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Encyclopedia > Reading and Leeds Festivals
Reading and Leeds Festivals
Location(s) England
  • Various as National Jazz Festival (1961–1970)
  • Reading (since 1971)
  • Leeds (since 1999)
Years active 1961–present
Founded by
Date(s) August bank holiday
Genre(s) Rock, alternative rock, heavy metal, punk rock, indie rock, dance
Website www.readingfestival.com
www.leedsfestival.com

The Reading and Leeds Festivals are a pair of annual music festivals that take place in Reading and Leeds in England and are run by Festival Republic. The events both happen on the bank holiday weekend in August (on Friday, Saturday, Sunday), and share the same bill (usually with one or two exceptions). Between 1998 and 2007 the dual festivals were known officially as the "Carling Weekend" until parting ways with their sponsor Carling in November 2007. Leeds Festival may refer to: Leeds Festival – a rock festival in Leeds founded in 1999. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... , Reading is a town, unitary authority (the Borough of Reading) and urban area in the English county of Berkshire. ... For other uses, see Leeds (disambiguation) and Leeds City (disambiguation). ... This article is about the genre. ... Alternative music redirects here. ... Heavy metals, in chemistry, are chemical elements of a particular range of atomic weights. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A music festival is a festival oriented towards music that is sometimes presented with a theme such as musical genre, nationality or locality of musicians, or holiday. ... , Reading is a town, unitary authority (the Borough of Reading) and urban area in the English county of Berkshire. ... For other uses, see Leeds (disambiguation) and Leeds City (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Carling (disambiguation). ...


Reading Festival, the world's oldest popular music festival still in existence, has had various musical phases, as detailed below. In the twin-site era, rock, alternative, indie, punk and metal have tended to dominate. The festival typically has the following stages:[1] This article is about the genre. ... Alternative music redirects here. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Heavy metal music. ...

  • Main stage – major rock, indie and alternative acts
  • NME/Radio 1 stage – less well-known acts, building up to an alternative headline act
  • Carling stage – acts with less popular appeal and breakthrough acts
  • Radio 1 Lock Up Stage – underground punk and hardcore acts.[2] Due to demand, from 2006 this stage took up two days rather than previous years where it was only one day.
  • Dance tent – dance music acts, on the day that the above stage does not run
  • Alternative tent – comedy and cabaret acts plus DJs.[3]
  • TopMan Unsigned stage – Unsigned acts from the local area (Leeds only).[4]

The festivals are run by Festival Republic, which was divested from Mean Fiddler Music Group[5]. For promotional purposes during 1998-2007 they were known as the Carling Weekend: Reading and the Carling Weekend: Leeds. Unsurprisingly, these titles were seldom used when not required, although NME did so as part of its involvement. In 2007, the organisers welcomed "Reading Festival reclaiming its prestigious name" when the sponsored title was abolished.[6] For other uses, see NME (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Carling (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Cabaret is a form of entertainment featuring comedy, song, dance, and theatre, distinguished mainly by the performance venue — a restaurant or nightclub with a stage for performances and the audience sitting around the tables (often dining or drinking) watching the performance. ... Topshop is a clothing retailer in the United Kingdom. ... Festival Republic (formerly the Mean Fiddler Music Group) is a United Kingdom music promoter. ... For other uses, see NME (disambiguation). ...


In 2007, the capacity of the Reading site was 80,000[7] and the Leeds site was 70,000.[8] This was an increase of several thousand on previous years[9] The Reading festival is held at Little John's Farm on Richfield Avenue in central Reading, near the Caversham Bridge. The Leeds event is held in Bramham Park, the grounds of a historic house. Campsites are available at both sites and weekend tickets include free camping. Day tickets are also sold. Caversham Bridge is a bridge across the River Thames between Caversham and Reading. ... Bramham is a historic house in West Yorkshire, England, currently owned by Nicholas Lane Fox. ...

Contents

History

The Reading Festival originates from the National Jazz Festival, which was conceived by Harold Pendleton (founder of the Marquee Club in London) and was first held at Richmond Athletic Ground in 1961. This festival, in turn, took inspiration from events held in America. Throughout its first decade the festival changed names and moved around sites several times, being held at Windsor Racecourse, Kempton Park and Plumpton, before reaching its permanent home at Reading in 1971.[10] The National Jazz and Blues Festival was the precursor to the Reading Rock Festival and was the brainchild of Harold Pendleton, the manager of the prestigious Marquee Club in Soho. ... The National Jazz and Blues Festival was the precursor to the Reading Rock Festival and was the brainchild of Harold Pendleton, the manager of the prestigious Marquee Club in Soho. ... The Marquee is a legendary music club first located at 165 Oxford Street, London, England when it opened in 1958 with a range of jazz and skiffle acts. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... Windsor Racecourse, also known as Royal Windsor Racecourse is a thoroughbred horse racing venue located in Windsor, Berkshire. ... Kempton Park Racecourse is a horse racing track in Sunbury-On-Thames, UK; the site is set in 210 acres of land. ... There are several places in the United Kingdom and elsewhere, called Plumpton: Plumpton, Cumbria, England Plumpton, Northamptonshire, England Plumpton, East Sussex, England Plumpton, New South Wales, Australia This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


1970s

Reading festival promotional sticker from 1976
Reading festival promotional sticker from 1976

The line-up settled into a pattern of prog rock, blues and heavy metal during the 1970s[11]. It did dabble with punk rock in 1978 when The Jam, Sham 69 and Penetration played.[12] The festival attempted to provide both traditional rock acts and new punk bands, leading to clashes between the two sets of fans. Although The Ramones played the following year, the festival gradually became known for focusing on heavy metal and rock acts.[13] The progressive rock band Yes performing in 1977. ... Blues music redirects here. ... Heavy metal is a form of rock music characterized by aggressive, driving rhythms and highly amplified distorted guitars, generally with grandiose lyrics and virtuosic instrumentation. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... The Jam were an English punk rock/mod revival band active during the late 1970s and early 1980s. ... Sham 69 are an English punk band that formed in Hersham in 1975. ... Penetration were a punk rock band originally formed in 1976. ... Rock is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars, and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles, however saxophones have been omitted from newer subgenres of rock music since the 90s. ... The Ramones (L-R, Johnny, Tommy, Joey, Dee Dee) on the cover of their debut self-titled album (1976), cementing their place at the dawn of the punk movement. ...

1980s

During this decade, the festival followed a similar format to that established in the late 1970s, with large crowds flocking to see the era's leading rock and heavy metal acts perform on the last two days, with a more varied lineup including punk and new wave bands on the opening day.


Conservative ban

In 1984 and 1985, the Conservative Party-led local council effectively banned the festival by reclaiming the festival site for 'development' and refusing to grant licences for any alternative sites in the Reading area. A proposed move to Lilford in Northamptonshire failed, and the resulting gap in the British festival calendar kickstarted the rise of the minor CND benefit event at Glastonbury from obscure beginnings as a "hippie" festival in the 1970s to its present corporate giant status. Northamptonshire (abbreviated Northants or Nhants) is a landlocked county in central England with a population of 629,676 (2001 census). ...


Eventually a Labour Party council election win in 1986 saw the festival restored to fields adjacent to its original site with a line-up put together from scratch at just three months' notice.[14] The Arts & Entertainments councillor responsible for the re-introduction of the festival was Martin Salter, now MP for Reading West, the constituency where the festival is held.[15] The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ...


The following year notched up a record attendance at what was to be the last of the "classic" rock years of the festival, with headlining acts such as The Stranglers, Alice Cooper and Status Quo. The Stranglers are an English rock music group, formed on September 11, 1974 in Guildford, Surrey. ... Alice Cooper (born Vincent Furnier February 4, 1948) is an American rock singer, songwriter and musician whose career spans five decades. ... This article is about the English rock band. ...


Late 80s slump

1988 saw a disastrous attempt to take the festival in a mainstream commercial pop direction[16], dominated by the likes of Starship, Squeeze, Bonnie Tyler and Meat Loaf (who was "bottled" off stage), and the ensuing recriminations eventually saw the ousting of original festival promoter Harold Pendleton by the Mean Fiddler Music Group organization.[17] One of the fictional ships called the Starship Enterprise from Star Trek, one of the most famous fictional starships. ... For other uses, see Squeeze (disambiguation). ... Bonnie Tyler (born June 8, 1951 in Skewen in Wales, United Kingdom) is a pop/rock singer. ... This article is about the singer. ... Mean Fiddler is a United Kingdom music promoter and owner of venues. ...


Pendleton initially tried to continue at a new site near Newbury using the name "Redding Festival" but this failed to take off. Meanwhile, the official Reading Festival, now under Mean Fiddler guidance, continued at the Thames-side site in Reading, pursuing an almost completely Goth and indie music policy that alienated much of the traditional fan base and saw attendances continue to fall. Newbury is the name of several places: Canada Newbury, Ontario (village) Newbury Station, Ontario (Southwest Middlesex Township, Middlesex County, Ontario) England Newbury, Berkshire United States of America Newbury, Massachusetts Newbury, New Hampshire Newbury, Ohio also: Newbury Park, California Newburyport, Massachusetts The place name was bestowed on Newbury in England late... Look up Gothic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ...


The future of the festival looked in doubt at this point. However, things were to improve from 1992 onwards as the festival broadened its musical policy and attendances gradually increased.


1990s

The NME/Radio 1 tent at the 2005 Reading Festival
The NME/Radio 1 tent at the 2005 Reading Festival

In 1991, Nirvana played the first of their two appearances at Reading, midway down the bill. This is also the year the first britpop bands such as Suede and Blur started to show themselves on the festival circuit. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 962 KB) Summary Radio 1/NME tent at the 2005 Reading Festival. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 962 KB) Summary Radio 1/NME tent at the 2005 Reading Festival. ... This article is about the American grunge band. ... Britpop was a mid-1990s British alternative rock genre and movement. ... Suede (or The London Suede in the U.S.) were a popular and influential English rock band of the 1990s that helped start the Britpop musical movement of the decade. ... Blur were an English rock band that formed in Colchester in 1989. ...


Kurt Cobain's wheelchair

1992 was one of the most famous in the festival's history. Nirvana played what was to become their last UK concert, and one of their most famous. The band's frontman, Kurt Cobain took to the stage in a wheelchair pushed by music journalist Everett True, parodying speculations about his mental health. Then he got up and joined the rest of the band, playing an assortment of old and new material[18]. At one point in the show before singing "All Apologies", Cobain revealed to the crowd the recent birth of his daughter Frances Bean and succeeded in having the crowd chant "Courtney, we love you!" in unison (in reference to his wife, musician Courtney Love).[19] Kurt Donald Cobain (February 20, 1967 – c. ... Everett True (born Jerry Thackray in 1960 or 1961) is a British music journalist, who grew up in Chelmsford, Essex. ... In Utero track listing tourettes (11) All Apologies (12) (Gallons of Rubbing Alcohol Flow Through the Strip) (12 - hidden track, only European pressings) All Apologies is a song by the American rock band Nirvana. ... Frances Bean Cobain (born August 18, 1992) is the only child of the late Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain and Hole frontwoman Courtney Love. ... Courtney Love[1] (born Courtney Michelle Harrison on July 9, 1964) is an American rock musician. ...


Festival expansion

Over the next few years the festival continued to grow as the popularity of outdoor festivals increased. Britpop and indie continued to dominate along with rock. Notably, rap acts such as Ice Cube began to appear regularly on the main stage to mixed receptions. Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... Media:Example. ...


In 1996, The Stone Roses played their final gig at the festival.[20] The Stone Roses were an influential English rock band from Manchester formed in 1984. ...


In 1998 it absorbed the failed Phoenix Festival. This resulted in a now infamous on-stage spat between The Beastie Boys and The Prodigy over the song "Smack My Bitch Up".[21] The Phoenix festival was set up by Mean Fiddler as an alternative to the established Glastonbury Festival. ... The Beastie Boys as depicted on the cover of their 1992 album Check Your Head. ... This article is about the English band. ...


In 1999, the festival gained another leg at Temple Newsam in Leeds, where V Festival had been held in 1997 and 1998, when it was clear that the Reading site was far too small to deal with the demand. A system where the line up of Reading play Leeds the following day, with the bands from Leeds' opening day playing the final day in Reading, soon developed.[22] Temple Newsam is an estate in the county in Leeds, West Yorkshire, England. ... For other uses, see Leeds (disambiguation) and Leeds City (disambiguation). ... For the North American spin-off of the rock festival, see Virgin Festival For the Australian spin-off, see V Festival (Australia) The V Festival is an annual music festival in England, the first to be held simultaneously at two sites - currently Hylands Park in Chelmsford and Weston Park in...


After a successful first year in Leeds, a continued resurgence in the popularity of outdoor music festivals led to the Reading festival selling out more and more quickly every year. The Leeds leg, however, was plagued by riots and violence which led to problems in retaining its licence.[23] The worst of these was in 2002, after which Mean Fiddler moved the festival to Bramham Park, near Wetherby to the east of Leeds in 2003.[24] Since then, security at both sites has increased and problems appear to have been quelled.[25] However, this has also lead to an increase in demand. Bramham is a historic house in West Yorkshire, England, currently owned by Nicholas Lane Fox. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


The first few years of the 2000s saw a varied but predominantly rock line-up, however as the decade has progressed the Main Stage and Radio 1 Stage line-up has followed music trends and featured more and more indie artists, that have become very popular in the British music mainstream. However, one day (Sunday in the case of Reading) is traditionally set aside for hard rock and metal. This was most pronounced at the 2006 festival, which saw little hard rock on the first two days, but featured bands such as Mastodon, Slayer and Pearl Jam on the Sunday. However this can be arguably laid down to the growing popularity of the Download festival in June providing a solely metal, hard rock and punk outlet. This article is about the prehistoric elephant-like animal. ... For other uses, see Slayer (disambiguation). ... This article is about the rock group. ...


The Evening Session tent has also had its share of infamous sets, like Feeder's set in 2002 which saw the tent heavily overcrowded, with many people watching from outside as a result. The band decided to play the second stage to keep the show low-key, as it was their first official appearance after the death of their drummer Jon Lee. The BBC Radio 1 broadcast of the set was repeated in late 2002, due to the bands frontman Grant Nicholas unable to attend a Steve Lamacq acoustic session after doctors' advice, and later in early 2006 on 6 Music. Feeder are an award-winning British/Japanese rock band that formed in Newport, South Wales. ... This article is about the member of the band Feeder. ... BBC Radio 1 (commonly referred to as just Radio 1) is a British national radio station operated by the BBC, specialising in popular music and speech and is aimed primarily at the 14-29[1] age group. ... Feeder - 1 December 2005 - Cardiff CIA Grant Nicholas is the lead singer of the Indie band Feeder, along with bassist Taka Hirose and drummers Jon Lee and later Mark Richardson. ... Steve Lamacq (born 16 October 1965), sometimes known by his nicknames Lammo (given to him by John Peel) or The Cat (due to his ability as a goalkeeper), is an English disc jockey, currently working with the BBC radio stations Radio 1, BBC 6 Music and now BBC Radio 2... BBC 6 Music is one of the BBCs newest radio stations, launched on March 11, 2002 and originally codenamed Network Y. It is only available via digital media - DAB radio, the Internet and the various forms of digital television. ...


The announcement of the line-up and ticket release for the 2006 festival saw weekend tickets for Reading sell out in just under two hours, breaking all records so far, and emphasising the growing desire for live music because of the "rock revival" of the past few years, and the fact that the Glastonbury Festival was not taking place. Further Weekend tickets went on sale again soon after and sold out in 26 minutes. The Glastonbury Festival of Contemporary Performing Arts, commonly abbreviated to Glastonbury or Glasto, is the largest[1] greenfield music and performing arts festival in the world. ...


In 2005, the Festival spawned the Reading Fringe Festival in the town. Much like the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, this sees venues in the town hosting fringe acts hoping to draw crowds and industry figures from the larger festival. The Reading Fringe has run annually since then. The Reading Fringe Festival was started in 2005 in Reading, Berkshire, after a group of musicians decided to put on events in the week running up to the Carling Reading Festival. ... Categories: Festival stubs | Edinburgh ...


A second Fringe followed in 2006 and a third in 2007.

Leeds Main Stage on 25th August 2007 in-between sets by Kings of Leon and Razorlight
Leeds Main Stage on 25th August 2007 in-between sets by Kings of Leon and Razorlight

In 2006, Mean Fiddler announced that they were using the Government's new licensing laws to keep the festival going later into the night (an attempt to quell some of the unrest of earlier years). The organisers kept revellers happy with the Aftershock tent, an Oxfam tent and the Silent Disco. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... (Redirected from 25th August) August 25 is the 237th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (238th in leap years), with 129 days remaining. ... Kings of Leon are a rock band made up of three brothers and one cousin, based in Mt. ... Razorlight is an Anglo-Swedish band formed in 2002 by singer-songwriter Johnny Borrell. ... Mean Fiddler is a United Kingdom music promoter and owner of venues. ... The Silent Disco is a clubbing concept where dancers are provided with personal wireless headphones which can be tuned in to listen to a DJ. This type of disco earned its name because of the fact that an outsider walking in would see a tent full of people dancing, yet...

A 2007 Leeds Festival Weekend Ticket.
A 2007 Leeds Festival Weekend Ticket.

Tickets for the 2007 festival were released on 19 March and sold out within hours. However, over 3,000 fans found that their tickets were cancelled due to computer errors which caused a confirmation e-mail to be released even though the payment was denied.[26] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 409 pixelsFull resolution (1580 × 808 pixel, file size: 295 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 409 pixelsFull resolution (1580 × 808 pixel, file size: 295 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The 2007 festivals ran from 24 to 27 August. However, concerns were raised at the Reading site due to the torrential weather conditions in the UK.[27] The floods caused the River Thames to burst its bank causing floods at the festival site. Melvin Benn, the festival organiser said "I'd guess about 25% of the campsite is under water at the moment and before long someone will be saying that the festival is in danger, so I just wanted to state that the festival will definitely take place".[28] Plans were put in place to move campsites and car parks if the floods persisted. These plans were laid down by Melvin Benn in an e-mail sent to those signed up to the Reading Festival newsletter and on the official Reading Festival website.


Also at the 2007 festival, Kaiser Chiefs played at the Leeds portion of the festival (their home city) under the name Hooks For Hands in the Carling tent.


2008

The Reading and Leeds Festivals 2008 are scheduled to take place on the weekend of the 22nd to 24th August.


Tickets for 2008 were released on 31 March at 6:45pm[29] and sold out in record time[30], and the tickets made available via HMV sold out after just one hour[31]


This is also the first year "BBC Introducing..." will have a stage at the festival.



For the full line-up, see Reading and Leeds Festivals line-ups The Reading and Leeds Festivals are a pair of annual music festivals that take place in Reading and Leeds in England. ...


Bottled off

While the mass-participation can and bottle fights of the 1970s and 1980s have long since ended, the Reading Festival 'tradition' of unpopular bands being bottled off (being forced off stage by a barrage of audience-thrown plastic bottles and cans) has continued throughout its history. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Bottling is when a concert audience throws things at the performers onstage. ...


The 1983 reggae act Steel Pulse suffered possibly the most vicious bottling-off ever seen at the Festival, before or since, disappearing within moments of appearing on stage under an avalanche of missiles launched by the temporarily united ranks of punks and rockers waiting to see The Stranglers. Steel Pulse is a well-known roots reggae musical band. ... The Stranglers are an English rock music group, formed on September 11, 1974 in Guildford, Surrey. ...


In 1988 Bonnie Tyler bravely completed her set despite an unending barrage of bottles, turf and litter. Unfortunately, the day's headliner Meat Loaf was not so brave, retreating ingloriously only 20 minutes into his set after taking a 2-litre cider bottle full in the face.[citation needed] Bonnie Tyler (born June 8, 1951 in Skewen in Wales, United Kingdom) is a pop/rock singer. ... This article is about the singer. ...


Good Charlotte experienced it in 2003, but remained on-stage and encouraged the crowd to throw more[citation needed]. This article is about the band. ...


In 2004, it was the turn of rapper 50 Cent, who was pelted with bottles [32]. 50 Cent lasted nearly 20 minutes before finally throwing his microphone into the crowd in anger. 50 cents may refer to 50 subunits of currencies where the subunit is called a cent. ... Microphones redirects here. ...


In 2006 at Reading, Panic! at the Disco lead singer Brendon Urie was struck in the face with a bottle, knocking him unconscious and forcing the band to stop mid-song. Urie received treatment from his road crew for several minutes, then the band continued from the point at which their song was interrupted. [33] Panic! at the Disco is an alternative rock band from Las Vegas, Nevada. ...


List of headliners

Historical lineup posters can be seen on the official festival website.


References

  1. ^ Carling festival main page. Retrieved on 2008-01-14.
  2. ^ New Stages Announced. Retrieved on 2008-01-14.
  3. ^ The Alternative stage. Retrieved on 2008-01-14.
  4. ^ The Topman stage. Retrieved on 2008-01-14.
  5. ^ Festival Republic About Page.
  6. ^ Festivals part company with Carling.
  7. ^ NME News.
  8. ^ Increased Leeds Festival.
  9. ^ An extra 5,000 tickets are granted for the Leeds Festival. Retrieved on 2006-11-04.
  10. ^ Carling Weekend | Reading festival | 2006 | By Tom Knight
  11. ^ Leader: In praise of ... the Reading festival | | Guardian Unlimited Arts
  12. ^ Reading Rock Festival.Reading 1978
  13. ^ Reading Rock Festival.Reading 1979
  14. ^ Viator | Tours, Tickets & Things to do from Tour Operators Worldwide by Viator
  15. ^ Meet the man who plans the biggest party in Reading - Get Reading
  16. ^ Explore the Collections - Reading Festival
  17. ^ How I Got Here: Fiddling all over the world - MBAs Guide, Postgraduate - Independent.co.uk
  18. ^ BBC - Seven Ages of Rock - Events - Nirvana headline Reading Festival
  19. ^ All Music Spot :: Nirvana Biography
  20. ^ BBC - h2g2 - The Stone Roses - 'The Stone Roses'
  21. ^ Leader: In praise of ... the Reading festival | | Guardian Unlimited Arts
  22. ^ [1]
  23. ^ BBC NEWS | Entertainment | Music | Festival marred by violence
  24. ^ BBC NEWS | 2003 Festivals
  25. ^ BBC - Leeds - Entertainment - Happy campers
  26. ^ MacInnes, Paul. "Computer error frustrates Reading and Leeds fans", The Guardian, 2007-03-22. Retrieved on 2007-08-06. 
  27. ^ 2007 United Kingdom Floods. Retrieved on 06 August 2007.
  28. ^ "This is the Carling Weekend: Reading Festival site", NME, 4 August 2007
  29. ^ Reading & Leeds tickets go on sale
  30. ^ Reading & Leeds Tickets Sell Out
  31. ^ [2]
  32. ^ YouTube - 50 Cent at Reading 2004
  33. ^ [http://www.nme.com/news/panic-at-the-disco/24093

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Reading and Leeds Festivals are a pair of annual music festivals that take place in Reading and Leeds in England. ... There are a large number of music festivals in the United Kingdom, covering a wide variety of genres. ... The Workers Beer Company (WBC) is a British-Irish organisation which runs temporary bars at events and festivals in Europe. ...

Further reading

  • Carroll, Ian (2007). The Reading Festival: Music, Mud and Mayhem - The Official History. Reynolds & Hearn Ltd. ISBN 978-1-905287-43-7. 

External links

  • Reading Festival official website
  • Leeds Festival official website
  • Reading Festival Online website
  • Carling Weekend: Reading Festival and Carling Weekend: Leeds Festival page
  • The world's greatest Carling Weekend: Reading Festival 2007 gallery!
  • Recollections and photographs from over 20 years of the Reading Festival
  • Reading Festival News
  • Reading Festival 2007 Videos
  • View from the Leeds Festival's local paper (Wetherby News)
  • Review and footage from Reading 2007
  • /Extensive History of Reading 1971-81
  • / History of the Festival on the Reading Museum website
  • Myspace dedicated to providing the latest news and info on the festival
There are a large number of music festivals in the United Kingdom, covering a wide variety of genres. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Electronic music (disambiguation). ... The Big Chill is a UK festival of alternative and chillout music. ... Creamfields is a large dance music festival featuring DJs and live acts. ... The Glade is an electronic dance music festival which originally started out as a stage at Glastonbury Festival. ... Global Gathering is a music festival which takes place each July at Long Marston Airfield, Near Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire, United Kingdom. ... RockNess is an annual dance concert staged by Loudsound and Slingshot. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Heavy metal music. ... Bloodstock can also refer to the industry of breeding and trading thoroughbred race horses. ... Bloodstock Open Air is a heavy metal festival held annually at Bloodstock in Derby, England since 2005. ... Damnation Festival is a metal festival, organised for the fans, by the fans. The festival was started by a group of eight passionate music fans who were disappointed in the lack of extreme metal bands and UK talent appearing on major British festival line-ups, and therefore decided to create... The Download Festival is a three day music festival held annually at the spiritual home of rock music in England: Donington Park (which hosted the Monsters of Rock Festivals between 1980 and 1996, and 2002s Ozzfest). ... Monsters of Rock was an annual rock music festival in England held every August at the Castle Donington racetrack from 1980–1996 (with the odd exception, and a one-off comeback in 2006). ... Since 1980 when rock music was revived in Britain by the New Wave of British Heavy Metal, Donington Park has played host to many music festivals. ... This article is about the genre. ... The term alternative rock or alternative music1 was coined in the early 1980s to describe bands which didnt fit into the mainstream genres of the time. ... Give It A Name, sometimes abbreviated to GIAN, is an annual British rock music festival, held on the weekend nearest to the end of April. ... The Isle of Wight Festival is a music festival which takes place annually on the Isle of Wight, England. ... T in the Park is a major music festival that has been held annually in Scotland since 1994. ... T On The Fringe, sponsored by Tennents Lager, is a music festival which runs as part of the Edinburgh Festival. ... Tennents ViTal is music festival originally held in the Botanic Gardens in Belfast, Northern Ireland. ... For the North American spin-off of the rock festival, see Virgin Festival For the Australian spin-off, see V Festival (Australia) The V Festival is an annual music festival in England, the first to be held simultaneously at two sites - currently Hylands Park in Chelmsford and Weston Park in... For the music genre, see Pop music. ... All Tomorrows Parties logo projected at festival. ... The Bestival is a music festival on the Isle of Wight. ... The Connect Music Festival is a new music festival that takes place at Inveraray Castle at Loch Fyne in Argyll, Scotland. ... The Glastonbury Festival of Contemporary Performing Arts, commonly abbreviated to Glastonbury or Glasto, is the largest[1] greenfield music and performing arts festival in the world. ... The Godiva Festival is a music festival held each year in Coventry, UK. // The Festival attracts more than 75,000 visitors each year to a 12 acre site in the citys War Memorial Park. ... Guilfest, formerly the Guildford Festival, is a British music festival, held in Stoke Park, Guildford each July. ... Image:Skyemusicfestival. ... The Latitude Festival is a newly created annual music festival that takes place in Henham Park, Southwold, Suffolk, England. ... The Phoenix festival was set up by Mean Fiddler as an alternative to the established Glastonbury Festival. ... Radio 1s Big Weekend (previously known as One Big Weekend) is a music festival run by BBC Radio 1. ... Goldrush on stage at the 2005 festival Truck Festival is an annual music festival in Oxfordshire, England. ... The O2 Wireless Festival is a music festival in England that takes place every year in both Hyde Park, London and at Harewood House, Leeds. ... The festivals logo, the Womad lion World of Music, Arts and Dance (WOMAD) is a festival started in Shepton Mallet, England in 1982. ... Womad Charlton Park is the name given to the WOMAD festival to be held in England, replacing Womad Reading, the last of which took place in 2006. ... Womad Reading is a festival of Music, Arts and Dance that takes place every year around the end of July, in the Rivermead Complex, in Reading, Berkshire This year, the Womad team have confirmed the dates 28th-30th of July. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Reading and Leeds Festivals - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2101 words)
The Reading festival is held at Little John's Farm on Richfield Avenue in central Reading, near the Caversham Bridge.
The Reading Festival originates from the National Jazz Festival, which was conceived by Harold Pendleton (founder of the Marquee Club in London) and was first held at Richmond Athletic Ground in 1961.
The NME/Radio 1 tent at the 2005 Reading Festival
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Reading and Leeds Festivals (8206 words)
Reading is a town and unitary authority (the Borough of Reading) in the English county of Berkshire.
Leeds is a major city in the northern English county of Yorkshire in the United Kingdom and the urban core of the City of Leeds metropolitan borough of West Yorkshire.
A music festival is a festival that presents a number of musical performances usually tied together through a theme or genre.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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