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Encyclopedia > Red Grange
Harold "Red" Grange
Date of birth June 13, 1903
Place of birth Flag of United States Forksville, Pennsylvania
Date of death January 28, 1991
Place of death Lake Wales, Florida
Position(s) Halfback
College Illinois
Career highlights
Honors NFL 1920s All-Decade Team
Retired #s Chicago Bears #77
University of Illinois #77
Stats
Statistics
  • DatabaseFootball
Team(s)
1925, 1929–1934
1926–1927
Chicago Bears
New York Yankees
College Hall of Fame
Pro Football Hall of Fame, 1963

Harold (Red) Edward Grange (June 13, 1903January 28, 1991), was a professional and college American football player. He was a charter member of both the College and Pro Football Hall of Fame. June 13 is the 164th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (165th in leap years), with 201 days remaining. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Forksville is a borough located in Sullivan County, Pennsylvania. ... January 28 is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lake Wales is a city located in Polk County, Florida. ... In American football, each team has 11 players on the field at one time. ... High school running back A running back, halfback or tailback is the position of a player on an American and Canadian football team who lines up in the offensive backfield. ... This is a list of athletic conferences of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA). ... The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), is the largest campus in the University of Illinois system. ... See also National Football League NFL 1930s All-Decade Team NFL 1940s All-Decade Team NFL 1950s All-Decade Team NFL 1960s All-Decade Team NFL 1970s All-Decade Team NFL 1980s All-Decade Team NFL 1990s All-Decade Team Category: ... City Chicago, Illinois Other nicknames Da Bears, The Monsters of the Midway Team colors Navy Blue, Orange and White Head Coach Lovie Smith Owner Virginia Halas McCaskey Chairman Michael McCaskey General manager Jerry Angelo Fight song Bear Down, Chicago Bears Mascot Staley Da Bear League/Conference affiliations Independent (1919) National... The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), is the largest campus in the University of Illinois system. ... City Chicago, Illinois Other nicknames Da Bears, The Monsters of the Midway Team colors Navy Blue, Orange and White Head Coach Lovie Smith Owner Virginia Halas McCaskey Chairman Michael McCaskey General manager Jerry Angelo Fight song Bear Down, Chicago Bears Mascot Staley Da Bear League/Conference affiliations Independent (1919) National... The New York Yankees were a professional American football team from 1926 to 1928. ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the National Football Leagues Hall of Fame. ... // May 4 — Pan American Games Marathon, Sao Paulo, Brazil Mens Winner: Fidel Negrete Gamboa (MEX) 2:27:56 July 13 — Enschede Marathon, Netherlands Mens Winner: Václav Chudomel (CZE) 2:25:11 October 15 — Fukuoka Marathon, Japan Mens Winner: Jeff Julian (NZL) 2:18:01 Stock car... June 13 is the 164th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (165th in leap years), with 201 days remaining. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... January 28 is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... College Football Hall of Fame front. ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the National Football Leagues Hall of Fame. ...

Contents

NFL career

He signed with the NFL's Chicago Bears the day after his last college game; player/manager George Halas agreed to a contract for a 19-game barnstorming tour which earned Grange a salary and share of gate receipts that amounted to $100,000, during an era when typical league salaries were less than $100/game. That 67-day tour is credited with legitimizing professional football in the United States. == The first NFL player was Wade Zane, he played for the L.A Rams The National Football League (NFL) is the largest and most prestigious professional American football league, consisting of thirty-two teams from American cities and regions. ... City Chicago, Illinois Other nicknames Da Bears, The Monsters of the Midway Team colors Navy Blue, Orange and White Head Coach Lovie Smith Owner Virginia Halas McCaskey Chairman Michael McCaskey General manager Jerry Angelo Fight song Bear Down, Chicago Bears Mascot Staley Da Bear League/Conference affiliations Independent (1919) National... George Stanley Halas (February 2, 1895 - October 31, 1983), nicknamed Papa Bear and Mr. ...


It has to be kept in mind that at the time, college football was far more popular than professional football. Fans preferred cheering on a college alma mater than professional paid athletes. It is Grange, more than any other single player in history, who is credited with changing that view and bringing professional football into the mainstream.


After the tour, Grange became involved in a dispute with the Bears and left to form his own league, the American Football League, to challenge the NFL. The league only lasted one season, after which Grange's team, the New York Yankees, was assimilated into the NFL. Grange suffered a serious knee injury, ironically, against the Bears, which robbed him of some speed and his magical cutting ability. After sitting out 1928, Grange returned to the Bears, where he was a solid runner and excellent defensive back through the 1934 season.


The two highlights of Grange's later NFL years came in consecutive championship games. In the unofficial 1932 championship, Grange caught the game winning touchdown pass from Bronko Nagurski. In the 1933 Championship, Grange made a touchdown saving tackle that saved the game and the title for the Bears. Bronislau Bronko Nagurski (November 3, 1908 - January 7, 1990) was an American football player. ...


Famous Comments about Grange

"I was interviewing George Halas and I asked him who is the greatest running back you ever saw. And he said, 'That would be Red Grange.' And I asked him if Grange was playing today, how many yards do you think he'd gain. And he said, 'About 750, maybe 800 yards.' And I said, 'Well, 800 yards is just okay.' He sat up in his chair and he said, 'Son, you must remember one thing. Red Grange is 75 years old.'" -- Chris Berman on ESPN's SportsCentury show. [1] Christopher (Boomer) James Berman (born May 10, 1955, in Greenwich, Connecticut) is a sportscaster, who anchors SportsCenter, Monday Night Countdown, Sunday NFL Countdown, Baseball Tonight, U.S. Open golf, and other programming on ESPN. He joined ESPN a month after its founding and has been with the network since. ... {{Infobox Network | network_name = ESPN| network_logo = | country =  United States| network_type = Cable Television Network| available = National| owner = The Walt Disney Company (80%) Hearst Corporation (20%)| key_people = George Bodenheimer, President, ESPN, Inc. ...


Trivia

Grange Field at Wheaton Warrenville South High School, which was named in his honor.
  • As a high school junior, Grange scored 36 touchdowns in leading Wheaton High School to an undefeated season. Each time he scored, his father gave him a quarter.
  • For delivering ice in Wheaton during the summers, he earned $37.50 a week.
  • As a college senior, Grange was on the cover of Time magazine (October 5, 1925).
  • When Illinois played at Penn in 1925, it was such a big game that Laurence Stallings, a famed war correspondent who had co-written What Price Glory?, covered the game for the New York World. After Grange accounted for 363 yards in leading Illinois to a 24-2 upset of the Ivy League powerhouse, Stallings said, "This story's too big for me. I can't write it."
  • On December 6, 1925, more than 65,000 showed up at the Polo Grounds to watch Grange, helping save the New York Giants' franchise. Grange scored a touchdown on a 35-yard interception return in the Bears' 19-7 victory. Offensively, he ran for 53 yards on 11 carries, caught a 23-yard pass and completed 2-of-3 passes for 32 yards.
  • Grange married his wife Margaret, nicknamed Muggs, in 1941 and they were together until his death in 1991. She was a flight attendant, and they met on a plane. The couple had no children.
  • To commemorate college football's 100th anniversary in 1969, the Football Writers Association of America chose an all-time All-America team. Grange was the only unanimous choice.
  • In 1999, though 65 years had passed since his last game, he was ranked number 80 on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Football Players.
  • Wheaton-Warrenville South High School's football field is named in his honor; however, Grange's high school eventually became Longfellow Elementary School, which feeds into rival Wheaton North High School.
  • On January 15, 1978 at Super Bowl XII, Grange became the first person other than the game referee to toss the coin at a Super Bowl.
  • Mentioned by Ward Cleaver (Hugh Beaumont) in the episode "Beaver, The Hero" on Leave It To Beaver.
  • Red Grange is mentioned in Arthur Miller's play Death of a Salesman. Willy Loman says his son Biff will be "the next Red Grange", to which Charley asks "who is Red Grange?" and Willy replies by challenging him to a fight.

Image File history File links Wwshs_grange_field. ... Image File history File links Wwshs_grange_field. ... Wheaton Warrenville South High School, or WWSHS, and locally referred to as South, is a public four-year high school located at the corner of Butterfield Road and Wiesbrook Road in the southwest corner of affluent Wheaton, Illinois, a western suburb of Chicago, Illinois, in the United States. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... For the record label, see Ivy League Records. ... City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Big Blue Wrecking Crew, Big Blue, G-Men, The Jints, The New York Football Giants Team colors Royal Blue, Red, Gray, and White Head Coach Tom Coughlin Owner John Mara (50%) and Steve Tisch (50%) General manager Jerry Reese League/Conference affiliations National... Flight attendant in an Embraer ERJ 145 LR (PBair, Thailand) Stewardess, circa 1949-50, American Overseas, Flagship Denmark, Boeing Stratocruiser In aviation, flight attendants—also known as sky girls, air hostesses, stewardesses or stewards—are members of a flight crew employed by airlines to ensure the safety of the passengers... The Football Writers Association of America is the organization responsible for naming college footballs All-American team, freshman All-America team, Bronko Nagurski Trophy winner, Outland Trophy winner, Grantland Rice Trophy winner, Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year, weekly defensive player of the week, scholarship program, surveys for better... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... The Sporting News (TSN) is an American-based sports newspaper. ... January 15 is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Date January 15, 1978 Stadium Louisiana Superdome City New Orleans, Louisiana MVP Randy White, Defensive tackle; and Harvey Martin, Defensive end Favorite Cowboys by 5 1/2 National anthem Phyllis Kelly of Northeast Louisiana State University Coin toss Red Grange Referee Jim Tunney Halftime show From Paris to the Paris... NFL officials (striped shirts) and guests prepare to toss the coin to start the 40th annual Pro Bowl. ... Coin flipping or coin tossing is the practice of throwing a coin in the air to resolve a dispute between two parties or otherwise choose between two alternatives. ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... Arthur Asher Miller (October 17, 1915 – February 10, 2005) was an American playwright, essayist and author. ... Cover to the Penguin Group edition. ... Death of a Salesman is a play by Arthur Miller. ...

Retirement

He retired from pro football in 1934, earning a living in a variety of jobs including motivational speaker and sports announcer. See also: 1933 in sports, 1935 in sports and the list of years in sports. Baseball July 10 - In the second Major League Baseball All-Star Game, played at the Polo Grounds in New York City, left-handed pitcher Carl Hubbell sets a record by striking out Babe Ruth, Lou... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Continuity announcer. ...


His autobiography, first published in 1953, is The Red Grange Story (1993 paperback edition: ISBN 0-252-06329-5). The book was written "as told to" by Ira Morton, a syndicated newspaper columnist from Chicago. See also: 1952 in sports, other events of 1953, 1954 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Auto Racing NASCAR Championship - Herb Thomas AAA Racing: Bill Vukovich won the Indianapolis 500 Sam Hanks won the season driving championship Formula One Championship - Alberto Ascari of Italy 24 hours of... See also: 1992 in literature, other events of 1993, 1994 in literature, list of years in literature. ...


In the 1950s, he visited Abington Senior High School (in Abington, PA, a suburb of Philadelphia). Shortly after, the school adopted his nickname for the mascot in his honor, the Galloping Ghost. Abington Senior High School is a high school (Grades: 10-12) located in Abington, Pennsylvania, United States. ...


External links

National Football League | NFL's 1920s All-Decade Team

Jimmy Conzelman | Paddy Driscoll | Red Grange | Joe Guyon | Curly Lambeau | Jim Thorpe | Ernie Nevers | Guy Chamberlin | Lavern Dilweg | George Halas | Ed Healey | Pete Henry | Cal Hubbard | Steve Owen | Hunk Anderson | Walt Kiesling | Mike Michalske | George Trafton | {{Infobox Network | network_name = ESPN| network_logo = | country =  United States| network_type = Cable Television Network| available = National| owner = The Walt Disney Company (80%) Hearst Corporation (20%)| key_people = George Bodenheimer, President, ESPN, Inc. ... Wheaton College is a private, independent, evangelical Protestant, coeducational, liberal arts college located in Wheaton, Illinois, USA. Wheaton has an enrollment of approximately 2,400 undergraduate students. ... == The first NFL player was Wade Zane, he played for the L.A Rams The National Football League (NFL) is the largest and most prestigious professional American football league, consisting of thirty-two teams from American cities and regions. ... See also National Football League NFL 1930s All-Decade Team NFL 1940s All-Decade Team NFL 1950s All-Decade Team NFL 1960s All-Decade Team NFL 1970s All-Decade Team NFL 1980s All-Decade Team NFL 1990s All-Decade Team Category: ... Jimmy Conzelman (March 6, 1898 - August 5, 1970) was a professional football player for in the National Football League. ... John Leo Paddy Driscoll (January 11, 1895 - June 28, 1968) was a Pro Football Hall of Fame quarterback. ... Joe Guyon (November 26, 1892 - November 27, 1971) was a professional football player for in the National Football League. ... Earl Louis Curly Lambeau (April 9, 1898 - June 1, 1965) was the founder, a player and the first coach of the Green Bay Packers professional football team. ... Jacobus Franciscus Jim Thorpe (Meskwaki: Wa-Tho-Huk) (May 28, 1888–March 28, 1953[1]) was an American athlete. ... Ernest Nevers (1903 - 1976) was a U.S. football player. ... Guy Chamberlin (January 16, 1894 - April 4, 1967) was a professional football player and coach in the National Football League (NFL). ... LaVern Ralph Dilweg (January 11, 1903 - January, 1968) was an American football player. ... George Stanley Halas (February 2, 1895 - October 31, 1983), nicknamed Papa Bear and Mr. ... Edward Francis Healey, Jr. ... Wilbur Pete Henry (October 31, 1897 - February 7, 1952) was a professional American football player and coach in the National Football League. ... Robert Calvin Hubbard (October 31, 1900 _ October 17, 1977) was an American professional football player and later an umpire in Major League Baseball, and is a member of three major sports halls of fame. ... Steve Owen (April 21, 1898 - May 17, 1964) was a football player and coach who earned a place in the Pro Football Hall of Fame as head coach of the National Football Leagues New York Giants from 1930 to 1953. ... Heartley Anderson was a college football coach at NC State, and Notre Dame. ... Walt Andrew Kiesling (May 27, 1903 – March 2, 1962) was an American football player and coach. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... George Edward Trafton (December 6, 1896-September 5, 1971) was an American football center for the Decatur Staleys (now known as the Chicago Bears) of the NFL from 1920-1921 and 1923-1932. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
MSN Encarta - Red Grange (344 words)
Grange was a major college star and played an important role in attracting a wider audience for professional football during its early years.
Harold Edward Grange was born in Forksville, Pennsylvania, and moved to Wheaton, Illinois, as a child.
During his notable college athletic career Grange was named to three All-American football teams, in 1923 and 1924 as a halfback and in 1925 as a quarterback.
Red Grange - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (844 words)
Harold Edward Grange, better known as Red Grange (June 13, 1903 - January 28, 1991), was a college football player.
Grange married his wife Margaret, nicknamed Muggs, in 1941 and they were together until his death in 1991.
Grange died of pneumonia brought on by parkinsons disease in Lake Wales, Florida at the age of 87.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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