FACTOID # 8: Bookworms: Vermont has the highest number of high school teachers per capita and third highest number of librarians per capita.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Real tennis
Jeu de paume in the 17th century.
Jeu de paume in the 17th century.

Real tennis is the original racket sport from which the modern game of lawn tennis, or tennis, is descended. It is also known as jeu de paume in France, "court tennis" in some parts of United States, and formerly[citation needed] called "royal tennis" in Australia. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 346 × 460 pixelsFull resolution (346 × 460 pixel, file size: 49 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Jeu de paume in Paris, France +/- Source: http://www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 346 × 460 pixelsFull resolution (346 × 460 pixel, file size: 49 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Jeu de paume in Paris, France +/- Source: http://www. ... The following is a list of sports, divided by category. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Jeu de paume was originally a French precursor of tennis played without racquets. ...


The term real tennis is often thought to be a corruption of "royal" and related to the game's connection with royalty during its heyday in England and France in the 16th and 17th centuries. In fact[citation needed], "real" was first used at the end of the 19th century as a retronym to distinguish it from the then recently invented game of lawn tennis. Real tennis players often just call it "tennis", describing the modern game as "lawn tennis". (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... A retronym is a type of neologism coined for an old object or concept whose original name has come to be used for something else, is no longer unique, or is otherwise inappropriate or misleading. ...


Real tennis is still played at a small number of active courts in the United Kingdom, Australia, the United States, and France. The sport is supported and governed by organizations around the world. Real tennis in Paris, 17th century. ...

Contents

History

The term "tennis" derives from the French word tenez, which means "take it" — a warning from the server to the receiver. Tennis has evolved over centuries from an earlier ball game played around the 12th century in France. This had some similarities to palla, fives, pelota, or handball, involving hitting a ball with a bare hand and later with a glove. One theory is that this game was played by monks in monastery cloisters, and the shape of the court is certainly to this day reminiscent of a courtyard. Another theory is that the court features relate to medieval city streets and squares. (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... Palla (Italian for ball) is a traditional Tuscan ball game played in towns between Siena and Grosseto. ... Fives is a British sport believed to derive from the same origins as many racket sports. ... Pelota Vasca or Pelota Valenciana (in Spanish; pilota in Basque, Valenciano and Catalan; pelote in French, from Latin pila) is a name for a variety of court sports played with a ball using ones hand, a racket, a wooden bat (pala), or a basket propulsor, against a wall (front... American (or court) handball, usually referred to simply as handball, is an American form of fives played against one or more walls. ... Monastery of St. ... Cloister of Saint Trophimus, in Arles, France A Cloister is part of cathedrals and abbeys architecture. ...


The game spread across Europe and became increasingly popular, with the Venetian Ambassador reporting in 1600 that there were 1,800 courts in Paris alone.[citation needed] By the 16th century, the glove had become a racquet, the game had moved to an enclosed playing area and the rules had stabilised. Courts were built near many European palaces including the Louvre in Paris and Hampton Court in England. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... 1600 was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the capital of France. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... This article is about the museum. ... The clock tower straddles the entrance between the inner and outer courts Hampton Court Palace is a former royal place on the north bank of the River Thames in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames about 12 miles (19 km) southwest and upstream of Central London, nowadays open to...


Henry VIII's great attachment to the game around this time is also well known. He played the game at Hampton Court, and indeed his second wife Anne Boleyn was watching a game of real tennis at Hampton Court when she was arrested, whilst it is claimed that Henry was playing real tennis when news was brought to him of her execution. “Henry VIII” redirects here. ... Anne Boleyn, Queen Consort of England, 1st Marchioness of Pembroke[1] (ca. ...


The game became popular among the 17th and 18th century nobility in England and France, but eventually declined in popularity. This was due[citation needed] in large part to the impact that wider political and social changes—the English Civil War and Puritanism, and the French revolution—had upon the aristocracy and its pursuits. Real tennis played a minor role in the history of the French Revolution, through the Tennis Court Oath, a pledge signed by French deputies in a real tennis court, which formed a decisive early step in starting the revolution. (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see English Civil War (disambiguation). ... The Puritans were members of a group of radical Protestants which developed in England after the Reformation. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... Sketch by Jacques-Louis David of the Tennis Court Oath. ... For other uses, see Revolution (disambiguation). ...


The game regained popularity in the 19th century[citation needed], but broad public interest shifted to the outdoor game of lawn tennis which quickly became the most popular form of the sport. Real tennis also influenced the game of stické, which was also invented in the 19th century and combined aspects of real tennis, lawn tennis, and raquets. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Stické (also Sticke Tennis) is a racquet sport invented in the late 19th century merging aspects of real tennis, racquets, and lawn tennis. ... R. P. Keigwin (right) with AEJ Collins the Colleges racquets team at Clifton College circa 1902 Rackets (British English) or Racquets (American English), is an indoor racquet sport played in the United Kingdom, United States, and Canada. ...

Racquets and balls.
Racquets and balls.

Real tennis racquets and balls. ... Real tennis racquets and balls. ...

Manner of play

The rules and scoring are similar to those of lawn tennis, which derives from real tennis. Although in both sports game scoring is by fifteens (with the exception of 40), in real tennis six games wins a set, even if the opponent has five games. A match is typically best of five sets. For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ...


The 2½ inch (64 mm) diameter balls are handmade and consist of a core made of cork with fabric tape tightly wound around it and is covered with a hand-sewn layer of heavy, woven, woolen cloth, traditionally "Melton" cloth (not felt which is unwoven and not strong enough to last as a ball covering). Until recently the balls were always white, but "optic yellow" has been introduced for improved visibility, as was done years earlier in lawn tennis. The balls are much less bouncy than a lawn tennis ball, and weigh about 2½ ounces (71 grams) (lawn tennis balls typically weigh 2 ounces). The 27 inch (686 mm) long racquets are made of wood and use very tight strings to cope with the heavy ball. The racquet head is bent slightly to make it easier to strike balls close to the floor or in corners. , Melton Mowbray (known locally as Melton) is a town within the Melton borough of Leicestershire, England. ... A selection of 4 different felt cloths. ... Squash racquet and ball Racquetball racquet and ball A racquet (or racket) is a sports implement consisting of a handled frame with an open hoop across which a network of cord is stretched. ...

Jesmond Dene jeu à dedans court
Jesmond Dene jeu à dedans court
Falkland Palace jeu quarré court
Falkland Palace jeu quarré court

A real tennis court (jeu à dedans) is a very substantial building (a larger area than a lawn tennis court, with walls and a ceiling to contain all but the highest lob shots). It is enclosed by walls on all sides, three of which have sloping roofs (known as "penthouses") with various openings, and a buttress (tambour) off which shots may be played. The courts (except at Falkland Palace, a jeu quarré design) share the same basic layout but have slightly different dimensions. The courts are about 110 by 39 feet (33.5 × 11.9 m) including the penthouses, or about 96 by 32 feet (29.3 × 9.8 m) on the playing floor, varying by a foot or two per court. They are doubly asymmetric—not only is one end of the court different in the shape from the other, but the left and right sides of the court are also different. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 534 pixelsFull resolution (1137 × 759 pixels, file size: 126 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 534 pixelsFull resolution (1137 × 759 pixels, file size: 126 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (1138 × 757 pixels, file size: 92 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (1138 × 757 pixels, file size: 92 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... In classical architecture, a tambour (Fr. ... Servers view of the court Receivers view of the court The Falkland Palace Royal Tennis Club (also previously called the Falkland Palace Real Tennis Club) organizes play at the real tennis court in the gardens of Falkland Palace, Fife, Scotland. ... Sphere symmetry group o. ...


The service only happens from one end of the court (the "service" end) and the ball must touch the penthouse above and to the left of the server once before touching the floor in the "hazard" (receiving) end of the court. There are numerous and widely differing styles of service, many with exotic names to distinguish them, such as "railroad", "bobble", "poop", "pique", "boomerang", and "giraffe".


The game has other complexities, including that when the ball bounces twice at the serving end, the serving player does not generally lose the point outright. Instead a "chase" is called, and the server gets the chance, later in the game currently being played, to replay the point from the other end, but under the obligation of ensuring every shot he plays has a second bounce further back from the net than the shot he failed to reach. A chase can also be called at the receiving ("hazard") end, but only on the half of that end nearest the net; this is called a "hazard" chase. Those areas of the court in which chases can be called are marked with lines running across the floor, from left to right, generally about 1 yard apart - it is these lines that the chases are measured against. One result of this feature is that a player can only gain the advantage of serving through skillful play (viz. "laying" a "chase", which ensures a change of end). This is in marked contrast to lawn tennis where players alternately serve and receive entire games. It is thus not uncommon, in real tennis, to see a player serve for several consecutive games, till a chase be made. Indeed, an entire match (theoretically) could be played with no change of service, the same player serving every point. A yard (abbreviation: yd) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ...


The heavy, unbouncy balls take a great deal of spin, causing them to swerve when bounced off the walls, and a cutting stroke is often used to cause them to drop sharply off the back wall for the sake of a good chase.


Another twist to the game is the various windows below the penthouse roof that, in some cases, offer the player a chance to win the point instantly by hitting the ball into the opening. The largest window, located behind the server, is called the "Dedans" and must often be defended from hard hit shots (called "forces") coming from the receiving (called the "hazard") side of the court. The resulting strategy of long volleys and shots off the side walls and penthouse roof lead to many interesting shots not normally played in lawn tennis. However, because of the weight of the balls, the small racquets, and the need to defend the rear of the court, lawn tennis strategies like serve and volley are rarely employed.


Real tennis in literature

William Shakespeare mentions the game in Act I - Scene II of Henry V; the Dauphin, a French Prince, sends King Henry a gift of tennis-balls, out of jest, in response to Henry's claim to the French throne. King Henry replies to the French Ambassadors: "His present and your pains we thank you for: When we have matched our rackets to these balls, we will, in France, by God's grace, play a set [that] shall strike his father's crown into the hazard ... And tell the pleasant Prince this mock of his hath turn'd his balls to gun stones". Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Title page of the first quarto (1600) Henry V, also known as The Cronicle History of Henry the fift, is a play by William Shakespeare based on the life of King Henry V of England. ... Louis, Dauphin of France and Duke of Guyenne (22 January 1397 – 18 December 1415) was a younger son of Charles VI of France and Isabella of Bavaria-Ingolstadt. ...


The Penguin book of Sick Verse includes a poem by William Lathum comparing life to a tennis-court:

If in my weak conceit, (for selfe disport),
The world I sample to a Tennis-court,
Where fate and fortune daily meet to play,
I doe conceive, I doe not much misse-say.
All manner chance are Rackets, wherewithall
They bandie men, from wall to wall;
Some over Lyne, to honour and great place,
Some under Lyne, to infame and disgrace;
Some with a cutting stroke they nimbly sent
Into the hazard placed at the end; ...

The Scottish gothic novel The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner by James Hogg (1824) describes a tennis match that degenerates into violence. Strawberry Hill, an English villa in the Gothic revival style, built by seminal Gothic writer Horace Walpole The gothic novel was a literary genre that belonged to Romanticism and began in the United Kingdom with The Castle of Otranto (1764) by Horace Walpole. ... The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner was published by the Scottish author James Hogg in 1824. ... For the Texas Governor, see Jim Hogg James Hogg James Hogg (1770 - November 21, 1835) was a Scottish poet and novelist who wrote in both Scots and English. ...


The detective story Dead Nick takes place in a tennis milieu, and the title alludes to a shot that drops in the nick between the back wall and the floor.


Hazard Chase (1964) by Jeremy Potter is a thriller-detective story featuring real tennis on the court at Hampton Court Palace. During the story the game is explained, and the book contains a diagram of a real tennis court. Jeremy Potter wrote historical works (including Tennis and Oxford (1994)), and was himself an accomplished player of the game, winning the World Amateur Over-60s Championship in 1986.


The First Beautiful Game: Stories of Obsession in Real Tennis (2006) by top amateur player Roman Krznaric contains a mixture of real tennis history, memoir and fiction, which focuses on what can be learned from real tennis about the art of living.


Real tennis in film

Real tennis is featured in the film The Seven-Per-Cent Solution, a fictionalized meeting between Sherlock Holmes and Sigmund Freud. One of the film's plot points turns on Freud being forced into a grudge set with a Teutonic nobleman. The film The French Lieutenant's Woman includes a sequence featuring a few points being played. Also The Three Musketeers (1973) and Ever After briefly feature the game. Although presented with varying degrees of accuracy, these films provide a chance to see the game played, which otherwise may be difficult to observe personally. The Showtime series The Tudors (2007) portrays Henry the VIII playing the game. In the film version of Tom Stoppard's Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead the two lead characters play word games in a court, scoring points as if playing the game. The Seven-Per-Cent Solution (1976) is a Sherlock Holmes pastiche by Nicholas Meyer. ... A portrait of Sherlock Holmes by Sidney Paget from the Strand Magazine, 1891 Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, who first appeared in publication in 1887. ... Sigmund Freud (IPA: ), born Sigismund Schlomo Freud (May 6, 1856 – September 23, 1939), was an Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist who founded the psychoanalytic school of psychology. ... The French Lieutenants Woman is a 1981 film directed by Karel Reisz and adapted by playwright Harold Pinter. ... The Three Musketeers is a 1973 film based on the novel by Alexandre Dumas, père. ... Ever After: A Cinderella Story is a 1998 film adaptation of the fairy tale Cinderella, directed by Andy Tennant and starring Drew Barrymore. ... This article is about the pay TV channel. ... The Tudors is an Emmy Award-nominated television series that examines the early reign of Henry VIII, with Jonathan Rhys Meyers in the lead role. ... Sir Tom Stoppard, OM, CBE (born as Tomáš Straussler on July 3, 1937)[1] is an Academy Award winning British playwright of more than 24 plays. ... Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead is a 1990 film written and directed by Tom Stoppard based on his play of the same name. ...


See also

Mens singles championship, Dublin, 1890. ... For the basketball team, see Real Madrid Baloncesto. ...

References

Specific references:



General references:

  • Lord Aberdare (2001). The J.T. Faber Book of Tennis and Rackets. London: Quiller Press. ISBN 1-899163-62-X.
  • Heiner Gillmeister (1997). Tennis: A Cultural History. London: Leicester University Press. ISBN 0-7185-0147-0.
  • Roman Krznaric (2006). The First Beautiful Game: Stories of Obsession in Real Tennis. Oxford: Ronaldson Publications. ISBN 1-899804-13-7.
  • Kathryn McNicoll (2006) "Real Tennis". UK: Shire Publications. ISBN 978 0 7478 06103 (Album 437).
  • Julian Marshall (1878). The Annals of Tennis. Facsimile reprinted 1973 by Racquet Sports Information & Services, Inc.: Baltimore.

Image File history File links Emblem-important. ...

External links

  • Real Tennis Online, financially supported and officially endorsed by the governing bodies of real tennis in Australia, France, the UK and the USA

  Results from FactBites:
 
Real tennis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1718 words)
Real tennis is still played at a small number of active courts in the United Kingdom, Australia, the United States and France.
The term real tennis is often thought to be a corruption of this last name and related to the game's connection with royalty during its heyday in England and France in the 16th and 17th centuries.
Real tennis played a minor role in the history of the French Revolution, through the Tennis Court Oath, a pledge signed by French deputies in a real tennis court, which formed a decisive early step in starting the revolution.
real tennis - definition of real tennis in Encyclopedia (870 words)
Real tennis is the original racquet sport from which the modern game of lawn tennis, or tennis, is descended.
Real tennis did in fact play a minor role in history of the French Revolution, through the Tennis Court Oath, which was a pledge signed by French deputies in a real tennis court, which formed an decisive early step in starting the revolution.
A real tennis court is a very substantial building (a larger area than a lawn tennis court, with walls and a ceiling to contain all but the highest lob shots).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m