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Encyclopedia > Rector

The word rector ("ruler," from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings, but all of them indicate someone who is in charge of something.


The word "rector" also appears in many modern languages, such as Dutch and Spanish. In Danish, German, Icelandic, Norwegian, Croatian, Serbian, Swedish, Polish, Indonesian and Filipino, the homophonous spelling is Rektor; other languages use derived forms, e.g. Rettore in Italian, Reitor in Portuguese and Rehtori in Finnish.


The term and office of a rector are called rectorate.


Rector is also a surname in English speaking countries.

Contents

Academic rectors

The Rector is the highest academic official of many universities and certain other institutions of higher, sometimes even secondary, education. Representation of a university class, 1350s. ...


The title is used widely in universities across Europe, including the Benelux, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Germany, Iceland, Italy, Moldova, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Scandinavia, Scotland, Serbia, Spain, Turkey and Ukraine. It is also very common in Latin American countries such as Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and Peru, and also in Philippines and Israel. At some universities it is phrased in a loftier manner, as Rector Magnificus or Lord Rector. World map showing the location of Europe. ... Location of Benelux in Europe Official languages Dutch and French Membership  Belgium  Netherlands  Luxembourg Website http://www. ... Bosnia and Herzegovina (also variously written Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Bosnia-Hercegovina) is a mountainous country in the western Balkans. ... Scandinavia is a historical and geographical region centered on the Scandinavian Peninsula in Northern Europe and includes the three kingdoms of Denmark, Norway and Sweden. ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic) Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic and Scots1 Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Monarch Queen Elizabeth II... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian 3 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 9th century   -  First unified state c. ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ...


A notable exception to this terminology was England, where universities were traditionally headed by a "Chancellor", and this designation followed in the Commonwealth, USA and other countries under Anglo-Saxon influence. Scotland follows suit in this practice, with the ancient universities being headed by a Chancellor, with the Lord Rector as an elected representative of students heading the university court. Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total 130... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... A University Court is the supreme governing body of an Ancient university in Scotland, analogous to a Board of Directors or a Board of Trustees The University Courts were established by the Universities (Scotland) Act 1858 and they are responsible for the finances and administration of each university. ...


Scotland

In Scotland, the position of Rector exists in the four ancient universities, which are the Universities of St Andrews, Glasgow, Aberdeen and Edinburgh. Dundee, technically an ancient university owing to its separation from the University of St Andrews, although only existing independently since 1967, also follows this tradition. The Ancient universities of Scotland are those universities founded during the medieval period, and comprise (list by year of being chartered): The University of St Andrews, founded 1411 by papal bull The University of Glasgow, founded 1451 by papal bull The University of Aberdeen, founded 1495 by papal bull (as... St Marys College Bute Medical School St Leonards College[5][6] Affiliations 1994 Group Website http://www. ... Master of Theology (MTh) Dentistry Nursing Affiliations Russell Group, Universitas 21 Website http://www. ... The University of Aberdeen was founded in 1495, in Aberdeen, Scotland. ... The University of Edinburgh (Scottish Gaelic: ), founded in 1582,[4] is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... The University of Dundee is the principal university in the city and Royal burgh of Dundee, Scotland. ...


The post (officially Lord Rector, but by normal use Rector alone) was made an integral part of these universities by the Universities (Scotland) Act 1889. The nominal head of an ancient university in Scotland is its Chancellor and the day-to-day functions of the chief executive is vested in the Vice-Chancellor who also holds the title of Principal. The Rector is the third ranked official of university governance and chairs meetings of the University Court, the governing body of the university, and is elected at regular intervals (usually three years to enable every undergraduate completing a degree to vote at least once) by their matriculated student bodies. A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... The Principal is the chief executive and the chief academic officer of a University in Scotland and at certains institutions in Canada and other parts of the Commonwealth. ... A University Court is the supreme governing body of an Ancient university in Scotland, analogous to a Board of Directors or a Board of Trustees The University Courts were established by the Universities (Scotland) Act 1858 and they are responsible for the finances and administration of each university. ... The matriculation ceremony at Oxford Matriculation, in the broadest sense, means to be registered or added to a list, from the Latin matrix. ...


This role is considered by many students to be integral to their ability to shape the universities' agendas and it is one of the main functions of the Rector to represent the interests of the students. To some extent the office has evolved into more of a figurehead role, but given recent threats to the status of the Rector as the chair of the Court, and the value placed upon this role, there has been a resurgence of interest in recent years in the idea of electing more respected, experienced figures. This is because students have come to realise the importance of electing people who are competent and could be taken seriously, and that not treating the position with respect would make it far easier to argue for the status of the Rector as chair of the Court to be discontinued. Nonetheless, a significant number of celebrities have often been elected as Rectors, such as Lorraine Kelly at Dundee, Clarissa Dickson-Wright at Aberdeen, and John Cleese and Frank Muir at St. Andrews. In many cases, particularly with high profile Rectors, attendance at the University Court in person is rare, however the Rector nominates another individual (usually a student) to exercise his functions under the title of Rector's Assessor. Lorraine Kelly Lorraine Kelly (born 30 November 1959 in Glasgow) is a Scottish television presenter and journalist best known as a presenter for GMTV, the ITV morning television station. ... Clarissa Dickson-Wright (born Clarissa Theresa Philomena Aileen Mary Josephine Agnes Elsie Trilby Louise Esmerelda Dickson-Wright in London on June 28, 1947) is a Scottish celebrity chef best known from her appearances with the late Jennifer Paterson in the BBC series Two Fat Ladies. ... John Marwood Cleese (born 27 October 1939) is an Academy Award-nominated and Emmy Award winning English comedian and actor. ... Frank Muir (5 February 1920 - 2 January 1998) was an English comedy writer, radio and television personality, and raconteur. ...


Gordon Brown, the current Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, was Rector of Edinburgh University while a student there, but since then most universities have amended their procedures to forbid currently matriculated students from standing for election. For the Scottish rugby player, see Gordon Brown (rugby player). ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ...


The head teacher of a Scottish secondary school is in many cases known as its Rector, particularly in older or independent schools. A head teacher, headmaster or headmistress (all often referred to simply as the head) is the most senior teacher in a school in the United Kingdom and elsewhere. ... The term, secondary school, refers to an institution where the third stage of schooling, known as secondary education, takes place. ...


England

At Oxford and Cambridge, English universities headed by chancellors, most colleges are headed by a master. At a few colleges, this role is instead played by a president or a warden; and at two of the Oxford colleges - Lincoln College and Exeter College - the head is called a rector. The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... College name Lincoln College Named after Richard Fleming, Bishop of Lincoln Established 1427 Sister college Downing College, Cambridge Rector Prof. ... College name Exeter College Latin name Collegium Exoniense Named after Walter de Stapledon, Bishop of Exeter Established 1314 Sister college Emmanuel College, Cambridge Rector Ms Frances Cairncross JCR President Simon Heawood Undergraduates 299 MCR President Meredith Riedel Graduates 150 Location of Exeter College within central Oxford , Homepage Boatclub Exeter College...


At Imperial College London the head is called a Rector, and the Vice-Chancellor of Liverpool Hope University also takes upon the role of Rector. Imperial College London (also known as Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine) is a British university institution and a constituent college of the University of London. ... Liverpool Hope University is a university in Liverpool, England. ...


Iceland

A rektor is the headmaster or headmistress of Icelandic Universities and of some Gymnasiums. A gymnasium (pronounced with or, in Swedish, as opposed to ) is a type of school providing secondary education in some parts of Europe, comparable to English Grammar Schools and U.S. High Schools. ...


Norway

A rektor is the headmaster of a Norwegian primary school, secondary school, private school, high school, college or university.


The European continent

The head of Dutch and German universities is called rector magnificus, as in some Belgian universities (notably the oldest and largest, KULeuven). The Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Catholic University of Leuven in English - also the translated name of its French-speaking sister university) or K.U. Leuven is a Flemish university, located in the town of Leuven in Flanders, the Dutch-speaking (northern) region of Belgium. ...


In some countries, including Germany, the position of head teacher in a secondary school is also designated as Rector, however, the position of head teacher in a German Gymnasium school is called Studiendirektor or Oberstudiendirektor. In the Netherlands (aside from Dutch-speaking Flanders), Rector or often Conrector (literally co-Rector; not necessarily collegial, sometimes assistant head) is used commonly, as in some Maltese and Dutch secondary schools. A gymnasium (pronounced with or, in Swedish, as opposed to ) is a type of school providing secondary education in some parts of Europe, comparable to English Grammar Schools and U.S. High Schools. ...


In the Scandinavian countries, the head of universities and gymnasiums (upper secondary schools) is called rektor. In Norway this also applies to primary schools.


Russia

Rector is the head of most universities and other higher educational institutions in Russia. The rector's deputies are known as prorectors.


The United States

Most US colleges use the titles 'president' for the chief executive of the college and 'chairman of the board of trustees' for the head of the body that legally "owns" the college. The terms "president" and term "chancellor" are used for the chief executive of universities and university systems, depending on the school's own statutes (some university systems run by state governments have both presidents of constituent colleges and a chancellor of the overall system). However there are several notable exceptions: the University of Virginia employs the term "rector"; Virginia State University, located in Petersburg,Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University located in Richmond, Virginia , Washington and Lee University located in Lexington,Virginia,the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia and Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia use of the term "Rector" to designate the head of the Board of Visitors; however, William and Mary also has a "Chancellor" who acts in a ceremonial capacity. The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... Virginia State University is an historically black university located in Ettrick, Virginia (near Petersburg, in the Richmond area), and was founded on March 6, 1882. ... Virginia Commonwealth University, or VCU, is a large public American research university with its main campuses located in downtown Richmond, Virginia. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States State Virginia County Independent City Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... Washington and Lee University is a private liberal arts college in Lexington, Virginia. ... The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ... Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... This article or section should include material from Virginia Bioinformatics Institute. ... Blacksburgs location within Virgina Virginias location within the United States Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Montgomery Founded 1798 Government  - Mayor Ron Rordam Area  - Town  19. ... A board of governors is usually the governing board of a public entity. ...


Several Catholic colleges and universities, particularly those run by religious orders of priests (for instance, the Jesuits) formerly employed the term "rector" to refer to the school's chief officer. In many cases, he was also the head of the community of priests assigned to the school, and so the two posts -- head of the university and local superior of the priests -- were merged in his person (See Ecclesiastical rectors below). This practice is no longer followed as the details of the governance of most of these schools have changed. The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ...


Canada

Like most Commonwealth and "Anglo-Saxon"-influenced countries, the term "rector" is uncommon.


However, in Quebec's Universities, both francophone (e.g., Université de Montréal) and anglophone (e.g., Concordia University), employ the term ("recteur" in French) to designate the head of the institution. As well, the historically French-Catholic, and currently bilingual University, Saint Paul University in Ottawa Ontario uses the term to denote its head. The Université de Montréal (UdeM) (translated into English commonly as (the) University of Montreal) is one of six universities in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... Concordia University is a large urban university in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, one of Montreals two universities that teach primarily in the English language (the other being McGill University). ... Saint Paul University (French: Université Saint Paul) is a federated Catholic university of the University of Ottawa, located in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. ... Motto: Advance Ottawa/Ottawa en avant Location of the City of Ottawa in the Province of Ontario Coordinates: , Country Canada Province Ontario Established 1850 as Town of Bytown Incorporated 1855 as City of Ottawa Amalgamated January 1, 2001 Government  - Mayor Larry OBrien  - City Council Ottawa City Council  - MPs List...


Queen's University (Kingston, Ontario) is the only anglophone post-secondary institution outside Quebec to use the term "rector". However, the term applies to a member of the student body elected to work as an equal beside the Chancellor and Principal. Queens University, generally referred to simply as Queens, is a coeducational, non-sectarian, public university located in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. ... Murney Tower, Kingston The Fort Henry Guard performing an historical demonstration The Prince George Hotel. ... Motto: Je me souviens (French: I remember) Capital Quebec City Largest city Montreal Official languages French Government - Lieutenant-Governor Pierre Duchesne - Premier Jean Charest (PLQ) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 75 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area  Ranked 2nd - Total 1,542,056 km² (595... For other uses, see Chancellor (disambiguation). ... A principal is: The head of an educational institution. ...


India

The heads of certain Indian Boarding schools are called Rectors. A boarding school is a usually fee-paying school where some or all pupils not only study, but also live during term time, with their fellow students and possibly teachers. ...


Italy

In Italy the rector is the head of the university and Legale Rappresentante of the university he or she is elected by an electoral body composed of all Professori ordinari and Associati the two highest ranks of the italian university teacher and a representatives of Ricercatori (a lowest rank of teachers) and workers of the university. The term of the reattore usually is long 4 or 5 years following the statuto ( costitution of the university ). The rettore if also named Magnifico Rettore


Philippines

The term Rector or Rector Magnificus is used to refer to the highest official in prominent Catholic universities and colleges such as the University of Santo Tomas and San Beda College. The rector typically sits as chairman of the university board of trustees. He exercises policy-making as well as general academic, managerial, and religious functions over all university academic and non-academic staff. The Pontifical and Royal University of Santo Tomas, The Catholic University of the Philippines (or simply the University of Santo Tomas, UST or affectionately, Ustê), is a private Roman Catholic university run by the Order of Preachers in Manila. ... San Beda College (SBC) (Spanish for Saint Bede) is a college run by the Benedictine monks in the Philippines. ...


In the University of Santo Tomas, the highest individual academic award conferred on a graduating college student is the Rector's Award for Academic Excellence. The Pontifical and Royal University of Santo Tomas, The Catholic University of the Philippines (or simply the University of Santo Tomas, UST or affectionately, Ustê), is a private Roman Catholic university run by the Order of Preachers in Manila. ...


See also

For other uses, see Chancellor (disambiguation). ... {{Infobox Education| country name = Scotland | agency image = | agency = Scottish Executive | leader titles = Minister for Education and Young People Minister for Enterprise and Lifelong Learning| leader names = Peter Peacock   Nicol Stephen | budget = £4. ... The position of Lord Rector of the University of Glasgow is elected every three years by the students at the University of Glasgow. ... The Lord Rector of Edinburgh University is elected every three years by the students and staff at the University of Edinburgh. ... The position of Lord Rector of St Andrews University is elected every three years by the students at the University of St Andrews. ... The Pontifical and Royal University of Santo Tomas, The Catholic University of the Philippines (or simply the University of Santo Tomas, UST or affectionately, Ustê), is a private Roman Catholic university run by the Order of Preachers in Manila. ...

Ecclesiastical rectors

In ancient times bishops as rulers of cities and provinces, especially in the Papal States, were called rectors; also administrators of the patrimony of the Church (e.g. rector Siciliæ). Rector is used by Pope Gregory the Great in the "Regula Pastoralis" as equivalent to pastor. Coat of arms Map of the Papal States; the reddish area was annexed to the Kingdom of Italy in 1860, the rest (grey) in 1870. ... Saint Gregory I, or Gregory the Great (called the Dialogist in Eastern Orthodoxy) (circa 540 - March 12, 604) was pope of the Catholic Church from September 3, 590 until his death. ...


Catholic Church

In the Roman Catholic Church, a rector is a person who holds the office of presiding over an ecclesiastical institution. This institution might be a particular building—like a church or shrine—or it could also be an organization, such as a parish, a mission or quasi-parish, a seminary or house of studies, a university, a hospital, or a community of clerics or religious. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic... It has been suggested that Ecclesia (Church) be merged into this article or section. ... Eastern Orthodox shrine Buddhist shrine just outside Wat Phnom. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ...


The Canon law of the Catholic Church explicitly mentions as special cases three offices of rectors: rectors of seminaries (c. 239 & c. 833 #6); rectors of churches that do not belong to a parish, a chapter of canons, or a religious order (c. 556–553); and rectors of Catholic universities (c. 443 §3 #3 & c. 833 #7). However, these are not the only officials that function as a rector. Canon Law is the ecclesiastical law of the Roman Catholic Church. ...


Since the term rector refers to the function of the particular office, a number of officials are not called rector but nevertheless are rectors. The diocesan bishop, for instance, is himself a rector, since he presides over both an ecclesiastical organization (the diocese) and an ecclesiastical building (his cathedral). In many dioceses, the bishop delegates the day-to-day operation of the cathedral to a priest, who is often called a rector but whose specific title is plebanus or "people's pastor", especially if the cathedral is also a parish. As further example, the pastor of a parish (parochus in Latin) is rector over both his parish and the parish church. Finally, a president of a Catholic university is rector over the university and, if a priest, often the rector of any church that the university may operate (c. 557 §3). Pope Pius XI blesses Bishop Stephen Alencastre as fifth Apostolic Vicar of the Hawaiian Islands in a Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace window. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In some religious congregations of priests, rector is the title of the local superior of a house or community of the order (for instance, a community of several dozen Jesuit priests might include the pastor and priests assigned to a parish church next door, the faculty of a Jesuit high school across the street, and the priests in an administrative office down the block, but the community as a local installation of Jesuit priests is headed by a rector).


Rector general is the title given to the superior general of certain religious orders, e.g. the Clerics Regular of the Mother of God, Pallottines. A Superior General, or General Superior, is the Superior at the head of a whole religious order of congregation. ... The Clerks Regular of the Mother of God of Lucca are a Roman Catholic congregation of priests. ... Pallottine fathers The Pallottines are a religious congregation within the Roman Catholic Church, founded in 1835 as SAC, societas apostolatus catholici, by the Roman priest Vincent Pallotti. ...


There are some other uses of this title, for instance for residence hall directors at the University of Notre Dame which were once (and to some extent still are) run in a seminary-like fashion. This title is used similarly at the University of Portland, another institution of the Congregation of Holy Cross. The University of Notre Dame IPA: is a Roman Catholic institution located in Notre Dame, Indiana, immediately northeast of South Bend, Indiana, United States. ... The University of Portland (UP) is a private Catholic university located in Portland, Oregon. ... The Congregation of Holy Cross (C.S.C.) is a Roman Catholic congregation of priests and brothers founded in 1837 by the Venerable Father Basil Anthony-Marie Moreau, CSC in Le Mans, France. ...


The pope has been called rector of the world, in the (now discontinued) conferring of the papal tiara as part of his formal installation after election. The Papal Tiara, also known as the Triple Tiara, or in Latin as the Triregnum, and in Italian as the Triregno, is the three-tiered jewelled papal crown, supposedly of Byzantine and Persian origin, that is a prominent symbol of the papacy. ...


A now obsolete use of the term occurred in the United States prior to the formulation of the 1917 Code of Canon Law. Canon Law grants a type of tenure to pastors (parochus) of parishes, giving them certain rights against arbitrary removal by the bishop of their diocese. In order to preserve their flexibility and authority in assigning priests to parishes, bishops in the United States until that time did not actually appoint priests as pastors, but as "permanent rectors" of their parishes: the "permanent" gave the priest a degree of confidence in the security in his assignment, but the "rector" rather than "pastor" preserved the bishop's absolute authority to reassign clergy. Hence, many older parishes list among their early leaders priests with the postnominal letters "P.R." (as in, a plaque listing all of the pastors of a parish, with "Rev. John Smith, P.R."). This practice was discontinued and today priests are normally assigned as pastors of parishes, and bishops in practice (though there are still questions about the canonical legality of this) reassign them at will.


Anglican churches

In the Anglican Churches, a rector is one type of parish priest. For historical reasons, some parish priests in the Church of England are called by this term while others are called vicars. Roughly speaking, the distinction was that the rector directly received the tithes of his parish, while a vicar was paid instead a salary (sometimes by the diocese). The rector was then responsible for the repair of the chancel of his church - the part dedicated to the sacred offices, while the rest of the building was the responsibility of the parish. This rectorial responsibility persists, in perpetuity, with the occupiers of the original rectorial land where it has been sold. This is called chancel repair liability, and affects institutional, corporate and private owners of land once owned by around 5,200 churches in England and Wales.[1] (See also Church of England#Organisation.) Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Anglicanism is the term used to encapsulate... A parish is a type of administrative subdivision. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... In the broadest sense, a vicar (from the Latin vicarius) is anyone acting as a substitute or agent for a superior (compare vicarious). In this sense, the title is comparable to lieutenant. ... A tithe is a one-tenth part of something, paid as a voluntary contribution or as a tax or levy, usually to support a religious organization. ... Pope Pius XI blesses Bishop Stephen Alencastre as fifth Apostolic Vicar of the Hawaiian Islands in a Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace window. ... This article is about an architectural feature; for the astronomical term see apsis. ... Chancel repair liability is a liability on some property owners England and Wales to fund repairs to the chancel of their local church. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ...


The term has been re-used to designate the priest in charge of a team ministry (See also curate.) From the Latin curatus (compare Curator), a curate is a person who is invested with the care, or cure (cura), of souls of a parish. ...


In the Church of Ireland, Scottish Episcopal Church and Anglican Church of Canada, most parish priests are called rectors, not vicars. However, in the some dioceses of the Anglican Church of Canada rectors are officially licensed as incumbents to express the diocesan polity of employment of clergy. In the Episcopal Church in the United States of America, "rector" is usually used for the priest in charge of a self-sustaining parish while the priest who heads a mission—a congregation supported by the diocese—is generally called a vicar. The Church of Ireland (Irish: ) is an autonomous province of the Anglican Communion, operating seamlessly across the border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... Anglican Church of Canada The Anglican Church of Canada (the ACC) is the Canadian branch of the Anglican Communion. ... In some Christian churches, the diocese is an administrative territorial unit governed by a bishop, sometimes also referred to as a bishopric or episcopal see, though more often the term episcopal see means the office held by the bishop. ... Anglican Church of Canada The Anglican Church of Canada (the ACC) is the Canadian branch of the Anglican Communion. ... The Episcopal Churchs Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul in Washington, D.C. is often referred to as the National Cathedral. The Episcopal Church in the United States of America is the Province of the Anglican Communion in the United States and several other nations, including dioceses... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


In schools affiliated with the Anglican church the title "rector" is sometimes used at secondary schools and boarding schools, where the headmaster is often a priest. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Anglicanism is the term used to encapsulate...


Rectorates in politics and administration

  • Rector provinciae was the Latin generic term for the governor of a Roman province, known since Suetonius, and specifically a legal term (as used in the Codices of the Emperors Theodosius and Justinianus) since Emperor Diocletian's Tetrarchy (when they came under the administrative authority of the Vicarius of a diocese and these under a Pretorian prefect), regardless of the specific titles (of different rank, such as Consularis, Corrector provinciae, Praeses and Proconsul)
  • For the use of the style duke and rector of Burgundy by the Zähringer dynasty claimants to viceregal powers as Regent in the Arelat kingdom of Burgundy within the Holy Roman Empire, see King of Burgundy#Rectorate of Burgundy
  • Contemporary charters in Latin used a number of additional styles for the Danish king Cnut (Canute the Great, with Norway as his third realm; 23 April 1016 - 12 November 1035 in Britain) having rex Anglorum in the core plus various other titles, including rex Anglorum totiusque Brittannice orbis gubernator et rector i.e. 'king of the Angli and of all Britain governor and rector' (the last two in the generic sense 'ruler')
  • The Comtat Venaissin in southern France was administered by a Rector since it became a papal possession till 1790 (on 24 May its States General -representative assembly- proclaims a constitution, but remains loyal to the pope).
  • Similar gubernatorial use or as Chief magistrate in city states in the Adriatic, also in the Italian form Rettore, includes:
    • The Republic of Ragusa (presently Dubrovnik, in Croatian Dalmatia), was governed by a Rettore repeatedly:
      • 1190 - 1194 between the sovereignty of the Norman Kingdom of "Sicily" (Naples) and Venetian sovereignty, annually elected, alongside the title Comes
      • 1370 - 1808, alongside the title Duke or its Slavonic equivalent Knez, during periods of sovereignty of the Hungarian crown till 1458, then the Ottoman Sultan (formally 1526 - 1718), since 1684 under the joint 'protection' of Habsburg Austria's and the Ottoman Empire, then from 1798 under Austrian - and from 1806 under French occupation till incorporation in Napoleonic Illyria
      • once more Rector 18 - 29 January 1814 Simone, conte de Giorgi, the last previous incumbent, during the short-lived restoration of the republic
    • Primo Rettore, 8 September 1920 - 29 December 1920 Gabriele D'Annunzio (b. 1863 - d. 1938) (formerly Italian Commander) in Fiume
  • In a few 'Crown lands' of the Austrian Empire, one seat in the Landtag (regional legislature of semi-feudal type) was reserved for the Rector of the capital's university, notably: Graz in Steiermark (Styria), Innsbruck in Tirol, Wien (Vienna) in Nieder-Österreich (Lower Austria); in Bohemia, two Rectors seated in the equivalent Landesvertretung

Map of the Roman Empire, with the provinces, after 120. ... Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus ( 69/75 - after 130), also known as Suetonius, was a prominent Roman historian and biographer. ... Theodosius (from greek friend of God) is a common name to three emperors of ancient Rome and Byzantium: Theodosius I (379-395) Theodosius II (408-450) Theodosius III (715-717) Categories: Disambiguation | Late Antiquity ... Justinian may refer to: Justinian I, a Roman Emperor; Justinian II, a Byzantine Emperor; Justinian, a storeship sent to the convict settlement at New South Wales in 1790. ... The Tetrarchs, a porphyry sculpture sacked from a Byzantine palace in 1204, Treasury of St. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The following is a list of the Kings of Burgundy // Kings of the Burgundians Gebicca (late 4th century–407) Godemar Giselcar Gundicar (413–436) Aetius moves the Burgundians into Sapaudia (Upper Rhone Basin) Gunderic/Gundioc (436–473) opposed by Chilperic I (443–c. ... The Comtat Venaissin, often called the Comtat for short, was the name formerly given to the region around the city of Avignon in Provence, in what is now southern France. ... Chief Magistrate is a generic designation for a Magistrate whose office -individual or collegial- is the highest in his class, in either of the fundamental meanings of Magistrate (which often overlapped in the Ancient régime): as a major political and administrative office (in a republican form of government, at... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings. ... Borders of the Republic of Ragusa, 1426-1808 Capital Ragusa Language(s) Latin, Italian since 1492 Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Duke  - 1808 Auguste Marmont Historical era Renaissance  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Invasion by France January 31, 1808  - Annexed October 14, 1808 Area  - 1808? 1,500 km2 579... Dalmatia, highlighted, on a map of Croatia. ... A duke is a nobleman, historically of highest rank and usually controlling a duchy. ... Kniaz’ or knyaz (Russian and Ukrainian: ; Serbian: knez; Romanian: cneaz; in fem. ... Rijeka (Fiume in Italian and Hungarian; Rijeka and Fiume both mean river) is the principal seaport of Croatia, located on the Kvarner Bay, an inlet of the Adriatic Sea. ... A Landtag (Diet) is a representative assembly or parliament in German speaking countries with some legislative authority. ... Styria (Steiermark in German, Štajerska in Slovenian) is a federal state or Bundesland, located in the south east of Austria. ... Tyrol (Tirol in German) is a federal state or Bundesland, located in the west of Austria. ... Map of Lower Austria showing districts and the four quarters (Waldviertel in green, Weinviertel in red, Mostviertel in yellow and Industrieviertel in blue) Lower Austria (de: Niederösterreich) is one of the nine states or Länder in Austria. ... Flag of Bohemia Bohemia (Czech: ; German: ) is a historical region in central Europe, occupying the western and middle thirds of the Czech Republic. ...

Compound titles

To a rector who has resigned is often given the title rector emeritus. One who supplies the place usually occupied by a rector is styled pro-rector (in parishes, administrator).


Deputies of rectors in institutions are known as vice-rectors (in parishes, as curates, assistant - or associate rectors, etc.). In some universities the title vice-rector has, like vice-chancellor in many Anglo-Saxon cases, been used for the de facto head when the essentially honorary title of rector is reserved for a high externa dignitary- until 1920, there was such a vice-recteur at the Parisian Sorbonne as the French Minister of Education was its nominal Recteur A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ...


Sources and references


  Results from FactBites:
 
Rector - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1123 words)
Whilst the chief executive of these universities is the Principal and Vice-Chancellor, the Rector chairs meetings of the University Court, the governing body of the university, and is elected at regular intervals by their matriculated student bodies.
Roughly speaking, the distinction was that the rector directly received the tithes of his parish, while a vicar was paid instead a salary (sometimes by his diocese).
In the Episcopal Church in the United States of America, "rector" is usually used for the priest in charge of a self-sustaining parish while the priest who heads a mission—a congregation supported by the diocese—is generally called a vicar.
Rector of Glasgow University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (492 words)
The position of Lord Rector of Glasgow University is elected every three years by the students at the University of Glasgow.
The Rector is also entitled to chair the University Court, the governing body of the university.
Indeed, the most recently elected Rector, Mordechai Vanunu has thus far been unable to undertake his responsibilities as Israel refuses to let him leave the country to do so, thus he could reasonably fall into the category as someone elected as a statement of solidarity rather than as a working rector.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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