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Encyclopedia > Red Faber
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Urban Clarence "Red" Faber (September 6, 1888 - September 25, 1976) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball from 1914 until 1933, playing his entire career for the Chicago White Sox. He won 254 games over his twenty-year career, a total which ranked 17th-highest in history upon his retirement. He was also the last legal spitballer in the American League. September 6 is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years). ... Jump to: navigation, search 1888 is a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... Jump to: navigation, search September 25 is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years). ... Jump to: navigation, search 1976 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... A baseball pitcher delivers the ball to home plate In baseball, the pitcher is the player who throws the baseball from the pitchers mound toward the catcher to begin each play, with the goal of retiring a batter who attempts to either make contact with it or draw a... Jump to: navigation, search MLB logo Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in the world. ... See also: 1913 in sports, 1915 in sports and the list of years in sports. Baseball April 22 - Baltimore Orioles Babe Ruth, age 19, pitches his first professional game Football (Australian Rules) Victorian Football League Carlton wins the 18th VFL Premiership (Carlton 6. ... See also: 1932 in sports, 1934 in sports and the list of years in sports. Baseball New York Giants defeat Washington Senators in the World Series, 4-1. ... Jump to: navigation, search Major league affiliations American League (1901-present) Central Division (1994-present) West Division (1969-1993) Major league titles World Series titles (3) 2005 â€¢ 1917 â€¢ 1906 AL Pennants (6) 2005 â€¢ 1959 â€¢ 1919 â€¢ 1917 1906 â€¢ 1901 Central Division titles (2) [1] 2005 â€¢ 2000 West Division titles (2) 1993... In baseball, a pitcher is credited with a win (or W) when, in a game won by his team, he is the teams pitcher at the time that his team takes a lead that it does not relinquish for the remainder of the game. ... A spitball is a baseball pitch in which the ball has been altered by the application of spit, petroleum jelly, or some other foreign substance. ... The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ...


Born in Cascade, Iowa, Faber started well in the minor leagues, pitching a perfect game in 1910; but he developed a sore arm in his early 20s, and as a recourse began using the spitball in 1911. He broke into the major leagues in 1914, starting 19 games and relieving in another 21, and posted a respectable 2.68 ERA while winning 10 games and saving a league-leading 4 others. Through the 1910s he would vary between starting and relieving for a team which enjoyed a wealth of pitching talent. In his 1915 season, he won 24 games to tie for 2nd in the American League behind Walter Johnson, and led the league with 50 appearances. In one game that season, he pitched a 3-hitter with only 67 pitches. Cascades Baseball Field at Sunset Cascade is a city located in Dubuque County, Iowa. ... Since 1991, a perfect game has been defined by Major League Baseball as a game in which a pitcher pitches a complete game victory that lasts a minimum of nine innings and in which no opposition player reaches first base. ... In baseball or softball, a starting pitcher, often abbreviated as starter, is the pitcher who pitches the first pitch to the first batter of a game. ... A relief pitcher warms up in the bullpen as the game goes on A relief pitcher or reliever is a baseball or softball pitcher who enters the game after the starting pitcher is removed due to injury, ineffectiveness or fatigue. ... In baseball statistics, earned run average (ERA) is the mean of earned runs given up by a pitcher per nine innings pitched. ... In baseball, a pitcher is credited with a win (or W) when, in a game won by his team, he is the teams pitcher at the time that his team takes a lead that it does not relinquish for the remainder of the game. ... To save in a sport means to stop a goal or to maintain the lead. ... See also: 1914 in sports, 1916 in sports and the list of years in sports. Football (Australian Rules) Victorian Football League - Carlton wins the 19th VFL Premiership (Carlton 11. ... Walter Johnson on a 1909-1911 American Tobacco Company baseball card (White Borders (T206)). Walter Perry Johnson (November 6, 1887-December 10, 1946), American professional baseball pitcher. ...

This person is a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame.
This person is a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame.

In 1917 he had a fair record of 16-13, and at one point started - and won - three games in two days; but he saved his best work for the World Series against the New York Giants. After winning Game 2 in Chicago but losing Game 4 on the road, he came into Game 5 (at home) in relief and picked up the win as the Sox came back from a 5-2 deficit in the 7th inning to win 8-5. Faber came back two days later to go the distance in the clinching Game 6 at the Polo Grounds, picking up his third win of the Series by a 4-2 score. National Baseball Hall of Fame logo This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... National Baseball Hall of Fame logo This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, United States, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests that serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in North America, the display of baseball-related... See also: 1916 in sports, 1918 in sports and the list of years in sports. Football (Australian Rules) Victorian Football League - Collingwood wins the 21st VFL Premiership (Collingwood 9. ... Jump to: navigation, search The World Series is the championship series of Major League Baseball in the United States and Canada, played in October after the end of the regular season between the pennant winner of the American League and the pennant winner of the National League. ... The San Francisco Giants are a Major League Baseball team based in San Francisco, California. ... Jump to: navigation, search Chicago, colloquially known as the Second City and the Windy City, is the third-largest city in population in the United States, following New York City and Los Angeles, California, and the largest inland city in the country. ... The Polo Grounds was the name given to four different stadiums in New York City used by Major League Baseballs New York Giants from 1883 until 1957, New York Metropolitans from 1883 until 1885, the New York Yankees from 1912 until 1922, and by the New York Mets in...


After spending most of 1918 in the Navy due to World War I, he returned in 1919 only to develop arm trouble, finishing with a 3.83 ERA - the only time in his first nine seasons he posted a mark over 3.00. Those problems, along with a case of the flu possibly related to the epidemic, prevented him from playing in the scandal-torn World Series against the Cincinnati Reds. Jump to: navigation, search The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... Jump to: navigation, search World War I was primarily a European conflict with many facets: immense human sacrifice, stalemate trench warfare, and the use of new, devastating weapons - tanks, aircraft, machineguns, and poison gas. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Spanish Flu Pandemic, also known as the Great Influenza Pandemic, the 1918 Flu Epidemic and La Grippe, was an unusually severe and deadly strain of avian influenza, a viral infectious disease, that killed some 25 million to 50 million people worldwide in 1918 and 1919. ... ... The Cincinnati Reds are a Major League Baseball team based in Cincinnati, Ohio. ...


Faber then enjoyed the greatest success of his career in the early 1920s. The Live Ball Era was beginning, but he was among the pitchers who made the most successful transition. The spitball was phased out after the 1920 season, with Faber one of the 17 pitchers permitted to use it for the remainder of their careers; and he took advantage of Comiskey Park's spacious dimensions, surrendering only 91 home runs - barely one homer per month - from 1920 to 1931. He was one of only six pitchers to win 100 or more games in both the "dead ball" (through 1920) and live ball eras. The Live Ball Era, also referred to as the Lively Ball Era, is the period in Major League Baseball beginning in 1920. ... Comiskey Park (35th Street & Shields Avenue, Chicago, Illinois) was the ballpark in which the Chicago White Sox played from 1910 to 1990. ... For other uses of the phrase see Home run (disambiguation) In baseball, a home run is a base hit in which the batter is able to circle all the bases, ending at home plate and scoring a run himself (along with a run for each runner who was already on...


From 1920-22, he posted win totals of 23, 25 and 21, leading the league in ERA ('21-'22), starts ('20), innings ('22), and complete games ('21-'22). He was also among the league leaders in strikeouts each year, while pitching at least 25 complete games and over 300 innings. But the decimation of the team in the wake of the Black Sox scandal, particularly on offense, made winning on a consistent basis increasingly difficult. After being one of the top teams in the league with a powerful offense in the late 1910s, the White Sox had only two winning seasons in his last 13 years, never finishing above 5th place. His 1921 season, going 25-15 for the post-scandal team that limped to a 62-92 finish, is particularly remarkable; from 1921 to 1929 his record was 126-103. Despite the widespread hitting of the era, he did not post an ERA over 3.88 until he was 41. Perhaps his last great performance was a one-hitter at age 40 in 1929. In baseball, a complete game (denoted by CG) is the act of a pitcher pitching an entire game himself, without the benefit of a relief pitcher. ... In baseball, a strikeout or strike out (denoted by K, K-S, or SO) occurs when the batter receives three strikes during his time at bat. ... In baseball, innings pitched (IP) are the number of innings a pitcher has completed, measured by the number of batters and baserunners that are put out while the pitcher is in the game. ...


In his last few seasons, Faber again returned to relief pitching, coming out of the bullpen 96 times between 1931 and 1933. He ended his career at age 45 with a 254-213 career record, a 3.15 ERA and 1471 strikeouts. He holds the White Sox franchise record for most games pitched, and held the team records for career wins, starts, complete games and innings until they were later broken by Ted Lyons. He returned as a White Sox coach for a few seasons, and later worked on a Cook County highway surveying team until he was past 80. Theodore Amar Lyons (December 28, 1900 - July 25, 1986) was a Major League Baseball starting pitcher and manager. ... Cook County is a county located in the state of Illinois. ...


Faber was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1964. The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, United States, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests that serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in North America, the display of baseball-related... See also: 1963 in sports, other events of 1964, 1965 in sports and the list of years in sports. Auto Racing Stock car racing: Richard Petty won the Daytona 500 NASCAR Championship - Richard Petty Indianapolis 500 - A.J. Foyt USAC Racing - A.J. Foyt won the season championship Formula One...


He died in Chicago at age 88. Urban Faber is interred in Acacia Park Cemetery in Chicago, Illinois.


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Red Faber - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (800 words)
Born in Cascade, Iowa, Faber started well in the minor leagues, pitching a perfect game in 1910; but he developed a sore arm in his early 20s, and as a recourse began using the spitball in 1911.
Faber came back two days later to go the distance in the clinching Game 6 at the Polo Grounds, picking up his third win of the Series by a 4-2 score.
The spitball was phased out after the 1920 season, with Faber one of the 17 pitchers permitted to use it for the remainder of their careers; and he took advantage of Comiskey Park's spacious dimensions, surrendering only 91 home runs - barely one homer per month - from 1920 to 1931.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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