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Encyclopedia > Realism
Look up realism, realist, realistic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Contents

Realism, Realist or Realistic may refer to: Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ...


The arts

  • Realism (arts), the depiction of subjects as they appear in everyday life
  • Realism (dramatic arts), a movement towards greater fidelity to real life
  • Realism (visual arts), a style of painting that depicts what the eye can see
  • Classical Realism, an artistic movement in late 20th Century that valued beauty and artistic skill
  • Hyperrealism (painting), a genre of painting that resembles high resolution photography
  • Kitchen sink realism, an English cultural movement in the 1950s and 1960s that concentrated on contemporary social realism
  • Literary realism, a 19th century literary movement
  • Magic realism, an artistic genre in which magical elements appear in an otherwise realistic setting
  • Nazi heroic realism or the art of the third Reich, a style of propaganda art associated with Nazi Germany
  • New Realism, an artistic movement founded in 1960 by Pierre Restany and Yves Klein
  • Poetic realism, a film movement in France in the 1930s that used heightened aestheticism
  • Photorealism, a genre of painting that resembles photography
  • Romantic realism, an aesthetic art term popularized by writer/philosopher Ayn Rand
  • Social realism, an artistic movement which depicts working class activities
  • Socialist realism, a style of propaganda art associated with Communism

For other uses, see Realism (disambiguation). ... Realism in the theatre was a general movement in the later 19th century that steered theatrical texts and performances toward greater fidelity to real life. ... Realism is a style of painting that depicts the actuality of what the eyes can see. ... This article refers to the art movement. ... Hyperrealism is a genre of painting and sculpture resembling a high resolution digital photograph. ... Kitchen sink realism was a recognisable English cultural movement in the late 1950s and early 1960s. ... // Literary realism most often refers to the trend, beginning with certain works of nineteenth-century French literature and extending to late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century authors in various countries, towards depictions of contemporary life and society as they were. In the spirit of general realism, Realist authors opted for... Magic realism (or magical realism) is an artistic genre in which magical elements appear in an otherwise realistic setting. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... New Realism (in French: Nouveau Réalisme) refers to an artistic movement founded in 1960 by Pierre Restany and Yves Klein. ... Poetic realism was a film movement in France leading up to World War II. More a tendency than a movement, Poetic Realism is not strongly unified like Soviet Montage or French Impressionism. ... This article is about the artistic movement. ... Romantic Realism is an aesthetic term that usually refers to art that deals with the themes of volition and value while also acknowledging objective reality and the importance of technique. ... A Diego Rivera mural depicting factory workers in Detroit Social Realism is an artistic movement, expressed in the visual and other realist arts, which depicts working class activities as heroic. ... Roses for Stalin, Boris Vladimirski, 1949 For other meanings of the term realism, see realism (disambiguation). ...

International relations

  • Defensive realism, a theory that anarchy on the world stage causes states to increase their security, resulting in greater instability
  • Liberal realism or the "English school of international relations theory", the theory that there exists a 'society of states'
  • Neorealism or structural realism, a theory that international structures act as a constraint on state behavior
  • Offensive realism, a theory that states will exploit opportunities to expand whenever they are presented
  • Political realism, a theory that the primary motivation of states is the desire for power or security, rather than ideals or ethics
  • Subaltern realism, a theory that Third World states are more concerned with short term gains

It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Realism (international relations). ... The English School of international relations theory, also known as Liberal Realism, Rationalism or the British institutionalists, maintains that there is a society of states at the international level, despite the condition of anarchy (literally the lack of a ruler or world state). ... Main International Relations Theories and derivates Realism & Neorealism Idealism, Liberalism & Neoliberalism Marxism & Dependency theory Functionalism & Neofunctionalism Critical theory & Constructivism Neorealism or structural realism is a theory of international relations, outlined by Kenneth Waltz in his 1979 book, Theory of International Politics. ... In international relations, offensive realism is a variant of realism. ... Main International Relations Theories and derivates Realism & Neorealism Idealism, Liberalism & Neoliberalism Marxism & Dependency theory Functionalism & Neofunctionalism Critical theory & Constructivism The term realism or political realism collects a wide variety of theories and modes of thought about International Relations that have in common that the motivation of states is in the...

Law

  • Legal realism, a theory that law is made by human beings and thus subject to human imperfections
  • Left realism, a theory that crime disproportionately affects working class people
  • Right Realism, a theory about the prevention and control of crime

Legal realism is a family of theories about the nature of law developed in the first half of the 20th century in the United States (American Legal Realism) and Scandinavia (Scandinavian Legal Realism). ... Left Realist Criminology emerged out of Critical Criminology as a reaction against what was perceived to be the Lefts failure to take a practical interest in everyday crime, leaving it to the Right Realists to monopolise the political agenda on law and order. ... In criminology, Right Realism (also known as New Right Realism, Neo-Classicism, Neo-Positivism, or Neo-Conservatism) is the ideological polar opposite of Left Realism. ...

Philosophy

  • Aesthetic Realism, a philosophy founded by the American poet and critic Eli Siegel
  • Australian realism or Australian materialism, a 20th Century school of philosophy in Australia
  • Christian Realism, a philosophy advocated by Reinhold Niebuhr
  • Constructive realism, a philosophy of science
  • Cornell realism, a view in meta-ethics associated with the work of Richard Boyd and others
  • Critical realism, a philosophy of perception concerned with the accuracy of human sense-data
  • Direct realism, a theory of perception
  • Entity realism, a philosophical position within scientific realism
  • Epistemological realism, a subcategory of objectivism
  • Hyper-realism or Hyperreality, the inability of consciousness to distinguish reality from fantasy
  • Mathematical realism, a branch of philosophy of mathematics
  • Moderate realism, a position holding that there is no realm where universals exist
  • Modal realism, a philosophy propounded by David Lewis, that possible worlds are as real as the actual world
  • Moral realism, the view in philosophy that there are objective moral values
  • Mystical realism, a philosophy concerning the nature of the divine, advanced by Nikolai Berdyaev
  • Naive realism, a common sense theory of perception
  • New realism (philosophy), a school of early 20th-century epistemology rejecting epistemological dualism
  • Organic realism or the Philosophy of Oganism, the metaphysics of Alfred North Whitehead, now known as process philosophy
  • Philosophical realism, the belief that reality exists independently of observers
  • Platonic realism, a philosophy articulated by Plato, positing the existence of universals
  • Quasi-realism, an expressivist meta-ethical theory which asserts that though our moral claims are projectivist we understand them in realist terms
  • Representative realism, the view that we cannot perceive the external world directly
  • Scientific realism, the view that the world described by science is the real world
  • Transcendental realism, a concept implying that individuals have a perfect understanding of the limitations of their own minds
  • Truth-value link realism, a metaphysical concept explaining how to understand parts of the world that are apparently cognitively inaccessible

Aesthetic Realism is the philosophy founded by the American poet and critic Eli Siegel in 1941. ... Christian Realism is a philosophy advocated by Reinhold Niebuhr. ... Cornell realism is a view in metaethics, associated with the work of Richard Boyd, Nicholas Sturgeon, David Brink, and Peter Railton. ... In the philosophy of perception, critical realism is the theory that some of our sense-data (for example, those of primary qualities) can and do accurately represent external objects, properties, and events, while other of our sense-data (for example, those of secondary qualities and perceptual illusions) do not accurately... Direct realism is a theory of perception that claims that the senses provide us with direct awareness of the external world. ... Entity realism is a philosophical position within the debate about scientific realism. ... Epistomological realism is a philosophical position, a subcategory of objectivism, holding that what you know about an object exists independently of your mind. ... In semiotics and postmodern philosophy, hyperrealism (not to be confused with surrealism) is a symptom of an evolved, postmodern culture. ... Philosophy of mathematics is that branch of philosophy which attempts to answer questions such as: why is mathematics useful in describing nature?, in which sense, if any, do mathematical entities such as numbers exist? and why and how are mathematical statements true?. The various approaches to answering these questions will... Moderate realism as a position in the debate on the metaphysics of universals holds that there is no realm in which universals exist, but rather universals are located in space and time wherever they are manifest. ... Modal realism is the view, notably propounded by David Lewis, that possible worlds are as real as the actual world. ... Moral realism is the view in philosophy that there are objective moral values. ... Mystical realism is a view concerning the nature of the divine. ... In philosophy naïve realism is used to describe the belief that physical objects continue to exist when they are no longer perceived. ... New realism was a philosophy expounded by a group of six U.S. based scholars in the early 20th century. ... Contemporary philosophical realism, also referred to as metaphysical realism, is the belief in a reality that is completely ontologically independent of our conceptual schemes, linguistic practices, beliefs, etc. ... Platonic realism is a philosophical term usually used to refer to the idea of realism regarding the existence of universals after the Greek philosopher Plato who lived between c. ... Quasi-realism is an expressivist meta-ethical theory propounded by Simon Blackburn which asserts that whilst our moral claims are projectivist we understand them in realist terms as part of our ethical experience of the world. ... Representative Theory of Perception, also known as Indirect realism and epistemological dualism, is a philosophical concept. ... Scientific realism is a view in the philosophy of science about the nature of scientific success, an answer to the question what does the success of science involve? The debate over what the success of science involves centers primarily on the status of unobservable entities (objects, process and events) apparently... Transcendental realism is a concept stemming from the philosophy of Immanuel Kant that implies individuals have a perfect understanding of the limitations of their own minds. ... The principle of truth-value links is a concept in metaphysics discussed in debates between philosophical realism and anti-realism. ...

Other fields

  • Realism (album), a 2006 album by the German electronic band Steril
  • Depressive realism, a contested theory that individuals suffering from clinical depression have a more accurate view of reality
  • Ethnographic realism, a writing style, in anthropology, which narrates the author's experiences and observations as if they were first-hand
  • Tactical realism, a genre of combat simulations in computer gaming
  • Realists, a typeface in VOX-ATypI classification

Depressive realism is the proposition that people with depression have a more accurate view of reality. ... Tactical realism is a style of gaming in first-person shooters where realistic settings are simulated by the game engine to the best of its ability and players use authentic military tactics to accomplish goals in the game. ...

See also

  • Anti-realism
  • Fantastic Realism (disambiguation)
  • Irrealism (disambiguation)
In philosophy, the term anti-realism is used to describe any position involving either the denial of the objective reality of entities of a certain type or the insistence that we should be agnostic about their real existence. ... Image File history File links Disambig_gray. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Realism (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) (11753 words)
Platonic realism is committed to the existence of acausal objects and to the claim that these objects, and facts about them, are independent of anyone's beliefs, linguistic practices, conceptual schemes, and so on (in short to the claim that these objects, and facts about them, are language- and mind-independent).
What is challenged is the independence dimension of realism, the claim that the objects distinctive of the area exist, or that the properties distinctive of the area are instantiated, independently of anyone's beliefs, linguistic practices, conceptual schemes, and so on.
The dispute [between realism and its opponents] concerns the notion of truth appropriate for statements of the disputed class; and this means that it is a dispute concerning the kind of meaning which these statements have (1978: 146).
Realism (558 words)
Realism, which emphasizes the importance of the ordinary¬čthe ordinary person and the ordinary situation, tends to reject the heroic and the aristocratic and embrace the pedestrian, the comic, and the middle class.
The antiliterary thrust of realism can be taken either as an assertion of the power of the real over the imagined, and hence of a determined world, or as an assertion of the variety and energy against the enclosing and determining forms of art.
"Realism [in poetry]." Princeton Enclopedia of Powetry and Poetics.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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