FACTOID # 22: South Dakota has the highest employment ratio in America, but the lowest median earnings of full-time male employees.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Reel (dance)

The reel is a folk dance type as well as the accompanying dance tune type. In Scottish country dancing, the reel is one of the four traditional dances, the others being the jig, the strathspey and the waltz, and is also the name of a dance figure (see below). Folk dancers in Prague Folk dance is a term used to describe a large number of dances, mostly of European origin, that tend to share the following attributes: They were originally danced in about the 19th century or earlier (or are, in any case, not currently copyrighted); Their performance is... Dance music is a style of popular music commonly played in dance music nightclubs, radio stations and shows and raves. ... Scottish country dancing at the 2005 Skagit Valley Highland Games in Mount Vernon, Washington Scottish country dancing or SCD is a form of social dance involving groups of mixed couples of dancers tracing progressive patterns according to a predetermined choreography. ... The jig (sometimes seen in its French language or Italian language forms gigue or giga) is a folk dance type as well as the accompanying dance tune type, popular in Ireland and Scotland. ... A strathspey is a dance tune in 4/4, usually written in 1/8th notes. ... The waltz (G.: Walzer, It. ...


In Irish dance, a reel is any dance danced to music in reel time (see below). In Irish stepdance, the reel is danced in soft shoes and is one of the first dances taught to students. Normally, though not always, it has very simple steps, executed very quickly. There is also a treble reel, danced in hard shoes to reel music. Irish dancers at St. ... Irish stepdance is a stype of performance dance originating in Ireland from traditional Irish dance. ...

Contents

Reel music

Reel music is transcribed in 4/4 or 2/4 time signature. All reels have the same structure, consisting largely of quaver movement with an accent on the first and third beats of the bar. A reel is distinguished from a hornpipe by consisting primarily of even beats. Most reels have two parts (A and B) each of which is repeated (AABB). Each part (either A or B) has eight bars, which again are divided into four and then into two. These are called phrases. The structure obeys to a scheme of question-answer where A is the "question" and B is the "answer" to A. The group of thirty-two bars (four times eight) is itself repeated three or four times before a second reel is introduced. The grouping of two tunes or more in this manner is typical in all dance tunes.[citation needed] Today many Irish reels are supplemented with new compositions and by tunes from other traditions which are easily adapted as reels. It is the most popular tune-type within the Irish dance music tradition. The time signature (also known as meter signature) is a notational device used in Western musical notation to specify how many beats are in each bar and what note value constitutes one beat. ... The term hornpipe refers to one of several dance forms played and danced in Britain and elsewhere from the late 17th century until the present day. ... Dance music is a style of popular music commonly played in dance music nightclubs, radio stations and shows and raves. ... Ireland is an island in the North Atlantic politically divided between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. ...


Reels are popular in the folk music of South West England. It crossed the Atlantic ocean with Irish and Scottish immigration and thus entered the musical tradition of Atlantic and French Canada including that of Quebecers and Acadians. Reels are featured in many pieces of Quebec singers and bands; for example: La Bolduc, La Bottine Souriante and even the more modern néo-trad group Les Cowboys Fringants (like the song Mon Pays suivi du Reel des aristocrates). Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2005 est. ... Being a modern cosmopolitan society, today, all types of music can be found in the Canadian province of Quebec. ... Acadians are the original French settlers of parts of the northeastern region of North America comprising what is now the Canadian provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island. ... Mary Rose-Anna Travers, born June 4, 1894 in Newport in the Gaspé region of Quebec, Canada – died February 21, 1941, was a Quebecois singer best known as La Bolduc. ... La Bottine Souriante is a folk band from Quebec specialising in traditional Quebecois music, often with a modern twist. ... Néo-trad is a musical style from Quebec that arose around the turn of the 21st century. ... Les Cowboys Fringants (English The Frisky Cowboys ) are a popular band and cult phenomenon from Quebec, who perform Québécois néo-trad music (modernized Quebec folk music with a rock flavour), the band also draws on Country music. ... Les Cowboys Fringants (English The Frisky Cowboys ) are a popular band and cult phenomenon from Quebec, who perform Québécois néo-trad music (modernized Quebec folk music with a rock flavour), the band also draws on Country music. ...


Reel (dance figure)

The start of a right-shoulder reel of three. The three dancers simultaneously follow the same path, starting from different points and ending where they began.
The start of a right-shoulder reel of three. The three dancers simultaneously follow the same path, starting from different points and ending where they began.

In Scottish country dancing, reels are figures in which three or more dancers follow an interweaving path, similar to the hey of other folk dance traditions. The most common reel is the reel of three, in which, as the name implies, three dancers weave in and out of one another, completing a figure 8 pattern on the floor, usually in six or eight bars of music. The dancers simultaneously follow the same path, but begin the pattern at different points: one each at top and bottom, and one in the middle. Two of the dancers will pass each other to begin the reel, and the reel is labeled a right- or left-shoulder reel depending on which of their shoulders are closest when they pass. When the reel is finished, all three dancers will be back where they began. Image File history File linksMetadata Scottish_country_dance_reel. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Scottish_country_dance_reel. ... Scottish country dancing at the 2005 Skagit Valley Highland Games in Mount Vernon, Washington Scottish country dancing or SCD is a form of social dance involving groups of mixed couples of dancers tracing progressive patterns according to a predetermined choreography. ... Folk dancers in Prague Folk dance is a term used to describe a large number of dances, mostly of European origin, that tend to share the following attributes: They were originally danced in about the 19th century or earlier (or are, in any case, not currently copyrighted); Their performance is...


There are myriad variations, including:

  • Half reels of three, in which the dancers complete only half their path, usually in four bars of music. At the end of the figure, the dancers on the ends of the 8 will have switched places, and the dancer in the middle will be back where he or she began.
  • Parallel reels, in which two reels are danced simultaneously by two groups of dancers, usually one group on the men's side of the set and one group on the ladies' side of the set. The reels are "parallel" in the sense that each person in one reel dances exactly the same track as the corresponding person in the other reel, maintaining the same distance from them at all times.
  • Mirror reels, which resemble parallel reels, except that each person dances a mirror image of the track being danced by the corresponding person in the other reel (so that if one reel begins with two dancers passing left shoulders, the other reel will begin by passing right shoulders).
  • Crossover mirror reels, which are mirror reels that begin with two of the dancers crossing over to participate in the opposite reel. In double crossover mirror reels, they cross back to their original reels when the figure repeats.
  • Inveran (or sausage) reels, in which a couple crosses back and forth between two reels at both ends of the figure.
  • Tandem reels, in which two dancers take the place of a single dancer in the reel, one following close behind the other. In dolphin reels, those two dancers switch positions with each other at each end of the 8.
  • Reels of four, in which four people dance a reel, adding a smaller loop to the path in the middle of the figure 8 to allow the two inner dancers to pass each other.
  • Closing reels, which are six-bar reels of three danced by the active couple with their corners at the end of a dance. The active couple crosses over to their own sides on the final two bars of the figure.

External links

  • Military Two Step
  • Gay Gordons
  • Sheffield University Ceilidh SocietyProbably one of the most well established and largest English Ceilidh Societies in England.
  • The Round is the website of the Cambridge University English Dance society, and an excellent resource on e-ceilidh.
  • Gremlinuk has a page about Scottish ceilidh dancing, with some dances written out.

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Reel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (507 words)
A reel is used on a fishing rod to wind the fishing line up.
The "reel" was established as a standard measurement because of considerations in printing motion picture film at a film laboratory, for shipping (especially the film case sizes) and for the size of the physical film magazine attached to the motion picture projector.
A Split Reel is a motion picture film reel in two halves that, when assembled, hold a specific length of motion picture film that has been wound on a plastic core.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m