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Encyclopedia > Reformed Protestant
Calvinism
John Calvin

Background
Christianity
St. Augustine
The Reformation
Calvinism is a general approach to Christian theology advanced by a group of sixteenth-century reformers, the most famous of whom was John Calvin. ... From [1], in the public domain This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... John Calvin (July 10, 1509 – May 27, 1564) was an important French Christian theologian during the Protestant Reformation and is the namesake of the system of Christian theology called Calvinism. ... Christianity is a monotheistic religion that recognizes Jesus Christ as its central figure, Lord and Messiah. ... St. ... The Protestant Reformation was a movement which emerged in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church in Western Europe. ...

Distinctives
Calvin's Institutes
Five Solas
Five Points (TULIP)
Regulative principle
Confessions of faith Institutes of the Christian Religion is John Calvins seminal work on Protestant theology. ... The Five Solas are five Latin phrases (or slogans) that emerged during the Protestant Reformation and summarize the Reformers basic beliefs and emphasis in contradistinction to the teaching of the Roman Catholic Church of the day. ... Calvinist theology is in the English-speaking world often identified in the popular mind as the so-called five points of Calvinism, which are a summation of the judgments (or canons) rendered by the Synod of Dort and which were published in the Quinquarticular Controversy as a point-by-point... The regulative principle of worship in Christian theology teaches that the public worship of God should include those and only those elements that are instituted, commanded, or appointed by command or example in the Bible. ... The Reformed churches express their consensus of faith in various creeds. ...

Influences
Theodore Beza
Synod of Dort
Puritan theology
Jonathan Edwards
Princeton theologians
Karl Barth
This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... xxx cciiiox The Synod of Dort was a National Synod held in Dordrecht in 1618/19, by the Dutch Reformed Church, in order to settle a serious controversy in the Dutch churches initiated by the rise of Arminianism. ... The Puritans were members of a group of radical Protestants which developed in England after the Reformation. ... Jonathan Edwards is the name of several individuals: An American theologian in the 18th century; see Jonathan Edwards (theology). ... The Princeton theology is a tradition of conservative, Christian, Reformed and Presbyterian theology at Princeton Seminary, in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Karl Barth on the cover of TIME magazine Karl Barth (May 10, 1886–December 10, 1968) (pronounced Bart) was the most influential Reformed Christian theologian since John Calvin. ...

Churches
Reformed
Presbyterian
Congregationalist
Reformed Baptist
Presbyterianism is a form of church government, practiced by many (although not all) of those Protestant churches (known as Reformed churches), which historically subscribed to the teachings of John Calvin. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... The name Reformed Baptist does not refer to a distinct denomination but instead is a description of the churchs theological leaning. ...

Peoples
Afrikaner Calvinists
Huguenots
Pilgrims
Puritans
Afrikaner Calvinism is a unique cultural development that combined the Calvinist religion with the political aspirations of the white Afrikaans speaking people of South Africa. ... In the 16th and 17th centuries, the name of Huguenots came to apply to members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France, or historically as the French Calvinists. ... Pilgrims Going to Church by George Henry Boughton (1867) The Pilgrims were a group of English religious separatists who sailed from Europe to North America in the early 17th century, in search of a home where they could freely practice their style of religion. ... The Puritans were members of a group of English Protestants seeking further reforms or even separation from the established church during the Reformation. ...

The Reformed churches are a group of Christian Protestant denominations historically related by a similar Zwinglian or Calvinist system of doctrine but organisationally independent. Each nation in which the Reformed movement was originally established had its own church government. Several of these local churches have expanded to worldwide denominations and most have experienced splits into multiple denominations. Commitment to teaching the original Calvinism usually continues to be reflected in their official definitions of doctrine, but in some cases is no longer necessarily typical of these churches. A 1999 survey found 746 Reformed denominations worldwide. As a noun, Christian is an appellation and moniker deriving from the appellation Christ, which many people associate exclusively with Jesus of Nazareth. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... A denomination, in the Christian sense of the word, is an identifiable religious body, organization under a common name, structure, and/or doctrine. ... Huldrych (or Ulrich) Zwingli (January 1, 1484 – October 11, 1531) was the leader of the Swiss Reformation, and founder of the Swiss Reformed Churches. ... Calvinism is a general approach to Christian theology advanced by a group of sixteenth-century reformers, the most famous of whom was John Calvin. ...

Contents


Form of doctrine

Reformed doctrine is expressed in various creeds. A few creeds are shared by many denominations. Different denominations use different creeds, usually based on historical reasons. Some of the common creeds are (with year of writing):

The Three forms of unity are common among Reformed churches with origins in the European continent (especially those in the Netherlands). The Westminster Standards have a similarly common use, among Reformed churches (known commonly as the Presbyterian churches) with origins in the British Isles. More recent confessions and creeds are shared by fewer denominations. The Scots Confession was written in 1560 by six leaders of the Protestant Reformation in Scotland, coincidentally all named John. The Confession was the first Book of Faith for the Protestant Scottish Kirk. ... The Heidelberg Catechism is a document taking the form of a series of questions and answers, for use in teaching Reformed Christian doctrine. ... The Confession of Faith, popularly known as the Belgic Confession, following the seventeenth-century Latin designation Confessio Belgica. ... The Canons of Dort, or Canons of Dordrecht, formally titled The Decision of the Synod of Dort on the Five Main Points of Doctrine in Dispute in the Netherlands, is the judgment of the National Synod held in the Dutch city of Dordrecht in 1618 / 19. ... Helvetic Confessions, the name of two documents expressing the common belief of the Reformed churches of Switzerland. ... The Westminster Confession of Faith is the chief doctrinal product of the Protestant Westminster Assembly. ... The Westminster Shorter Catechism (also known simply as the Shorter Catechism, hereinafter referred to as the WSC) was written in the 1640s by English and Scottish divines. ... The Westminster Larger Catechism along with the Westminster Shorter Catechism is the catechism of Presbyterians througout the World. ... The 1689 Baptist Confession of Faith was written by Calvinistic Baptists in England to give a formal expression of the Reformed and Protestant Christian faith with an obvious Baptist perspective. ...


Form of governance

In contrast to the episcopalian church governance of Lutheran, Anglican or Methodist churches, Reformed churches have three main forms of governance: Episcopalian government in the church is rule by a hierarchy of bishops (Greek: episcopoi). ...

A sub-family of the Reformed churches, called Reformed Baptist churches, adheres to modified Reformed confessions, and have Baptist views of the sacraments and of church government. Many Reformed Christians do not consider Reformed Baptists to be truly Reformed. Presbyterian governance of a church is typified by the rule of assemblies of presbyters, or elders. ... Presbyterianism is a form of church government, practiced by many (although not all) of those Protestant churches (known as Reformed churches), which historically subscribed to the teachings of John Calvin. ... A synod (also known as a council) is a council of a church, usually a Christian church, convened to decide an issue of doctrine, administration or application. ... Congregationalist church governance, often known as congregationalism, is a system of church governance in which every local congregation is independent. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation indepedently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... The name Reformed Baptist does not refer to a distinct denomination but instead is a description of the churchs theological leaning. ... A Baptist is a member of a Baptist church. ... A sacrament is a Christian rite that mediates divine grace. ...


Continental Reformed churches

  • Swiss Reformed Churches
The Reformed branch of Protestantism was started in Zurich by Huldrych Zwingli and spread within a few years to Basle (Johannes Oecolampadius), Berne (Berchtold Haller and Niklaus Manuel), St. Gall (Joachim Vadian), to cities in Southern Germany and via Alsace (Martin Bucer) to France. After the early death of Zwingli 1531, his work was continued by Heinrich Bullinger, the author of the Second Helvetic Confession. The French-speaking cities Neuchatel, Geneva and Lausanne changed to the Reformation ten years later under William Farel and John Calvin coming from France. The Zwingli and Calvin branches had each their theological distinctions, but in 1549 under the lead of Bullinger and Calvin they came to a common agreement in the Consensus Tigurinus (Zurich Consent), and 1566 in the Second Helvetic Confession. Organizationally, the Reformed Churches in Switzerland remained separate units until today (the Reformed Church of the Canton Zurich, the Reformed Church of the Canton Berne, etc.), the German part more in the Zwingli tradition, in the French part more in the Calvin tradition. They are governed synodically and their relation to the respective canton (in Switzerland, there are no church-state regulations on country-level) ranges from independent to close collaboration, depending on historical developments. A distinctive of the Swiss Reformed churches in Zwingli tradition is their historically almost symbiotic link to the state (cantons) which is only loosening gradually in the present.
The largest branch of the Reformed movement, and the only one of the national Reformed churches to survive without division since the Reformation to the present time. The Hungarian Reformed Church has adopted the Heidelberg Catechism and the Second Helvetic Confession as a definition of their teaching, together the Ecumenical creeds of the Christian Church: Athanasian Creed, Nicene Creed, Chalcedon, and the common creed ("Apostles' Creed"). Regional churches may also adopt the Canons of Dordt, and in Transylvania Luther's Small Catechism is adopted.
  • Reformed Church of France
In France, the Reformed protestants were called Huguenots. The Reformed Church of France survived under persecution from 1559 until the Edict of Nantes (1598), the effect of which was to establish regions in which Protestants could live unmolested. These areas became centers of political resistance under which the Reformed church was protected until 1628, when La Rochelle, the protestant center of resistance to Louis XIII, was overrun by a French army blockade. After the protestant resistance failed, the Reformed Church of France reorganized, and was guaranteed toleration under the Edict of Nantes until the final revocation of toleration in 1685 (Edict of Fontainebleau). The periods of persecution scattered French Reformed refugees to England, Germany, Switzerland, Africa and America. A free (meaning, not state controlled) synod of the Reformed Church emerged in 1848 and survives in small numbers to the present time. The French refugees established French Reformed churches in the Latin countries and in America.
The first Reformed churches in France produced the Gallic Confession and French Reformed confession of faith, which served as models for the Belgic Confession of Faith (1563).
  • German Reformed Church
Tolerance for the Reformed churches in Germany was established under the Peace of Westphalia, in 1648, but political difficulties at the end of the 17th century almost eliminated them. In the 19th century, by state mandate the Reformed churches were combined with the Lutherans to form an Evangelical Union in Prussia.
  • Reformed churches in the Netherlands
The Dutch Reformed churches have suffered numerous splits and unions. Currently existing denominations are:
Originally founded by Peter Waldo in the 12th century, the Waldensian church adopted the Reformed doctrines under the influence of William Farel.

Huldrych (or Ulrich) Zwingli (January 1, 1484 – October 11, 1531) was the leader of the Swiss Reformation, and founder of the Swiss Reformed Churches. ... Johannes Oecolampadius or Oekolampad (1482 - November 24, 1531) was a German religious reformer, whose real name was Hussgen or Heussgen (changed to Hausschein and then into the Greek equivalent). ... Engraving by David Herrliberger from Zurich, 1748, after an older original Joachim Vadian (November 29, 1484 – April 6, 1551), born as Joachim von Watt, was a Swiss Humanist and scholar and also mayor and reformer in St. ... Martin Bucer (or Butzer) (1491 - 1551) was a German Protestant reformer. ... Events January 26 - Lisbon, Portugal is hit by an earthquake-- thousands die October 1 - Battle of Kappel - The forces of Zürich are defeated by the Catholic cantons. ... Heinrich Bullinger Heinrich Bullinger (July 18, 1504 - September 17, 1575) was a Swiss religious reformer. ... Helvetic Confessions, the name of two documents expressing the common belief of the Reformed churches of Switzerland. ... William Farel William Farel (Guillaume Farel, 1489-1565) was a French evangelist, and a founder of the Reformed Church in the cantons of Neuchâtel, Berne and Geneva, and the Canton of Vaud Switzerland. ... John Calvin (July 10, 1509 – May 27, 1564) was an important French Christian theologian during the Protestant Reformation and is the namesake of the system of Christian theology called Calvinism. ... Events July - Ketts Rebellion Francis Xavier arrives in Japan. ... The Hungarian Reformed Church (Magyarországi Református Egyház in Hungarian) is the most representative of the Magyar Christianity, being in terms of numbers, the largest denomination in Hungary, after the Roman Catholic Church and the biggest denomination among ethnic hungarians in Romania History During the Reformation, Hungary was... The Heidelberg Catechism is a document taking the form of a series of questions and answers, for use in teaching Reformed Christian doctrine. ... Helvetic Confessions, the name of two documents expressing the common belief of the Reformed churches of Switzerland. ... The Athanasian Creed (Quicunque vult) is a statement of Christian doctrine traditionally ascribed to St. ... Icon depicting the Holy Fathers of the First Council of Nicaea holding the Nicene Creed. ... The Apostles Creed (in Latin, Symbolum (Credo) Apostolicum), is an early statement of Christian belief, possibly from the first or second century, but more likely post-Nicene Creed in the early 4th Century AD. The theological specifics of the creed appear to be a refutation of Gnosticism, an early heresy. ... The Canons of Dort is one of the confessional standards of the Netherlands. ... Transylvania (Romanian: Transilvania or Ardeal; Hungarian: Erdély; German: Siebenbürgen; see also other languages) forms the western and central parts of Romania. ... Luthers Small Catechism was written by Martin Luther and published in 1529 for the training of children. ... In the 16th and 17th centuries, the name of Huguenots came to apply to members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France, or historically as the French Calvinists. ... Events January 15 - Elizabeth I of England is crowned in Westminster Abbey. ... The Edict of Nantes was issued on April 13, 1598 by Henry IV of France to grant French Protestants (also known as Huguenots) substantial rights in a Catholic nation. ... Events January 7 - Boris Godunov seizes the throne of Russia following the death of his brother-in-law, Tsar Feodor I. April 13 - Edict of Nantes - Henry IV of France grants French Huguenots equal rights with Catholics. ... Events March 1 - writs were issued in February 1628 by Charles I of England that every county in England (not just seaport towns) pay ship tax by this date. ... Location within France La Rochelle is a city or commune of western France, and a seaport on the Atlantic Ocean (population 76,584 in 1999). ... Louis XIII in full military regalia, by Peter Paul Rubens, 1622-25: On a ribbon at his hip is the Cross of the Order of Saint Esprit Louis XIII (September 27, 1601 – May 14, 1643), called the Just (French: le Juste), was King of France from 1610 to 1643. ... The Edict of Nantes was issued on April 13, 1598 by Henry IV of France to grant French Protestants (also known as Huguenots) substantial rights in a Catholic nation. ... Events February 6 - James Stuart, Duke of York becomes King James II of England and Ireland and King James VII of Scotland. ... The Edict of Fontainebleau (October 1685) was an edict issued by Louis XIV of France. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001 Census) – Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most populous continent, after Asia. ... The Americas (sometimes referred to as America) is the area including the land mass located between the Pacific Ocean and the Atlantic Ocean, generally divided into North America and South America. ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Confession of Faith, popularly known as the Belgic Confession, following the seventeenth-century Latin designation Confessio Belgica. ... Events February 1 - Sarsa Dengel succeeds his father Menas as Emperor of Ethiopia February 18 - The Duke of Guise is assassinated while besieging Orléans March - Peace of Amboise. ... The Ratification of the Treaty of Münster by Gerard Terborch (1648) Banquet of the Amsterdam Civic Guard in Celebration of the Peace of Münster by Bartholomeus van der Helst, 1648 The Peace of Westphalia, also known as the Treaties of Münster and Osnabrück, refers to the... The Protestant Church in the Netherlands (Protestantse Kerk in Nederland, PKN) is an organisation created on 1 May 2004 from the merger of the Dutch Reformed Church (Nederlandse Hervormde Kerk, NHK), the Reformed Churches in the Netherlands (Gereformeerde Kerken in Nederland, GKN) and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in the Kingdom... The Dutch Reformed village church of St. ... The Reformed Churches in the Netherlands (Dutch: Gereformeerde Kerken in Nederland, in short Gereformeerde kerk) was the second largest protestant church in the Netherlands until it merged into the Protestant Church in the Netherlands in 2004. ... Synod Seal of the Lutheran Church in the Kingdom of the Netherlands (1818-2004) The Evangelical Lutheran Church in the Kingdom of the Netherlands (Evangelisch-Lutherse Kerk in het Koninkrijk der Nederlanden) was a denomination in the Netherlands which existed from 1818 to 2004. ... The Waldensians were followers of Peter Waldo (or Valdes or Vaudes); they called themselves the Poor men of Lyon, the Poor of Lombardy, or the Poor. ... Peter Waldo was the founder of a radical ascetic Christian movement in 12th-century France. ... William Farel William Farel (Guillaume Farel, 1489-1565) was a French evangelist, and a founder of the Reformed Church in the cantons of Neuchâtel, Berne and Geneva, and the Canton of Vaud Switzerland. ...

Reformed churches in Australia and New Zealand (and Old World counterparts)

(see also List of Presbyterian Denominations in Australia) Evangelical Presbyterian Church Presbyterian Church of Australia Presbyterian Church of Eastern Australia Presbyterian Reformed Church Reformed Presbyterian Church of Australia Westminster Presbyterian Church Australian Free Church Southern Presbyterian Church Categories: Presbyterianism | Christian denominations ...

Logo of the UCA The Uniting Church in Australia (UCA) was formed on June 22, 1977 when the Methodist Church of Australasia, Presbyterian Church of Australia and Congregational Union of Australia came together under the Basis of Union document. ... The Presbyterian Church of Australia is the largest Presbyterian denomination in Australia. ... The Free Reformed Churches of Australia is a federation of 11 congregations, nine in Western Australia and two in Tasmania. ... The Christian Reformed Churches of Australia has its roots in the great European Reformation of the 15th and 16th centuries, affirming the Biblical truths that God saves us by grace alone, in Christ alone and through faith alone. ... Reformed Churches of New Zealand is the New Zealand representation of the Reformed churches. ... The Presbyterian Church of Aotearoa New Zealand (PCANZ) is the main Presbyterian church in the country of New Zealand. ... Grace Presbyterian Church of New Zealand (GPCNZ) is a Presbyterian denomination in New Zealand which was formed in 2002. ...

Reformed churches in Britain and Ireland

The churches with presbyterian traditions in the United Kingdom have the Westminster Confession of Faith as one of their important confessional documents. The Westminster Confession of Faith is the chief doctrinal product of the Protestant Westminster Assembly. ... A creed is a statement of belief—usually religious belief—or faith. ...

In addition to these, there are also other churches with smaller flocks, notably in Northern Ireland. Logo of The United Reformed Church The United Reformed Church (URC) is a Christian denomination (church) in the United Kingdom. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation indepedently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... Royal motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within the UK Languages English, Gaelic, Scots Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... The Church of Scotland (C of S, also known informally as The Kirk; until the 17th century officially the Kirk of Scotland) is the Christian national church of Scotland. ... See also civil religion. ... This article concerns the Free Church of Scotland 1843-1900, for the Free Church of Scotland existing from 1900 to the present day see Free Church of Scotland (post 1900). ... St. ... The Presbyterian Church in Ireland has a membership of 300,000 people in 650 congregations across both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. ... Dieu et mon droit (Royal motto) (French for God and my right)3 Northern Irelands location within the UK Official languages English, Irish, Ulster Scots Capital and largest city Belfast First Minister Office suspended Area  - Total Ranked 4th 13,843 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 4th 1,685...

  • A group of churches called New Frontiers began in England and also exists elsewhere in the world. This group tends to hold to Reformed theology, but is also Charismatic in its experience.

Newfrontiers describes itself as is an international family of chruches together on a mission. ... Charismatic is an umbrella term used to describe those Christians who believe that the manifestations of the Holy Spirit seen in the first century Christian Church, such as healing, miracles and glossolalia, are available to contemporary Christians and ought to be experienced and practiced today. ...

Reformed churches in the United States of America and Canada (and Old World counterparts)

The CRC is a conservative/evangelical denomination founded by Dutch immigrants in the nineteenth century in West Michigan.
The Presbyterian Church in Canada, formed in June 1875, as a union of 4 Presbyterian groups in the Dominion of Canada (created in 1867); These "Continuing Presbyterians", did not join the United Church of Canada in 1925, of Presbyterians, along with Methodists, Congregationalists, and Union Churches.
Most Presbyterian churches adhere to the Westminster Confession of Faith, but the Presbyterian Church (USA), in order to embrace the historical expressions of the whole Reformed tradition as found in the United States, has adopted a Book of Confessions.
The Presbyterian Church (USA) has split a number of times in its history. Many of these historic splits have been resolved. From the continuing branch churches, some have split in turn. Only some of the continuing branches from the main bodies are listed here, with the year of their separation.
One of the most conservative Reformed/Calvinist denominations in the world, the PRC separated from the CRC in the 1920s in a schism over the issue of common grace.
The RCA is an evangelical denomination formed by Dutch immigrants during colonial times.

The Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church Seal: The Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church is a small denomination, formed from the merger of the Associate (Seceder) and the Reformed Presbyterian (Covenantor) churches in Philadelphia in 1782. ... Ulster-Scots is a term mainly used in Ireland and Britain (Scotch-Irish or Scots-Irishis commonly used in North America) primarily to refer to Presbyterian Scots, or their descendents, who migrated from the Scottish Lowlands to Ulster (the northern province of Ireland), largely across the 17th century. ... The Canadian and American Reformed Churches (CanRC) is a federation of Protestant Christian churches. ... Official logo of the Christian Reformed Church The Christian Reformed Church in North America (CRCNA or CRC) is a Protestant Christian denomination which follows Reformed Calvinist theology. ... The word evangelicalism usually refers to a tendency in diverse branches of Protestantism, typified by an emphasis on evangelism, a personal experience of conversion, biblically-oriented faith, and a belief in the relevance of Christian faith to cultural issues. ... The Free Reformed Church of North America (FRCNA) is committed to the infallibility of Scripture and subscribes to the Three Forms of Unity. ... The Heritage Netherlands Reformed Church is a very conservative denomination with congregations in the United States and Canada. ... The Presbyterian Church in America (PCA) is the second largest Presbyterian Protestant church body in the United States, after the Presbyterian Church (USA). ... The Presbyterian Church in Canada is the name of a Christian church, of Protestant, of presbyterian, and reformed theology and polity, serving in Canada under this name since 1875. ... This article needs cleanup. ... The Westminster Confession of Faith is the chief doctrinal product of the Protestant Westminster Assembly. ... The Book of Confessions is the book of doctrinal statements of the Presbyterian Church (USA) and is designated Part 1 of the PCUSA Constitution. ... The Presbyterian Church (USA) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination in the United States. ... On February 4, 1810 in the log cabin home (near what later became the town of Burns, Dickson County, Tennessee) of Rev. ... Along with Westminster Seminary, the Orthodox Presbyterian Church (OPC) was founded by conservative Presbyterians who revolted against the modernist theology within the Presbyterian Church (USA) (PCUSA) during the 1930s. ... The Bible Presbyterian Church was formed in 1939-1940, predominantly through the efforts of conservative Presbyterian clergyman Carl McIntire. ... The Presbyterian Church in America (PCA) is the second largest Presbyterian Protestant church body in the United States, after the Presbyterian Church (USA). ... The Reformed Presbyterian Church in the United States [1] is a branch of the Presbyterianism with ten churches in the United States. ... The Evangelical Presbyterian Church (EPC) is a family of churches, Reformed and Presbyterian, defined by shared core values and bonded by the fellowship of the Holy Spirit. ... The Presbyterian Reformed Church is an indigenous North American group of churches continuing historic Scottish Presbyterian orthodoxy in doctrine, worship, government and discipline, on the basis of a conviction that these principles and practices are founded upon and agreeable to the Word of God. ... The Protestant Reformed Churches in America (PRCA) are a denomination of 27 churches and almost 6000 members in the United States and Canada. ... Sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or primarily in North America and in Australia as the Roaring Twenties . In Europe it is sometimes refered to as the Golden Twenties. ... The word schism (IPA: or ), from the Greek σχισμα, schisma (from σχιζω, schizo, to split), means a division or a split, usually in an organization. ... Common Grace is a theological concept in Protestant Christianity, primarily in Reformed and Calvinistic circles, referring to the grace of God that is common to all humankind. ... The Reformed Church in the United States (RCUS) is a small Christian denomination in the German Reformed theological heritage. ... The Reformed Church in America (RCA) is a Calvinist Reformed Protestant denomination that was formerly known as the Dutch Reformed Church. ... The Reformed Presbyterian Church of North America is a Christian, Protestant, Reformed denomination which adheres to the biblical principles first enunciated during the Protestant Reformation of the 16th century. ... The United Reformed Churches in North America (URCNA)is a theologically conservative denomination in the Dutch Calvinist tradition. ... St. ... Emblem of the UCC The United Church of Christ (UCC) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination in the United States, generally considered within the Reformed tradition, and formed in 1957 by the merger of two denominations, the Evangelical and Reformed Church and the Congregational Christian Churches. ...

Reformed churches in Korea

  • Presbyterian Church in Korea (Kosin 고신). The PCK is a Reformed denomination in Korea which accepts the Westminster standards as its confession. The church also recognizes "Three Forms of Unity", to be same as the Westminster Standards. Kosin church wants to be a biblical and confessional denomination, pure in doctrine and life. There are about 2,000 local churches, including some churches in North America and Europe.
  • The Korean Presbyterian Church (Hapdong 합동) which formed the primary body of the Presbyterian General Assembly (the Reformed Church in Korea) was established by missionaries of the Presbyterian Church (USA), and Canadian and Australian Presbyterians.

Reformed churches in Nigeria (and founding counterparts)

  • Christian Reformed Church of Nigeria - (Dutch Reformed)
  • Reformed Church of Christ in Nigeria - (Dutch Reformed)
  • Presbyterian Church of Nigeria - (Scottish Presbyterian)
  • Qua Iboe Church - (Northern Irish Presbyterian)
  • Church of Christ in the Sudan among the Tiv - (Dutch Reformed)
  • Evangelical Reformed Church of Christ - (Dutch Reformed)
  • Nigeria Reformed Church - (Dutch Reformed)

The various Reformed churches of Nigeria formed the Reformed Ecumenical Council of Nigeria in 1991 to further cooperation.


Reformed churches in India

The Bible Presbyterian Church was formed in 1939-1940, predominantly through the efforts of conservative Presbyterian clergyman Carl McIntire. ...

Reformed churches in South Africa

The Free Reformed Churches in South Africa (also known as the Vrye Gereformeerde Kerke in Suid Afrika) is a bond of Protestant Christian churches. ...

International organizations of Reformed churches

The International Conference of Reformed Churches is a federation of calvinist churches in several continents. ... Reformed Ecumenical Council is an international organization of calvinist Churches with a membership at large of 10 million people. ... The World Alliance of Reformed Churches (WARC) is a fellowship of more than 200 churches with roots in the 16th-century Reformation. ...

See also

Christianity is a monotheistic religion that recognizes Jesus Christ as its central figure, Lord and Messiah. ... Jesus, also known as Jesus of Nazareth or Jesus the Nazarene, is the central figure of Christianity, in which context he is known as Jesus Christ (from Greek Ιησούς Χριστός) with Christ being a title meaning Anointed One or Messiah. Christian viewpoints on Jesus (known as Christology) are both diverse and complex. ... Christian Apologetics is the field of study concerned with the systematic defense (apologetics) of Christianity. ...

External links

  • Reformed.net - world list of reformed churches.
  • Presbyterian Church Malaysia (GPM)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Reformation - ninemsn Encarta (2799 words)
The Protestant Reformation was a movement in The Holy Roman Empire that began with Martin Luther 's activities in 1517, with roots further back in time.
Ecclesiastical reform “in head and members” was discussed at a succession of Church councils from the Council of Constance to the 5th Lateran Council in Rome.
The Reformation in Switzerland was contemporaneous with that in Germany and an older historiography disputed the primacy of the latter in favour of the former.
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Protestant Reformation (3383 words)
The Protestant Reformation was a movement in Europe that began with Martin Luther's activities in 1517 and ended with the Peace of Westphalia in 1648.
The Counter-Reformation or the Catholic Reformation was a strong reaffirmation of the doctrine and structure of the Catholic Church, climaxing at the Council of Trent, partly in reaction to the growth of Protestantism.
Reformation a great number of those who, without a serious vocation, had embraced the religious life from purely human and worldly motives, and who wished to be rid of obligations towards God which had grown burdensome, and to be free to gratify their sensual cravings.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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