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Encyclopedia > Redbud Woods controversy

The Redbud Woods controversy was a dispute between protesters and the administration of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York over the demolition of a patch of woodlands known as the "Redbud Woods." The area received this name because of the many Redbud trees that grew there and whose blossoms gave the woods a pink tint in the springtime. The website of Cornell University Planatations contained, on September 3, 2005, a description of the woods, and used the name Redbud Woods, so it had some official status at Cornell under this name. Demonstrators march in the street while protesting the World Bank and International Monetary Fund on April 16, 2005. ... This is about the university. ... The City of Ithaca (named for the Greek island of Ithaca in Homers Odyssey) sits on the southern shore of Cayuga Lake, in Central New York State. ... Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  Ranked 27th  - Total 54,520 sq mi (141,205 km²)  - Width 285 miles (455 km)  - Length 330 miles (530 km)  - % water 13. ... Woodlands refers to several places in the world: Woodlands, Dorset, England Woodlands, Glasgow, Scotland Woodlands, Lusaka, Zambia Woodlands, Singapore Woodlands, South Africa Woodlands, South Yorkshire Woodlands, Western Australia Woodlands is also a part of the name of: The Woodlands, Texas, United States of America The Woodlands High School in The... September 3 is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents


History

Early in Cornell's history, at the turn of the 20th century, banker and hardware magnate Robert H. Treman, Class of 1878, built his family estate on University Hill, just west of today's West Campus. Treman hired his friend Warren Manning, a pioneer of American landscape architecture, to design the site. The Ithaca Daily News of November 2, 1901 reported that the west lawn would be "left to nature as the best gardener." Upon his death in 1937, Treman, who preserved all of the Ithaca area's gorges, donated $5000 to the University specifically for the beautification of the campus. Much of his west lawn grew into beautiful Redbud Woods, which retains many original Manning design elements and boasts locally rare yellow oak and hackberry trees as well as an unusually dense stand of redbuds. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Species About 60-70 species including: Celtis australis - European Hackberry Celtis bungeana Bunges Hackberry Celtis caucasica - Caucasian Hackberry Celtis labilis - Hubei Hackberry Celtis koraiensis - Korean Hackberry Celtis jessoensis - Japanese Hackberry Celtis laevigata - Southern Hackberry Celtis occidentalis - Common hackberry Celtis reticulata - Netleaf hackberry Celtis sinensis - Chinese Hackberry Celtis tenuifolia - Georgia...


Redbud Woods was part of the landscaping of Robert H. Treman's historic estate. In the late 1800's Warren Manning designed the landscape of the Treman family estate (now Von Cramm Hall, 660, and the Kahin Center) so that it would grow into natural woodlands and beautify the campus. The woods, if left to grow untouched, might eventually reach the stage of a climax forest. Over time, Redbud Woods became perceived as a buffer between the University and the surrounding community. 1800 (MDCCC) was an common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


2005 controversy

Background

As part of its "West Campus Residential Initiative," Cornell decided to reloate approximately 176 parking spots to the area occupied by the Redbud Woods, about 2 blocks from the new dorms. However, in 2001, the Ithaca Common Council named Redbud Woods a historic district. The University sued the city, and in 2005, the New York State Supreme Court's Appellate division ruled in Cornell's favor[1], allowing construction of the parking lot to procede. 2001: A Space Odyssey. ...


Points of View

In the fall of 2004, then University President Jeffrey Lehman had presented three challenges to the University, the third of which was sustainability. Lehman went on to more fully articulate Cornell's "institutional commitment to sustainability." Some, including many Cornell faculty, students and Ithaca community members, argued that paving a beloved, historic urban green space for a surface parking lot was unsustainable. They suggested that parking needs might be satisfied elsewhere on campus and be further mitigated through demand management, promotion of public transit, and planning. Jeffery Sean Lehman (b. ...


Those in opposition to construction of the lot also argued that paving the woods might increase localized flooding and allow for the leakage of toxic materials, for example motor oil, into the storm sewer system and ultimately into Cayuga Lake, which supplies drinking water for many living in Tompkins County. Cayuga Lake is the longest of western New Yorks glacial Finger Lakes, and is the second largest in surface area. ... Tompkins County is a county located in the state of New York. ...


Major protests around the construction of the parking lot continued through the summer of 2005, including the occupation of President Jeffry Lehman's office on April 28, 2005.[2] by eight students. April 28 is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 247 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Final Agreement

On July 18, 2005, Cornell University interim president Hunter Rawlings visited Redbud Woods and signed an agreement between the University and many of the Redbud protesters[3], effecively ending the dispute, although some protests continued. Details of the agreement included a pledge by Cornell to offer free bus passes to all new students entering the University in the fall of 2005 and 2006 who did not purchase parking permits. By August of 2005 several thousand new students had chosen this option, raising demand on the Tompkins Consolidated Area Transit bus system that services Ithaca and the rest of the county[4] July 18 is the 199th day (200th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 166 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hunter R. Rawlings III is an American classics scholar and academic administrator. ...


Media Documentation

The New York Times published three articles about the Redbud Woods controversy in June and July 2005. Locally, The Ithaca Journal and the Cornell Daily Sun published many articles over the course of 2004-2005 about the protests. The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... The Cornell Daily Sun, of Cornell University, is an independent daily newspaper published in Ithaca, New York. ...


References

  1. ^ Geng, Julie (March 18, 2005). ""C.U. Wins Redbud Appeal." The Cornell Daily Sun.".
  2. ^ Morisy, Michael and Shavit, Yuval (April 29, 2005). ""'Redbud Eight' Occupy Day Hall." The Cornell Daily Sun.".
  3. ^ Sun Staff (July 18, 2005). ""Administration, Redbud Activists Agree to Deal." The Cornell Daily Sun.".
  4. ^ Barnes, Chris (January 26, 2006). ""TCAT Bus Use Rises in 2005." The Cornell Daily Sun.".

March 18 is the 77th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (78th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 29 is the 119th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (120th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 18 is the 199th day (200th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 166 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 26 is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

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