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Encyclopedia > Reform Association of Ontario

The Reform Party of Ontario was, until September 2003, a pseudo party that ran one candidate each election merely to keep the party’s name in the possession of the Reform Party of Canada. There is also a small group of conservative populists who lay claim to the moniker, but have been forced to run under the Independent Reform moniker. For the Reform Party that existed prior to Canadian Confederation see Reform Party (pre-Confederation) The Reform Party of Canada was a Canadian federal political party in the 1980s and 1990s. ... Conservatism or political conservatism is any of several historically related political philosophies or political ideologies. ... Populism is a political ideology or rhetorical style that holds that the common person is oppressed by the elite in society, which exists only to serve its own interests, and therefore, the instruments of the State need to be grasped from this self-serving elite and instead used for the...


The Reform Party of Ontario is not to be confused with the pre-Confederation Reform Party, which later became the Liberal Party of Ontario, or with the leftist United Reform party of the 1940s. The Reform movement, sometimes referred to as the Reform Party, began in the 1830s as the movement in the English speaking parts of British North America (Canada). ... The Ontario Liberal Party is a centrist provincial political party in the province of Ontario, Canada. ... The United Reform Movement or United Reform was an attempt in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, to create a left wing farmer-labour coalition. ...

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Official Reform Party of Ontario

The federal Reform party registered the "Reform Party of Ontario" in 1989, and re-registered it in 1994. This registration was made to prevent anyone else from using the 'Reform' name in Ontario politics. The RPO nominated one paper candidate in each provincial election in order to maintain the official registration, but did not campaign actively. In a representative democracy, the term paper candidate is often given to a candidate who stands for a political party in an electoral division where the party in question enjoys little or no support. ...


For instance Ken Kalopsis, the co-president of the Reform Party of Canada's successor, the Canadian Alliance, was hand-picked to run for the RPO in the 1999 provincial election in Davenport riding solely in order to control the rights to the party name. Kalopsis won 174 votes without campaigning. The Canadian Alliance (in full, the Canadian Reform Conservative Alliance) was a Canadian right_of_centre conservative political party that existed from 2000 to 2003. ... The Ontario general election of 1999 was held in the Canadian province of Ontario in the late spring of 1999. ... This page refers to a Riding as a unit in local government. ...


Federal Reform leader, Preston Manning and Ontario Premier Mike Harris had a good relationship, and it was agreed that Reform would not run any candidates provincially. The provincial PCs returned the favour by giving some unofficial support to Reform in federal politics. Ernest Preston Manning (born June 10, 1942, in Edmonton, Alberta), is a Canadian politician. ... A premier is an executive official of government. ... Michael Deane Harris (born January 23, 1945, in Toronto, Ontario) was the twenty-second Premier of Ontario from June 26, 1995 to April 15, 2002. ...


Robert Beard was the party's leader in 2002. With the end of the federal Reform Party, the RPO was deregistered in September 2003. 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Unofficial movement

In 1993, a handful of supporters of the Reform Party of Canada started a provincial Reform movement in Ontario. This movement was not affiliated with the national Reform party, which maintained a policy of remaining outside of provincial politics. The renegade Reformers were prevented from using the RFO name by Elections Canada, agency that oversees federal elecitons in Canada. Elections Canada is the non-partisan agency of the Government of Canada responsible for the conduct of federal elections and referendums. ...


This small group of Reformers, that including one disaffected advisor to Mike Harris, formed a Reform Association for Ontario and ran unsuccessfully as candidates of the "Reform Association of Ontario" in 1995. The movement's leader was Kimble Ainslie, who alleged that Preston Manning and Mike Harris had arranged a secret deal to prevent the federal Reform Party from participating in provincial politics. Candidates were nominated in Huron riding and in other ridings in the London, Ontario and Kitchener-Waterloo areas against the Ontario PCs. These candidates won only a handful of votes. Kimble F. Ainslie is not a politician, but rather public policy analyst, pollster, author and activist, originally based in Ontario, Canada. ... This page refers to a Riding as a unit in local government. ... London is a city in southwestern Ontario, Canada on the Quebec City-Windsor Corridor with a metropolitan area population of about 447,286; the city proper has a population of about 351,267 (2004). ...


Subsequent to the 1995 election, the small group of provincial Reformers founded Grassroots United Against Reform's Demise to lobby for the Reform Party's participation in provincial politics. However, the vast majority of Ontario Reform supporters backed the Focus Federally For Reform initiative. Those opposed to creating a real provincial party were successful, and the supporters lost their bid to have the party enter Ontario politics.


In the 1999 Ontario election, the Reform Association for Ontario again unsuccessfully ran an underdog Independent Reformer in Prince Edward-Hastings. The Reform Association for Ontario ran another Independent Reformer in Bruce-Grey-Owen Sound in the 2003 Ontario election, who was also unsuccessful. The Ontario general election of 1999 was held in the Canadian province of Ontario in the late spring of 1999. ... The province of Ontario, Canada conducted a general election on October 2, 2003, to elect the 103 Members of Provincial Parliament (MPPs) in the Ontario Legislative Assembly. ...


The Reform Association for Ontario was renamed the Reform Ontario movement, and continued to promote its agenda, including fixed election dates, a referendum on the issue of electoral reform, and more free votes in the legislature.


Reform Ontario was a small group of committed activists who operated web-based discussion forums and mailing lists.


Reform Ontario claimed to have supporters from the three big parties of Ontario Liberal Party, Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario and the Ontario New Democratic Party, to have a base of undecided voters of the fringe Green Party, Family Coalition Party, Confederation of Regions Party, Freedom Party, and Libertarian Party, and to have historic links to the pre-Confederation Reform Party, Clear Grits, Northern Ontario Heritage Party, United Farmers of Ontario, and to the Ontario Party of Canada. The Ontario Liberal Party is a centrist provincial political party in the province of Ontario, Canada. ... The Ontario Progressive Conservative Party (PC Party of Ontario) is a right-of-centre political party in Ontario, Canada. ... The Ontario New Democratic Party (formerly known as the Ontario Cooperative Commonwealth Federation) is a social democratic political party in Ontario, Canada. ... The Green Party of Ontario contests provincial elections in Ontario, Canada. ... The Family Coalition Party is a political party in Ontario, Canada that was founded in 1987 with a social conservative platform. ... The Confederation of Regions Party (CoR) was a right-wing Canadian political party founded in 1984 by Elmer Knutson. ... The Freedom Party of Ontario is a provincial political party in Ontario, Canada that was founded on 1 January 1984 by Robert Metz and Marc Emery - then of London, Ontario - as a successor to the Unparty. ... The Ontario Libertarian Party is a political party in Ontario, Canada that was founded in 1975 as an offshoot of the Libertarian Party in the USA. It is inspired by the philosophical ideas of such authors and thinkers as Jan Narveson, anarcho-capitalist socio-economic ideas of Murray Rothbard. ... The Reform movement, sometimes referred to as the Reform Party, began in the 1830s as the movement in the English speaking parts of British North America (Canada). ... Clear Grits were Upper Canadian reformers with support concentrated among southwestern Ontario farmers, who were frustrated and disillusioned by the 1849 Reform government of Robert Baldwin and Louis_Hippolyte Lafontaines lack of radicalism. ... The Northern Ontario Heritage Party was a provincial political party in Ontario, Canada that was formed in 1977 to campaign for provincial status for Northern Ontario. ... The United Farmers of Ontario (UFO) were the Ontario section of the nation-wide United Farmers movement that arose in Canada in the early part of the 20th century. ... The Ontario Party of Canada was a political party in Canada that was founded in September 2002 by George Burns of London, Ontario to promote the interests of the Province of Ontario within the Canadian confederation. ...


Reform Ontario now appears to have been supeceded by the Representative Party of Ontario, which was formed by and is led by Bill Cook, a former Reform Ontario activist. Reform Ontario's website now links to the Representative Party website. The Representative Party of Ontario is a reserved provincial political party name in the Province of Ontario, Canada. ... Bill Cook is a political activist in Ontario, Canada. ...


See also

Beginning with the 2003 election, Ontario elections are held every 4 years in October. ... A political party is a political organization subscribing to a certain ideology or formed around very special issues with the aim to participate in power, usually by participating in elections. ...

External links

Note: these links point to "Reform Ontario" pages, not in anyway connected to the official Reform Party of Ontario.


Reform Ontario reborn against the Mike Harris Ontario PCs (http://www.eye.net/eye/issue/issue_05.16.96/NEWS/prk0516.htm)

  • Reform Ontario DMOZ (http://dmoz.org/Regional/North_America/Canada/Ontario/Society_and_Culture/Politics/Parties/)
  • Reform Ontario petition (http://www.petitiononline.com/ont0ref4/petition.html)
  • Reform Ontario listserv (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/reformontario/)
  • Reform Ontario website (http://www.reformontario.on.to/)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Reform Party of Canada (825 words)
The Reform Party's major preoccupations, however, were with decentralizing and otherwise reducing the size, scope and cost of government, primarily by cuts to social welfare and cultural support programs (including bilingualism and multiculturalism) and firm opposition to Québec's demands for special status within Confederation.
Reform failed to win a seat in the 1988 federal election, but its percentage of the electoral vote was encouraging, especially in Alberta.
Reform's public appeal was further blunted by the adoption of fiscally conservative policies by the governing Liberals after 1993, a recovery in the Canadian economy, and a decline in public concern over constitutional issues following Québec's sovereignty referendum in 1995.
Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal (702 words)
The Reform Party of Ontario is not to be confused with the pre-Confederation Reform Party, which later became the Liberal Party of Ontario, or with the leftist United Reform party of the 1940s.
The Reform Association for Ontario was renamed the Reform Ontario movement, and continued to promote its agenda, including fixed election dates, a referendum on the issue of electoral reform, and more free votes in the legislature.
It appears that Reform Ontario was intended to be superseded by the Representative Party of Ontario, which was formed by and led by Bill Cook, a former Reform Ontario activist.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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