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Encyclopedia > Reed bed
A reed bed in summer
Reed bed in winter

Reed beds are a natural habitat found in floodplains, waterlogged depressions and estuaries. Reed beds are part of a succession from young reed colonising open water or wet ground through a gradation of increasingly dry ground. As reed beds age, they build up a considerable litter layer which eventually rises above the water level, and ultimately provides opportunities for scrub or woodland invasion. Artificial reed beds are used as a method of removing pollutants from grey water. Image File history File links Merge-arrows. ... A Reedswamp is a marsh dominated by Common Reed (Phragmites australis) Reedbeds vary in the species they can support, depending on water levels within the wetland system. ... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (956x834, 192 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Phragmites Reedbed ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (956x834, 192 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Phragmites Reedbed ... This picture shows the flood plain following a 1 in 10 year flood on the Isle of Wight. ... For other meanings, see Estuary (disambiguation) Río de la Plata estuary An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. ... Succession is the act or process of pooing or of following in order or sequence. ... Scrubland is plant community characterized by scrub vegetation. ... Greywater is wastewater generated by household processes such as washing dishes, laundry and bathing. ...

Contents

Types of reed bed

Reed beds vary in the species they can support, depending on water levels within the wetland system, climate, seasonal variations, and the nutrient status and salinity of the water. Those that normally have 20 cm or more of surface water during the summer are referred to as reed swamp. These often have high invertebrate and bird species use. Reed beds with water levels at or below the surface during the summer are often more complex botanically and are known as reed fen. Reeds and similar plants do not generally grow in very acidic water, and so in these situations reed beds are replaced by other vegetation such as poor-fen and bog. Lütt-Witt Moor, a bog in Henstedt-Ulzburg in northern Germany. ...


Although common reed is characteristic of reed beds, not all vegetation dominated by this species is reed bed. It also occurs commonly in unmanaged damp grassland and as an understorey in certain types of damp woodland. Binomial name Phragmites australis (Cav. ... The Konza tallgrass prairie in the Flint Hills of northeastern Kansas. ... Limber Pine woodland, Toiyabe Range, central Nevada Biologically, a woodland is a treed area differentiated from a forest. ...


Wildlife

Most European reed beds are composed mainly of the large wetland grass common reed (Phragmites australis), but also include many other tall monocotyledons adapted to growing in wet conditions – other grasses such as reed sweet-grass (Glyceria maxima), Canary reed-grass (Phalaris arundinacea) and small-reed (Calamagrostis species), large sedges (species of Carex, Scirpus, Schoenoplectus, Cladium and related genera), yellow flag iris (Iris pseudacorus), reed-mace ("bulrush" – Typha species), water-plantains (Alisma species), and flowering rush (Butomus umbellatus). Many dicotyledons also occur, such as water mint (Mentha aquatica), gipsywort (Lycopus europaeus), skull-cap (Scutellaria species), touch-me-not balsam (Impatiens noli-tangere), brooklime (Veronica beccabunga) and water forget-me-nots (Myotis species). Binomial name Phragmites australis (Cav. ... Orders Base Monocots: Acorus Alismatales Asparagales Dioscoreales Liliales Pandanales Family Petrosaviaceae Commelinids: Arecales Commelinales Poales Zingiberales Family Dasypogonaceae Monocotyledons or monocots are a group of flowering plants usually ranked as a class and once called the Monocotyledoneae. ... Binomial name Phalaris arundinacea Reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea) is an invasive, tall, coarse-looking perennial grass that commonly forms extensive single-species stands along the margins of lakes and streams and in wet open areas. ... Genera See text Calamagrostis, or Small-reed or (Am. ... For other uses, see Species (disambiguation). ... Carex (L., 1753) is a genus of plants in the family Cyperaceae, commonly known as sedges (although other, related species are also called sedges, those of genus Carex may be called true sedges). ... Species About 120; see text The plant genus Scirpus consists of a large number of aquatic, grass-like species in the family Cyperaceae (the sedges), many with the common names club-rush or bulrush (see also bulrush for other plants so-named). ... Species About 80; see text Schoenoplectus (Club-rush [Old World species], Bulrush or Tule [New World species]) is a genus of about 80 species of sedges with a cosmopolitan distribution. ... Species See text. ... For other uses, see Genus (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Iris pseudacorus L. The iris bearing the Latin name Iris pseudacorus is known by the common names yellow iris, yellow flag, and bastard fleur de lys. ... Species See text Typha is a genus of about eleven species of monocotyledonous flowering plants in the monogeneric family, Typhaceae. ... Species A. plantago-aquatica Alisma is a genus of plants in the Alismataceae family. ... Binomial name Butomus umbellatus L. The flowering rush (Butomus umbellatus), also known as grass rush, is a perennial aquatic plant, constituting the family Butomaceae. ... Orders See text. ... Binomial name Mentha aquatica L. Water mint (Mentha aquatica) is a perennial plant in the mentha genus common throughout Europe, except for the extreme North. ... Binomial name Lycopus europaeus L. Gypsywort (Lycopus europaeus), also called Sweet Bugle and Water Bugle, is a member of the Mint family Lamiaceae and the Lycopus genus. ... Species See text. ... Binomial name Impatiens noli-tangere L. Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Impatiens noli-tangere Wikispecies has information related to: Impatiens noli-tangere Touch-me-not Balsam (Impatiens noli-tangere) is an annual herbaceous plant of the family Balsaminaceae found in damp places in Eurasia and North America. ... Binomial name Veronica beccabunga Linnaeus, 1753 Brooklime (Veronica beccabunga) is a succulent herb belonging to the family Plantaginaceae. ... Species See text The mouse-eared bats, genus Myotis, are a vast group of small brown bats, found across the globe. ...


Many animals are adapted to living in and around reed-beds. These include mammals such as Eurasian otter, European beaver, water vole, harvest mouse and water shrew, and birds such as Great Bittern, Purple Heron, European Spoonbill, Water Rail (and other rails), Purple Gallinule, Marsh Harrier, various warblers (Reed Warbler, Sedge Warbler etc), Bearded Reedling and Reed Bunting. Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Range map (note: range also includes British Isles) The Eurasian otter, Lutra lutra, also known as the Eurasian river otter, common otter, Old World otter and European otter, is a European and Asian member of the Lutrinae or otter subfamily, and is typical of freshwater otters. ... Binomial name Castor fiber Linnaeus, 1758 Distribution of both species of beaver. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) This article deals with the European Water Vole. ... Binominal name Micromys minutus The Harvest mouse, Micromys minutus is a small rodent native to Europe and Asia. ... Water Shrew may refer to one of several species of aquatic red-toothed shrews: Genus Chimarrogale (Asiatic water shrews) Hantu Water Shrew () Himalayan Water Shrew () Sunda Water Shrew () Flat-headed Water Shrew () Styans Water Shrew () Sumatra water shrew () Genus Nectogale Elegant Water Shrew () Genus Neomys (Eurasian water shrews) Southern... Binomial name Botaurus stellaris (Linnaeus, 1758) The Great Bittern (Botaurus stellaris) is a wading bird of the heron family Ardeidae. ... Binomial name Ardea purpurea Linnaeus, 1766 The Purple Heron (Ardea purpurea) is a wading bird of the heron family Ardeidae, common throughout southern Europe and Asia. ... Binomial name Platalea leucorodia Linnaeus, 1758 The Common Spoonbill (Platalea leucorodia) is a wading bird of the ibis and spoonbill family Threskiornithidae. ... Binomial name Rallus aquaticus Linnaeus, 1758 The Water Rail (Rallus aquaticus) is a small wetland bird of the rail family. ... Rail can mean: Rail tracks, see also third rail Rail transport A Railroad-related periodical For the group of birds called rails, see Rallidae For the Mayfair Games board games, see Crayon Rails For rail in electronics, see . ... Binomial name Porphyrio martinica (Linnaeus, 1766) The American Purple Gallinule (Porphyrio martinica) is a swamp hen in the rail family Rallidae. ... Binomial name Circus aeruginosus Linnaeus 1758 Circus spilonotus Kaup, 1847 Circus approximans Peale, 1848 The marsh harriers are birds of prey of the harrier subfamily. ... Genus Many: see text The Old World Warblers, family Sylviidae, are a group of more than 280 small insectivorous passerine bird species. ... Binomial name Acrocephalus scirpaceus (Hermann, 1804) The Eurasian Reed Warbler, or just Reed Warbler, Acrocephalus scirpaceus, is an Old World warbler in the genus Acrocephalus. ... Binomial name Acrocephalus schoenobaenus (Linnaeus,, 1758) The Sedge Warbler (Acrocephalus schoenobaenus) is an Old World warbler in the genus Acrocephalus. ... Binomial name Panurus biarmicus (Linnaeus, 1758) The Bearded Tit, Panurus biarmicus, is a small passerine bird. ... Binomial name Emberiza schoeniclus (Linnaeus, 1758) The Reed Bunting, Emberiza schoeniclus, is a passerine bird in the bunting family Emberizidae, a group now separated by most modern authors from the finches, Fringillidae. ...

A previously sandy lake shore colonised by reeds forming a reed bed.

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 158 pixelsFull resolution (5063 × 1000 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 158 pixelsFull resolution (5063 × 1000 pixels, file size: 1. ...

Uses of reed beds

Constructed wetlands

Main article: Constructed wetlands

Constructed wetlands are artificial swamps (sometimes called reed fields) using reed or other marshland plants to form part of small-scale sewage treatment systems. Water trickling through the reed bed is cleaned by microorganisms living on the root system and in the litter. These utilising the sewage for growth nutrients, resulting in a clean effluent. The process is very similar to aerobic conventional sewage treatment, as the same organisms are used, except that conventional treatment systems require artificial aeration. // A constructed wetland is an artificial marsh or swamp, created for anthropogenic discharge such as wastewater, stormwater runoff or sewage treatment, and as habitat for wildlife, or for land reclamation after mining or other disturbance. ... Sewage is the mainly liquid waste containing some solids produced by humans which typically consists of washing water, faeces, urine, laundry waste and other material which goes down drains and toilets from households and industry. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... A cluster of Escherichia coli bacteria magnified 10,000 times. ... A nutrient is a substance used in an organisms metabolism which must be taken in from the environment. ... In the context of creating Plutonium at the Hanford Site, effluent refers to the cooling water that is discharged from a nuclear reactor that may or may not be radioactive. ...


Treatment ponds

Reed bed of Harchies ponds Belgium
Main article: Treatment pond

Treatment ponds are small versions of constructed wetlands which uses reed beds or other marshland plants to form an even smaller water treatment system. Similar to constructed wetlands, water trickling through the reed bed is cleaned by microorganisms living on the root system and in the litter. Treatment ponds are used for eg the water treatment of a single house or a small neighbourhood. A treatment pond is a small lake-sized body of water designed to treat fouled water by anaerobic bacteria. ... A cluster of Escherichia coli bacteria magnified 10,000 times. ...


See also

  • Organisms used in water purification
This ecology-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.
Image File history File links File links The following pages link to this file: Ecological succession ... For the journal, see Ecology (journal). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Reedbed Treatment Schemes used for Pollution Prevention in rural areas (343 words)
Reed bed schemes have proven themselves to be an effective, sustainable, reliable and economical method of treatment.
However, it is important to realise that reed beds are an old established form of treatment on the continent and the withy beds used in Victorian times were a form of constructed wetland.
The limiting factor in the use of reed beds is the availability and topography of the land.
Reed bed - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (225 words)
Under normal circumstances, an unmanaged reedbed shows a succession from young reed colonising open water or wet ground through a gradation of increasingly dry ground.
Those that normally have 20 cm or more of surface water during the summer are referred to as ‘reed swamp’.
Artificial reedbeds (sometimes called "reed fields") are increasingly being adopted for efficient small-scale sewage treatment systems: water trickling through the reed bed is rapidly cleaned up by the extensive root system and its associated microorganisms utilising the sewage for growth nutrients, giving an extremely clean effluent.
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