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Encyclopedia > Red Dragon (film)
Red Dragon
Directed by Brett Ratner
Produced by Dino De Laurentiis
Written by Thomas Harris (novel)
Ted Tally (screenplay)
Starring Edward Norton
Anthony Hopkins
Ralph Fiennes
Harvey Keitel
Emily Watson
Philip Seymour Hoffman
Mary-Louise Parker
Music by Danny Elfman
Cinematography Dante Spinotti
Editing by Mark Helfrich
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release date(s) October 4, 2002
Running time 124 min.
Country USA USA
Language English
Preceded by Hannibal (2001)
Followed by Hannibal Rising (2007)
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile

Red Dragon is a 2002 thriller film, based on the novel of the same name written by Thomas Harris featuring the brilliant psychiatrist and serial killer Dr. Hannibal Lecter. Red Dragon movie poster. ... Brett Ratner (born March 28, 1969) is an American film director and music-video director. ... Agostino De Laurentiis, usually credited as Dino De Laurentiis, (born August 8, 1919) is an Italian movie producer born at Torre Annunziata in the province of Naples. ... Thomas Harris. ... Ted Tally is an American playwright and screenwriter, best known for the play Terra Nova and the screenplay for the film The Silence of the Lambs, which won him the Academy Award for Best Screenplay. ... Edward H. Norton[1] (born August 18, 1969) is a critically acclaimed two-time Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe-winning American film actor and director. ... Philip Anthony Hopkins CBE (IPA: ) (born 31 December 1937) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe and Emmy Award-winning film, stage and television actor. ... Ralph Nathaniel Fiennes, (IPA: ), born 22 December 1962) is a Tony Award-winning, Academy Award-nominated and Genie Award-nominated British actor. ... Harvey Keitel (born May 13, 1939) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor from New York City. ... Emily Anita Watson (born January 14, 1967) is an Oscar nominated English actress best known for her acclaimed debut film performance in Lars von Triers Breaking the Waves. ... Philip Seymour Hoffman (born July 23, 1967) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Mary-Louise Parker (born August 2, 1964 in Fort Jackson, South Carolina) is an American actress whose work in theatre and film has won her international acclaim. ... Daniel Robert Elfman (born May 29, 1953 in Los Angeles, California) is an American singer-songwriter who led the rock band Oingo Boingo from 1978 until its breakup in 1995, and has since 1985s Pee-Wees Big Adventure worked as a film score composer. ... Born in Tolmezzo, Italy on August 22nd, 1943, Dante Spinotti is a well respected cinematographer. ... Mark Helfrich is an ACE (American Cinema Editor)-certified film editor. ... Universal Pictures is the main motion picture production/distribution arm of Universal Studios, a subsidiary of NBC Universal. ... October 4 is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Hannibal is a 2001 film directed by Ridley Scott, adapted from the Thomas Harris novel of the same name. ... Hannibal Rising is a 2007 feature film thriller, a prequel to Red Dragon, The Silence of the Lambs, and Hannibal. ... The thriller is a broad genre of literature, film, and television. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... Thomas Harris. ... Psychiatry is a branch of medicine that studies and treats mental and emotional disorders (see mental illness). ... Serial killers are individuals who have a history of multiple slayings of victims who were usually unknown to them beforehand. ... Hannibal Lecter is a fictional character in a series of novels by author Thomas Harris. ...


Directed by Brett Ratner and written by Ted Tally (who also wrote the screenplay for The Silence of the Lambs), it starred Edward Norton as Graham and Anthony Hopkins as Lecter—a role he had, by then, played twice before in The Silence of the Lambs and Hannibal. Brett Ratner (born March 28, 1969) is an American film director and music-video director. ... Ted Tally is an American playwright and screenwriter, best known for the play Terra Nova and the screenplay for the film The Silence of the Lambs, which won him the Academy Award for Best Screenplay. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Silence of the Lambs is a 1991 Academy Award-winning film directed by Jonathan Demme and starring Jodie Foster and Anthony Hopkins. ... Edward H. Norton[1] (born August 18, 1969) is a critically acclaimed two-time Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe-winning American film actor and director. ... Philip Anthony Hopkins CBE (IPA: ) (born 31 December 1937) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe and Emmy Award-winning film, stage and television actor. ... Hannibal is a 2001 film directed by Ridley Scott, adapted from the Thomas Harris novel of the same name. ...


Red Dragon is, in publishing chronology, the first story in the Lecter saga (Hannibal Rising, a later-published origin story, was released on February 9, 2007). Red Dragon's story takes place before the events in The Silence of the Lambs, and after Lecter's original capture and incarceration. While Lecter plays a central role, Red Dragon focuses more on the characters of Will Graham and the tortured serial killer, Francis Dolarhyde. Hannibal Rising is a 2007 feature film thriller, a prequel to Red Dragon, The Silence of the Lambs, and Hannibal. ... Red Dragon. ... Francis Dolarhyde is a fictional character featured in Thomas Harris novel Red Dragon. ...

Contents

Cast

Edward H. Norton[1] (born August 18, 1969) is a critically acclaimed two-time Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe-winning American film actor and director. ... Red Dragon. ... Philip Anthony Hopkins CBE (IPA: ) (born 31 December 1937) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe and Emmy Award-winning film, stage and television actor. ... Hannibal Lecter is a fictional character in a series of novels by author Thomas Harris. ... Ralph Nathaniel Fiennes, (IPA: ), born 22 December 1962) is a Tony Award-winning, Academy Award-nominated and Genie Award-nominated British actor. ... Francis Dolarhyde is a fictional character featured in Thomas Harris novel Red Dragon. ... Emily Anita Watson (born January 14, 1967) is an Oscar nominated English actress best known for her acclaimed debut film performance in Lars von Triers Breaking the Waves. ... Reba McClane is a fictional character from the Thomas Harris novel Red Dragon, the first in the Hannibal Lecter trilogy, and also appears in the film adaptations Manhunter (played by Joan Allen) and Red Dragon (played by Emily Watson. ... Mary-Louise Parker. ... Harvey Keitel (born May 13, 1939) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor from New York City. ... Jack Crawford. ... Philip Seymour Hoffman (born July 23, 1967) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Freddy Lounds is a fictional character in the novel Red Dragon by Thomas Harris, and its film adaptations. ... Anthony Heald is an American actor best known for portraying Hannibal Lecters smarmy psychiatrist, Frederick Chilton, in The Silence of the Lambs and Red Dragon, and as deputy principal Scott Guber in Boston Public. ... Chilton taunts Lecter in The Silence of the Lambs. ... Frankie Faison, often credited as Frankie R. Faison is one of those actors which many people may recognise, but not know his name. ... Barney may refer to: Fictional characters: Barney & Friends, a childrens TV show (about Barney, a dinosaur) Barney Fife, a character from The Andy Griffith Show Barnard Barney Gumble, a character from The Simpsons Barney Rubble, a character from The Flintstones Barney Bear, a cartoon series Barney Google, a character... Ellen Burstyn (born December 7, 1932 as Edna Rae Gillooly in Detroit, Michigan) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Frank A. Langella, Jr. ...

Synopsis

Being an adaptation of the novel Red Dragon, the film follows the story of Special Agent Will Graham, who has been called out of retirement by the FBI to track down a serial killer which media had dubbed "The Tooth Fairy". Graham had retired several years earlier after nearly being killed by Dr. Hannibal Lecter, a brilliant psychiatrist and cannibalistic serial murderer whom Graham was looking for at the time. It has been suggested that this section be split into a new article entitled Red Dragon (film). ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... Hannibal Lecter is a fictional character in a series of novels by author Thomas Harris. ... This article is about consuming ones own species. ...


Haunted by the brilliant sociopath who was once his co-agent, Graham must find the courage to ask him for help in finding the Tooth Fairy. The Tooth Fairy is a disturbed man named Francis Dolarhyde, who worships Lecter after learning of his crimes. Dolarhyde also calls himself "The Great Red Dragon" because of his obsession with the William Blake painting, "The Great Red Dragon and the Woman Clothed in the Sun". Graham later discovers that Lecter is manipulating him by corresponding with Dolarhyde. Francis Dolarhyde is a fictional character featured in Thomas Harris novel Red Dragon. ... William Blake (November 28, 1757 – August 12, 1827) was an English poet, visionary, painter, and printmaker. ... The Great Red Dragon and the Woman Clothed in the Sun by William Blake. ...


The relationship between Lecter and Graham parallels the relationship between Lecter and Clarice Starling in the later novels, but here there are different overtones. Lecter treats Starling as an unworthy student but Graham as a fellow professional (though not an equal). Lecter's acceptance of Graham does not stop at the being "professional" level, but extends further into the overlapping realm between Graham's and Lecter's surprisingly similar psyches. Jodie Foster as Clarice Starling, with Anthony Hopkins as Hannibal Lecter, in the 1991 film adaptation of The Silence of the Lambs Clarice Starling is a fictional character in the novels The Silence of the Lambs and Hannibal by Thomas Harris. ...


Two complications hinder the investigation. On the one hand there is Freddy Lounds, a tabloid reporter who once ran afoul of Graham during the Lecter case and is now dogging him to get the story on The Tooth Fairy. On the other hand there is the correspondence between Lecter and Dolarhyde which eventually sees Lecter providing Dolarhyde with Graham's home address, endangering Graham's wife and son. Fortunately, both complications are solved: the first because Dolarhyde kills Lounds after the latter writes unfavorably about him in the newspapers; the second because Graham manages to evacuate his family from their house before any harm can come to them. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In the meantime, Dolarhyde falls in love with begin a blind co-worker named Reba McLane. Dolarhyde's newfound love conflicts with his homicidal urges, which manifest themselves in his mind as his separate personality "The Great Red Dragon". After his association with Reba, Dolarhyde attempts to stop the Dragon's "possession" of him. In order to stop killing, he believes that he must dominate the dragon by consuming the original copy of the painting. Dolarhyde goes to the Brooklyn Museum, beats a museum secretary unconscious, and eats the original Blake watercolour of The Red Dragon. The Brooklyn Museum, located at 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, New York, is the second largest art museum in New York City, and one of the largest in the United States. ...

Hannibal Lecter assisting Will Graham with an investigation.

Graham eventually realizes that the killer knew the layout of his victims' houses from their home videos, which he only could have seen if he worked for a home video editing company, the company that transfers the home videos to video cassette. Dolarhyde's job gives him access to all home movies that pass through the company. Sensing that he is about to be caught, Dolarhyde goes to see one last time, but he finds her talking to a co-worker, Ralph Mandy (in this film, a composite of Dandridge and Ralph Mandy in the novel, corresponding to Ralph Dandridge in Manhunter). Enraged, Dolorhyde kills Ralph Mandy, kidnaps McClane and, having taken her to his house, sets the place on fire. He intends to kill her and then himself, but finds himself unable to shoot her. After he apparently shoots himself, McClane escapes. Image File history File links Willandgram. ... Image File history File links Willandgram. ... The video cassette recorder (or VCR, less popularly video tape recorder) is a type of video tape recorder that uses removable cassettes containing magnetic tape to record audio and video from a television broadcast so it can be played back later. ... Home Movies is a dialogue-driven animated series about 8-year-old Brendon Small (voiced by the creator, head writer, and lead musician of Home Movies Brendon Small), who makes films with his friends, Melissa and Jason, in his spare time. ...


Graham is given Dolarhyde's scrapbook, saved from the wreckage of the house, which details the killer's obsession with the Blake painting and his admiration of Hannibal Lecter's murder style. The book also exposes the abuse Dolarhyde suffered as a child at the hands of his grandmother, which evidently turned him into a monster.


However, it turns out Dolarhyde did not shoot himself but instead the body of a previous victim (the body is that of Ralph Mandy; in the novel, it is that of a gas station attendant with whom Dolarhyde had had a previous confrontation) in order to stage his own death. Dolarhyde pursues Graham to his home and attacks Graham's son. In order to save his son, Graham subsequently uses the same terms that Dolarhyde's grandmother had used against him (eg. "dirty little beast", threatening to cut off his penis, a threat Dolarhyde's grandmother had used to prevent him from bedwetting as a child), on his own son. This enrages Dolarhyde, who attacks Graham, allowing his son to escape to safety (this episode was added for the movie to prevent a rather graphically violent attack scene from ensuing). Graham's wife, Molly, ends the horrific ordeal by managing to shoot and kill Dolarhyde. After recovering, Graham receives a slightly triumphant letter from Lecter, which bids him well and hopes that he isn't too disfigured (a statement which has almost no strength in the film version, as opposed to the book in which it is cruelly mocking Graham, as his face is, in fact, irreparably disfigured by Dolarhyde's attack.) The film ends with Dr. Chilton informing Lecter that there is a young woman from the FBI waiting to speak with him; presumably Clarice Starling. Bedwetting (or nocturnal enuresis or sleepwetting) is involuntary passing of urine while asleep after the age at which bladder control would normally be anticipated. ... Jodie Foster as Clarice Starling, with Anthony Hopkins as Hannibal Lecter, in the 1991 film adaptation of The Silence of the Lambs Clarice Starling is a fictional character in the novels The Silence of the Lambs and Hannibal by Thomas Harris. ...


Analysis

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Please help Wikipedia by adding references. See the talk page for details.

The story of Red Dragon has been filmed twice. The first film, released in 1986 under the title Manhunter, was written and directed by Michael Mann and focused on FBI Special Agent Will Graham, played by William Petersen. Lecter (renamed Lecktor) was played by Brian Cox. Manhunter is often recognized as a looser adaptation, leaving out a small part of Dolarhyde's backstory and having him die at Graham's hands during the fire. Ratner's Red Dragon was more faithful to the novel in some respects, although some people argue that Ratner produced the remake and "over extended" Lecter's role in the film, simply to give Hopkins more screentime as his most famous character. Lecter in truth, based on the fact that even though his character is important in this story, he has a particularly minor role in the book, only appearing two or three times. Lecter in Ratner's adaptation appears numerous times, and even the opening sequence was filmed specifically to show the audience how he got caught by Will Graham (in a scene and subplot entirely different from the novel's version of the event.) Red Dragon's chronology also does not match that of the novels, and it's quite a bit darker than the book. Red Dragon also ignores many "happier" scenes that Manhunter adapted, as well as completely changing some scenes and who-did-what in some scenes. Even though the adaptation Manhunter is respected more as a film, it is reported that it is Thomas Harris's least favorite adaptation.[citation needed] Image File history File links Circle-question. ... Manhunter (1986; see also 1986 in film) is a film based on Thomas Harris novel Red Dragon. ... William Louis Petersen (born February 21, 1953) is an American actor, best known for playing Gil Grissom on CSI. // Petersen was born in Evanston, Illinois of Danish ancestry. ... Brian Denis Cox, CBE (born June 1, 1946 in Dundee, Scotland) is a Scottish actor, notable for being the first actor to play Hannibal Lecter, a role he took in the Michael Mann film Manhunter (in which the characters surname was spelled Lecktor). Image:Http://www. ... Thomas Harris. ...


One of the main themes covered in the book is Will Graham's struggle with his own nature: specifically, his ability to think and feel like a serial killer. Will's greatest fear is him knowing that he does not significantly differ from the pyches of Lecter and Dolarhyde, and that the only significant difference is that he is able to establish a barrier between right and wrong. This ability to have final dominance over one's impulses is what Dolarhyde sought to establish by eating the Blake painting.


It is no accident that Lecter calls Dolarhyde "Pilgrim". Yet, where Lecter is base and primal in his communications with Dolarhyde ("You're very beautiful"), he behaves in a cultured, refined manner in his dealings with Graham. Lecter symbolizes a midpoint between the two journeyman "monsters": Dolarhyde, who is at a "less-evolved" state where he still acts solely to sate his impulses, and Graham, who instead fights his darker nature and uses it to hunt those who would not share his fight. Lecter, who has chosen to rationalize and intellectualize his actions by killing only the rude and incompetent, seems to harbor an affinity towards Graham, perhaps because of their similar backgrounds in academia and their mutual disdain for 'irrational' killing, but most likely because Graham's decision is based on choice. Dolarhyde, in believing he has no choice in the matter, exhibits weaker mental fortitude, and thus places himself below Graham in Lecter's eyes. In psychology, rationalization is the process of constructing a logical justification for a decision, action or lack thereof that was originally arrived at through a different mental process. ... Intellectualization is a defense mechanism where reasoning is used to block confrontation with an unconscious conflict and its associated emotional stress. ...


A key moment in this storyline occurs when Graham tries to goad Lecter into helping him catch the Dragon. Graham suggests it would be an opportunity to prove that Lecter is smarter than the emerging Dragon character. Lecter proves himself capable of meeting Graham's challenge, ruining both Dolarhyde and Graham, having set the two against each other. In the book, Dolarhyde stabs Graham in the face in the end, but is attacked by Molly, who strikes him with an aluminium fishing rod, embedding a barbed hook into his cheek, while the sequence goes quite differentely in the film. This means that Dolarhyde leaves Graham with a permanent disfigurement, something Graham's mind will be hard-pressed to ignore as a sort of "mark of the beast", a reminder of what he is. Harris foreshadows Graham's fate during Lecter and Graham's exchange on the Tooth Fairy's self-loathing and disfigurement. Lecter accomplishes all of this on a whim while incarcerated in a maximum security facility. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Number of the Beast (numerology). ... Maximum Security was a comic book published by Marvel Comics in 2001 as the core of a company-wide crossover. ...


Lecter's wit and charm, his ability to toy with people and to remain a serious threat even while imprisoned and heavily restrained and the obvious fear he evokes through this, were all used by Harris to create a dark mystique and infamy around the Lecter character, which Harris highlights by refusing to ever directly mention the nature of Lecter's crimes or his exact methods of murder. This leaves the reader with the challenge of reconciling the debonair and affluent, if evidently sadistic character whom they are introduced to through the narrative, with the psychotic serial killer perception Harris deliberately builds up around the character of Dr. Lecter, but never in his presence. It was these qualities and their contrast with the usual slasher-story method of totally dehumanizing the killer through excruciating explication which made the Lecter character such a show-stealer, and set the stage for that character to become the subject-in-his-own-right of the now world-famous "Hannibal Lecter" series of books which have inspired the blockbuster films. Mystique, as a name, can refer to: Mystique, a comic book character from the Marvel Comics universe. ... Infamy, from INFAMIA, the Latin antonym of Fama (fame), means: -a negative reputation (but high profile, in modern speech often considered as a form of celebrity), as in crime, immorality, cruelty . ...


Response

Red Dragon was a box office success, earning $92,930,005 in the US [1]. It received a mixed reaction from many critics. While some reviewers compared it negatively to Manhunter, others, such as Roger Ebert, were enthusiastic about the remake. The average Rotten Tomatoes rating was 'fresh' with a rating of 68%, much lower than Manhunter's 94%, which also had 100% by its Cream of the Crop, comparing to Red Dragon's very low Cream of the Crop rating. However, there are only 24 "Manhunter" reviews counted on Rotten Tomatoes as opposed to 177 "Red Dragon" reviews. [2]. Furthermore, as of June 2007, users at IMDB rate Red Dragon higher than Manhunter, 7.3 vs. 7.1 respectively. Roger Joseph Ebert (June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) [1] is an online database of information about actors, movies, television shows, television stars and video games. ...


Errors

Francis Dolarhyde is a fictional character featured in Thomas Harris novel Red Dragon. ... The Great Red Dragon and the Woman Clothed in the Sun was painted by the English poet and painter William Blake between 1806 and 1809. ... The Great Red Dragon and the Woman Clothed in the Sun by William Blake. ...

Trivia

  • In this film, Frankie Faison reprises his role as Barney, the orderly from The Silence of the Lambs and Hannibal. Though Barney wasn't featured in the original novel, his mention of the year he came to the Hospital establishes that he could have been present during the events of Red Dragon, an example of a retcon. Faison is the only person to appear in all of the first four Hannibal Lecter films, having played Lt. Fisk in Manhunter.
  • Anthony Heald, who reprised his role as Dr. Frederick Chilton, wore a hair piece to match the hair style he wore in The Silence of the Lambs because at the time of shooting he sported a crew cut while in the TV show Boston Public.
  • Whereas MGM and Universal split distribution of Hannibal, MGM was a silent partner in this film, with Universal releasing the film in America and worldwide. On the DVD commentary track director Brett Ratner says that they were forced to go to MGM to obtain an establishing shot of the hospital where Lecter is incarcerated since it had been demolished since the production of The Silence of the Lambs and MGM insisted on co-distribution in return.
  • Brett Ratner wanted to digitally de-age Anthony Hopkins for this film but ultimately didn't do it. Four years later he would digitally de-age actors Patrick Stewart and Ian McKellen in his film X-Men: The Last Stand during a flashback scene that took place several years prior to the beginning of the film.
  • The end of the film leads into the beginning of The Silence of the Lambs. While not explicitly stated, it is implied that Hannibal's female visitor is Clarice Starling, with Lecter asking, "What's her name?".
  • The Red Dragon tattoo on Dolarhyde's back was designed by Tom Berg. He also designed the elaborate tattoo for the TV series Prison Break.
  • The film processing company that employs Dolarhyde is called Chromalux, compared to Gateway in the original novel and Manhunter film. This was most likely done to avoid confusion with the computer company Gateway, Inc..

Frankie Faison, often credited as Frankie R. Faison is one of those actors which many people may recognise, but not know his name. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Anthony Heald is an American actor best known for portraying Hannibal Lecters smarmy psychiatrist, Frederick Chilton, in The Silence of the Lambs and Red Dragon, and as deputy principal Scott Guber in Boston Public. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... DVD (Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is an optical disc storage media format that can be used for data storage, including movies with high video and sound quality. ... On a DVD (or laserdisc), an audio commentary is a bonus track consisting of a lecture or comments by one or more speakers, who talk about the movie as it progresses. ... Patrick Stewart OBE (born July 13, 1940) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe-nominated English film, television and stage actor. ... Sir Ian Murray McKellen, CBE (born May 25, 1939) is a veteran English stage and screen actor, the recipient of a Tony Award and two Oscar nominations. ... Jodie Foster as Clarice Starling, with Anthony Hopkins as Hannibal Lecter, in the 1991 film adaptation of The Silence of the Lambs Clarice Starling is a fictional character in the novels The Silence of the Lambs and Hannibal by Thomas Harris. ... Prison Break is an American television series that premiered on the Fox Network on August 29, 2005. ... Gateway, Inc. ...

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