FACTOID # 8: Bookworms: Vermont has the highest number of high school teachers per capita and third highest number of librarians per capita.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Red Auerbach
Arnold Jacob "Red" Auerbach

Red Auerbach at Boston Garden by Steve Lipofsky
Born: September 20, 1917
Brooklyn, New York, USA
Died: October 28, 2006
Washington, D.C., USA
Occupation: Hall of Fame NBA coach
Spouse: Dorothy Lewis
Children: Nancy Auerbach Collins, Randy Auerbach


Arnold Jacob "Red" Auerbach (September 20, 1917October 28, 2006) was a highly successful and influential basketball coach of the BAA Washington Nationals, the NBA Tri-Cities Blackhawks and the NBA Boston Celtics. In the closing stages of his career, he worked as a front office executive and president of the Celtics until his death. As a coach, the son of an Russian Jewish immigrant won 938 games, a record at his retirement,[1] and won nine titles with the Celtics, a record shared with Phil Jackson. Winning an additional seven titles as the Celtics general manager, he won 16 NBA championships in 29 coaching and managing years, making him one of the most successful officials in North American professional sports.[2] Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... NY redirects here. ... October 28 is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 64 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - City Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2: Jack... Basketball Hall of Fame Logo The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... October 28 is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 64 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Basketball is a team sport in which two teams of five active players each try to score points against one another by throwing a ball through a 10-foot high hoop (the basket) under organized rules. ... Look up baa, BAA in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Major league affiliations National League (1969–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Washington Nationals (2005–present) Montreal Expos (1969-2004) Ballpark RFK Stadium (2005–present) Hiram Bithorn Stadium[3] (San Juan) (2003-2004) Olympic Stadium (Montreal) (1977-2004) Jarry Park (Montreal) (1969-1976) [3] The... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... The Tri-Cities Blackhawks were one of the early NBA Franchises. ... The Boston Celtics are a professional basketball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The vast territories of the Russian Empire at one time hosted the largest Jewish population in the world. ... Philip Douglas Phil Jackson (born September 17, 1945 in Deer Lodge, Montana) is the current coach of the Los Angeles Lakers, an American professional basketball team. ...


Beyond trophies, Auerbach is remembered as a pioneer of modern basketball, redefining basketball as a game dominated by teamplay and tough defense rather than individual feats and high scoring and introducing the fastbreak as a potent offensive weapon.[2] In addition, Auerbach was vital in breaking down color barriers in the NBA. He made history by drafting the first African-American NBA player in Chuck Cooper (1950), and introduced the first fully black starting five in 1964.[3] Famous for his polarising nature, he was also well-known for smoking victory cigars when he thought a game was decided, a habit that became cult in the Boston area.[2] Fastbreak is an offensive strategy in which a team attempts to move the ball up court and into scoring position as quickly as possible so that the defense is outnumbered and does not have time to set up. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Charles Harrison Cooper (September 29, 1926 - February 5, 1984), better known as Chuck Cooper, was one of three players with legitimate claims to be the first African American basketball player in the NBA. Each satisfied a different condition of being first: Cooper was the first black player to be drafted... This article does not discuss cult in its original sense of religious practice; for that usage see Cult (religious practice). ...


For his feats, Auerbach received a multitude of honours. In 1967, the NBA Coach of the Year award, which he himself won in 1965, was named the "Red Auerbach Trophy", and Auerbach was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1969.[1]. Furthermore, in 1980 he was named the greatest coach in the history of the NBA by the Professional Basketball Writers Association of America, [4] and was named NBA Executive of the Year in 1981.[1] Finally, Auerbach was also voted one of the NBA 10 Greatest Coaches in history, is a member of the Jewish Hall of Fame and is honoured with a retired number-2 jersey in the Boston Garden, the home of the Boston Celtics. The person recognized as the NBA Coach of the Year receives the Red Auerbach Trophy. ... Basketball Hall of Fame Logo The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ... See also: 1979 in sports, other events of 1980, 1981 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Auto Racing Stock car racing: NASCAR Championship - Dale Earnhardt Buddy Baker won the Daytona 500 CART Racing - Johnny Rutherford won the season championship Indianapolis 500 - Johnny Rutherford Formula One Champion - Alan... The 50 Greatest Players in National Basketball Association History (commonly referred to as the NBAs 50th Anniversary All-Time Team) were chosen in 1996 on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the National Basketball Association (NBA) to comprise the fifty best and most influential players... The Boston Garden was a famous arena built in 1928 in Boston, Massachusetts. ...

Contents

Early years

Arnold Jacob Auerbach was born as one of four children of Marie and Hyman Auerbach. Hyman was a Russian Jewish immigrant from Minsk, and Marie Auerbach, née Thompson, was American-born. Auerbach Sr. had left Russia when he was 13,[5] and they owned a deli and later went into the dry cleaning business. Little Arnold spent his whole childhood in Williamsburgh in Brooklyn playing basketball. Given his flaming red hair and fiery temper, he was soon nicknamed "Red".[2] The vast territories of the Russian Empire at one time hosted the largest Jewish population in the world. ... Location of Minsk, shown within the Minsk Voblast Coordinates: Country Subdivision Belarus Minsk Founded 1067 Government  - Mayor Mikhail Pavlov Area  - City 305. ... The word delicatessen designates a kind of food store. ... Williamsburgh is a place name, derived from the name William and the Scots language and Scottish English word burgh: Williamsburgh, Paisley, a residential area in Paisley, Scotland, originally a separate village outwith the boundary of the ancient Burgh of Paisley Williamsburg, Brooklyn, originally called Williamsburgh from 1802-1855 Rockville, Maryland... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


In the midst of the Great Depression, Auerbach Jr. would play basketball at PS 122 and in the Eastern District High School, but with his relative diminutive height of 5-9 and his asthma, he never was really successful. His only achievement was being named "Second Team All-Brooklyn by the World-Telegram" in his senior year.[2] After graduating in 1935, Auerbach planned to go into basketball coaching. After several rejections due to relatively low academic scores, Bill Reinhart of George Washington College (now George Washington University) accepted Auerbach into his basketball program in Washington, D. C..[2] Auerbach became a standout basketball player and graduated with a M.A. in 1941.[5] In those years, Auerbach began to understand the importance of the fastbreak, understanding how potent a quick attack with three charging attackers versus two back-pedalling defenders would be.[2] The Great Depression started after October 29, 1929, known as Black Tuesday. ... ... Fastbreak is an offensive strategy in which a team attempts to move the ball up court and into scoring position as quickly as possible so that the defense is outnumbered and does not have time to set up. ...


First coaching years (1941-50)

In 1941, Auerbach began coaching basketball at St. Albans Prep School and Roosevelt High School.[5] Two years later, Auerbach joined the Navy for three years, coaching the Navy basketball team in Norfolk. There, he caught the eye of Washington millionaire Mike Uline, who hired him to coach the Washington Capitols in the newly-founded BAA, a predecessor of the NBA.[2] In the 1946-47 BAA season, Auerbach led a fastbreak-oriented team built around early BAA star Bones McKinney and various ex-Navy players to a 49–11 record into the playoffs, where they were defeated by the Chicago Stags with 1-2.[5] Roosevelt High School is the name of various public and independent secondary schools in the United States, established as memorials to either of two Presidents of the United States: Theodore Roosevelt, or Franklin Delano Roosevelt; or Eleanor Roosevelt. ... The multinational Combined Task Force One Five Zero (CTF-150) The British Grand Fleet, the supreme naval force of World War I A rare occurrence of a 5-country multinational fleet, during Operation Enduring Freedom in the Oman Sea. ... The Washington Capitols were a National Basketball Association team based in Washington, D.C. Founded: 1946 Folded: 1951 Formerly known as: Home Arena: Uniform colors: Logo design: NBA Championships: // Franchise history Players of note Basketball Hall of Famers: Not to be forgotten: Coaches and others Categories: | ... Look up baa, BAA in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The 1946-47 BAA Season was the inaugural season of the Basketball Association of America, the league that would eventually become the National Basketball Association. ... Horace Albert (Bones) McKinney (born January 1, 1919 in Lowlands, North Carolina – died May 16, 1997) was a professional basketball player and coach. ... The Chicago Stags were the first NBA team in Chicago. ...


The next year the Capitols went 28–20[5] but were eliminated from the playoffs in the last regular-season game.[2] In the 1948-49 BAA season, the Caps improved to 38–22[5] and reached the BAA Finals, but were beaten by the Minneapolis Lakers led by Hall-of-Fame center George Mikan. In the next season, the BAA and the rival league NBL merged to become the NBA, and Auerbach felt he had to rebuild his squad. However, owner Uline declined his proposals, and Auerbach resigned.[2] The 1947-48 BAA Season was the 2nd season of the Basketball Association of America, the league that would eventually become the National Basketball Association. ... The 1948-49 BAA Season was the 3rd season of the Basketball Association of America, the league that would eventually become the National Basketball Association. ... The Los Angeles Lakers are a National Basketball Association team based in Los Angeles, California. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... George Lawrence Mikan, Jr. ... NBL may refer to: the Australian National Basketball League the New Zealand National Basketball League the defunct American National Basketball League the defunct Canadian National Basketball League the Australian student political grouping National Broad Left This page expands a three-character combination which might be any or all of an... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ...


Auerbach was then approached by Ben Kerner, owner of the Tri-Cities Blackhawks. After getting green light to rebuild the team from scratch, Auerbach traded more than two dozen players in just six weeks, and the revamped Blackhawks improved, but ended the 1949-50 NBA season with a losing record of 28–29. When Kerner traded Auerbach's favorite player John Mahnken, an angry Auerbach resigned again.[2] The Tri-Cities Blackhawks were one of the early NBA Franchises. ... The 1949-50 NBA Season was officially the 4th season of the National Basketball Association. ...


Boston Celtics (1950-2006)

The early years (1950-56)

Prior to the 1950-51 NBA season, Auerbach was approached by Walter Brown, owner of the Boston Celtics. Brown was desperate to turn around his struggling and financially strapped franchise which was reeling from a terrible 22-46 record.[5] So, the still young but already seasoned Auerbach was made coach. In the 1950 NBA Draft, Auerbach made some notable moves. First, he famously snubbed Hall-of-Fame New England point guard Bob Cousy in the 1950 NBA Draft, infuriating the Boston crowd. Back then, he argued that the famously flashy Cousy was too air-headed to make his team, taunting him as a "local yokel".[2] Second, he drafted African-American Chuck Cooper, who became the first black player to get signed by a NBA club. Auerbach effectively broke down the color barrier in professional basketball.[3] The 1950-51 NBA season was the 5th season of the National Basketball Association. ... Walter Frederick Brown (born July 28, 1926) was the presidential candidate of the Socialist Party USA in 2004. ... The Boston Celtics are a professional basketball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The 1950 NBA Draft consisted of 12 rounds with 121 players selected. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Robert Joseph Cousy (born August 9, 1928 in New York City, is an American former professional basketball player, who played point guard with the NBAs Boston Celtics from 1951 to 1963 and (briefly) with the Cincinnati Royals in the 1969-1970 season, being recognized as one of the greatest... The 1950 NBA Draft consisted of 12 rounds with 121 players selected. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Charles Harrison Cooper (September 29, 1926 - February 5, 1984), better known as Chuck Cooper, was one of three players with legitimate claims to be the first African American basketball player in the NBA. Each satisfied a different condition of being first: Cooper was the first black player to be drafted... The Rex Theatre for Colored People, Leland, Mississippi, June 1937 Racial segregation is characterized by separation of people of different races in daily life when both are doing equal tasks, such as eating in a restaurant, drinking from a water fountain, using a rest room, attending school, going to the...


In that year, the core of the Celtics consisted of Hall-of-Fame center Ed Macauley, Auerbach's old favourite McKinney and an unlikely addition, Bob Cousy. Cousy had refused to report to the club which drafted him (ironically, Auerbach's old club, the Blackhawks), and because his next team (the Chicago Stags) folded, he ended up with the Celtics. With Auerbach's fastbreak tactics, the Celtics scored a 39-30 record, but lost in the 1951 NBA Playoffs to the New York Knicks. However, the relationship between Auerbach and Cousy improved when the coach saw that the "Houdini of the Hardwood"—as the spectacular dribbler and flashy passer Cousy was lovingly called—became the first great playmaker of the NBA.[2] Ed Macualey (born March 22, 1928 in Saint Louis, Missouri), is a former professional basketball player. ... The 1951 NBA Playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Associations 1950-1951 season. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Harry Houdini (March 24, 1874 – October 31, 1926), born Erich Weisz, was a Hungarian-American magician, escapologist, stunt performer, as well as an investigator of spiritualists, and an amateur aviator. ...


In the following 1951-52 NBA season, Auerbach made a remarkable draft pick, namely future Hall-of-Fame guard Bill Sharman. With the high-scoring Macauley, elite passer Cousy and new prodigy Sharman, Auerbach had a core which provided high-octane fastbreak basketball. Other notable players who joined were forwards Frank Ramsey and Jim Loscutoff. In the next years until 1956, the Celtics would make the playoffs every year, but never won the title. In fact, the Celtics often choked in playoffs, going a mere 10-17 in the postseason.[5] As Cousy put it: "We would get tired in the end and could not get the ball".[6] As a result, Auerbach sought a defensive big man who could both get easy rebounds, initiate fastbreaks and close out games.[2] The 1951-52 NBA Season was the 6th season of the National Basketball Association. ... William Walton Bill Sharman (born May 25, 1926 in Abilene, Texas) is a former professional basketball player and coach. ... Frank Plumpton Ramsey (February 22, 1903 - January 19, 1930) was a British mathematician and logician. ... James Loscutoff (born February 4, 1930 in San Francisco, California, United States) is a former professional basketball player for the NBAs Boston Celtics. ... A rebound in basketball is the act of successfully gaining possession of the basketball after a missed field goal or free throw. ...


The dynasty (1956-67)

In the 1956 NBA Draft, Auerbach had set his sights on defensive rebounding center Bill Russell. Via a draft-day trade that sent Macauley and rookie Cliff Hagan to the rival St. Louis Hawks, he finally acquired a future Hall-of-Fame center. In the same draft, Auerbach also picked up forward Tom Heinsohn and guard K.C. Jones, two further Hall-of-Famers. Emphasising team play rather than individual performances and stressing that defense was more important than offense, Auerbach drilled his players to play tough defense and force opposing turnovers for easy fastbreak points. Anchored by defensive stalwart Russell, the tough Celtics forced their opponents to take low-percentage shots from a larger distance; misses were then often grabbed by perennial rebounding champion Russell, who then either passed it on to elite fastbreak distributor Cousy or made the outlet pass himself, providing their sprinting colleagues opportunities for an easy slam dunk or layup.[2] Auerbach also emphasised the need for role players like Frank Ramsey and John Havlicek, who became one of the first legitimate sixth men in NBA history,[6] a role later succeeded by Don Nelson. The 1956 NBA Draft was held in New York on April 30th. ... William Felton Bill Russell (born February 12, 1934) is a retired American professional basketball player who played center for the Boston Celtics of the NBA. A five-time winner of the NBA Most Valuable Player Award and a twelve-time All-Star, the 6 ft 9 in Russell was the... Clifford Oldham Hagan (born December 9, 1931 in Owensboro, Kentucky) is a former professional basketball player. ... The Atlanta Hawks are a National Basketball Association (NBA) team based in Atlanta, Georgia. ... In the context of basketball, forward usually refers to one of two positions: Power forward Small forward In addition, some basketball players share the attributes of a small forward and a point guard, and are accordingly called point forwards. ... Tom Heinsohn (August 26, 1934- ) is a member of the Basketball Hall of Fame as a player on the Boston Celtics basketball team. ... Sara Giauro shoots a three-point shot, FIBA Europe Cup for Women Finals 2005 For other uses, see Basketball (disambiguation). ... K.C. Jones (born May 25, 1932 in Taylor, Texas) is a former pro basketball player and coach. ... In basketball, a turnover occurs when a player from one team gives possession to a member of another team by losing the ball. ... A slam dunk (or simply a dunk) is a type of basketball shot that is performed when a player jumps in the air and manually powers the ball through the basket with one or both of his hands, then often grabs the rim shortly after the ball passes through the... Allen Iverson performing a high percentage layup. ... Frank Plumpton Ramsey (February 22, 1903 - January 19, 1930) was a British mathematician and logician. ... John J. Havlicek (born April 8, 1940 in Martins Ferry, Ohio) is a former professional basketball player who competed for 16 seasons with the Boston Celtics, winning eight NBA titles, half of them coming in his first four seasons. ... The NBA Sixth Man of the Year Award is the award given by the National Basketball Association to the leagues best player coming off of the bench. ... Donald Arvid Nelson (born May 15, 1940 in Muskegon, Michigan) is an NBA head coach. ...


Auerbach's recipe proved devastating for the opposition. From 1956 to 1966, the Celtics won nine of ten NBA championships. This included eight consecutive championships—which formed the longest championship streak in North American sports—and beating the Los Angeles Lakers of Hall-of-Famers Elgin Baylor and Jerry West six times in the NBA Finals. Perhaps most notably, this also included denying perennial scoring and rebounding champion Wilt Chamberlain any chance of winning a title during Auerbach's coaching reign.[7] Lakers logo 1966-1991 The Los Angeles Lakers are a National Basketball Association (NBA) team based in Los Angeles, California. ... Elgin Gay Baylor (born September 16, 1934 in Washington, D.C.) is an American former basketball forward. ... Jerry Alan West (born May 28, 1938, in Chelyan, West Virginia) is a retired basketball player who played his entire professional career in the NBAs Los Angeles Lakers. ... Wilton Norman Wilt Chamberlain (August 21, 1936–October 12, 1999), nicknamed Wilt the Stilt and The Big Dipper, was an American professional National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player for the Philadelphia / San Francisco Warriors, the Philadelphia 76ers and the Los Angeles Lakers; and also played for the Harlem Globetrotters. ...


In this period, Auerbach produced nine players who made the Basketball Hall of Fame, namely Ramsey, Cousy, Sharman, Heinsohn, Russell, K. C. Jones, Havlicek, Sam Jones and Bailey Howell. In addition, Russell, Sharman, Heinsohn and K.C. Jones would win additional championship rings as coaches, and Nelson would join Auerbach as one of the 10 Greatest Coaches in NBA history.[2] In that period, Auerbach also popularised smoking a victory cigar whenever he thought a game was already decided, a habit that became cult in the Boston area.[6] Auerbach also became known as a fierce competitor, often getting into verbal altercations with officials, receiving more fines and getting ejected more often then any other coach in NBA history.[6] Basketball Hall of Fame Logo The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ... Sam, Samantha or Samuel Jones can refer to a number of different people. ... Bailey E. Howell (born January 20, 1937 in Middleton, Tennessee) is a former professional basketball player. ... This article does not discuss cult in its original sense of religious practice; for that usage see Cult (religious practice). ... In sports, an ejection is a disqualifying action assessed to a player or coach by a game official (such as a referee or umpire), usually for unsportsmanlike conduct. ...


Striking about his teams was that they never seemed to have a dominant scorer: in the 1960-61 NBA season, the Celtics had six players who scored between 15 and 21 points, but no one who was in the Top 10 scoring list.[6] Forward Tom Sanders also recalled that the teams were also regularly among the best-conditioned and toughest squads.[6] The 1960-61 NBA Season was the 15th season of the National Basketball Association. ...


In this period, Auerbach also further broke down colour barriers in the NBA. In 1964, he sent out the first-ever NBA starting five consisting of an African-American quintet, namely Russell, Willie Naulls, Tom Sanders, Sam Jones and K. C. Jones. Auerbach would go a step further in the 1966-67 NBA season, when he stepped down after winning nine titles in 11 years, and made Bill Russell coach. William Dean Naulls (born October 7, 1934 in Dallas, Texas) is a retired American basketball player. ... Thomas Ernest Satch Sanders (born November 8, 1938 in New York City, New York) is a former professional basketball player and coach. ... The 1966-67 NBA Season was the 21st season of the National Basketball Association. ...


General manager (1967-1984)

Prior to the 1966-67 NBA season, Auerbach announced his retirement as a coach and named his successor, Bill Russell. Russell took over as a player-coach and so became the first African-American coach in the NBA.[2] While his pupil led the Celtics to two further titles in 1968 and 1969, Auerbach rebuilt the aging Celtics with shrewd draft picks, among them future Hall-of-Famers Dave Cowens, Jo Jo White, Paul Westphal and Don Chaney. With his ex-player Tom Heinsohn coaching the Celtics and led by former sixth man John Havlicek, Auerbach's new recruits won the Eastern Division every year from 1972 to 1976, winning the NBA title in 1974 and 1976. Further notable Auerbach signings were veteran center Paul Silas and ex-ABA star Charlie Scott.[5] The 1966-67 NBA Season was the 21st season of the National Basketball Association. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Dave Cowens David William Cowens (born October 25, 1948 in Newport, Kentucky) is a former professional basketball player and NBA Head Coach. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Paul Westphal (born November 30, 1950 in Torrance, California) is a former basketball player and coach in the NBA. A native of California, Westphal has had a storied career in the NBA, both as a player and as a head coach. ... Donald R. Chaney (born March 22, 1946 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana) is a former pro basketball player and coach. ... Paul Theron Silas (born July 12, 1943 in Prescott, Arizona) is a former professional basketball player and coach. ... Look up ABA in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Charles Thomas Scott (born December 15, 1948 in New York City, New York) is an American former professional basketball player. ...


However, Auerbach could not prevent the Celtics going into a slump at the end of the 1970s. When scoring champion Havlicek retired in 1978, the Celtics went 61-103 in two seasons.[5] But in 1979, Boston's fortunes changed when Auerbach set his eyes on talented college player Larry Bird. Despite knowing that Bird was only eligible to play in the NBA in 1979, he drafted him in the 1979 NBA Draft and waited for a year until the future Hall-of-Fame forward Bird finally arrived. Auerbach immediately sensed that the brilliant, hardworking Bird was the cornerstone of a new Celtics generation.[2] This article contains a trivia section. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ...


In 1980, Auerbach made another great coup. He convinced the Golden State Warriors to trade him a #3 overall pick and future Hall-of-Fame center Robert Parish in exchange for the #1 pick in the draft, namely Joe Barry Carroll, who went on to have an unremarkable career. With the #3 pick, Auerbach selected the player he most wanted in the draft, Kevin McHale, who would also join the Hall of Fame. The three-Hall-of-Famer-frontcourt Parish-McHale-Bird became one of the greatest frontlines in NBA history. Other valuable role players were M.L. Carr, veteran point guard Nate Archibald and Gerald Henderson, and later Dennis Johnson and Danny Ainge. Auerbach's hand-picked coach Bill Fitch led the revamped Celtics to the 1981 NBA title, and it was another Auerbach pupil, K.C. Jones, who continued with another title in 1984.[5] The Golden State Warriors are a professional basketball team based in Oakland, California. ... Robert Lee Parish (born August 30, 1953 ) in Shreveport, Louisiana) is a retired American basketball center. ... 1980 NBA Draft - 10 June 1980 See also: List of NBA Drafts, NBA Draft Categories: NBA Draft ... Joe Barry Carroll (born July 24, 1958 in Pine Bluff, Arkansas) is a retired American professional basketball player who spent ten seasons in the NBA. A 70 center who starred at Purdue University, he holds the all-time school records for career and single-season rebounds (1148 and 352... Kevin Edward McHale (born December 19, 1957) is an American former professional basketball player who starred for thirteen seasons in the NBA for the Boston Celtics. ... Michael Leon (M.L.) Carr (born January 9, 1951 in Wallace, North Carolina) is a former basketball player in the National Basketball Association and American Basketball Association, and former head coach and General Manager of the Boston Celtics. ... Nathaniel (Nate) Tiny Archibald (born September 2, 1948 in New York City) is a former professional basketball player. ... Jerome McKinley Gerald Henderson (born January 16, 1956 in Richmond, Virginia) is a former shooting guard who had a 13 year career in the National Basketball Association from 1979 until 1992. ... Dennis Johnson (September 18, 1954 – February 22, 2007), nicknamed DJ, was an American professional basketball player and coach. ... Daniel Ray Ainge (born March 17, 1959 in Eugene, Oregon, USA) is a former professional basketball and baseball player who played in the NBA for the Boston Celtics, Sacramento Kings, Portland Trail Blazers, and Phoenix Suns, and also in Major League Baseball for the Toronto Blue Jays. ... Bill Fitch (born 1935) is an NBA coach who has been successful in making teams playoff contenders throughout his coaching career. ...


President and vice chairman (1984-2006)

In 1984, Auerbach quit general managing duties and became president and later vice-chairman of the Boston Celtics.[5] When the Celtics took the 1986 title, it was Auerbach's 16th title, an unmatched feat in the NBA. However, in the next years, tragedy struck the Celtics. Sensing that the 1980s Celtics of Larry Bird needed fresh blood, Auerbach traded Henderson away for a number-2 draft, and so picked college prodigy Len Bias in the 1986 NBA Draft. But just two days later, Bias died of a cocaine overdose. Several years later, Celtics player Reggie Lewis suddenly died in 1993, and the Celtics never recovered from these two blows.[5] The 1986 NBA Finals was the championship round of the 1985-1986 NBA season The Boston Celtics won the series over the Houston Rockets four games to two. ... | Leonard Kevin Bias (November 18, 1963 – June 19, 1986) was an American college basketball player who suffered a fatal cardiac arrhythmia that resulted from a cocaine overdose less than 48 hours after being selected by the Boston Celtics in the 1986 NBA Draft. ... The 1986 NBA Draft is perhaps most notable for the drug-related death of highly-touted Len Bias less than two days after being selected second overall by the defending champion Boston Celtics. ... Reggie Lewis (November 21, 1965 - July 27, 1993) was a basketball player for the Boston Celtics from 1987-1993. ...


In an interview, Auerbach confessed that he lost interest in big-time managing in the early 1990s, preferring to stay in the background and concentrating on his pastimes, racquetball and his beloved cigar-smoking. He would however stay on the Celtics as a president until 1997, then was vice chairman until 2001, and became president again, a position he held until 2006[6] although he grew visibly frail in his final years.[8] Racquetball racquet and ball Racquetball is a sport played with racquets and a hollow rubber ball on an indoor or outdoor court. ...

A visibly frail Auerbach speaking after being honored with the Lone Sailor Award on October 25th, 2006. Three days later, he died.
A visibly frail Auerbach speaking after being honored with the Lone Sailor Award on October 25th, 2006. Three days later, he died.

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1632x2464, 516 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Red Auerbach User:Durin/Contributions ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1632x2464, 516 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Red Auerbach User:Durin/Contributions ...

Private life

Auerbach was one of four children of American-born Marie Auerbach and Russian Jewish immigrant Hyman Auerbach in Brooklyn. His brother Zang Auerbach, four years his junior, was a respected cartoonist and portraitist at the Washington Star.[7] He married Dorothy Lewis in the spring of 1941 and fathered two daughters, Nancy and Randy."[6] The vast territories of the Russian Empire at one time hosted the largest Jewish population in the world. ... The Washington Star, previously known as the Washington Star-News and the Washington Evening Star, was a daily newspaper published in Washington, D.C. between 1852 and 1982. ...


Auerbach was known for his love for cigar smoking. Having made his victory cigars a cult in the 1960s, Boston restaurants would often say "no cigar or pipe smoking, except for Red Auerbach".[6] In addition, Auerbach was well-known for his love of Chinese food. In an interview shortly before his death, he explained that since the 1950s, Chinese takeaway was the most convenient nutrition: back then, NBA teams travelled on regular flights and had a tight time schedule, so filling up the stomach with heavier non-Chinese food, meant wasting time and risking travel-sickness. Over the years, Auerbach became so fond of this food that he even part-owned a Chinese restaurant in Boston.[7]


Despite his fierce nature, Auerbach was popular among his players. He recalled that on his 75th birthday party, 45 of his ex-players showed up;[6] and when he became 80, his perennial 1960s victim Wilt Chamberlain showed up, a gesture which Auerbach dearly appreciated.[7] Wilton Norman Wilt Chamberlain (August 21, 1936–October 12, 1999), nicknamed Wilt the Stilt and The Big Dipper, was an American professional National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player for the Philadelphia / San Francisco Warriors, the Philadelphia 76ers and the Los Angeles Lakers; and also played for the Harlem Globetrotters. ...


In an interview with ESPN, Auerbach stated that his all-time team would consist of Bill Russell—whom in the former's opinion was the ultimate player to start a franchise—as well as Bob Pettit, Elgin Baylor, Oscar Robertson and Jerry West, with John Havlicek as the sixth man. Regarding greatest basketballers of all time, Auerbach's candidates were Russell, Larry Bird, Magic Johnson, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Michael Jordan and Robertson."[6] ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... Bob Pettit (with the ball) as a player of the St. ... Elgin Gay Baylor (born September 16, 1934 in Washington, D.C.) is an American former basketball forward. ... Oscar Palmer Robertson (born November 24, 1938 in Charlotte, Tennessee), nicknamed The Big O, is a former American NBA player with the Cincinnati Royals and the Milwaukee Bucks. ... Jerry Alan West (born May 28, 1938, in Chelyan, West Virginia) is a retired basketball player who played his entire professional career in the NBAs Los Angeles Lakers. ... John J. Havlicek (born April 8, 1940 in Martins Ferry, Ohio) is a former professional basketball player who competed for 16 seasons with the Boston Celtics, winning eight NBA titles, half of them coming in his first four seasons. ... The NBA Sixth Man of the Year Award is the award given by the National Basketball Association to the leagues best player coming off of the bench. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... Earvin Johnson, Jr. ... For the football player, see Abdul-Karim al-Jabbar. ... For other persons named Michael Jordan, see Michael Jordan (disambiguation). ...


Death

On October 26, 2006, Auerbach died of a heart attack. He was 89 years old. His death was met with great grief throughout the basketball world, and also throughout the Boston community. NBA commissioner David Stern said "the void by his death will never be filled" and ex-players Bill Russell, K.C. Jones, John Havlicek and Larry Bird as well as contemporaries like Jerry West, Pat Riley and Wayne Embry universally hailed Auerbach as one of the greatest personalities in NBA history.[8] Auerbach was survived by his two daughters, Nancy and Randy. Auerbach was buried in Falls Church, Virginia at the King David Memorial Gardens / National Memorial Park on October 31, 2006. October 26 is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... A myocardial infarction occurs when an atherosclerotic plaque slowly builds up in the inner lining of a coronary artery and then suddenly ruptures, totally occluding the artery and preventing blood flow downstream. ... For other people with the name David Stern, see Stern (disambiguation) David Joel Stern (born on September 22, 1942) is an American lawyer, who has been commissioner of the National Basketball Association (NBA) since 1984, when, via a successful coup detat he wrestled control from the previous commissioner, Larry... Jerry Alan West (born May 28, 1938, in Chelyan, West Virginia) is a retired basketball player who played his entire professional career in the NBAs Los Angeles Lakers. ... Pat Riley reacts to a call during a game. ... Wayne Embry (born March 26, 1937 Springfield, OH - ) was a center/forward with an 11 year career from 1959 to 1969. ... Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Independent City Founded 1875 Government  - Mayor Robin Gardner Area  - City  2. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... October 31 is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


During the 2006-07 NBA season, Auerbach posthumously appeared in a series of NBA commercials where he breaks down formations like "3 on 2 situations" and "rebounding", and as a testament to his importance in the Boston sports world, the Boston Red Sox honored Auerbach at their April 20th, 2007 game against the New York Yankees by wearing green uniforms and by hanging replicated Celtics championship banners on the "Green Monster" at Fenway Park. Boston won 7-6. The 2006-07 NBA season was the 61st season of the National Basketball Association. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox, Las Medias Rojas (Spanish) Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present... April 20 is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... The Boston Celtics are a National Basketball Association team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The Green Monster in 2006, showing the manual scoreboard and Green Monster seating, and more recent additions, including charity advertisements along the top, billboards above the Green Monster seating, and the American League East standings. ... “Fenway” redirects here. ...

Red Auerbach Memorial worn by the Celtics for the 2006-07 NBA season.
Red Auerbach Memorial worn by the Celtics for the 2006-07 NBA season.

Image File history File links RedMemshamrock. ... Image File history File links RedMemshamrock. ... The 2006-07 NBA season was the 61st season of the National Basketball Association. ...

Legacy

With 16 NBA championship rings in 29 coaching and managing years, Auerbach is the most successful official in NBA history.[2] He is credited with creating several generations of championship Boston Celtics teams, most notably the first Celtics dynasty with Bill Russell which won an unprecedented eight rings in a row (1959-1966). As Celtics general manager, he created championship-winning teams around Hall-of-Famers Dave Cowens in the 1970s and Larry Bird in the 1980s. [2] William Felton Bill Russell (born February 12, 1934) is a retired American professional basketball player who played center for the Boston Celtics of the NBA. A five-time winner of the NBA Most Valuable Player Award and a twelve-time All-Star, the 6 ft 9 in Russell was the... Dave Cowens David William Cowens (born October 25, 1948 in Newport, Kentucky) is a former professional basketball player and NBA Head Coach. ... This article contains a trivia section. ...


Remarkably, several players under Auerbach would become successful coaches themselves. Bill Russell won two titles as Auerbach's successor, Tom Heinsohn won a pair of championships as a Celtics coach in the 1970s, K.C. Jones led the Celtics to two further titles in the 1980s, and Bill Sharman coached the Los Angeles Lakers to their first title in 1972. In addition, ex-sixth man Don Nelson had a highly successful coaching career and joined his mentor Auerbach as one of 10 Greatest Coaches in NBA history. William Felton Bill Russell (born February 12, 1934) is a retired American professional basketball player who played center for the Boston Celtics of the NBA. A five-time winner of the NBA Most Valuable Player Award and a twelve-time All-Star, the 6 ft 9 in Russell was the... Tom Heinsohn (August 26, 1934- ) is a member of the Basketball Hall of Fame as a player on the Boston Celtics basketball team. ... K.C. Jones (born May 25, 1932 in Taylor, Texas) is a former pro basketball player and coach. ... William Walton Bill Sharman (born May 25, 1926 in Abilene, Texas) is a former professional basketball player and coach. ... Lakers logo 1966-1991 The Los Angeles Lakers are a National Basketball Association (NBA) team based in Los Angeles, California. ... Donald Arvid Nelson (born May 15, 1940 in Muskegon, Michigan) is an NBA head coach. ... The 50 Greatest Players in National Basketball Association History (commonly referred to as the NBAs 50th Anniversary All-Time Team) were chosen in 1996 on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the National Basketball Association (NBA) to comprise the fifty best and most influential players...


In Auerbach's honour, the Celtics have retired a number-2 jersey with the name "AUERBACH", expressing that he is the second most important Celtic ever, behind founder Walter Brown, in whose honour the number-1 "BROWN" jersey is retired. Walter Frederick Brown (born July 28, 1926) was the presidential candidate of the Socialist Party USA in 2004. ...

In 1985, the Boston Celtics retired the number-2 jersey with Red Auerbach's name.

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Coaching pioneer

From his early days, Auerbach was convinced that the fastbreak, in which a team used a quick outlet pass to fast guards who run downcourt and score before the opponent had re-established position, was a potent tactical weapon. This new strategy proved lethal for the opposition.[2] Further, Auerbach moved emphasis away from individual accolades and instilled the teamwork element into his players.[5] He also invented the concept of the role player[9] and of the sixth man, stating: "Individual honors are nice, but no Celtic has ever gone out of his way to achieve them. We have never had the league's top scorer. In fact, we won seven league championships without placing even one among the league's top 10 scorers. Our pride was never rooted in statistics."[5] Fastbreak is an offensive strategy in which a team attempts to move the ball up court and into scoring position as quickly as possible so that the defense is outnumbered and does not have time to set up. ... The NBA Sixth Man of the Year Award is the award given by the National Basketball Association to the leagues best player coming off of the bench. ...


While Auerbach was not known for his tactical bandwidth, famously restricting his teams to just seven plays,[5] he was well-known for his psychological warfare, often provoking opposing players and officials with unabashed trash talk. For his fiery temper, he was ejected more often and received more fines than any other coach in NBA history.[6] Concerning his own team, Auerbach was softer. Earl Lloyd, the first black player to play in the NBA, said: "Red Auerbach convinced his players that he loved him […] so all they wanted to do was please him."[6] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Earl Francis Lloyd (born April 3, 1928), was the first African-American to play in the NBA, in the 1950-51 NBA season. ...


Breaking down color barriers

Auerbach was known choosing players regardless of skin color. He made history by drafting the first African-American NBA player in Chuck Cooper (1950), and constantly added new black players to his squad like Bill Russell, Tom Sanders, Sam Jones, K.C. Jones and Willie Naulls until these five players became the first fully African-American NBA starting five in 1964. Finally, when he gave up coaching to become general manager, Auerbach also appointed the first black NBA coach in history, namely Bill Russell in 1966.[3] Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Charles Harrison Cooper (September 29, 1926 - February 5, 1984), better known as Chuck Cooper, was one of three players with legitimate claims to be the first African American basketball player in the NBA. Each satisfied a different condition of being first: Cooper was the first black player to be drafted... William Felton Bill Russell (born February 12, 1934) is a retired American professional basketball player who played center for the Boston Celtics of the NBA. A five-time winner of the NBA Most Valuable Player Award and a twelve-time All-Star, the 6 ft 9 in Russell was the... Thomas Ernest Satch Sanders (born November 8, 1938 in New York City, New York) is a former professional basketball player and coach. ... Sam, Samantha or Samuel Jones can refer to a number of different people. ... K.C. Jones (born May 25, 1932 in Taylor, Texas) is a former pro basketball player and coach. ... William Dean Naulls (born October 7, 1934 in Dallas, Texas) is a retired American basketball player. ...


Writing

Auerbach was the author of seven books. His first, Basketball for the Player, the Fan and Coach, has been translated into seven languages and is the largest-selling basketball book in print.[2] His second book, co-authored with Paul Sann, was Winning the Hard Way. He also wrote a pair of books written with Joe Fitzgerald: Red Auerbach: An Autobiography and Red Auerbach On and Off the Court. In October, 1991, M.B.A.: Management by Auerbach, was co-authored with Ken Dooley. In 1994, Seeing Red was written with Dan Shaughnessy. In October 2004, his latest book, Let Me Tell You A Story, was co-authored with sports journalist John Feinstein. Joe Fitzgerald one of the designers of the new, 2005 US nickel. ... Dan Shaughnessy is a sports columnist and reporter for The Boston Globe. ... John Feinstein is an American sportswriter and commentator. ...


Notes

  1. ^ a b c May, Peter (2007-07-10). Auerbach, pride of the Celtics, dies.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v jockbio.com (2007-07-10). Red Auerbach biography.
  3. ^ a b c Ryan, Bob (2007-07-10). Red was just full of color.
  4. ^ "Red Auerbach, Who Built Basketball Dynasty, Dies at 89" (2007-07-10).
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Hilton, Lisette (2007-07-10). Auerbach's Celtics played as a team.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Shouler, Ken (2007-07-10). The Consummate Coach.
  7. ^ a b c d Feinstein, Ron (2007-07-10). Red Auerbach: True Stories and NBA Legends.
  8. ^ a b nba.com (2007-07-10). A Tribute to Red.
  9. ^ a player who is not expected to have a good all-around game, but makes up for gaps in his game by being proficient in one or two special skills, such as man-to-man defense, long range shooting, shot blocking, rebounding etc.

References

The Jewish Telegraph is a Jewish Newspaper in Britain. ...

External links

Preceded by
Initial coach
Washington Capitols Head Coach
1946–1949
Succeeded by
Bob Feerick
Preceded by
Roger Potter
Tri-Cities Blackhawks Head Coach
1949–1950
Succeeded by
Dave McMillan
Preceded by
Doggie Julian
Boston Celtics Head Coach
1950–1966
Succeeded by
Bill Russell
v  d  e
Top Ten Coaches in NBA History

Red AuerbachChuck DalyBill FitchRed HolzmanPhil JacksonJohn KundlaDon NelsonJack RamsayPat RileyLenny Wilkens The Washington Capitols were a National Basketball Association team based in Washington, D.C. Founded: 1946 Folded: 1951 Formerly known as: Home Arena: Uniform colors: Logo design: NBA Championships: // Franchise history Players of note Basketball Hall of Famers: Not to be forgotten: Coaches and others Categories: | ... Robert Joseph (Bob) Feerick (born January 2, 1920 in San Francisco, California - died June 8, 1976) was a professional basketball player, coach and general manager. ... Roger Potter was an American basketball coach, who was the first coach for the NBAs Tri-Cities Blackhawks (now the Atlanta Hawks). ... The Atlanta Hawks are an American professional basketball team based in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Dave McMillan is a former basketball coach. ... Alvin F. Doggie Julian (b. ... The Boston Celtics are a professional basketball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... William Fenton Russell (born February 12, 1934) is a former American basketball player remembered for his central role in the Boston Celtics dynasty that won 11 championships in the 13 seasons that he played. ... The 50 Greatest Players in National Basketball Association History (commonly referred to as the NBAs 50th Anniversary All-Time Team) were chosen in 1996 on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the National Basketball Association (NBA) to comprise the fifty best and most influential players... Chuck Daly Charles Jerome Chuck Daly (born July 20, 1930 in St. ... Bill Fitch (born 1935) is an NBA coach who has been successful in making teams playoff contenders throughout his coaching career. ... William Red Holzman (August 10, 1920 â€“ November 13, 1998) was an NBA basketball player and coach probably best known as the head coach of the New York Knicks from 1967 to 1982. ... Philip Douglas Phil Jackson (born September 17, 1945 in Deer Lodge, Montana) is the current coach of the Los Angeles Lakers, an American professional basketball team. ... John Albert Kundla (born July 3, 1916 in Star Junction, Pennsylvania) is a former professional and college basketball coach. ... Donald Arvid Nelson (born May 15, 1940 in Muskegon, Michigan) is an NBA head coach. ... Dr. John T. Ramsay (born February 21, 1925 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a former professional basketball coach in the National Basketball Association. ... Pat Riley reacts to a call during a game. ... Lenny Wilkens with the Portland Trail Blazers Leonard Randolph Wilkens (born October 28, 1937, in Brooklyn, New York, USA) is a former National Basketball Association player, as well as the NBAs career leader in coaching wins and losses. ...

PotterAuerbachMcMillanLoganTodorovichMooreLevaneHolzmanMartinHannumPhillipMacauleySeymourLevanePettitGallatinGuerinFitzsimmonsTormohlenBrownFratelloLougheryFratelloWeissWilkensKrugerStottsWoodson The Atlanta Hawks are an American professional basketball team based in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Roger Potter was an American basketball coach, who was the first coach for the NBAs Tri-Cities Blackhawks (now the Atlanta Hawks). ... Dave McMillan is a former basketball coach. ... John Arnold (Johnny) Logan (born January 1, 1921 in Richmond, Indiana, died September 16, 1977), was a basketball player and coach. ... Marko John (Mike) Todorovich (born June 11, 1923 in St. ... Doxie Moore is a former basketball coach. ... Andrew Joseph (Fuzzy) Levane (born April 11, 1920 in Brooklyn, New York) is a former basketball player and coach. ... William Red Holzman (August 10, 1920 â€“ November 13, 1998) was an NBA basketball player and coach probably best known as the head coach of the New York Knicks from 1967 to 1982. ... Slater Nelson Dugie Martin, Jr. ... Alexander Murray Hannum (July 19, 1923 - January 18, 2002) was a pro basketball coach. ... Andy Phillip (born March 7, 1922 Granite City, IL - ) was a guard/forward with an 11 year career from 1948 to 1958. ... Ed Macualey (born March 22, 1928 in Saint Louis, Missouri), is a former professional basketball player. ... Paul Norman Seymour (born January 30, 1928 in Toledo, Ohio – died May 5, 1988) is a former basketball player and coach. ... Andrew Joseph (Fuzzy) Levane (born April 11, 1920 in Brooklyn, New York) is a former basketball player and coach. ... Bob Pettit (with the ball) as a player of the St. ... Harry J. Gallatin (born April 26, 1927 in Roxana, Illinois) is a former pro basketball player and coach. ... Richard V. Guerin (born May 29, 1932 in New York City) is a former NBA player and pro basketball coach. ... Lowell Fitzsimmons (October 7, 1931–July 24, 2004) was a native of Hannibal, Missouri who was a college and NBA basketball coach. ... Eugene R. (Bumper) Tormohlen (born May 12, 1937) is an American former professional basketball player and coach. ... Hubert Jude Hubie Brown (born September 25, 1933 in Hazelton, Pennsylvania) is a former basketball coach and television analyst. ... Mike Fratello (born February 24, 1947 in Hackensack, New Jersey, United States) is a professional basketball coach. ... Kevin Michael Loughery (born March 28, 1940 in Brooklyn, New York) is a former pro basketball player and coach. ... Mike Fratello (born February 24, 1947 in Hackensack, New Jersey, United States) is a professional basketball coach. ... Robert William Weiss (born May 7, 1942, in Easton, Pennsylvania) was most recently the head coach of the Seattle SuperSonics of the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... Lenny Wilkens with the Portland Trail Blazers Leonard Randolph Wilkens (born October 28, 1937, in Brooklyn, New York, USA) is a former National Basketball Association player, as well as the NBAs career leader in coaching wins and losses. ... Lon Kruger (born August 19, 1952 in Silver Lake, Kansas) is an American basketball coach. ... Terry Stotts (born November 25, 1957 in Cedar Falls, Iowa) is an American basketball coach, and the current head coach of the NBAs Milwaukee Bucks (as of 2005/06). ... Michael Dean Woodson (born March 24, 1958 in Indianapolis, Indiana) is a former NBA player and current head coach of the Atlanta Hawks. ...

v  d  e
Boston Celtics Head Coaches

J. RussellJulianAuerbachB. RussellHeinsohnSandersCowensFitchJonesRodgersFordCarrPitinoO'BrienCarrollRivers The Boston Celtics are a professional basketball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... John Honey Russell (born May 31, 1902 in Brooklyn, New York, died November 15, 1973) was an American basketball player and coach. ... Alvin F. Doggie Julian (b. ... William Felton Bill Russell (born February 12, 1934) is a retired American professional basketball player who played center for the Boston Celtics of the NBA. A five-time winner of the NBA Most Valuable Player Award and a twelve-time All-Star, the 6 ft 9 in Russell was the... Tom Heinsohn (August 26, 1934- ) is a member of the Basketball Hall of Fame as a player on the Boston Celtics basketball team. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Dave Cowens David William Cowens (born October 25, 1948 in Newport, Kentucky) is a former professional basketball player and NBA Head Coach. ... Bill Fitch (born 1935) is an NBA coach who has been successful in making teams playoff contenders throughout his coaching career. ... K.C. Jones (born May 25, 1932 in Taylor, Texas) is an American former professional basketball player and coach. ... Jimmy Rodgers is a former basketball coach. ... Christopher Joseph Ford (born January 11, 1949 in Atlantic City, New Jersey) is a former professional basketball player and head coach. ... Michael Leon (M.L.) Carr (born January 9, 1959 in Wallace, North Carolina) is a former basketball player in the National Basketball Association and American Basketball Association, and former head coach and General Manager of the Boston Celtics. ... Rick Pitino (born September 18, 1952) is the head basketball coach at the University of Louisville. ... Jim OBrien (born February 11, 1952 in Philadelphia, PA) is best known as a professional basketball coach. ... John Carroll is a former basketball head coach for the NBAs Boston Celtics. ... Glenn Anton Doc Rivers (born October 13, 1961 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American former professional basketball player from Marquette University who played point guard in the National Basketball Association notably for the Atlanta Hawks, Los Angeles Clippers, New York Knicks, and San Antonio Spurs. ...

Persondata
NAME Auerbach, Red
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Auerbach, Arnold Jacob
SHORT DESCRIPTION Hall of Fame basketball coach
DATE OF BIRTH September 20, 1917
PLACE OF BIRTH Brooklyn, New York, United States
DATE OF DEATH October 28, 2006
PLACE OF DEATH Washington, D.C., United States

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m