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Encyclopedia > Reed College

Reed College

Reed Griffin
Image File history File links Reed_College_griffin. ...

Established 1908
Type Private liberal arts college
Endowment $386 million
President Colin Diver
Faculty 132
Undergraduates 1,407 [1]
Postgraduates 29
Location Portland, OR, USA
Campus Residential, 98.52 acres (400,000 m²)
Colors Maroon and Richmond rose
Mascot Griffin
Website http://www.reed.edu/

Reed College is a private, independent liberal arts college located in Portland, Oregon. Founded in 1908, Reed is a highly selective[2] four-year residential college with a campus located in Portland's residential Eastmoreland neighborhood, featuring architecture based on the Tudor-Gothic style,[3] and a forested canyon wilderness preserve at its center. Reed is distinctive for its mandatory freshman Humanities program, as the only private undergraduate college with a nuclear reactor supporting its science programs, and for the unusually high percentage of graduates who go on to earn PhDs and other academic honors. The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are primarily liberal arts colleges with an emphasis upon undergraduate study in the liberal arts. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Colin Diver Colin Diver is currently the President of Reed College in Portland, Oregon. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Nickname: Location in Multnomah County and the state of Oregon Coordinates: , Country United States State Oregon County Multnomah County Incorporated February 8, 1851 Government  - Mayor Tom Potter Area  - City 376. ... Official language(s) (none)[1] Capital Salem Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 9th  - Total 98,466 sq mi (255,026 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 2. ... A residential area is a type of land use where the predominant use is residential. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The word Maroon can have the following meanings: Maroon is a color mixture composed of brown and purple. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... An unusually naturalistic depiction of a griffin by Sir John Tenniel for Lewis Carroll’s Alices Adventures in Wonderland. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... Nickname: Location in Multnomah County and the state of Oregon Coordinates: , Country United States State Oregon County Multnomah County Incorporated February 8, 1851 Government  - Mayor Tom Potter Area  - City 376. ... Eastmoreland, Portland, Oregon is an up-market neighborhood in inner south-east Portland, Oregon, located south of Reed College. ... Kings College Chapel outside view The Tudor style in English architecture is the final development of medieval architecture during the Tudor period (1485–1603) and even beyond, for conservative college patrons. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin San Sebastian Church in Manila, Philippines made entirely of steel. ... The humanities are those academic disciplines which study the human condition using methods that are largely analytic, critical, or speculative, as distinguished from the mainly empirical approaches of the natural and social sciences. ...

Contents

History

Reed College's Eliot Hall on a rare snowy day.
Reed College's Eliot Hall on a rare snowy day.

The Reed Institute (the legal name of the College) was founded in 1908, and Reed College held its first classes in 1911. Reed is named for Oregon pioneers Simeon Gannett Reed and Amanda Reed.[1]. Simeon was an entrepreneur in trade on the Columbia River; in his will he suggested that his wife could "devote some portion of my estate to benevolent objects, or to the cultivation, illustration, or development of the fine arts in the city of Portland, or to some other suitable purpose, which shall be of permanent value and contribute to the beauty of the city and to the intelligence, prosperity, and happiness of the inhabitants". The first president of Reed (1910–1919) was William Trufant Foster, a former professor at Bates College and Bowdoin College in Maine. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 894 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Reed College Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 894 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Reed College Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Simeon Gannett Reed was the founder of Reed College in Portland, Oregon His wife was Amanda Reed. ... The Columbia River (French: fleuve Columbia) is a river in the Pacific Northwest region of North America. ... William Trufant Foster (Jan. ... Bates College is a private liberal arts college, founded in 1855 by abolitionists, located in Lewiston, Maine, in the United States. ... Bowdoin College, founded in 1794, is a private liberal arts college located in the coastal New England town of Brunswick, Maine. ...


Although it holds a reputation for the anti-authoritarian leanings of its students (and sometimes its faculty), the only connection between Reed College and the journalist John Reed is the similarity of their names and the fact that both were native to Portland. John Reeds signature John Jack Silas Reed (October 22, 1887 – October 19, 1920) was an American journalist, poet, and communist activist, famous for his first-hand account of the Bolshevik Revolution, Ten Days that Shook the World. ...


Distinguishing features

According to Burton Clark, Reed is one of the most unusual institutions of higher learning in the United States,[4] featuring a traditional liberal arts and natural sciences curriculum. It requires freshmen to take Humanities 110 - an intensive introduction to the Classics, covering ancient Greece and Rome as well as the Bible and ancient Jewish history. Its program in the sciences is likewise unusual — Reed's TRIGA research reactor makes it the only school in the US to have a nuclear reactor operated almost entirely by undergraduates.[5] Reed also requires all students to complete a thesis (a two-semester-long research project conducted under the guidance of professors) during the senior year as a prerequisite of graduation, and passing a junior qualifying exam at the end of the junior year is a prerequisite to beginning the thesis. Upon completion of the senior thesis, students must also pass an oral exam that may encompass questions not only about the thesis, but also about any course previously taken. Classics, particularly within the Western University tradition, when used as a singular noun, means the study of the language, literature, history, art, and other aspects of Greek and Roman culture during the time frame known as classical antiquity. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Reed Research Reactor (RRR) is a research nuclear reactor located on-campus at Reed College in Portland, OR. It is a pool-type TRIGA Mark I reactor, built by General Atomics in 1968 and operated since then under licence from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Core of a small nuclear reactor used for research. ...


Reed maintains a 10:1 student-to-faculty ratio,[6] and its small classes emphasize a "conference" style, in which the teacher often acts as a mediator for discussion rather than a lecturer. While large lecture-style classes exist, Reed emphasizes its smaller lab and conference sections.


Reed has no fraternities, sororities, or NCAA sports teams, although physical education classes (which range from kayaking to juggling) are required for graduation. Reed also has several intercollegiate athletic teams, most notably the Rugby, Fencing, and Ultimate Frisbee teams. The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Sea Kayaking at Wilsons Promontory in Victoria, Australia Kayaking is the use of a kayak for moving across water. ... Juggling is a form of skillful, often artful, object manipulation. ...


Reed operates under an Honor Principle.[7] First introduced as an agreement to promote ethical academic behavior, with the explicit end of relieving the faculty of the burden of policing student behavior, the Honor Principle was extended to cover all aspects of student life. There are few codified rules governing behavior (thus distinguishing Reed from other institutions with an Honor Code); the onus is on students individually and as a community to define which behaviors are acceptable and which are not. An honor system or honesty system is a philosophical way of running a variety of endeavors based on trust, honor, and honesty. ...

What this means is that a community governed by an honor principle is a community not of rules and procedures but of virtue. As such, it is a community of unfreedom. There is no protected realm; one can never take refuge in, seek protection from, or hide behind a doctrine of rights. Anything that anyone does is, in principle, subject to evaluation. Was it a virtuous thing to do? was it consistent with notions of honorableness? does it contribute to the well-being of the community? is it the kind of behavior that we value and wish to encourage? In the absence of rights, behavior that we do not wish to value and do not wish to encourage has absolutely no protection. –Peter J. Steinberger, Dean of the Faculty[8]

"Honor Cases" (or discrete cases of grievance) are adjudicated by the "J-Board" (or Judicial Board), which consists of nine full-time students. There is also an "Honor Council" which consists of students, faculty, and staff, designed to educate the community and mediate conflict between individuals. A grievance is a formal statement of complaint, generally against an authority figure. ...


Academic program

Reed categorizes its academic program into five Divisions and the Humanities program. Overall, Reed offers five Humanities courses, twenty-six department majors, twelve interdisciplinary majors, six dual-degree programs with other colleges and universities, and programs for pre-medical and pre-veterinary students. The humanities are those academic disciplines which study the human condition using methods that are largely analytic, critical, or speculative, as distinguished from the mainly empirical approaches of the natural and social sciences. ...


Divisions

The Reed College campus
The Reed College campus
  • Division of Arts: includes the Art (Art History and Studio Art), Dance, Music, and Theatre Departments;
  • Division of History and Social Sciences: includes the History, Anthropology, Economics, Political Science, and Sociology Departments, as well as the International and Comparative Policy Studies Program;
  • Division of Literature and Languages: includes the Classics, Chinese, English, French, German, Russian, and Spanish Departments, as well as the Creative Writing and General Literature Programs;
  • Division of Mathematics and Natural Sciences: includes the Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry, and Physics Departments, and
  • Division of Philosophy, Religion, Psychology, and Linguistics: includes the Psychology, Philosophy, Religion, and Linguistics Departments.

Image File history File linksMetadata Reedcollege. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Reedcollege. ...

Humanities program

Reed President Richard Scholz in 1922 called the educational program as a whole "an honest effort to disregard old historic rivalries and hostilities between the sciences and the arts, between professional and cultural subjects, and, ... the formal chronological cleavage between the graduate and the undergraduate attitude of mind."[9] The Humanities program, which came into being in 1943 (as the union of two year-long courses, one in "world" literature, the other in "world" history) is one manifestation of this effort. The most recent change to the program was the addition of a course in Chinese Civilization in 1995.


Reed's Humanities program includes the mandatory freshman course Introduction to Western Humanities covering ancient Greek and Roman literature, history, art, religion, and philosophy. Sophomores may take Early Modern Europe covering Renaissance thought and literature; Modern Humanities covering the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, and Modernism, and/or Foundations of Chinese Civilization. There is also a Humanities Senior Symposium. Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... The Renaissance (French for rebirth, or Rinascimento in Italian), was a cultural movement in Italy (and in Europe in general) that began in the late Middle Ages, and spanned roughly the 14th through the 17th century. ... The Age of Enlightenment (French: ; German: ) was an eighteenth century movement in European and American philosophy, or the longer period including the Age of Reason. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... The Industrial Revolution was a major shift of technological, socioeconomic, and cultural conditions that occurred in the late 18th century and early 19th century in some Western countries. ... For Christian theological modernism, see Liberal Christianity and Modernism (Roman Catholicism). ...


Interdisciplinary and dual-degree programs

Reed also offers interdisciplinary programs in American studies, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Chemistry/Physics, Classics/Religion, Dance/Theatre, History/Literature, International and Comparative Policy Studies (ICPS), Literature/Theatre, Mathematics/Economics, and Mathematics/Physics.


Reed offers dual-degree programs in Applied Physics (with OHSU/OGI), Computer Science (with University of Washington), Engineering (with Caltech and others), Environmental Science (with Duke University), and Fine Art (with the Pacific Northwest College of Art). A double degree, sometimes called a conjoint degree, joint, ordual degree, programme normally involves a student working for two university degrees in parallel. ... Oregon Health and Science University is the present-day (2003) name for a university that can trace its roots back to the 1860s. ... In June 2001, Oregon Graduate Institute became the OGI School of Science and Engineering within Oregon Health and Science University. ... The University of Washington, founded in 1861, is a public research university in Seattle, Washington. ... California Institute of Technology The California Institute of Technology (commonly known as Caltech) is a private, coeducational university located in Pasadena, California, in the United States. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, USA. Founded by Methodists and Quakers in the present-day town of Trinity in 1838, the school moved to Durham in 1892. ... The Pacific Northwest College of Art is a college in Portland, Oregon, United States that grants Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees in painting, communication design, illustration, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and intermedia, a mentor-based MFA in Visual Studies, and also provides continuing education in the arts to the local community. ...


Admissions and student demographics

Eliot Hall
Eliot Hall

Until the late 1990s, Reed accepted a larger percentage of total applicants than peer institutions — 76% in 1996. This led to high levels of attrition (drop-outs) during that period. Since then the number of applicants for freshman admission has increased sharply — by 76% between 2001/2002 and 2005/2006.[10] Since 2002, Reed's attrition rate has moved toward that of peer institutions, and the five-year graduation rate (72% for the 2000/2001 entering class) now exceeds the national average. The class of 2011's average combined Math and Verbal SAT scores were 1410 and high school GPA was 4.024, with 33.1% of applicants accepted.[11] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (948x1404, 1375 KB) Summary Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (948x1404, 1375 KB) Summary Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... For other uses, see SAT (disambiguation). ... The initials GPA can refer, among other things, to Grade Point Average; see Grade (education) Guinness Peat Aviation General Practice Australia, a private, independent medical accreditation society Greyhound Pets of America This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same...


As of 2007, Reed has had a significant increase in the number of applicants, as the applicant pool for the class of 2011 reached an all-time high of 3,363 students with 1,112 admitted for the 330 available freshman spaces. Referring to this trend, Paul Marthers, the Dean of Admission, said: "This represents a 94 percent increase in applicants since 2001." The admission department admitted 33.1 percent of applicants who applied in 2007, which is a decrease from the 40 percent admittance rate for last year's applicants.


Reed's student body is 45% male and 55% female, and includes 22% minority students: 3% self-report as Black (including African-American, African, and Afro-Caribbean); 6% as Hispanic; 9% as Asian, 2% Native American, and 2% Mixed/Other.[12] Minority numbers include some of the 7% international citizens (13% of freshmen did not self-report their ethnicity). In the class of 2010, 38% of students are from the U.S. West Coast (California, Oregon, Washington), with the most coming from California.


In the Fall of 2006, Reed enrolled 376 incoming freshmen and 47 transfer students, its largest entering class in many years. At the same time, an unusually low number of students left after the 2005/2006 academic year, and this large entering class has placed pressure on humanities, social science, and language classes, in some cases increasing class sizes beyond what has been traditional.


Tuition and finances

The total base cost for the 2007-2008 academic year, including tuition, fees and room-and-board, is $45,880.[13] In recent years between 50% and 60% of students have received financial aid from the college.[14] In 2004 (the most recent data available), 1.4% of Reed graduates defaulted on their student loans[15] -- below the national average of 5.1%.[16]


Reed's endowment as of June 30, 2006 was approximately $400 million, below the median of about $500m for comparable schools, and well below Amherst and Swarthmore's approximately one billion dollar endowments. However, on a per-student basis, Reed's $265,000 per student is only slightly below the median. Reed's endowment contributes 22% of its operating expenses (tuition contributes 72% and the balance is from grants and annual gifts). is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Old Dorm Block and Anna Mann residences
Old Dorm Block and Anna Mann residences

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2253x761, 1111 KB) Summary Authorized for use by the Reed College Public Affairs Office - 22:53, 6 February 2006 (UTC) Received: from suede. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2253x761, 1111 KB) Summary Authorized for use by the Reed College Public Affairs Office - 22:53, 6 February 2006 (UTC) Received: from suede. ...

Reed's reputation

Rankings

In 1995 Reed College refused to participate in the U.S. News and World Report "best colleges" rankings, making it the first educational institution in the United States to refuse to participate in college rankings. According to Reed's Office of Admissions: Criticism of college and university rankings refers to various movements in Canada and the United States which have critiqued rankings of universities and liberal arts colleges. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...

Reed College has actively questioned the methodology and usefulness of college rankings ever since the magazine's best-colleges list first appeared in 1983, despite the fact that the issue ranked Reed among the top ten national liberal arts colleges. Reed's concern intensified with disclosures in 1994 by the Wall Street Journal about institutions flagrantly manipulating data in order to move up in the rankings in U.S. News and other popular college guides. This led Reed's then-president Steven Koblik to inform the editors of U.S. News that he didn't find their project credible, and that the college would not be returning any of their surveys.[17]

Rolling Stone, in its 16 October 1997 issue, argued that Reed's rankings were artificially decreased by U.S. News after they stopped sending data to U.S. News and World Report.[18] Nicholas Thompson reitered this judgment in an article in The Washington Monthly in 2000.[19] Reed has also made the same claim.[20] In discussing Reed's decision, President Colin Diver wrote in an article for the November 2005 issue of the Atlantic Monthly, "by far the most important consequence of sitting out the rankings game, however, is the freedom to pursue our own educational philosophy, not that of some newsmagazine."[21] The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with an average daily circulation of 1,800,607 (2002). ... This article is about the magazine. ... October 16 is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years). ... Year 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1997 Gregorian calendar). ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Colin Diver Colin Diver is currently the President of Reed College in Portland, Oregon. ... Look up November in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Atlantic Monthly (also known as The Atlantic) is an American literary/cultural magazine that was founded in November 1857. ...


Academic honors

Reed has produced the second-highest number of Rhodes scholars for any liberal arts college—31—as well as over fifty Fulbright Scholars, over sixty Watson Fellows, and two MacArthur ("Genius") Award winners.[22] A very high proportion of Reed graduates go on to earn Ph.D.s, particularly in the sciences, history, political science, and philosophy. Reed is third in percentage of its graduates who go on to earn Ph.D.s in all disciplines, after only Caltech and Harvey Mudd.[23] Reed is first in this percentage in biology, second in chemistry and humanities, third in history, foreign languages, and political science, fourth in the physical sciences, math and computer science, and science and engineering, fifth in physics and social sciences, sixth in anthropology, seventh in area and ethnic studies and linguistics, and eighth in English literature and the medical sciences. Rhodes House in Oxford, designed by Sir Herbert Baker. ... Fulbright redirects here. ... The Thomas J. Watson Fellowship is a grant that enables graduating seniors to pursue a year of independent study outside the United States. ... The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation is a private, independent grantmaking institution. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... HIStory - Past, Present and Future, Book I is a double-disc album (one half greatest hits, one half studio album) by American musician Michael Jackson released in June of 1995 by the Epic Records division of Sony BMG. The first disc, (HIStory Begins) contains fifteen hit singles from the past... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... The philosopher Socrates about to take poison hemlock as ordered by the court. ... California Institute of Technology The California Institute of Technology (commonly known as Caltech) is a private, coeducational university located in Pasadena, California, in the United States. ... Harvey Mudd College is a highly selective, private college of science, engineering and mathematics, located in Claremont, California. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Chemistry - the study of interactions of chemical substances with one another and energy based on the structure of atoms, molecules and other kinds of aggregrates Chemistry (from Egyptian kÄ“me (chem), meaning earth[1]) is the science concerned with the reactions, transformations and aggregations of matter, as well as accompanying... The humanities are those academic disciplines which study the human condition using methods that are largely analytic, critical, or speculative, as distinguished from the mainly empirical approaches of the natural and social sciences. ... HIStory - Past, Present and Future, Book I is a double-disc album (one half greatest hits, one half studio album) by American musician Michael Jackson released in June of 1995 by the Epic Records division of Sony BMG. The first disc, (HIStory Begins) contains fifteen hit singles from the past... A foreign language is a language not spoken by the indigenous people of a certain place: for example, English is a foreign language in Japan. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... Physical science is the branch of science including chemistry and physics, usually contrasted with the social sciences and sometimes including and sometimes contrasted with natural or biological science. ... Incorrect shortening of Mathematics. ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... Engineering is the design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The social sciences are a group of academic disciplines that study human aspects of the world. ... Anthropology (from Greek: ἀνθρωπος, anthropos, human being; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the study of humanity. ... This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... Linguistics is the scientific study of language, which can be theoretical or applied. ... The term English literature refers to literature written in the English language, including literature composed in English by writers not necessarily from England; Joseph Conrad was Polish, Robert Burns was Scottish, James Joyce was Irish, Dylan Thomas was Welsh, Edgar Allan Poe was American, Salman Rushdie is Indian, V.S... Health Sciences are the group of disciplines of applied science dealing with human and animal health. ...


Reed's debating team, which had existed for only two years at the time, was awarded the first place sweepstakes trophy for Division Two schools at the final tournament of the Northwest Forensics Conference in February 2004.


Loren Pope, former education editor for The New York Times, called Reed "the most intellectual college in the country."[24] The Princeton Review, in its publication "The Best 361 Colleges," ranked Reed number one in the category "Best Overall Academic Experience For Undergraduates". It also ranked number one in the "Students Never Stop Studying" category and in the category of "Students Ignore God on a Regular Basis". In August 2006, Newsweek magazine named Reed as one of twenty-five "New Ivies,"[25] listing it among "the nation's elite colleges". Loren Pope is a nationally renown college advisor with several national publicatons on colleges and universities in the United States. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ...


Political

Reed has a reputation for being politically left-wing.[26] Whether in fact Reed's student body is more leftist than similar colleges is difficult to determine, but Reed's academic tradition of open and passionate debate often spills into the off-campus political arena and, combined with the freewheeling social environment, often leads to the appearance of radical leftism.

Old Dorm Block
Old Dorm Block

During the McCarthy era of the 1950s, then-President Duncan Ballantine fired Marxist philosopher Stanley Moore, a tenured professor, for his failure to cooperate with the HUAC investigation.[27][28] According to an article in the college's alumni magazine, "because of the decisive support expressed by Reed's faculty, students, and alumni for the three besieged teachers and for the principle of academic freedom, Reed College's experience with McCarthyism stands apart from that of most other American colleges and universities. Elsewhere in the academic world both tenured and untenured professors with alleged or admitted communist party ties were fired with relatively little fuss or protest. At Reed, however, opposition to the political interrogations of the teachers was so strong that some believed the campus was in danger of closure."[29] A statement of "regret" by the Reed administration and Board of Trustees was published in 1981, formally revising the judgment of the 1954 trustees. In 1993, then-President Steve Koblik invited Moore to visit the College, and in 1995 the last surviving member of the Board that fired Moore expressed his regret and apologized to him.[30] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1704x2272, 2675 KB) Summary Authorized for use by the Reed College Public Affairs Office - 22:53, 6 February 2006 (UTC) Received: from suede. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1704x2272, 2675 KB) Summary Authorized for use by the Reed College Public Affairs Office - 22:53, 6 February 2006 (UTC) Received: from suede. ... A 1947 comic book published by the Catechetical Guild Educational Society warning of the dangers of a Communist takeover. ... The House Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC) was an investigating committee of the United States House of Representatives. ...


Drug use

Since the 1960s, Reed has had a reputation for tolerating open drug use among its students,[31] and the 1998 Princeton Review listed Reed as the number-three school in the "reefer madness" category.[32] The Yale Daily News Insider's Guide to Colleges also notes an impression among students of institutional permissiveness: "according to students, the school does not bust students for drug or alcohol use unless they cause harm or embarrassment to another student". (2006 edition, p. 771). A new Drug and Alcohol Policy Enforcement was introduced in Fall of 2005. The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in... A front page of the Yale Daily News. ...


The Reed Psychology Department has conducted an ongoing survey since 1999 regarding both drug use and perceptions of drug use on the Reed campus.[33] The study found that the perceived level of drug use was exaggerated: in particular, the perceived use of marijuana at Reed is once a week while the actual reported use is 50% once a month or more often. Meanwhile, on average only 21% of the overall college student population report having used the drug within the last month.[34]


Campus

A. E. Doyle's 1920 Master Plan
A. E. Doyle's 1920 Master Plan

The Reed College campus was established on a southeast Portland tract of land known in 1910 as Crystal Springs Farm, a part of the Ladd Estate, formed in the 1870s from original land claims. The college's grounds include 98.52 contiguous acres, including a wooded wetland known as Reed canyon (see below). Image File history File links AEDoyle-Master-Plan-1920. ... Image File history File links AEDoyle-Master-Plan-1920. ... Nickname: Location in Multnomah County and the state of Oregon Coordinates: , Country United States State Oregon County Multnomah County Incorporated February 8, 1851 Government  - Mayor Tom Potter Area  - City 376. ...


Portland architect Albert E. Doyle developed a plan modeled on Oxford University's St. John's College that was never implemented in full. The original campus buildings (including the Library, the Old Dorm Block, and what is now the primary administration building, Eliot Hall) are brick Tudor Gothic buildings in a style similar to Ivy League campuses. In contrast, the science section of campus, including the physics, biology, and psychology (originally chemistry) buildings, were designed in the Modernist style. The Psychology Building, completed in 1949, was designed by famed Modernist architect Pietro Belluschi at the same time as his celebrated Equitable Building in downtown Portland. The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Kings College Chapel outside view The Tudor style in English architecture is the final development of medieval architecture during the Tudor period (1485–1603) and even beyond, for conservative college patrons. ... For the record label, see Ivy League Records. ... Modern architecture, not to be confused with contemporary architecture, is a term given to a number of building styles with similar characteristics, primarily the simplification of form and the elimination of ornament. ... Pietro Belluschi (August 18, 1899 - February 14, 1994) was an architect, a leader of the Modern Architecture movement, and responsible for the design of over one thousand buildings. ... The Equitable Building can refer to one of several notable buildings: The Equitable Building in Manhattan, built in 1915, which prompted the adoption of modern height and setback controls. ...


The campus and buildings have undergone several phases of growth, and there are now twenty-one academic and administrative buildings and eighteen residence halls. Since 2004, Reed's campus has expanded to include adjacent properties beyond its historic boundaries, such as the Birchwood Apartments complex and former medical administrative offices on either side of SE 28th Avenue, and the Parker House, across SE Woodstock from Prexy. At the same time the Willard House (donated to Reed in 1964), across from the college's main entrance at SE Woodstock and SE Reed College Place, was converted from faculty housing to administrative use. Most recently, Reed announced on July 13, 2007, that it had purchased the Rivelli farm, a 1.5-acre tract of land south of the Garden House and west of Botsford Drive, at the southwest edge of campus.


Reed also owns more than a dozen homes adjacent to the campus that are used to house new and visiting faculty.


Residence halls

The Old Dorm Block
The Old Dorm Block

Reed houses about 800 students in twelve residence halls on campus and several college-owned houses and apartment buildings on or adjacent to campus. Residence halls on campus range from the traditional (the Gothic Old Dorm Block, referred to as "ODB") to the eclectic Anna Mann, a Tudor-style cottage built in the 1920s originally used as a women's hall[35]), language houses (Spanish, Russian, French, German, and Chinese), "temporary" housing, built in the 1960s (Cross Canyon - Chittick, Woodbridge, McKinley, Griffin), to more recently built dorms (Bragdon, Naito, Sullivan). There are also theme residence halls including everything from substance-free living to a cat residence hall. The college's least-loved complex (as measured by applications to the College's housing lottery), MacNaughton and Foster-Scholz, is known on campus as "Asylum Block" because of its post-Word War II modernist architecture and interior spaces dominated by long, straight corridors lined with identical doors, said by students to resemble that of an insane asylum[2]. Until 2006, it was thought that these residence halls had been designed by architect Pietro Belluschi. MacNaughton houses Reed's Co-op floor, a 16-member cooperative living space. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2399x1129, 1361 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Reed College Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2399x1129, 1361 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Reed College Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... A psychiatric hospital (also called, at various places and times, mental hospital or mental ward), is a hospital specialising in the treatment of persons with mental illness. ... Pietro Belluschi (August 18, 1899 - February 14, 1994) was an architect, a leader of the Modern Architecture movement, and responsible for the design of over one thousand buildings. ...


Under the 10-year Campus Master Plan adopted in 2006, Foster-Scholz is scheduled to be demolished and replaced, and MacNaughton to be remodeled.[36] Reed also plans to raise the number of students it can house on campus to 900 or 950, while maintaining the overall student body at approximately its current size. According to the new master plan, "The College's goal is to provide housing on or adjacent to the campus that accommodates 75% of the [full-time equivalent] student population. At present, the College provides on-campus housing for 838 students."[36] At the 2006–2007 enrollment level of about 1400 students, meeting the master plan’s goal would require in all about 1050 spaces on campus — approximately 200 more spaces than the College currently provides.


In Spring 2007, the College broke ground for the construction of a new quadrangle with four new residence halls on the northwest side of the campus, scheduled for completion by Fall 2008. A new Spanish House residence is slated to be completed in early 2009. Together, the five new residences will add 142 beds.[37] This will advance the college substantially toward its goal of housing 75% of students on campus.


Reed Canyon

The Blue Bridge
The Blue Bridge

The Reed College Canyon, a natural area and national wildlife preserve, bisects the campus, separating the academic buildings from many of the residence halls (the so called cross-canyon halls). The canyon is filled by Crystal Creek Springs, a natural spring that drains into Johnson Creek.[38] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2200x1467, 954 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Reed College Blue Bridge (Oregon) ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2200x1467, 954 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Reed College Blue Bridge (Oregon) ... A natural spring on Mackinac Island in Michigan. ... Johnson Creek is a tributary of the Willamette River in the Portland metropolitan area, in the U.S. state of Oregon. ...


Canyon Day, a tradition spanning more than ninety years, is held once a semester. On Canyon Day students and Reed neighbors join canyon crew workers to spend a day helping with restoration efforts.[3]


A landmark of the campus, the Blue Bridge, spans the canyon. It appears on almost every viewbook that the college circulates. This bridge replaced the unique cantilevered bridge that served in that spot between 1959 and 1991, which "featured stressed plywood girders — the first time this construction had been used on a span of this size: a straight bridge 132 feet long and 15 feet high. It attracted great architectural interest during its lifetime."[39] The Blue Bridge is a curved pedestrian and bicycle bridge connecting the north and south halves of the Reed College campus. ...


A new pedestrian and bicycle bridge spanning the canyon is also being built and will open by Fall 2008. This bridge will be 370 feet long, about a third longer than the Blue Bridge, and "will connect the new north campus quad to Gray Campus Center, the student union, the library, and academic buildings on the south side of campus."[40]


Food services

The cafeteria, known simply as "Commons", has a reputation for ecologically sustainable food services. Due to the nature of the student body, vegan and vegetarian dishes feature heavily on the menu. It is currently the only cafeteria on the small campus. Off-campus students and others who choose not to purchase a meal plan are seen at mealtimes scrounging for free food from on-campus students and their leftovers, a practice that has persisted (despite periodic complaints) for decades. Hens kept in cramped conditions — the avoidance of animal suffering is the primary motivation of people who become vegans A vegan is a person who avoids the ingestion or use of animal products. ...


The Reed College Co-op is a theme residence hall located in the Garden House, after being located for many years on first floor of the MacNaughton building. It is the only campus residence that is independent of the school's board plan. This floor usually houses twelve to sixteen students who purchase and prepare food together for all meals, sharing chores and conducting weekly, consensus-based meetings. It is a close community valuing sustainability, organic food, consensus-based decisions, self-government, music, and plants.


The Paradox ("Est. in the 80s") is a cooperative student-run coffee shop located on campus. In 2003 a second cafe, dubbed the "Paradox Lost" (an allusion to John Milton's Paradise Lost), opened at the southern end of the biology building, in the space commonly called the "Bio Fishbowl." The new north-campus dorms, opening in Fall 2008, will include yet another small cafe, thereby providing three coffee shops within a 100-acre campus. For other persons named John Milton, see John Milton (disambiguation). ... Title page of the first edition (1667) Paradise Lost is an epic poem in blank verse by the 17th-century English poet John Milton. ...


Off-campus housing

Reed also has off-campus housing. Many houses in the Woodstock and Eastmoreland Portland neighborhoods are traditionally rented to Reed students. Woodstock is a neighborhood in Eastmoreland, Portland, Oregon. ... Eastmoreland, Portland, Oregon is an up-market neighborhood in inner south-east Portland, Oregon, located south of Reed College. ...


Icons and student life

The official mascot of Reed is the griffin (pictured below). In mythology, the griffin often pulled the chariot of the sun, making the griffin the symbolic "protector of knowledge and bane of ignorance". The griffin was featured on the coat-of-arms of founder Simeon Reed and is now on the official seal of Reed College. An unusually naturalistic depiction of a griffin by Sir John Tenniel for Lewis Carroll’s Alices Adventures in Wonderland. ...


The official school color of Reed is called "Richmond rose", possibly in part because Portland is the "City of Roses". Over the years, institutional memory of this fact has faded and the color appearing on the school's publications and merchandise has darkened to a shade of maroon, which many people now consider the de facto school color.


School song

The school song, "Fair Reed," is sung to the tune of the 1912 popular song "Believe Me, If All Those Endearing Young Charms." It was composed by former president William Trufant Foster shortly after Reed's founding, and is rarely heard today.[41] William Trufant Foster (Jan. ...


Unofficial mottos and folklore

An unofficial motto of Reed is "Communism, Atheism, Free Love", and can be found in the Reed College Bookstore on sweaters, t-shirts, etc. The motto purportedly was a comment of some outside person, known in the 1950s and possibly made much earlier. An alternative motto appeared on shirts in the late 1980s as "Capitalism, Avarism, and Free Beer", but never overtook the original in popularity. A small group of students has recently been petitioning the bookstore to update the shirts' text to read, "Socialism, Agnosticism, Safe Sex", a comment on the increasingly moderate (though still quite radical) predominating values of the student body. Additionally, the punning "Reed: You Might Learn Something" was a popular slogan in the mid-1980s.
A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ...

Faux Reed Seal

Another popular characterization was from a letter to the local newspaper, in which Reed students were said to resemble "unmade beds" which provided a subject for creating special Reed occasion costumes. Image File history File links ReedCollege-FauxSeal-bw. ... Image File history File links ReedCollege-FauxSeal-bw. ...


Every year's Reed College Student Handbook (a manual on student life written by students, not to be confused with the College Handbook, which is written by college officials) contains a test called the "Reed College Immorality Quotient" that tests an individual's immorality on topics such as sex, theft, and drug use. Morality is a complex of principles based on cultural, religious, and philosophical concepts and beliefs, by which an individual determines whether his or her actions are right or wrong. ... It has been suggested that Duration of sexual intercourse be merged into this article or section. ... Everyday instance of theft: the bike which fits on this wheel has disappeared. ... Recreational drug use is the use of psychoactive drugs for recreational rather than medical or spiritual purposes, although the distinction is not always clear. ...


One of the unofficial symbols of Reed is the Doyle Owl, a roughly 280 pound (127 kg) concrete statue that has been continuously stolen and re-stolen since 1913. The on-campus folklore of events surrounding the Doyle Owl is sufficiently large that, in 1983, a senior thesis was written on the topic of the Owl's oral history. The original Doyle Owl was almost certainly destroyed many years ago, but a number of replicas (of varying degrees of quality) remain in circulation, contributing to the frequency of its appearance. The Doyle Owl is considered to be an unofficial mascot of Reed College. ... Oral history is an account of something passed down by word of mouth from one generation to another. ...


Well-known on-campus myths claim there is an intact MG under the concrete foundation of the college library, an underground primate lab working exclusively with snow monkeys under the Psychology building (the legend states that the presence of this lab was discovered when a snow monkey escaped into the Canyon and necessitated the closing of the facility), and a four-story lab/habitation arcology under the Physics building. There are many other such stories, often referred to as "Reed legends". This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Binomial name Macaca fuscata Blyth, 1875 The Japanese Macaque (Macaca fuscata), also known as the Snow Monkey, is a terrestrial Old World monkey species native to northern Japan, although an introduced free-ranging population has been living near Laredo, Texas since 1972. ... The Try2004 Hyperstructure or Megacity as featured on the Discovery Channels Extreme Engineering programs. ...


Paideia

During the week before the beginning of second-semester classes, the campus undergoes Paideia (drawn from the Greek). This "festival of learning" takes the form of a week (although originally a whole month) of classes and seminars put on by anyone who wishes to teach, including students, professors, staff members, and outside educators invited on-campus by members of the Reed Community. Many such classes are explicitly silly (one long-running tradition is to hold an "Underwater Basket Weaving" class), while others are trivially educational (such as "Giant Concrete Gnome Construction", a class that, incidental to building monolithic gnomes, includes some content relating to the construction of pre-Christian monoliths). Genuine classes (such as martial arts seminars and mini-classes on obscure academic topics), tournaments, and film festivals round out the "class" list, which is different every year. The objective of Paideia is not only to learn new (possibly non-useful) things, but to turn the tables on students and encourage them to teach. To the ancient Greeks, Paideia (παιδεία) was the process of educating man into his true form, the real and genuine human nature. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... A monolith is a geological or technological feature such as a mountain, consisting of a single massive stone or rock. ... Hawaiian State Grappling Championships. ...


In his 2005 Stanford commencement lecture, Apple Computer founder and Reed alumnus Steve Jobs credited a Reed calligraphy class for his focus on choosing quality typefaces for the Macintosh.[42] While the full calligraphy course is no longer taught at Reed, Paideia usually features a short course on the subject. Apple Inc. ... Steven Paul Jobs (born February 24, 1955) is the co-founder and CEO of Apple and was the CEO of Pixar until its acquisition by Disney. ... Contemporary Calligraphy Calligraphy (from Greek kallos beauty + graphẽ writing) is the art of beautiful writing (Mediavilla 1996: 17). ... The first Macintosh computer, introduced in 1984, upgraded to a 512K Fat Mac. The Macintosh or Mac, is a line of personal computers designed, developed, manufactured, and marketed by Apple Computer. ...


Renn Fayre

A student-made katamari at the 2006 Renn Fayre
A student-made katamari at the 2006 Renn Fayre

Renn Fayre is an annual three-day celebration at Reed with a different theme each year. Born in the 1960s as an actual renaissance fair, it has long since lost all connection to anachronism and the Renaissance, although its name has persisted. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 1519 KB) Summary Taken by uploader Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 1519 KB) Summary Taken by uploader Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Katamari Damacy , Katamari Damashii) is a third-person puzzle-action video game published and developed by Namco for the PlayStation 2 video game console. ... Entertainers at the Golden Gate Renaissance Festival 2005. ... The Renaissance (French for rebirth, or Rinascimento in Italian), was a cultural movement in Italy (and in Europe in general) that began in the late Middle Ages, and spanned roughly the 14th through the 17th century. ...


Renn Fayre commences with the Thesis Parade, where graduating seniors make a symbolic march to deliver their theses to the registrar. Students, faculty, and staff gather at the entrance to the library where chaos, champagne, and fireworks get the party started. The parade commences when the senior class moves through the library and out through what was the library's original front entrance (now an emergency exit).


The Fayre runs from Friday to Sunday, beginning on the last day of classes for the spring semester. The week after Renn Fayre is Reading Week, in which no classes are held; final examinations are held in the following week.


Renn Fayre is often called the metaphorical explosion of the student body after a year of intense pressure. Traditions include bizarre art installations, insect-eating contests, occasional motorized couches, a naked Slip 'n Slide, naked people painting themselves blue (a vague tribute to the ancient Picts), a beer garden, the Glo Opera (performed at night by actors in lightstick-covered suits) and a general sense of mayhem. Serious injuries are rare, thanks in part to the presence of vigilant student volunteers (known as "Karma Patrol" and "Border Patrol", who ensure guest wellness and the exclusion of unauthorized visitors, respectively) and the non-profit White Bird Clinic. The Slip N Slide is a toy manufactured by Wham-O for use on lawns in the summer. ... A replica of the Hilton of Cadboll Stone. ... A typical beer garden in Munich A beer garden is an open-air area where alcohol is legally served. ... Three types of lightsticks in several colours A lightstick, also called a glowstick, is a transparent plastic tube which contains chemical fluids held apart in two compartments. ...


Student participation is almost unanimous; faculty and staff also attend some of the festivities. Alumni and authorized guests may also participate.


Student organizations

Student body funds are distributed semiannually to groups that place among the top 40 organizations in the semester funding poll (in Reed-speak, "top 40ed"). Most organizations are highly informal, although some that partner with outside groups such as Oxfam or Planned Parenthood are more structured. The Reed archive of comic books and graphic novels, the MLLL (Comic Book Reading Room) has existed for at least forty years, and Beer Nation, the student group that organizes and manages various beer gardens throughout the year and during Renn Fayre, has existed for many years. Some organizations, such as the Motorized Couch Collective – dedicated to installing motors and wheels into furniture – have become more Reed myth than reality in recent years.[43] Oxfam International logo Oxfam International is a confederation of 13 organizations working together with over 3000 partners in more than 100 countries to find lasting solutions to poverty and injustice. ... Planned Parenthoods logo Planned Parenthood is the collective name of organizations worldwide who are members of the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF). ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Trade paperback of Will Eisners A Contract with God (1978), often mistakenly cited as the first graphic novel. ... A typical beer garden in Munich A beer garden is an open-air area where alcohol is legally served. ... Reed College is a liberal arts college with about 1300 students as of 2004, located in Portland, Oregon in the quiet Eastmoreland neighborhood. ...


Reed has ample recreational facilities on campus,[44] a ski cabin on Mount Hood,[45] recreational clubs such as the Outing Club,[46] and Club Sports (with college-paid coaches), including ultimate frisbee, co-ed soccer, rugby, basketball, and squash.[47]


Notable alumni

Reed considers any student who attended a year or more at the college to be an alumnus or alumna, as applicable. Reed's notable alumni include:


Alumni

Mir Tamim Ansary is an afghan-american author and activist. ... Jon Appleton (born Jon Howard Appleton in Hollywood, California, 1939) is a composer of electronic, electro-acoustic, and acoustic music. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, in the United States. ... Leland Stanford Junior University, commonly known as Stanford University (or simply Stanford), is a private university located approximately 37 miles (60 kilometers) southeast of San Francisco and approximately 20 miles northwest of San José in Stanford, California. ... Doon Arbus, (b. ... Mary Barnard (1909-2001) is known for her clear translations of the works of Sappho. ... James Beard (May 5, 1903–January 21, 1985) was an American chef and food writer. ... Daryl J. Bem is a noted social psychologist at Cornell University, USA, and the originator of the self-perception theory of attitude change. ... Cornell University is a university located in Ithaca, New York, USA. Its two medical campuses are in New York City and Education City, Qatar. ... Don Berry can refer to: Don Berry, the artist and the author of the Trask novels. Don Berry, the golfer. ... Lee Blessing (born October 4, 1949) is an American playwright. ... Arlene Blum is an American mountaineer. ... Alafair Burke is a writer and Court TV commentator. ... View across garden, in new MoMA building by Yoshio Taniguchi. ... Ryland Ry Peter Cooder (born 15 March 1947, in Los Angeles, California) is an American guitarist, singer and composer, known for his slide guitar work, his interest in the American roots music and, more recently, for his collaborations with traditional musicians from many countries. ... The University of California, Berkeley (also known as Cal, UC Berkeley, UCB, or simply Berkeley) is a prestigious, public, coeducational university situated in the foothills of Berkeley, California to the east of San Francisco Bay, overlooking the Golden Gate and its bridge. ... Richard Danzig was the 71st Secretary of the United States Navy, serving under President Bill Clinton. ... Mike Davis, 1999 (Photo by Anne Fishbein) Mike Davis is an American social commentator, urban theorist, and sociographer. ... Katherine Dunn is a novelist, journalist, book reviewer, and poet from Portland, Oregon. ... David Eddings (born July 7, 1931) is an American author who has written several best-selling series of epic fantasy novels. ... Barbara Ehrenreich (born August 26, 1941, in Butte, Montana) is a prominent American writer, columnist, feminist, socialist and political activist. ... Janet Fitch at the book signing tent of the Texas Book Festival Janet Fitch is most famously known as the author of the Oprahs Book Club novel White Oleander, which became a film in 2002. ... White Oleander is a 2002 motion picture that tells a story of a mother and her daughter and their relationship. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Juliet Glass (born 1971) is a writer and food critic, currently residing in Minneapolis. ... Max Gordon (b. ... The Village Vanguard is a famous jazz club, located at 178 Seventh Avenue (just below W 11th St. ... Dr. Demento (born April 2, 1941 in Minneapolis, Minnesota) is the stage name of Barret Eugene Hansen [1], who has made a successful career as a radio disc jockey specializing in novelty songs and pop music parodies. ... Peter Dobkin Hall, historian, author, and educator, is Hauser Lecturer on Nonprofit Organizations at the Kennedy School of Government, and Lecturer in the Department of History, Harvard University <http://www. ... John F. Kennedy School of Government The John F. Kennedy School of Government is a public policy school and one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... Steven Paul Jobs (born February 24, 1955) is the co-founder and CEO of Apple and was the CEO of Pixar until its acquisition by Disney. ... Apple Inc. ... Dale W. Jorgenson is the Samuel W. Morris University Professor at Harvard University (BA, economics Reed College in Portland, Oregon, in 1955 and a PhD in economics from Harvard in 1959). ... Michael E. Levine is a Distinguished Research Scholar at the New York University School of Law. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Yale School of Management (also known as Yale SOM) is the graduate business school of Yale University and is located on Hillhouse Avenue in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. Yale SOM offers M.B.A. and Ph. ... Jessica Litman is a widely known expert on copyright law and author of Digital Copyright (2001), which traces the history of lobbying that led to the passage of the DMCA. She is currently Professor of Law at the University of Michigan Law School, after having been professor of law at... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, U-M or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan, and one of the foremost universities in the United States. ... Jayne Loader is an American director and writer. ... The Atomic Café is an acclaimed documentary film created from a broad range of archival of film from the 1940s, 1950s and early 1960s - including newsreel clips, television news footage, U.S. government-produced films (including military training films), advertisements, television and radio programs. ... Steven McGeady is a former Intel executive best known as a witness in the Microsoft Antitrust Trial. ... Bronze Gate (2005) is a cor-ten steel work by Robert Morris. ... Peter Norton Peter Norton (born November 14, 1943) is an American software publisher and philanthropist. ... The Norton Utilities releases were collections of software utilities. ... Eric Overmyer is a writer and producer. ... Keith Packard is a software developer, best known for his work on the X Window System. ... GNOME 2. ... Norman Packard Norman Packard (born 1954 in Silver City, New Mexico) is a chaos theory physicist and one of the founders of the Prediction Company and ProtoLife. ... Adam L. Penenberg (born July 27, 1962) is an American investigative journalist best known for uncovering the journalistic fraud of The New Republic reporter Stephen Glass in 1998. ... New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ... Marchese di Barsento Emilio Pucci (November 20, 1914 – 1992) was an Italian fashion designer. ... Steven David Raichlen is a barbeque chef and the star of his television show, Barbeque University or BBQ U. He is the author of several barbeque cookbooks. ... Howard Rheingold at the Ars Electronica in 2004 Howard Rheingold (born July 7, 1947) is a leading thinker and writer on the cultural, social and political implications of modern communications media such as the Internet, mobile telephony and virtual communities (a term he is credited with inventing). ... Lawrence Rinder is an art historian and curator at the California College of the Arts. ... 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Fictional alumni

The following is a listing of fictional characters from the HBO series, The Sopranos that are friends or family of the Sopranos. ... Information Gender Female Age 25 Occupation Student Family Tony Soprano (father) Carmela Soprano (mother) Anthony Soprano, Jr. ... The Sopranos is an American television drama series created by David Chase and originally broadcast on the HBO network. ... Judy Blume (born February 12, 1938) is a popular American author. ... Summer Sisters (ISBN 0385324057) is a 1998 novel by Judy Blume. ...

References

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  2. ^ Standard-Setting on Admissions Tests in Higher Education. National Assessment Governing Board.
  3. ^ "Facilities and Grounds", Reed College Web site
  4. ^ Clark, Burton (1964). The Distinctive College: Antioch, Reed, Swarthmore. ISBN 1-56000-592-0. 
  5. ^ Reed Research Reactor. Reed College. Retrieved on 2007-03-27.
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  7. ^ Living with the honor principle. Reed College.
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  9. ^ Scholz, Richard F., "Remarks to the Association of American Colleges", 1922.
  10. ^ Reed College receives record 3,051 applications. Reed College News Center (February 24, 2006).
  11. ^ Reed College (April 12, 2007). Reed College admits 1,112 Students to Class of 2011 from a Record-Breaking Applicant Pool. Press release. Retrieved on 2007-04-22.
  12. ^ Facts about Reed. Reed College Institutional Research. Retrieved on 2007-03-21.
  13. ^ 2007-08 Tuition & Fees. Reed College. Retrieved on 2007-04-11.
  14. ^ This cost does not include travel to and from college and home, books and supplies, and miscellaneous expenses.
  15. ^ Official Cohort Default Rate. Retrieved on 2007-04-11.
  16. ^ Cohort Default Rates for Schools. U.S. Department of Education. Retrieved on 2007-04-11.
  17. ^ College Rankings. Reed College Admission Office.
  18. ^ Watson, Harriet (November, 1997). U.S. News and World Report hat trick. Reed College.
  19. ^ Nicholas Thompson, "Playing With Numbers How U.S. News Mismeasures Higher Education and What We Can Do About It," Washington Monthly (September 2000).
  20. ^ College Rankings. Reed College Admission Office.
  21. ^ Diver, Colin (November, 2005). Is There Life After Rankings?. The Atlantic Monthly.
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  23. ^ Reed College PhD Productivity. Reed College Institutional Research.
  24. ^ Pope, Loren (2006). Colleges That Change Lives. Penguin Books, pp. 354. ISBN 0-14-303736-6. 
  25. ^ America's 25 New Elite 'Ivies' - Kaplan College Guide MSNBC. Newsweek.
  26. ^ Top 10 Most Liberal Colleges. MSN Encarta. Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  27. ^ Schrecker, Ellen (October 7, 1999). Political Tests for Professors: Academic Freedom during the McCarthy Years. The University Loyalty Oath. Retrieved on 2006-04-09.
  28. ^ History of Washington State and the Pacific Northwest. Center for the Study of the Pacific Northwest, University of Washington.
  29. ^ Harmon, Rick. "In the eye of the storm", Reed Magazine, August , 1997. Retrieved on 2007-02-07. 
  30. ^ Munk, Michael. "Oregon Tests Academic Freedom in (Cold) Wartime: The Reed College Trustees versus Stanley Moore", The Oregon Historical Quarterly, 1996. 
  31. ^ Rogue of the Week. Willamette Week (April 24, 2002). Link found to be inactive 14 March 2007.
  32. ^ Reed (be)rates the rankings. Reed Magazine (November, 1998).
  33. ^ Oleson, Kathy. Pluralistic Ignorance Project - Drugs & Alcohol. Reed Psychology Department.
  34. ^ Monitoring the Future - National Survey Results on Drug Use, 1975–2004 (PDF). National Institute on Drug Abuse.
  35. ^ Anna Mann was built by Reed's founding architect, A. E. Doyle in 1920. Romel Hernandez, "This New House," Reed (Spring 2007), p. 15.
  36. ^ a b Campus Facilities Master Plan (PDF). Reed College.
  37. ^ See Romel Hernandez, "This New House," cited above.
  38. ^ Jacklet, Ben (June 28, 2005). One vine at a time. Willamette Week. Retrieved on 2007-03-26.
  39. ^ Exploring Reed's Vanished Buildings. Reed Magazine (August 2005).
  40. ^ Romel Hernandez, cited earlier.
  41. ^ Reynolds, Robert. Reed College Alma Mater. Reed College.
  42. ^ Jobs, Steve (June 14, 2005). Commencement Address. Stanford Report. Retrieved on 2006-04-09.
  43. ^ Reed Student Senate, Spring 2006 Funding Poll, Reed College Quest, 2006-04-20.
  44. ^ http://web.reed.edu/sports_center/index.html
  45. ^ http://web.reed.edu/sports_center/cabin/index.html
  46. ^ http://academic.reed.edu/roc/
  47. ^ http://web.reed.edu/sports_center/sports_club_list.html
  48. ^ http://www.ced.berkeley.edu/ced/people/query.php?id=40&dept=all&title=all&first=Galen&last=Cranz&ced&berkeley
  49. ^ http://www.lisefunderburg.com/writ.html

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Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Atlantic redirects here; for the ocean, see Atlantic Ocean. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Colleges That Change Lives (Penguin, 2000) is a best-selling book by nationally renowned college advisor Loren Pope. ... 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Reed College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3650 words)
Reed College is a liberal arts college with 1350 students as of the autumn of 2005 (45% men and 55% women), located in Portland, Oregon in the Eastmoreland neighborhood.
The Reed College campus was established on a southeast Portland tract of land known in 1910 as Crystal Springs Farm, a part of the Ladd Estate, formed in the 1870s from original land claims.
The college's least-loved dorm complex (as measured by applications to the College's housing lottery), MacNaughton and Foster-Scholz, is known on campus as "Asylum Block" because of its post-WWII modernist architecture and interior spaces dominated by long, straight corridors lined with identical doors, said by students to resemble that of an insane asylum[16].
Reed College (276 words)
Reed was founded in 1911 as a co-educational institution by river trade magnate Simeon Gannett Reed[?] and rapidly gained a reputation for academic excellence.
Reed is one of the more unusual institutions of higher learning in the United States: it features a traditional liberal arts curriculum, requiring freshmen (who might insist on being called "first year students") to take an intensive introduction to ancient Greece and Rome, though it does very well in the sciences too.
Reed has produced an unusually high number of Rhodes scholars[?] for a college its size, and a very high proportion of graduates go on to earn Ph.D. 's, particularly in the sciences, history, political science, and philosophy.
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