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Encyclopedia > Regensburg Cathedral
Cathedral of St. Peter, Regensburg, west facade
Cathedral of St. Peter, south facade (before the towers were cleaned in 2005)

The Regensburg Cathedral (German: Kathedrale St. Peter), dedicated to St Peter, is the most important church of the city of Regensburg, and cathedral of the Diocese of Regensburg. The church is the prime example of Gothic architecture in southern Germany. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x1333, 445 KB) Photograph of Regensburg Cathedral St. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x1333, 445 KB) Photograph of Regensburg Cathedral St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 800 pixel, file size: 97 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Regensburg Cathedral, south facade Copyright: original photo by German Wikipedia user Michael. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 800 pixel, file size: 97 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Regensburg Cathedral, south facade Copyright: original photo by German Wikipedia user Michael. ... According to tradition, Peter was crucified upside-down, as shown in this painting by Caravaggio. ... Regensburg (also Ratisbon, Latin Ratisbona) is a city (population 151. ... A cathedral is a religious building for worship, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy, such as the Roman Catholic, Anglican and some Lutheran churches, which serves as a bishops seat, and thus as the central church of a diocese. ... The Diocese of Regensburg (Latin Dioecesis Ratisbonensis) is a diocese of the Roman Catholic Church seated in Regensburg. ... Interior of Cologne Cathedral Gothic architecture is a style of architecture, particularly associated with cathedrals and other churches, which flourished in Europe during the high and late medieval period. ... Southern Germany is the term used to desribe the southern states of Germany: namely Baden-Württemberg and Bavaria. ...

Contents

Dimensions

overall length (interior): 86 m
width (interior): 34.8 m
height (nave): 32 m
height (bell towers): 105 m

The or meter (see spelling differences) is a measure of length. ... Links to full descriptions of the elements of a Gothic floorplan are also found at the entry Cathedral diagram. ... Bell Tower is an office tower in Edmonton, Canada. ...

History

circa 700 First bishop's church built at the site of the present-day cathedral parish church Niedermünster (St. Erhard's tomb).
circa 739 Canonical erection of the diocese by Saint Boniface. He chose the area of the Porta Praetoria (North Gate of the old Roman fort) for the bishop's seat, and the site of the cathedral has remained there since.
late 8th or 9th century The Carolingian Cathedral is rebuilt.
early 11th century Large expansion to the west with an approx. 15-meter-high transept, two towers and an atrium.
1156/1172 The cathedral burns down twice and is rebuilt.
1273 Beginning of reconstruction at the west end after a city fire (approximately 1150) destroyed the old cathedral.
circa 1285/90 High Gothic redesign.
circa 1320 The three choirs of the new cathedral are ready for use. Demolition of the old cathedral.
1385-1415 Completion of the elaborate main entrance to the west.
1442 Construction of the roof support over the central nave.
circa 1520 Preliminary end of construction work.
1514-1538 Construction of the cloister.
1613-1649 Restoration of the cathedral and baroque renovation (cupola at the transept crossing).
1828-1841 Gothic restoration at the order of King Ludwig I (e.g., relocation of the baroque frescoes) and demolition of the cupola; it is replaced by a quadripartite rib vault.
1859-1869 Construction of the towers and completion of their spires.
1870/1872 Completion of the cathedral with the finishing of the transept gable and the spire (at the crossing) after 600 years of construction.
1923 Founding of the state-run Dombauhütte (Cathedral building workshop) for the ongoing oversight, maintenance, and restoration of the cathedral.
1984-1985 Construction of the crypt mausoleum and archeological exploration of the center nave (partial exposure of a former southern arcade entrance to the atrium of a precursor Roman structure)
1985-1988 Cleaning of the interior without changes.
since 1989 Cleaning of the exterior facade; removal of contaminants. The work on the main portal is expected to end in 2006.
2004 Construction and altar consecration of the Sailer meditation chapel.
2005 Cleaning of the tower spires is completed, so that the towers can be admired in their pristine state. According to the Dombauhütte, they should remain so for the next century.
2006 Completion of the west portal restoration before the planned visit of Pope Benedict XVI.

For the Roman general of this name, see Bonifacius. ... Ludwig I (or Louis I, which is the French form of his name) (August 25, 1786 – February 29, 1868) was king of Bavaria from 1825 until 1848. ... Pope Benedict XVI (Latin: ; born April 16, 1927 as Joseph Alois Ratzinger in Marktl am Inn, Bavaria, Germany) is the 265th reigning pope, the head of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City. ...

The building

An unusual feature of Regensburg Cathedral is its separation from the structure of the older cloister. This separation came about when the church was rebuilt and displaced to the southwest of the earlier Romanesque cathedral. Cloister of Saint Trophimus, in Arles, France A cloister (from latin claustrum) is a part of cathedral, monastic and abbey architecture. ...


In testimony of that Romanesque precursor, the Eselsturm tower still stands on the north side of the cathedral; it was used in the past and is still used to transport construction materials to the upper levels. A pulley remains in the west loft, and with it materials were lifted through an opening in the ceiling near the west portal. To the east of the cathedral is the state-run Dombauhütte (cathedral building workshop) which is responsible for the preservation of the structure. In contrast with many cathedral building works, neither modern machines nor exclusively old tools are used. Rather, tools are manufactured in the workshop itself. Romanesque St. ...


The Erminold Maria is one element of an Annunciation group in the Regensburg Cathedral. It goes back to the so-called Erminoldmeister, who carved and colorfully painted the figure of Mary and the famous laughing figure of the angel Gabriel about 1280. The figures are juxtaposed to one another on the two western pillars at the crossing of the nave. Mary's right hand is slightly raised toward the angel in greeting. In her left hand she holds a book, into which she is pointing with her index finger. 12th-century icon of Archangel Gabriel from Novgorod In Abrahamic religions, Gabriel (גַּבְרִיאֵל, Standard Hebrew Gavriʼel, Latin Gabrielus, Greek , Tiberian Hebrew Gaḇrîʼēl, Arabic جبريل Jibrīl or Jibrail, literally Master, of God, i. ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ...


On the eastern pillars at the crossing are stone figures of Saints Peter and Paul, which were installed in 1320 and 1360-1370 respectively. Events January 20 - Dante - Quaestio de Aqua et Terra January 20 - Duke Wladyslaw Lokietek becomes king of Poland April 6 - The Scots reaffirm their independence by signing the Declaration of Arbroath. ... Events October 24 - The Treaty of Brétigny is ratified at Calais, marking the end of the first phase of the Hundred Years War. ... Events Beginning of the rule of Poland by Capet-Anjou family. ...


On the exterior there is a Judensau (Jews' sow) in the form of a sow and three Jews hanging onto its teats. The Judensau faces in the direction of the former Jewish quarter at the Neupfarrplatz. In 2005 there was a controversy about the posting of an informational sign. Judensau (German for Jewish swine) is a derogatory and dehumanizing imagery of the Jews that appeared around the 13th century in Germany and some other European countries. ...

Judensau at the Cathedral of St. Peter (1250-1520) in Regensburg (June 2004)
Judensau at the Cathedral of St. Peter (1250-1520) in Regensburg (June 2004)

The All Saints' Chapel in the cathedral cloister was built in 1164 as a burial chapel for Bishop Hartwig II by the Comaschi, a family of master builders from Como in northern Italy. Its interior consists of a more finely articulated triconchos with frescoes from the time of its construction. Download high resolution version (1084x704, 96 KB)licence: public domain, picture taken by: M. Chlistalla, Regensburg June 2004 This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (1084x704, 96 KB)licence: public domain, picture taken by: M. Chlistalla, Regensburg June 2004 This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Regensburg (also Ratisbon, Latin Ratisbona) is a city (population 151. ... Events Count Henry I of Champagne marries Marie de Champagne. ... This article is about a title or office in religious bodies. ... Como (Comm in the local dialect of Lombard language) is a city in Lombardy, Italy, 45 km north of Milan. ... Northern Italy encompasses nine of the countrys 20 autonomous regions: Emilia-Romagna Friuli-Venezia Giulia Liguria Lombardia Piemonte Toscana Trentino-Alto Adige Valle dAosta Veneto Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Trentino-Alto Adige and Valle dAosta are regions with a special statute. ...


Most of the valuable stained glass windows were installed between 1220-1230 and 1320-1370. The windows of the west facade were only completed in the 19th century. In 1967-1968 came the windows of the left chancel, from the hand of the artist Professor Oberberger. He also produced the Pentecost window in the west of the north transept and the clerestory windows in Gothic style. // The world in 1220 Middle Ages in Europe Fifth Crusade (1217-1221) Events Mongols first invade Abbasid caliphate - Bukhara and Samarkand taken End of the Kara-Khitan Khanate, destroyed by Genghis Khans Mongolian cavalry Dominican Order approved by Pope Honorius III Frederick II crowned Holy Roman Emperor by Pope... Events Kingdom of Leon unites with the Kingdom of Castile. ... Events January 20 - Dante - Quaestio de Aqua et Terra January 20 - Duke Wladyslaw Lokietek becomes king of Poland April 6 - The Scots reaffirm their independence by signing the Declaration of Arbroath. ... Events Beginning of the rule of Poland by Capet-Anjou family. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ... Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. ...


The silver high altar stems from Augsburg artists and was built in the period between 1695 and 1785. A particular feature is the five Gothic altars of reservation. In the south choir a new altar of celebration was built in 2004, the work of Helmut Langhammer. Jan. ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


St. Peter Canisius preached from the stone pulpit in the central nave in 1556-1557. Saint Petrus Canisius (May 8, 1521 – December 21, 1597) was an important Jesuit who fought against the spread of Protestantism in Germany, Austria, Bohemia, and Switzerland. ... Events January 16 - Abdication of Emperor Charles V. His son, Philip II becomes King of Spain, while his brother Ferdinand becomes Holy Roman Emperor January 23 - The Shaanxi earthquake, the deadliest earthquake in history, occurs with its epicenter in Shaanxi province, China. ... Events Spain is effectively bankrupt. ...


Significance

The Regensburg Cathedral is the bishop's church and the principal church of the Regensburg diocese. It is also the home of the Regensburger Domspatzen ("cathedral sparrows"), a choir rich in tradition. The structure is considered the most significant Gothic work in southern Germany. The Regensburger Domspatzen (Regensburg Cathedral Choir) is the official choir for the liturgical music at St. ...


The Cathedral is also the burial place of important bishops, including Johann Michael von Sailer (1829-1832, memorial built by Konrad Eberhard in the south chancel), Georg Michael Wittmann (1832-1833, memorial also by Konrad Eberhard in the north chancel), and Archbishop Michael Buchberger (1927-1961, likewise in the north chancel). In the western part of the central nave stands a bronze memorial for the Prince-Bishop Cardinal Philipp Wilhelm (d. 1598), the brother of Duke Maximilian I of Bavaria. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1833 (MDCCCXXXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... Events January 7 - Boris Godunov seizes the throne of Russia following the death of his brother-in-law, Tsar Feodor I. April 13 - Edict of Nantes - Henry IV of France grants French Huguenots equal rights with Catholics. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Gallery

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Regensburg Cathedral
  • Diocese of Regensburg: Cathedral (German)
  • Diocese: Cathedral Museum (German)

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ...

References

This article is based on a translation of an article from the German Wikipedia.



Coordinates: 49°01′10″N, 12°05′53″E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Regensburg, Germany (393 words)
Regensburg, sometimes formerly called Ratisbon in English, is an historic, commercial and industrial city in Bavaria dating all the way back to the first century.
The Cathedral of St. Peter (1250-1520) is one of the finest Gothic structures in all of Bavaria.
The world famous Regensburger Domspatzen, the "sparrows of Regensburg Cathedral", as the boys choir is called, began its musical tradition of the city in this historic structure.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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