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Encyclopedia > Recreational drug use

Recreational drug use is the use of psychoactive drugs for recreational purposes rather than for work, medical or spiritual purposes, although the distinction is not always clear. An assortment of psychoactive drugs A psychoactive drug or psychotropic substance is a chemical substance that acts primarily upon the central nervous system where it alters brain function, resulting in temporary changes in perception, mood, consciousness and behavior. ... “Fun” redirects here. ... This article is about work. ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... Spirituality, in a narrow sense, concerns itself with matters of the spirit. ...


The psychopharmacologist Ronald K. Siegel, who has studied this field, refers to intoxication as the 'Fourth Drive,' arguing that the human instinct to seek mind-altering substances has so much force and persistence that it functions like the human drives for hunger, thirst and shelter.[1] Hunger is a feeling experienced when the glycogen level of the liver falls below a threshold, usually followed by a desire to eat. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Contents

Distinctions

Responsible drug use

Main article: Responsible drug use

The concept of responsible drug use is that a person can use recreational drugs with reduced or eliminated risk of negatively affecting other parts of one's life or other peoples lives. Advocates of this philosophy point to the many well-known artists and intellectuals who have used drugs, experimentally or otherwise, with few detrimental effects on their lives. Critics argue that the drugs are escapist--and dangerous, unpredictable and sometimes addictive, and have negative and profound effects in geographic areas well beyond the location of the consumer. Critics tend to be inexperienced with drugs, especially in the case of the 'escapist' argument. Those who are experienced and have quit tend to be more understanding, unless they've struggled with addiction. The concept of responsible drug use is that a person can use recreational drugs with reduced or eliminated risk of negatively affecting other parts of ones life or other peoples lives. ...


Drugs popularly used for recreation

Image File history File links Question_book-3. ...

Popular drugs

The drugs most popular for recreational use worldwide are [2]:

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Grain alcohol redirects here. ... For other uses, see Caffeine (disambiguation). ... Cannabis, also known as marijuana[1] or ganja (Hindi: गांजा),[2] is a psychoactive product of the plant Cannabis sativa. ... THC redirects here. ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ... This article is about the chemical compound. ...

Other substances

Other substances often used[3]:


Barbiturates, including

Barbituric acid, the basic structure of all barbiturates Barbiturates are drugs that act as central nervous system depressants, and by virtue of this they produce a wide spectrum of effects, from mild sedation to anesthesia. ... Amobarbital (formerly known as amylobarbitone) is a drug that is a barbiturate derivative. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Butalbital, 5-allyl-5-isobutylbarbituric acid, is a barbiturate with an intermediate duration of action. ... Methylphenobarbital (also known as mephobarbital) is marketed in the US as Mebaral by Ovation. ... Sodium thiopental, better known as Sodium Pentothal (a trademark of Abbott Laboratories), thiopental, thiopentone sodium, or trapanal, is a rapid-onset short-acting barbiturate general anaesthetic. ... Pentobarbital is a short acting barbiturate that is available as both a free acid and a sodium salt, the former of which is only slightly soluble in water and ethanol. ... Phenobarbital (INN) or phenobarbitone (former BAN) is a barbiturate, first marketed as Luminal by Friedr. ... Secobarbital (marketed by Eli Lilly and Company under the brand names Seconal® and Tuinal) is a barbiturate derivative drug. ...

Benzodiazepines, including

Benzodiazepine tablets The benzodiazepines are a class of drugs with hypnotic, anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, amnestic and muscle relaxant properties. ... Alprazolam, also known under the trade names Xanax and Niravam, is a short-acting drug in the benzodiazepine class used to treat severe anxiety disorders and as an adjunctive treatment for anxiety associated with clinical depression. ... Clonazepam (marketed by Roche under the trade-names Klonopin in the United States and Rivotril in Europe, South America, Canada, India, and Australia) is a drug which is a benzodiazepine derivative. ... Diazepam (IPA: ), first marketed as Valium by Hoffmann-La Roche) is a benzodiazepine derivative drug. ... Lorazepam is a benzodiazepine tranquilizer with short to medium duration of action. ... Flunitrazepam (IPA: ; is marketed by Roche under the trade name Rohypnol. ... Nimetazepam (marketed under brand name Erimin®) is a drug which is a benzodiazepine derivative. ... Nitrazepam (marketed under the trade names Mogadon®, Nitredon®, Nilandron®) is a powerful hypnotic drug, which is a benzodiazepine derivative. ... Temazepam (marketed under brand names Restoril®, Normison®, Planum®, Tenox® and Temaze®) is a benzodiazepine derivative with powerful hypnotic properties. ...

Deliriants, including

== LOL == // The deliriants (or anticholinergics) are a special class of acetylcholine-inhibitor dissociatives. ... Atropine is a tropane alkaloid extracted from the deadly nightshade (Atropa belladonna) and other plants of the family Solanaceae. ... Diphenhydramine hydrochloride (trade name Benadryl®, or Dimedrol outside the US) is an over-the-counter (OTC) antihistamine and sedative. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Scopolamine, also known as hyoscine, is a tropane alkaloid drug obtained from plants of the family Solanaceae (nightshades), such as henbane or jimson weed (Datura species). ... For other uses, see Nutmeg (disambiguation). ...

Dissociative anaesthetics, including

A dissociative is a drug which reduces (or blocks) signals to the conscious mind from other parts of the brain, typically, but not necessarily, or limited to the physical senses. ... Dextromethorphan (DXM or DM) is an antitussive (cough-suppressant) drug found in many over-the-counter cold and cough medicines. ... Ketamine is a dissociative anesthetic for use in human and veterinary medicine developed by Parke-Davis (1962). ... For other uses, see Nitrous oxide (disambiguation). ... “Angel Dust” redirects here. ...

Opium (Papaver somniferum) and opioids, including

This article is about the drug. ... Binomial name L. The opium poppy, Papaver somniferum, is the type of poppy from which opium and all refined opiates such as morphine, thebaine, codeine, papaverine, and noscapine are extracted. ... An opioid is a chemical substance that has a morphine-like action in the body. ... Buprenorphine, is an opioid drug with partial agonist and antagonist actions. ... Codeine (INN) or methylmorphine is an opiate used for its analgesic, antitussive and antidiarrheal properties. ... Dextropropoxyphene is an analgesic in the opioid category. ... Heroin or diamorphine (INN) (colloquially referred to as junk, babania, horse, golden brown, smack, black tar, big H, lady H, dope, skag, juice, diesel, etc. ... For other uses, see Heroin (disambiguation). ... Dihydrocodeine, also called DHC, Drocode, Paracodeine and Parzone and by the brand names of Synalgos DC, Panlor DC, Panlor SS, SS Bron, Drocode, Paracodin, Codidol, Didor Continus, Dicogesic, Codhydrine, Dekacodin, DH-Codeine, Didrate, Dihydrin, Hydrocodin, Nadeine, Novicodin, Rapacodin, Fortuss, Dico, and DF-118 amongst others, is a semi-synthetic opioid... Fentanyl is an opioid analgesic, first synthesized by Janssen Pharmaceutica (Belgium) in the late 1950s, with a potency many times that of morphine. ... Duragesic (or Durogesic in Europe) is the trade name of a fentanyl transdermal therapeutic system manufactured by ALZA Corporation and marketed by Janssen Pharmaceutica (both subsidiaries of Johnson & Johnson). ... Actiq, by Cephalon, is a recently-developed solid formulation of fentanyl citrate on a stick that dissolves slowly in the mouth for transmucosal absorption. ... 3-Methylfentanyl (3-MF, mefentanyl) is an opioid analgesic that is an analogue of fentanyl. ... Hydrocodone or dihydrocodeinone is a semi-synthetic opioid derived from two of the naturally occurring opiates, codeine and thebaine. ... Two variations of Vicodin, with different amounts of hydrocodone / paracetamol (acetaminophen) in each Vicodin is a trademarked brand of narcotic analgesics (painkillers) containing hydrocodone and paracetamol (acetaminophen). ... Hydromorphone is a drug developed in Germany in the 1920s and introduced to the mass market beginning in 1926. ... Pethidine (INN) or meperidine (USAN) (also referred to as: isonipecaine; lidol; operidine; pethanol; piridosal; Algil®; Alodan®; Centralgin®; Demerol®; Dispadol®; Dolantin®; Dolestine®; Dolosal®; Dolsin®; Mefedina®) is a fast-acting opioid analgesic drug. ... Pethidine (INN) or meperidine (USAN) (also referred to as: isonipecaine; lidol; pethanol; piridosal; Algil®; Alodan®; Centralgin®; Demerol®; Dispadol®; Dolantin®; Dolargan® (in Poland);[1] Dolestine®; Dolosal®; Dolsin®; Mefedina®) is a fast-acting opioid analgesic drug. ... Methadone (Dolophine®, Amidone®, Methadose®, Physeptone®, Heptadon® and many others) is a synthetic opioid, used medically as an analgesic, antitussive and a maintenance anti-addictive for use in patients on opioids. ... This article is about the drug. ... Not to be confused with oxytocin. ... Oxymorphone (Opana, Numorphan) or 14-Hydroxydihydromorphinone is a powerful semi-synthetic opioid analgesic that is derived from thebaine, and is approximately 6–8 times more potent than morphine. ... Pentazocine is a synthetically-prepared narcotic (opioid analgesic) drug used to treat mild to moderately severe pain. ...

Phenethylamines, including

Phenethylamine is an alkaloid and monoamine. ... 2C-B, or 4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine (4-Bromo-2,5-dimethoxybenzeneethanamine) is a class of phenethylamine, a lesser-known psychedelic drug of the 2C family, an entactogen. ... 2C-E (2,5-dimethoxy-4-ethylphenethylamine) is a psychedelic drug and phenethylamine of the 2C family. ... 2C-I is a psychedelic drug and phenethylamine that was developed and popularized by Alexander Shulgin. ... 2C-T-7 is a psychedelic phenethylamine and is sometimes used as an entheogen. ... Ephedrine (EPH) is a sympathomimetic amine similar in structure to the synthetic derivatives amphetamine and methamphetamine. ... Ephedra in medicine. ... MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine), most commonly known today by the street name Ecstasy (often abbreviated E, X, or XTC), is a semisynthetic member of the phenethylamine class of psychoactive drugs. ... MDEA (also MDE), which stands for 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-ethylamphetamine, is a psychedelic hallucinogenic drug and empathogen-entactogen of the phenethylamine family. ... 3,4-Methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA or Tenamfetamine), is a psychedelic hallucinogenic drug and empathogen/entactogen of the phenethylamine family. ... Mescaline (3,4,5-trimethoxyphenethylamine) is a psychedelic alkaloid of the phenethylamine class. ... Binomial name (Lem. ... This article is about the desert plant. ...

Stimulants, including

A stimulant is a drug which increases the activity of the sympathetic nervous system and produces a sense of euphoria or awakeness. ... Benzylpiperazine (street names include A2, frenzy and nemesis [1] However, there are some references to BZP in the literature that predate interest in piperazines as anthelmintics. ... Basic piperazine structure Piperazine is a six-sided organic ring compound containing two opposing nitrogen atoms (see image). ... Tablets containing mCPP confiscated by the DEA in Vernon Hills, Illinois 1-(3-Chlorophenyl)piperazine (or meta-chlorophenylpiperazine, mCPP) is a piperazine-based 5-HT receptor agonist that has been used as a challenge drug in MDMA research. ... Trifluoromethylphenylpiperazine (or simply TFMPP) is a piperazine-based drug, related to benzylpiperazine. ... For other uses, see Cocaine (disambiguation). ... Dextroamphetamine is a powerful psychostimulant which produces increased wakefulness, energy and self-confidence in association with decreased fatigue and appetite. ... Adderall XR 15 mg capsule Adderall is a pharmaceutical psychostimulant comprised of mixed amphetamine salts. ... This article is about the psychostimulant, d-methamphetamine. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Vitamin R redirects here. ... Ephedrine (EPH) is a sympathomimetic amine similar in structure to the synthetic derivatives amphetamine and methamphetamine. ... The abbreviation OTC may refer to: an Office of Technology Commercialization, the intellectual property managing office of many American research universities (sometimes referred to as an Office of Technology Transfer or OTT). ...

Indole alkaloids, including

Indole is an aromatic heterocyclic organic compound. ... Tryptamine (3-(2-aminoethyl)indole) is a monoamine compound that is widespread in nature. ... Dimethyltryptamine (DMT), also known as N,N-dimethyltryptamine, is a psychedelic tryptamine. ... Psilocybin (also known as psilocybine) is a psychedelic alkaloid of the tryptamine family, found in psilocybin mushrooms. ... Psilocin,(4-HO-DMT) sometimes called psilocine or psilotsin, is a psychedelic (hallucinogenic) mushroom alkaloid. ... Psychedelic mushrooms redirects here. ... LSA, also known as d-lysergic acid amide, d-lysergamide, ergine, and LA-111, is an alkaloid of the ergoline family that occurs in various species of vines of the Convolvulaceae and some species of fungi. ... LSD redirects here. ...

Inhalants, including

An aerosol metered-dose inhaler (MDI) used for administration of asthma medication. ... Alkyl nitrites are a group of organic compounds with the general formula R-O-N=O, where R is any organic group. ... Variety of popper brands Poppers is the street term for various alkyl nitrites taken for recreational purposes through direct inhalation, particularly amyl nitrite, butyl nitrite and isobutyl nitrite. ... Ethyl chloride is a chemical compound once widely used in producing tetraethyl lead, a gasoline additive. ... R-phrases , , , S-phrases , Flash point Non-flammable U.S. Permissible exposure limit (PEL) 50 ppm (240 mg/m3) (OSHA) Supplementary data page Structure and properties n, εr, etc. ... This article is about the chemical compound. ... Petrol redirects here. ... Look up glue in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Toluene, also known as methylbenzene or phenylmethane is a clear, water-insoluble liquid with the typical smell of paint thinners, redolent of the sweet smell of the related compound benzene. ... General Name, Symbol, Number xenon, Xe, 54 Chemical series noble gases Group, Period, Block 18, 5, p Appearance colorless Standard atomic weight 131. ...

Unclassified

GHB redirects here. ... Binomial name G.Forst. ... Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are a class of antidepressant drugs prescribed for the treatment of depression. ... Salvinorin A is the main active psychotropic constituent of the plant Salvia divinorum (diviners sage, Mexican mint). ... Binomial name Epling & Játiva[1] Salvia divinorum, also known as Diviners Sage,[2] Magic Mint,[2] María Pastora,[3] Sage of the Seers, or simply Salvia (although the genus name is shared among many plants), is a powerful psychoactive plant, a member of the sage genus and...

Drug use over time

Drug use has increased in all categories since prohibition.[4] Since 1937, 20–37 % of the youth in the United States have used marijuana.1 in 4 high school seniors are marijuana users, meaning they have used the drug in the past month. 1 in 10 8th graders are marijuana users.[5] [4] Between 1972 and 1988, the use of cocaine increased more than fivefold.[6] The usage patterns of the current two most prevalent drugs, methamphetamine and ecstasy, have shown similar gains.[4] Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ...


See also

Santa Cruz 4/20 celebration at Porter Meadow on UCSC campus in 2007 On April 20th 2007, at 4:20pm PST more than 700 people gathered at City Hall in Victoria, BC to celebrate Victorias 10th annual 4/20 celebration. ... This article needs cleanup. ... The prohibition of drugs is a subject of considerable controversy. ... Cannabis Culture Magazine was founded in the spring of 1995 by Marc Emery, BC Marijuana Party President, well-known as Canadas Prince of Pot. The magazine evolved from a publication called The Marijuana & Hemp Newsletter launched in 1994. ... Club drugs are a loosely defined category of recreational drugs which are popular at dance clubs, parties, and rock concerts. ... Demand reduction is a term used by drug control authorities to refer to educational and other efforts aimed at stopping people from seeking drugs, as opposed to cutting off their supply. ... Comparison of the perceived harm for various psychoactive drugs from a poll among medical psychiatrists specialized in addiction treatment[1] This article is an overview of the nontherapeutic use of alcohol and drugs of abuse. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Drug subcultures are examples of countercultures, primarily defined by recreational drug use. ... Hard and soft drugs are loose categories of psychoactive drugs. ... Harm reduction is a philosophy of public health, intended to be a progressive alternative to the prohibition of certain potentially dangerous lifestyle choices. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... An opium den was an establishment where opium was sold and smoked. ... A complete opium smoking layout including an opium lamp. ... A complete opium smoking layout including two opium pipes. ... Combat at Guangzhou during the Second Opium War The Opium Wars (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), also known as the Anglo-Chinese Wars, lasted from 1839 to 1842 and 1856 to 1860 respectively,[1] the climax of a trade dispute between China and the United Kingdom. ... For the general concept, see Prohibitionism. ... For psychedelics, see psychedelic drug. ... An assortment of psychoactive drugs A psychoactive drug or psychotropic substance is a chemical substance that acts primarily upon the central nervous system where it alters brain function, resulting in temporary changes in perception, mood, consciousness and behavior. ... The concept of responsible drug use is that a person can use recreational drugs with reduced or eliminated risk of negatively affecting other parts of ones life or other peoples lives. ... School district drug policies are measures that teachers and administrators of a school put into place in order to discourage drug use by students. ... Cannabis has an ancient history of ritual usage as a trance inducing drug and is found in pharmacological cults around the world. ... A stoner film (or stoner movie) is colloquial term referring to a subgenre of movies depicting the use and/or the users of marijuana. ... Also see Alcoholism and Drug addiction. ... The Yogurt Connection was a drug smuggling ring which operated out of Indianapolis, Indiana in the late 1970s and eary 1980s. ...

References

  1. ^ Siegel, Ronald K (2005). Intoxication: The universal drive for mind-altering substances. Vermont: Park Street Press, pp vii. ISBN 1-59477-069-7. 
  2. ^ Lingeman, Drugs from A-Z A Dictionary, Penguin ISBN 0 7139 0136 5
  3. ^ Lingeman, Drugs from A-Z A Dictionary, Penguin ISBN 0 7139 0136 5
  4. ^ a b c Monitoring The Future
  5. ^ Charles Whitebread: The History of the Non-Medical Use of Drugs in the United States
  6. ^ Controlling Cocaine: Supply Versus Demand Programs
  • (2002) Out of It: A Cultural History of Intoxication. Penguin Books. ISBN 0-14-027977-6. 
    • The Cult of Pharmacology: How America Became the World's Most Troubled Drug Culture by Richard DeGrandpre, Duke University Press, 2006.
  • Dale Pendell, Pharmakodynamis: Stimulating Plants, Potions and Herbcraft: Excitantia and Empathogenica, San Francisco: Mercury House, 2002.
  • Pharmako/Poeia: Plant Powers, Poisons, and Herbcraft, San Francisco: Mercury House, 1995.

Dale Pendell is a contemporary author who combines science and poetry in his explications of psychoactive compounds. ...

External links

  • Recreational drug production standards on Psilly.com

  Results from FactBites:
 
DRINFORMER.COM: Home (1332 words)
Recreational drug use is the use of psychoactive drugs for recreational rather than for working or for medical or spiritual...
Drug addiction, or substance dependence is the compulsive use of psychoactive drugs, to the point where the user has no effective...
Drugs that block these receptors therefore have the reverse effect: they lower the heart rate and blood pressure and hence are used in conditions when the heart itself is deprived of oxygen.
Recreational Drug Use (4287 words)
Drug use refers to the use of a drug for the purposes for which it was intended and with minimal hazard.
On the other hand, if an individual chooses to use a psychoactive drug recreationally and within the acceptable limits of the social group, that decision should also be supported by the abstainer, as long as he or she remains a part of the group.
It is quite acceptable to use a socially approved recreational drug within the context of most social settings; however, when the use of the drugs themselves dictates the context of the setting, we have moved from the realm of recreational to intensified or compulsive drug use.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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