the King of Denmark as sovereign of Iceland until the country became a republic in 1944.
It was a vision characterized by three central elements: it was to be a transdenominational graduate school that prized the denominational heritage brought by each new student, it was to have an emphasis on the whole people of God, and it was to be located on a university campus.
Regent encourages a vibrant Christianity that affirms the primacy of personal godliness and the importance of spiritual and intellectual integration in all walks of life.
Regent's Park - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (753 words)
Regent's Park (officially The Regent's Park) is one of the Royal Parks of London.
Regent's Park College is a Permanent Private Hall at the University of Oxford.
Regent Park is also the name of a neighbourhood in Toronto, Ontario, known as the first major social housing project in Canada.
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