FACTOID # 26: Delaware is the latchkey kid capital of America, with 71.8% of households having both parents in the labor force.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Reading, England
Borough of Reading
Reading
Geography
Status: Unitary, Borough
Region: South East England
Ceremonial County: Berkshire
Area:
- Total
Ranked 318th
40.40 km²
Admin. HQ: Reading
ONS code: 00MC
Demographics
Population:
- Total (2003 est.)
- Density
Ranked 114th
144,119
3,567 / km²
Ethnicity: 86.8% White
5.2% S.Asian
4.1% Afro-Carib.
Politics

Reading Borough Council
http://www.reading.gov.uk/
Leadership: Leader & Cabinet
Executive: Labour
MP, Reading East: Rob Wilson
MP, Reading West: Martin Salter
St Mary's Church and market
Enlarge
St Mary's Church and market

Reading is a town and unitary authority in Berkshire in England, at the confluence of the River Thames and River Kennet, halfway between London and Oxford. The district has a population of over 144,000. Reading is probably the most important business centre in South East England and outside Greater London, often referred to as the capital of the Thames Valley with the headquarters of some major British companies and the UK offices of a number of major foreign multinationals. The name Reading is pronounced to rhyme with bedding (in IPA /ˈrɛdɪŋ/). Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The region (sometimes known as Government Office Region) is currently the highest tier of local government in England. ... South East England is one of the official regions of England. ... For other places named Berkshire, see: Berkshire (disambiguation) Berkshire (IPA: or  ; sometimes abbreviated to Berks) is a county in the south of England, to the west of London and also bordering on Oxfordshire, Buckinghamshire, Greater London, Surrey, Wiltshire and Hampshire. ... This article explains the meaning of area as a Physical quantity. ... This is a list of districts of England ordered by area. ... To help compare sizes of different geographic regions, we list here areas between 10 km² (1000 hectares) and 100 km² (10,000 hectares). ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... The Office for National Statistics coding system is a hierarchical code used in the United Kingdom for tabulating census and other statistical data. ... 2003(MMIII) is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Density (symbol: ρ - Greek: rho) is a measure of mass per unit of volume. ... This is a list of districts of England ordered by population. ... Image File history File links Arms of Reading, Berkshire This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ... The United Kingdom is divided into four parts, England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. ... The Labour Party is the principal centrist/centre-left political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... This is a list of MPs elected in the UK general election, 2005 to the House of Commons for the Fifty-Fourth Parliament of the United Kingdom at the United Kingdom general election, 2005, arranged by constituency. ... Reading East is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Rob Wilson is a United Kingdom politician and entrepreneur. ... This is a list of MPs elected in the UK general election, 2005 to the House of Commons for the Fifty-Fourth Parliament of the United Kingdom at the United Kingdom general election, 2005, arranged by constituency. ... Reading West is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Martin John Salter is a United Kingdom politician and fisherman. ... St Marys Church and Butts, Reading, Berkshire, England Photograph taken by chris_j_wood on the 16th April 2004, with original filename DCP_2093. ... St Marys Church and Butts, Reading, Berkshire, England Photograph taken by chris_j_wood on the 16th April 2004, with original filename DCP_2093. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single-tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... For other places named Berkshire, see: Berkshire (disambiguation) Berkshire (IPA: or  ; sometimes abbreviated to Berks) is a county in the south of England, to the west of London and also bordering on Oxfordshire, Buckinghamshire, Greater London, Surrey, Wiltshire and Hampshire. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... Length 346 km Elevation of the source 110 m Average discharge entering Oxford: 17. ... The Kennet is a river in the south east of England, and a tributary of the River Thames. ... The clock tower of the Palace of Westminster, which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 (2001 census). ... South East England is one of the official regions of England. ... Greater London is the top level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... This article is about the Thames Valley in southern England. ... Symbols of the International Phonetic Alphabet as used for English. ...

Contents


Location

The centre of Reading is situated close to the confluence of the River Thames and River Kennet, reflecting the town's history as a river port. Just before the confluence, the Kennet cuts through a narrow and relatively steep sided gap in the hills forming the southern flank of the Thames flood plain. The absence of a flood plain on the Kennet in this defile enabled the development of wharves off the notoriously fickle unimproved Thames navigation. Several places exist with the name Thames, and the word is also used as part of several brand and company names Most famous is the River Thames in England, on which the city of London stands Other Thames Rivers There is a Thames River in Canada There is a Thames... Kennet is a local government district in Wiltshire, England. ...


Reading is located some 40 miles (64 km) due west of central London, and 25 miles (40 km) south east of Oxford. Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 (2001 census). ...


Position: grid reference SU714733 The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ...


Reading suburbs: Calcot, Caversham, Coley, Coley Park, Earley, Fords Farm, Katesgrove, Purley-On-Thames, Southcote, Tilehurst, Whitley, Whitley Wood, Woodley Calcot is a suburb of Reading, near to Junction 12 of the M4 motorway, in the English county of Berkshire. ... Caversham is a village in the unitary authority of Reading, England, although, historically, Caversham was part of Oxfordshire. ... Coley or Coley Park is a suburb within Reading, Berkshire Categories: UK geography stubs | Suburbs of Reading ... Location within the British Isles Earley is a town in Berkshire, England with a population of around 30,000 people. ... Fords Farm is a suburb within Reading in the English county of Berkshire. ... Katesgrove is a suburb of Reading, Berkshire Categories: UK geography stubs | Suburbs of Reading ... Purley-On-Thames was originally a village, but is now more a suburb of Reading, in the English county of Berkshire. ... Southcote is a suburb of Reading in the English county of Berkshire. ... Tilehurst was originally a village, but is now a large suburb some three miles to the west of Reading in the English county of Berkshire. ... Whitley is a large suburb to the south of Reading in the English county of Berkshire. ... Whitley Wood is a suburb to the south of Reading in the English county of Berkshire. ... Woodley is a town in the English county of Berkshire. ...


Nearby towns and cities: London, Oxford, Newbury, Wokingham, Bracknell, Henley-on-Thames The clock tower of the Palace of Westminster, which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 (2001 census). ... Newbury is the principal town in the west of the county of Berkshire in the United Kingdom. ... Wokingham is a small town in Berkshire in the south east of England, close to Reading. ... Map sources for Bracknell at grid reference SU870693 Bracknell is a town of about 50,000 people (1991) in the Bracknell Forest, in the English county of Berkshire. ... Map sources for Henley-on-Thames at grid reference SU7682 Henley-on-Thames from by the playground near the Rail Station A Hill near Henley-on-Thames Henley-on-Thames is a town on the north side of the River Thames in South Oxfordshire, England, about 10 miles downstream and...


Nearby villages: Pangbourne, Shinfield, Sonning, Sonning Common, Theale, Three Mile Cross, Twyford, Winnersh Pangbourne village centre The River Pang in the village The River Thames in the village Pangbourne is a large village on the River Thames in the English county of Berkshire. ... The Thames near Sonning Sonning is a small village in Berkshire, England a few miles east of Reading. ... Theale High Street The Old Brewery in Theale The Falcon pub in Theale Theale is a large village and civil parish in the English county of Berkshire. ... Three Mile Cross is a village in the county of Berkshire, close to Reading. ... Twyford Highstreet Twyford is a village situated in the heart of the Thames Valley on the A4 between Reading and Maidenhead, close to Henley-on-Thames, Wokingham and Bracknell. ... Winnersh is a former village in Berkshire, which is now a suburb of Reading, Berkshire Golden Globe-winning BBC sitcom The Office namechecks Winnersh when Ricky Gervais as David Brent muses on his future: My world does not end with these four walls. ...


History

The lion in Forbury Gardens - An unofficial symbol of Reading

The settlement was founded at the confluence of the River Thames and River Kennet in the eighth century as Readingum. The name is probably from the Anglo-Saxon for "(Place of) Readda's People", or (less probably) the Celtic Rhydd-Inge, "Ford over the River". It was occupied by the Vikings in 871 but had recovered sufficiently by its 1086 Domesday Book listing to contain around 600 people and be made a designated borough. The town saw much pilgrimage in mediaeval times to Reading Abbey see below. In 1253 Reading's Merchant Guild succcessfuly petioned for the grant of a charter from the King and negotiated a division of authority with the Abbey. The dissolution of the Abbey saw Henry VIII grant the Gild a new charter in 1542 with which to become a borough corporation to run the town. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1912 KB)Picture of Forbury Gardens, Reading, UK. Taken by User:MarkS 14 June 2005. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1912 KB)Picture of Forbury Gardens, Reading, UK. Taken by User:MarkS 14 June 2005. ... (7th century — 8th century — 9th century — other centuries) Events The Iberian peninsula is taken by Arab and Berber Muslims, thus ending the Visigothic rule, and starting almost 8 centuries of Muslim presence there. ... Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... Celtic languages are the languages descended from Proto-Celtic, both those spoken by the ancient Celts, and those used by their modern descendants, the Gaels, Welsh, Cornish and Bretons. ... The name Viking is a loan from the native Scandinavian term for the Norse seafaring warriors who raided the coasts of Scandinavia, Europe and the British Isles from the late 8th century to the 11th century, the period of European history referred to as the Viking Age. ... Events Nine battles are fought between the Danes and Wessex. ... Events Domesday Book is completed in England Emperor Shirakawa of Japan starts his cloistered rule Imam Ali Mosque is rebuilt by the Seljuk Malik Shah I after being destroyed by fire. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Pilgrim at Mecca A pilgrimage is a term primarily used in religion and spirituality of a long journey or search of great moral significance. ... Reading Abbey Reading Abbey is a large, ruined abbey in Reading, Berkshire, founded by Henry I in 1121 for the salvation of my soul, and the souls of King William, my father, and of King William, my brother, and Queen Maud, my wife, and all my ancestors and successors. // History... A guild is an association of people of the same trade or pursuits, formed to protect mutual interests and maintain standards of morality or conduct. ... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... Events War resumes between Francis I of France and Emperor Charles V. This time Henry VIII of England is allied to the Emperor, while James V of Scotland and Sultan Suleiman I are allied to the French. ...


By the end of the sixteenth century Reading was the largest town in Berkshire, home to over 3,000 people. During the medieval period and Tudor times Reading grew rich on its trade in cloth, as instanced by the fortune made by local merchant John Kendrick. The town played an important role during the English Civil War; it changed hands a number of times, and despite its fortifications the longest siege was only ten days in April 1643. However the taxes levyed on the town badly damaged its cloth trade, and it did not recover. Reading was also the only site of significant fighting in England during the Glorious Revolution of 1688 with The Reading Fight. (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... John Kendrick (1573-1624) was a prosperous clothing merchant. ... The term English Civil War (or Wars) refers to the series of armed conflicts and political machinations which took place between Parliamentarians and Royalists from 1642 until 1651. ... Fortifications (Latin fortis, strong, and facere, to make) are military constructions designed for defensive warfare. ... For the Boston area punk band see Siege (band). ... // Events January 21 - Abel Tasman discovers Tonga February 6 - Abel Tasman discovers the Fiji islands. ... The term Glorious Revolution refers to the generally popular overthrow of James II of England in 1688. ... // Events A high-powered conspiracy of notables, the Immortal Seven, invite William and Mary to depose James II of England. ... The Reading Fight 1688 Reading saw the only substantial military action on mainland Britain during the Glorious Revolution. ...


The 18th century saw the begining of a major iron works in the town and the growth of the brewing trade for which Reading was to become famous. Agricultural products from the surrounding area still used Reading as a market place, especially at the famous Reading cheese fair but now trade was coming in from a wider area. Reading's trade benefited from better designed turnpike roads which helped its establish its location on the major coaching routes from London to Oxford and the west country. It also gained from increasing river traffic on both the Thames and Kennet. In 1723 despite considerable local opposition the Kennet Navigation opened the River to boats as far as Newbury. This opposition stopped when it became apparent the new route benefited the town. The opening of the Kennet and Avon Canal in 1810 meant you could go by barge from Reading to the Bristol Channel. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Iron Works was a name applied in the 19th century to heavy industrial manufactories whose output products were primarily built of iron and/or steel. ... The Brewer, designed and engraved, in the Sixteenth. ... A toll road, turnpike or tollpike is a road on which a toll authority collects a fee for use. ... The clock tower of the Palace of Westminster, which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 (2001 census). ... The West Country is an informal area of southwestern England, roughly corresponding to the administrative region South West England. ... Length 346 km Elevation of the source 110 m Average discharge entering Oxford: 17. ... The Kennet is a river in the south east of England, and a tributary of the River Thames. ... Events February 16 - Louis XV of France attains his majority Births February 24 - John Burgoyne, British general (d. ... The Kennet and Avon Canal at Brass-Knocker-Bottom near Bath The Kennet and Avon Canal is a canal in southern England. ... The location of the Bristol Channel The Severn Bridge and Bristol Channel, looking northwestward from England towards Wales The Bristol Channel coast at Ilfracombe, North Devon, looking west towards Lee Bay The Bristol Channel is a major inlet in the island of Great Britain, separating South Wales from South West...


In 1801, the population of Reading was about 9,400. During the 19th century Reading grew rapidly as a manufacturing centre. From 1832 the town returned two Members of Parliament. A reformed town council was introduced in 1839. The railway arrived in 1841, with a second system connecting in 1849. In 1851 the population was 21,500. The town was given county borough status in 1887. By 1900 the population was 59,000 - large sections of the housing in Reading are terraced, reflecting its nineteenth century growth. The town has been famous for the "Three Bs" of beer (from 1785, India Pale Ale was invented in Reading), bulbs (1807-1976, Suttons Seeds), and biscuits (1822-1977, Huntley & Palmers). In the nineteenth century the town also made 'Reading Sauce'. 1801 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... 1832 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ... A Council is a group of people who usually possess some powers of governance. ... 1839 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1851 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1887 is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar). ... 1900 is a common year starting on Monday. ... A street of British terraced housing In architecture and city planning, a terrace, rowhouse, or townhouse (though the latter term can also refer to patio houses) is a style of housing in use since the late 17th century, where a row of identical or mirror-image houses share side walls. ... A typical mug of lager beer, showing the golden colour of the beer and the foamy head floating on top. ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... A bottle of Fullers IPA India Pale Ale (IPA, also known as Strong Pale ale and Imperial Pale ale), is a distinct style of beer and is characterized as a sparkling pale ale with a high level of alcohol (5. ... Shallot bulbs A bulb is an underground vertical shoot that has modified leaves (or thickened leaf bases) that are used as food storage organs by a dormant plant. ... 1807 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1976 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... Suttons Seeds is a long established supplier of seeds, bulbs, and other horticultural products. ... This article is about several types of food. ... 1822 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1977 was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1977 calendar). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


The town continued to expand in the 20th century, annexing Caversham across the River Thames in Oxfordshire in 1911. This expansion can be seen in the number of 1920s built semi-detached properties, and the 1950s expansion that joined Woodley, Earley and Tilehurst into Reading. Miles Aircraft in Woodley was an important local firm from the 1930s to 1950s. The Lower Earley development, started in the 1970s, was the largest private housing development of its time in Europe. This extended the urban area of Reading right up to the M4 motorway, which acts as the southern boundary to the town. Further recent housing developments have substantially increased the number of modern commuter houses in the surrounding parts of Reading, and 'out-of-town' shopping hypermarkets. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... Caversham is a village in the unitary authority of Reading, England, although, historically, Caversham was part of Oxfordshire. ... Oxfordshire (abbreviated Oxon, from Latin Oxonia) is a county in South East England, bordering on Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire, Berkshire, Wiltshire, Gloucestershire and Warwickshire. ... 1911 was a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... Sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or primarily in North America as the Roaring Twenties. // Events and trends Technology John T. Thompson invents Thompson submachine gun, also known as Tommy gun John Logie Baird invents the first working mechanical television system (1925) Charles Lindbergh becomes the first person to... Semi-detached housing (usually abbreviated to semi, as in three-bedroom semi) consists of pairs of houses built side by side as units sharing a party wall and usually in such a way that each houses layout is a mirror image of its twin. ... // Events and trends The 1950s in Western society was marked with a sharp rise in the economy for the first time in almost 30 years and return to the 1920s-type consumer society built on credit and boom-times, as well as the height of the baby-boom from returning... Woodley is a town in the English county of Berkshire. ... Location within the British Isles Earley is a town in Berkshire, England with a population of around 30,000 people. ... Tilehurst was originally a village, but is now a large suburb some three miles to the west of Reading in the English county of Berkshire. ... Miles Aircraft was a British manufacturer of light civil and military aircraft. ... // Events and trends The 1930s were spent struggling for a solution to the global depression. ... // Events and trends The 1950s in Western society was marked with a sharp rise in the economy for the first time in almost 30 years and return to the 1920s-type consumer society built on credit and boom-times, as well as the height of the baby-boom from returning... This article provides extensive lists of events and significant personalities of the 1970s. ... The M4 motorway is a motorway in the UK, which links London and west Wales via Bristol. ... In commerce, a hypermarket (from the French hypermarché) is a store which combines a supermarket and a department store. ...


Listed companies headquartered in Reading include BG Group, Wolseley and Yell. Other large employers in the area include Information and Communications Technology (ICT) giants like Microsoft, Hewlett-Packard and Oracle, as well as financial services giant Prudential and shaving products company Gillette. The town also hosts two annual music festivals - Reading Festival and WOMAD. BG Group Plc is an energy production and distribution company which is headquartered in Reading outside London, England. ... Wolseley plc is a British company based in Droitwich formerly known for the manufacture of Wolseley motor cars. ... Yell Group is a British directory company, which is a constituent of the FTSE 100 Index of leading British quoted companies. ... Categories: Information technology ... Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ: MSFT) is the worlds largest software company with over 50,000 employees in various countries as of May 2004. ... The Hewlett-Packard Company (NYSE: HPQ), commonly known as HP, is a very large, global company headquartered in Palo Alto, California, United States. ... Oracle Corporation (NASDAQ: ORCL), one of the major companies developing database management systems, tools for database development, and enterprise resource planning software, dates from 1977 and has offices in more than 145 countries around the world. ... This article refers to Prudential plc, based in the United Kingdom. ... The Gillette brand logo The Gillette Company (NYSE: G) is a company founded by King C. Gillette in 1901 as a safety razor manufacturer, which is currently based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The Reading and Leeds Festivals, officially called the Carling Weekend, are a pair of annual music festivals that take place in Reading and Leeds in England. ... World of Music, Arts and Dance (WOMAD) is a festival started in England in 1982. ...


Government

Although the largest town in Berkshire over many centuries, Reading had to wait until the 1974 County change to become the official county town of Berkshire (when the much smaller town of Abingdon moved to Oxfordshire). The Borough of Reading became a unitary authority area in 1998 when Berkshire County Council was abolished, and is now responsible for all aspects of local government within the borough. The borough council has made several applications for city status, but as of 2004 these have all been rejected. 1974 is a common year starting on Tuesday (click on link for calendar). ... The Local Government Act 1972 was an Act of Parliament in the United Kingdom, that reformed local government in England and Wales, on April 1, 1974. ... A county town is the location of the administrative headquarters of a county. ... Abingdon is a market town in Oxfordshire, England and is one of the towns which claim to be Britains oldest continuously occupied town. ... Oxfordshire (abbreviated Oxon, from Latin Oxonia) is a county in South East England, bordering on Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire, Berkshire, Wiltshire, Gloucestershire and Warwickshire. ... A unitary authority is a term used in a two-tier local government system to describe a unit of local government that operates as a single tier. ... 1998 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... For other places named Berkshire, see: Berkshire (disambiguation) Berkshire (IPA: or  ; sometimes abbreviated to Berks) is a county in the south of England, to the west of London and also bordering on Oxfordshire, Buckinghamshire, Greater London, Surrey, Wiltshire and Hampshire. ... Historically, city status was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The borough limits now include the former villages of Caversham, Southcote and Whitley together with part of the village of Tilehurst, but exclude several settlements which are still part of the urban area. These settlements include Woodley, Earley and Lower Earley which form part of Wokingham unitary authority, and the remainder of Tilehurst, Calcot and Purley-On-Thames which form part of West Berkshire unitary authority. The exclusion of these areas from the borough is politically controversial, and proposals occasionally surface to include them. Caversham is a village in the unitary authority of Reading, England, although, historically, Caversham was part of Oxfordshire. ... Southcote is a suburb of Reading in the English county of Berkshire. ... For the suburbs of Coventry, Warwickshire, see Whitley, Coventry Whitley and Whitley Wood are suburbs of Reading, Berkshire. ... Tilehurst was originally a village, but is now a large suburb some three miles to the west of Reading in the English county of Berkshire. ... Woodley is a town in the English county of Berkshire. ... Location within the British Isles Earley is a town in Berkshire, England with a population of around 30,000 people. ... Location within the British Isles Earley is a town in Berkshire, England with a population of around 30,000 people. ... Wokingham is a local government district in Berkshire, England. ... Calcot is a suburb of Reading, near to Junction 12 of the M4 motorway, in the English county of Berkshire. ... Purley-On-Thames was originally a village, but is now more a suburb of Reading, in the English county of Berkshire. ... West Berkshire is an local government district in Berkshire, South East England, governed by a unitary authority (West Bershire Council). ...


Reading and the surrounding area is currently divided between the parliamentary constituencies of Reading East and Reading West. Historically Reading was represented at various times by the members for the former Parliamentary Borough of Reading and the former parliamentary constituencies of Reading, Reading North, and Reading South. Reading East is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Reading West is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The Parliamentary Borough of Reading was a parliamentary borough represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Reading was a borough constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Reading North was a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Reading South was a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ...


Institutions

Reading Abbey
Reading Abbey

Reading Minster, or the Minster Church of St Mary the Virgin as it is more properly known, is Reading's oldest ecclesiastical foundation, known to have been founded by the 9th century and possibly earlier. Although eclipsed in importance by the later Abbey (see below), Reading Minster has regained its importance since the destruction of the Abbey and is now the seat of the Bishop of Reading. Image File history File links Reading Abbey in the centre of Reading in England. ... Image File history File links Reading Abbey in the centre of Reading in England. ... Reading Minster, or the Minster Church of St Mary the Virgin as it is more properly known, is the oldest ecclesiastical foundation in Reading, Berkshire. ... This earthenware dish was made in 9th century Iraq. ... The Bishop of Reading is a suffragan bishop in the Church of England, based in Reading, Berkshire. ...


Reading Abbey was founded by Henry I in 1121. He was buried there, as were parts of Empress Matilda, William of Poitiers, Constance of York, and Princess Isabella of Cornwall, among others. The abbey was one of the pilgrimage centres of medieval England, it held over 230 relics including the hand of St. James. The abbey was largely destroyed in 1538 during the Dissolution and Henry VIII had the abbot, Hugh Cook Faringdon, hanged. Reading Abbey Reading Abbey is a large, ruined abbey in Reading, Berkshire, founded by Henry I in 1121 for the salvation of my soul, and the souls of King William, my father, and of King William, my brother, and Queen Maud, my wife, and all my ancestors and successors. // History... Henry I (c. ... Events Concordat of Worms condemns Pierre Abélards writings on the Holy Trinity. ... Empress Matilda (February 1102 – September 10, 1167) is the title by which Matilda, daughter and dispossessed heir of King Henry I of England and his wife Matilda of Scotland (herself daughter of Malcolm III Canmore and St. ... William (August 17, 1153-1156) was the first child of Henry Plantagenet (later Henry II of England) and Eleanor of Aquitaine, strangely born on the same day that his fathers rival Eustace IV of Boulogne died. ... Constance of York (c. ... The word relic comes from the Latin reliquiae (remains) and there are many pre-Christian instances of some bone or other part of the corpse, or some intimately associated object, carefully preserved with an air of veneration as a tangible memorial. ... Saint James can refer to the following: Several men mentioned in the New Testament, whose various epithets and euphemisms cause some uncertainties: James, son of Zebedee, an apostle, brother of John the Apostle; also called Saint James the Great. ... Events Treaty of Nagyvarad. ... The Dissolution of the Monasteries (referred to by Roman Catholic writers as the Suppression of the Monasteries) was the formal process, taking place between 1536 and 1540, by which King Henry VIII confiscated the property of the Roman Catholic monastic institutions in England and took them to himself, as the... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... Hugh Cook Faringdon (also known as Hugh Faringdon or Hugh Cook of Faringdon) was appointed Abbot of Reading Abbey in 1520, on the death of Abbot Thomas Worcester. ... Hanging is a form of execution, or a method for suicide. ...


Reading School, founded in 1125, is the tenth oldest school in England. It is based in Victorian buildings designed by Alfred Waterhouse on Erleigh Road. Reading School is a grammar school in the town of Reading, Berkshire, United Kingdom. ... Events May 23 - Lothair of Saxony becomes Holy Roman Emperor on the death of Henry V. War ends between Toulouse and Provence. ... The Natural History Museum in South Kensington, London, has an ornate terracotta facade typical of high Victorian architecture. ...


The Reading Borough Public Library service dates back to 1877. The Central Library which was opened in 1985 contains the Reading Local Studies Library which provides books, maps, and illustrations of the history of the town and Berkshire. The Museum of Reading opened in 1883 in the Town Hall, parts of which date back to 1786. The museum has recently been restored and extended, and now contains galleries describing the history of Reading and its related industries, a gallery of artifacts discovered during the excavations of Silchester Roman Town, a copy of the Bayeux Tapestry and an art collection. Reading Borough Libraries are responsible for public library provision in the English town of Reading. ... 1877 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1985 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Museum of Reading is located in the old Town Hall in Reading in the English county of Berkshire. ... 1883 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Categories: Archaeology stubs | Archaeological sites in Britain | Berkshire | Hampshire | Roman sites in England ... The Bayeux Tapestry (French: Tapisserie de Bayeux) is not actually a tapestry (that is, a weaving), but is embroidery, and dates from 1077. ...


The University of Reading was established in 1892, affiliated to Oxford University. It was chartered as an independent university in 1926 and moved onto its new Whiteknights campus in 1949. The University runs several museums and botanic gardens in the town, including the Museum of English Rural Life, the Ure Museum of Greek Archaeology, the Cole Museum of Zoology, and the Harris Garden. The University of Reading (pronounced Redding) is a university in the English town of Reading. ... 1892 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... 1926 was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1949 is a common year starting on Saturday. ... The Museum of English Rural Life was founded by the University of Reading in 1951 to record the changing face of farming and the countryside. ... The Ure Museum of Greek Archaeology forms part of the Department of Classics at the University of Reading and is located on the universitys Whiteknights Campus in the English town of Reading. ... The Cole Museum of Zoology forms part of the School of Animal and Microbial Sciences at the University of Reading and is located on the universitys Whiteknights Campus in the English town of Reading. ... The Harris Garden is a botanical garden located on the Whiteknights Campus of the University of Reading in the English town of Reading. ...


Thames Valley University now runs what was Reading College of Art and Design. Thames Valley University is a University based on campuses in Ealing, Slough and Reading. ...


Transport

Reading's location in the Thames Valley to the west of London means that it has always had a significant position in the nation's transport infrastructure. As described above, the town grew up as river port at the confluence of the Thames and Kennet. Today both of these rivers remain navigable, although such navigation is exclusively leisure oriented. The locks of Caversham Lock, Blake's Lock, County Lock, Fobney Lock and Southcote Lock are also all within the borough. Length 346 km Elevation of the source 110 m Average discharge entering Oxford: 17. ... The Kennet is a river in the south east of England, and a tributary of the River Thames. ... Canal locks in England. ... Caversham Lock is a lock and weir situated on the River Thames in Reading, Berkshire, England. ... Blakes Lock is a lock situated on the River Kennet in Reading, Berkshire, England. ... County Lock is a lock on the River Kennet within Reading, Berkshire. ... Fobney Lock is a lock on the River Kennet within Reading, Berkshire. ... Southcote Lock is a lock on the River Kennet at Southcote within Reading, Berkshire. ...


Reading was also a major staging point on the old Bath Road (A4) from London to Bath and Bristol. This road still carries significant local traffic, but has now been largely replaced for long distance traffic by the M4 motorway which closely skirts the borough and serves it with three junctions (J10-J12). Within Reading the Thames is crossed by both Reading and Caversham road bridges, whilst several road bridges cross the Kennet. The A4 at Hotwells in Bristol The A4 crosses Picadilly Circus in central London The A4 is a major road in England, also known as the Great West Road. ... The clock tower of the Palace of Westminster, which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... Palladian Pulteney Bridge and the weir at Bath Bath is a city in south-west England, most famous for its baths fed by three hot springs. ... Bristol is an English city and county and one of the two administrative centres of South West England (the other being Plymouth). ... The M4 motorway is a motorway in the UK, which links London and west Wales via Bristol. ... Reading Bridge is a road bridge over the River Thames at Reading in the English county of Berkshire. ... Caversham Bridge is a bridge across the River Thames between Caversham and Reading. ...


Reading is a major junction point on the national rail system, and as a consequence Reading station is a major transfer point as well as serving heavy originating and terminating traffic. The main route is the Great Western Main Line, which runs west from London's Paddington station before splitting in Reading with lines serving the West Country and Bristol, Bath and South Wales. Secondary lines connect Reading with London's Waterloo station, Guildford, Gatwick Airport, Birmingham, Basingstoke, Southampton and the South Coast. A railway-operated express bus service links Reading with Heathrow Airport. National Rail uses the BR double-arrow logo National Rail is a brand name describing the passenger rail service previously provided by British Rail, the now-defunct UK state-owned rail operator. ... Reading station from the station car park at the north (rear) side of the station Reading (formerly Reading General) is a railway station in the large town of Reading in south central England. ... Categories: Rail stubs | British railway lines ... The central (and longest) span of Paddington Station Paddington station or London Paddington is the name of a major National Rail and London Underground station complex in the Paddington area of London. ... The West Country is an informal area of southwestern England, roughly corresponding to the administrative region South West England. ... Bristol is an English city and county and one of the two administrative centres of South West England (the other being Plymouth). ... Palladian Pulteney Bridge and the weir at Bath Bath is a city in south-west England, most famous for its baths fed by three hot springs. ... South Wales is an area of Wales bordered by England and the Bristol Channel to the East and South, and Mid Wales and West Wales to the North and West. ... The main entrance of Waterloo Station. ... Map sources for Guildford at grid reference SU9949 Guildford is the county town of Surrey, England, as well as being the seat for the borough of Guildford and the administrative headquarters of the South East England region. ... Gatwick Airport (IATA: LGW, ICAO: EGKK) is Londons second airport and the second busiest airport in the UK after Heathrow in terms of passengers per year. ... The city from above Centenary Square. ... Location within the British Isles View from Basingstoke railway station forecourt; the chrome yellow buildings stand on the site of older office buildings that have been demolished to build apartments. ... Civic Centre, Southampton Southampton is a city and major port situated on the south coast of England. ... London Heathrow Airport (IATA: LHR, ICAO: EGLL), often referred to simply as Heathrow, is the United Kingdoms busiest and best-connected airport. ...


Local transport is largely road based, with significant peak hour congestion in the borough. A comprehensive and frequent local bus network within the borough, and a less frequent network in the surrounding area, are provided by Reading Buses. Reading Transport is a bus operator serving the towns of Reading, Newbury and the surrounding area in the English county of Berkshire. ...


Retail

Reading Broad Street
Reading Broad Street

Reading is a major shopping centre. The principal shopping area is around Broad Street, which was pedestrianised in 1995. Broad Street is anchored at its east and west ends respectively by The Oracle and Broad Street Mall enclosed shopping centres. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1080x720, 200 KB)Broad Street, the main shopping street of Reading Photograph taken by chris_j_wood on the 19th March 2005, with original filename DCP_3648. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1080x720, 200 KB)Broad Street, the main shopping street of Reading Photograph taken by chris_j_wood on the 19th March 2005, with original filename DCP_3648. ... 1995 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Broad Street frontage Internal mall Riverside level The Oracle is a large indoor shopping and leisure mall located on the banks of the River Kennet in central Reading, UK. It takes its name from a workhouse that once occupied part of the site. ... The Broad Street Mall is a large indoor shopping mall located in central Reading in England. ...


There are three major department stores in Reading: John Lewis Reading (formerly known as Heelas), Debenhams and House of Fraser. There are also branches of the chains Marks and Spencers and British Home Stores. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... John Lewis Reading is a major department store in Reading in the English county of Berkshire. ... Debenhams plc is a chain of department stores based in the United Kingdom. ... House of Fraser is a British department store group with around 50 stores across the country. ... Marks and Spencer plc (known also as M&S and sometimes colloquially as Marks and Sparks) is the largest retailer in the United Kingdom by sales. ... British Home Stores (also known as BHS or, more recently Bhs) is a stalwart general retailer of the British High Street, selling clothes and household items (such as bedlinen, cutlery, crockery and lighting). ...


The booksellers Waterstone's have several branches in Reading. Their Broad Street branch is of particular interest, as it is a remarkable conversion of a nonconformist chapel dating from 1707. Gower Street branch Waterstones is a United Kingdom based chain of bookshops. ... The frontage building on Broad Street The interior of the 1707 chapel Waterstones, Broad Street, Reading is a branch of the Waterstones chain of bookshops, located in the principal shopping street of Reading in England. ... A nonconformist is an English or Welsh Protestant of any non-Anglican denomination, chiefly advocating religious liberty. ... A chapel is a private church, usually small and often attached to a larger institution such as a college, a hospital, a palace, or a prison. ... Events January 1 - John V is crowned King of Portugal March 26 - The Act of Union becomes law, making the separate Kingdoms of England and Scotland into one country, the Kingdom of Great Britain. ...


Sport

Reading F.C., formerly based at Elm Park, have since 1998 been in their new 24,084 capacity all-seater Madejski Stadium (named after chairman John Madejski). The football club is nicknamed the Royals (previously known as the Biscuitmen). Reading F.C. is a football team, based in the English town of Reading and currently playing in the Football League Championship. ... 1998 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... The Madejski Stadium is a sport stadium in Reading, England. ... John Robert Madejski, born April 28, 1941 in Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, is a British businessman, mainly active in publishing and the hotel industry. ...


The Reading Half Marathon is held on the streets of Reading in March of each year, with as many as 12,000 competitors from elite to fun runner. Reading Half Marathon in 2004 Reading Half Marathon in 2005 with the eventual winner The Reading Half Marathon is a half marathon held on the streets of the English town of Reading in March of every year. ... March is the third month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ...


Reading is a centre for Rugby Football in the area, and supports the Guinness Premiership team London Irish and three senior semi-professional clubs; Reading R.F.C., Redingensians R.F.C. and Reading Abbey R.F.C.. The town is also home to Reading Greyhound Racing and the Reading Racers speedway team, and there is a velodrome at Palmer Park. Rugby football, as a catch-all term, may refer to two related but separate team sports: rugby league and rugby union. ... The Guinness Premiership is the present name for the leading rugby union league competition for English clubs. ... For the British Army regiment see London Irish Rifles London Irish are a rugby union team in England. ... Reading R.F.C is an English Rugby Union club, which plays in National Division 3 South. ... Redingensians R.F.C is an English Rugby Union club. ... Reading Abbey R.F.C is an English Rugby Union club. ... Reading Greyhound Racing is an English greyhound racing track. ... Reading Racers is an English motorcycle speedway team. ... Speedway has multiple meanings: An alternative name for a race track Speedway, Indiana, home of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway The gas station chain Speedway SuperAmerica Motorcycle speedway, a form of motorcycle racing The name of a |Scottish pop rock group who hit the UK charts in 2003. ... Bicycle racing on a velodrome A velodrome is a sporting arena purpose-built for track cycling, ie: racing on bicycles. ... Palmer Park is an unicorporated community within the Greater Landover census area. ...


Literature

Oscar Wilde was imprisoned in Reading (HM Prison) from 1895 to 1897. While he was there he wrote De Profundis, which was published in 1905. After his release he lived in exile in Paris and wrote The Ballad of Reading Gaol, published in 1908. Oscar Wilde Oscar Fingal OFlahertie Wills Wilde (October 16, 1854 – November 30, 1900) was an Anglo-Irish playwright, novelist, poet, and short story writer. ... // Reading (HM Prison) HM Prison & YOI Reading is a British prison. ... 1895 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1897 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... 1905 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... The Ballad of Reading Gaol is a famous poem by Oscar Wilde, written after his release from prison on 19 May 1897. ... 1908 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Thomas Hardy painted a rather disparaging picture of the town, lightly disguised as Aldbrickham, in his 1895 novel Jude the Obscure. Photograph of Hardy Thomas Hardy, OM (2 June 1840 – 11 January 1928) was a novelist and poet, generally regarded as one of the greatest figures in English literature. ... 1895 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Jude the Obscure is the last of Thomas Hardys novels, first published as a novel in 1895. ...


T_E_Lawrence lost the first draft of his Seven Pillars of Wisdom at Reading train station. Thomas Edward Lawrence (August 16, 1888 – May 19, 1935), also known as Lawrence of Arabia, and (apparently, among his Arab allies) Aurens or El Aurens, became famous for his role as a British liaison officer during the Arab Revolt of 1916–1918. ...


Thomas Noon Talfourd, the judge and dramatist was born in Reading and later became MP for the town. Sir Thomas Noon Talfourd (May 26, 1795 - March 13, 1854), was an English judge and author. ...


Mary Russell Mitford lived in Reading for a number of years and then spent the rest of her life just outside the town at Three Mile Cross and Swallowfield. Mary Russell Mitford Mary Russell Mitford (December 16, 1787 - January 10, 1855), was an English novelist and dramatist. ... Three Mile Cross is a village in the county of Berkshire, close to Reading. ... Swallowfield - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...


Charles Dickens was asked to stand as MP for Reading, but declined. He became president of the Reading Athenaeum. In his Bleak House, Esther Summerson goes to school in Reading. Charles Dickens used his rich imagination, sense of humour and detailed memories, particularly of his childhood, to enliven his fiction. ... Bleak House is the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, published in 20 monthly parts from March, 1852 through September, 1853. ...


Media

Reading is served by two local newspapers.

Three local radio stations broadcast from Reading, these being Reading 107 FM, 2-Ten FM, and BBC Radio Berkshire. Other local radio stations, such as London's 95.8 Capital FM, Basingstoke's 107.6 Kestrel FM and Slough's Star 106.6 can also be received in Reading. The Reading Evening Post is an English local evening newspaper covering Reading and surrounding areas. ... The Reading Chronicle is an English local weekly newspaper covering Reading and surrounding areas. ... Reading 107 FM Contents // Categories: Station stubs | UK Radio Stations ... 2-Ten FM is the local pop station serving the Thames Valley and North Hampshire with studios in Reading. ... BBC Radio Berkshire is the BBC Local Radio service for the English county of Berkshire. ... Capital Radios headquarters Capital Radio is a London-based British radio group. ... 107. ... Star 106. ...


Notable people

Notable current and former residents of Reading include:

Henry Addington, 1st Viscount Sidmouth (May 30, 1757 - February 15, 1844) was a British statesman, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1804. ... A prime minister may be either: the chief or leading member of the cabinet of the top-level government in a country having a parliamentary system of government; or the official, in countries with a semi-presidential system of government, appointed to manage the civil service and execute the directives... The Royal Berkshire Hospital is a hospital in Reading, Berkshire. ... Jacqueline Bisset Jacqueline Bisset (born September 13, 1944) is a British actress, born in Weybridge, Surrey, England. ... Daniel Blagrave (1603-1668) was a prominent resident of the town of Reading, in the English county of Berkshire. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ... The broad definition of Regicide is the deliberate killing of a king, or the person responsible for it. ... John Blagrave (c. ... Kenneth Charles Branagh (born December 10, 1960) is a versatile Northern Irish actor and film director. ... Richard Burns is a rally driver from England. ... Deon Burton (born October 25, 1976 in Reading, England) is an English-Jamaican footballer who currently plays striker for Rotherham. ... Hugh Cook Faringdon (also known as Hugh Faringdon or Hugh Cook of Faringdon) was appointed Abbot of Reading Abbey in 1520, on the death of Abbot Thomas Worcester. ... Abbots coat of arms An abbot (from the Hebrew ab, a father, through the Syriac abba, Latin abbas (genitive form, abbatis), Old English abbad, ; German Abt; French abbé) is the head and chief governor of a community of monks, called also in the East hegumenos or The English version... Reading Abbey Reading Abbey is a large, ruined abbey in Reading, Berkshire, founded by Henry I in 1121 for the salvation of my soul, and the souls of King William, my father, and of King William, my brother, and Queen Maud, my wife, and all my ancestors and successors. // History... Dawn French (born October 11, 1957) is a British comedienne and actress best known as one half of the comic duo French & Saunders. ... Ricky Gervais in The Office Ricky Gervais (born June 25, 1961) is a comic writer and performer who grew up in the English town of Reading, Berkshire. ... Lenny Henry, CBE (born Lenny Hinton on August 29, 1958 in Dudley, West Midlands) is a British entertainer, whose family moved to the UK from Jamaica in the 1950s. ... John Kendrick (1573-1624) was a prosperous clothing merchant. ... William Laud (October 7, 1573 – January 10, 1645) was Archbishop of Canterbury and a fervent supporter of Charles I of England whom he encouraged to believe in the Divine Right of Kings. ... Arms of the Archbishop of Canterbury The Archbishop of Canterbury is the senior clergyman of the established Church of England and symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... John Robert Madejski, born April 28, 1941 in Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, is a British businessman, mainly active in publishing and the hotel industry. ... Mary Russell Mitford Mary Russell Mitford (December 16, 1787 - January 10, 1855), was an English novelist and dramatist. ... Samuel Alexander Mendes (born August 1, 1965) in Reading, Berkshire, England, is a British stage and film director. ... Jeff Yak Minter (born in Reading, April 22, 1962) is one of the most innovative and distinctive modern British computer/video game designers and programmers. ... Mike Oldfield on the album cover of Amarok (1990) Michael Gordon Oldfield (born May 15, 1953 in Reading, England) is a multi-instrumentalist musician and composer, working a style that blends rock or progressive rock, ethnic or world music, and classical music. ... Michael Sprott (1975-) is a professional boxer from Reading, Berkshire, England. ... William Henry Fox Talbot (February 11, 1800 - September 17, 1877) was one of the first photographers and made major contributions to the photographic process. ... Sir Thomas Noon Talfourd (May 26, 1795 - March 13, 1854), was an English judge and author. ... Christopher John Tarrant (born October 10, 1946, Reading, Berkshire) is a British radio broadcaster and television presenter now best known for hosting the TV game show Who Wants To Be A Millionaire?. Tarrant was educated at the University of Birmingham. ... Logo from the UK version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? is a television game show which offers very large cash prizes for correctly answering successive multiple-choice questions, which are usually of increasing difficulty. ... The Natural History Museum in South Kensington, London, has an ornate terracotta facade typical of high Victorian architecture. ... Neil Webb (born June 30, 1963 in Reading) is a former English football player. ... Oscar Wilde Oscar Fingal OFlahertie Wills Wilde (October 16, 1854 – November 30, 1900) was an Anglo-Irish playwright, novelist, poet, and short story writer. ... Kate Winslet Kate Winslet Kate Winslet Kate Elizabeth Winslet (born October 5, 1975 in Reading, Berkshire, England) is an English actress most famous for her role of Rose DeWitt Bukater in the 1997 blockbuster movie Titanic. ...

External links

  • Travel guide to Reading (Berkshire) from Wikitravel
  • Reading Borough Council
  • Reading Roars blog

Reading elected two members to the
Unreformed House of Commons


Wikitravel is a project to create an open content, complete, up-to-date, and reliable world-wide travel guide. ... UK Royal Coat of Arms This work is copyrighted. ... The House of Commons in the 18th century The unreformed House of Commons is the name generally given to the British House of Commons as it existed before the Reform Act of 1832. ...

Districts of England - South East England Flag of England

Adur | Arun | Ashford | Aylesbury Vale | Basingstoke and Deane | Bracknell Forest | Brighton and Hove | Canterbury | Cherwell | Chichester | Chiltern | Crawley | Dartford | Dover | Eastbourne | East Hampshire | Eastleigh | Elmbridge | Epsom and Ewell | Fareham | Gosport | Gravesham | Guildford | Hart | Hastings | Havant | Horsham | Isle of Wight | Lewes | Maidstone | Medway | Mid Sussex | Milton Keynes | Mole Valley | New Forest | Oxford | Portsmouth | Reading | Reigate and Banstead | Rother | Runnymede | Rushmoor | Sevenoaks | Shepway | Slough | Southampton | South Bucks | South Oxfordshire | Spelthorne | Surrey Heath | Swale | Tandridge | Test Valley | Thanet | Tonbridge and Malling | Tunbridge Wells | Vale of White Horse | Waverley | Wealden | West Berkshire | West Oxfordshire | Winchester | Windsor and Maidenhead | Woking | Wokingham | Worthing | Wycombe The Districts of England are the lowest level of local government in England, except for civil parishes. ... South East England is one of the official regions of England. ... Large sized chicken tender of England/St Georges Cross/State flag of Guernsey, 1936-1985 File links The following pages link to this file: The Ashes Arsenal F.C. Cornwall Cambridgeshire Charlton Athletic F.C. City of London London Borough of Croydon Cheshire Chelsea F.C. Devon England Essex... Adur is a local government district of West Sussex in England. ... Arun is a local government district in West Sussex, England. ... Ashford is a local government district and borough in Kent, England. ... The Aylesbury Vale (or Vale of Aylesbury) is a large area of flat land largely to be found in Buckinghamshire, England. ... Basingstoke and Deane is a local government district and borough in Hampshire, England. ... Bracknell Forest is a Unitary authority and borough in the former county of Berkshire in southern England. ... Brighton and Hove is a city on the south coast of England. ... The City of Canterbury is a local government district with city status in Kent, England. ... Cherwell is a local government district in northern Oxfordshire, England. ... Chichester is a local government district in West Sussex, England. ... The Chiltern District is one of four local government district of Buckinghamshire in south central England. ... Map sources for Crawley at grid reference TQ2736 Crawley is a town and local government district in West Sussex, England. ... Dartford is a local government district and borough in Kent, England. ... Dover is a local government district in Kent, England. ... Eastbourne, as seen from Beachy Head Eastbourne is a medium-sized town in East Sussex, on the south coast of the UK, with a population, according to the 2001 census, of around 90,000. ... East Hampshire is a local government district in Hampshire, England. ... Eastleigh is a local government district and borough in Hampshire, England, bordering Southampton. ... Elmbridge is a borough in Surrey, England. ... Epsom and Ewell is a local government district with borough status in Surrey, England, covering Epsom and Ewell. ... Fareham is a local government district and borough in Hampshire, England. ... other places of this name include Gosport, Indiana and Gosport, Ontario Gosport is a town and district in Hampshire with around 78,000 inhabitants, situated on the south coast of England. ... Gravesham is a local government district and borough in Kent, England. ... Guildford is a local government district with borough status in Surrey, England. ... Hart is a local government district in Hampshire, England, named after the River Hart. ... Hastings is a town and local government district in South East England, in the county of East Sussex. ... Havant is a town in Hampshire on the South coast of England, between Portsmouth and Chichester. ... Horsham is a local government district in West Sussex, England. ... The Isle of Wight is an island off the south coast of England, opposite Southampton. ... Lewes is a local government district in East Sussex in southern England. ... Maidstone is a local government district and borough in Kent, England. ... The Medway Towns is the name given to a conurbation located to the north of Kent in England: until 1998 it was part of that county (see below). ... Mid Sussex is a local government district in South East England - part of the county of West Sussex. ... The Borough of Milton Keynes is a borough in England. ... Mole Valley is a local government district in Surrey, England. ... New Forest is a local government district in Hampshire, England. ... Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 (2001 census). ... This article is about the English city of Portsmouth. ... Reigate and Banstead is a local government district with borough status in east Surrey. ... Rother is a local government district in East Sussex, England. ... Runnymede is a local government district with borough status in the English county of Surrey. ... Rushmoor is a local government district and borough in Hampshire, England. ... Sevenoaks is a local government district in Kent, England. ... Shepway is a local government district in Kent, England. ... Slough (pronounced ) is a town and unitary authority in the county of Berkshire in the south of England. ... Civic Centre, Southampton Southampton is a city and major port situated on the south coast of England. ... South Bucks is one of four local government districts in Buckinghamshire, in south central England. ... South Oxfordshire is a local government district in Oxfordshire, England. ... Spelthorne is a local government district and borough in Surrey, England. ... Surrey Heath is a local government district with borough status in Surrey, England. ... Swale is a local government district in Kent, England. ... Tandridge is a local government district in Surrey, England. ... Test Valley is a local government district and borough in Hampshire, England. ... The Thanet district is a local government district of Kent, England which was formed under the Local Government Act 1972, and came into being on 1 April of 1974. ... Tonbridge and Malling is a local government district and borough in Kent, England. ... Tunbridge Wells is a local government district and borough in Kent, England. ... The Vale of White Horse is a local government district of Oxfordshire in England. ... Waverley is a local government district with borough status in Surrey, England. ... Wealden is a local government district in East Sussex, England. ... West Berkshire is an local government district in Berkshire, South East England, governed by a unitary authority (West Bershire Council). ... West Oxfordshire is a local government district in north west Oxfordshire, England including towns such as Woodstock, Chipping Norton, Charlbury, and Witney (where the council is based). ... The City of Winchester is a local government district in Hampshire with city status. ... The Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead is a unitary authority in Berkshire, South East England. ... Town Square in Woking Woking is a large town in the west of Surrey, England, about 30 minutes by train from London. ... Wokingham is a local government district in Berkshire, England. ... |- |Admin. ... Wycombe is an local government district in Buckinghamshire in south central England. ...

Administrative counties with multiple districts: Berkshire - Buckinghamshire - East Sussex - Hampshire - Kent - Oxfordshire - Surrey - West Sussex The division into counties is one of the larger divisions of England. ... For other places named Berkshire, see: Berkshire (disambiguation) Berkshire (IPA: or  ; sometimes abbreviated to Berks) is a county in the south of England, to the west of London and also bordering on Oxfordshire, Buckinghamshire, Greater London, Surrey, Wiltshire and Hampshire. ... Buckinghamshire (abbreviated Bucks) is a county in South East England. ... East Sussex is a county in South East England. ... Hampshire (abbr. ... Kent is a county in England, south-east of London. ... Oxfordshire (abbreviated Oxon, from Latin Oxonia) is a county in South East England, bordering on Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire, Berkshire, Wiltshire, Gloucestershire and Warwickshire. ... Surrey is a county in southern England, one of the Home Counties. ... West Sussex is a county in the south of England, bordering onto East Sussex (with Brighton and Hove), Hampshire and Surrey. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
AllRefer.com - Reading, city, England (British And Irish Political Geography) - Encyclopedia (288 words)
The city of Reading, which was the seat of the former county of Berkshire, is a market center with iron founding, engineering, malting, brewing, and biscuit and seed industries.
There are a 15th-century grammar school, the Reading College of Technology, and the Univ. of Reading (1926; formerly a college, founded 1892, of Oxford Univ.), with noted departments of agriculture and dairying.
Oscar Wilde's Ballad of Reading Gaol was inspired by his imprisonment there, and Reading is the Aldbrickham of Thomas Hardy's Jude the Obscure.
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dominic of the Mother of God (552 words)
He was taught his letters by a kind Capuchin priest, and learned to read from a country lad of his own age; although he read all the books he could obtain, he had no regular education until he entered the Congregation of the Passion.
He was deeply religious from childhood, felt himself distinctly called to join the institute he entered, and believed that God, by a special manifestation, had told him that he was destined to announce the Gospel truth and to bring back stray sheep to the way of salvation.
Father Dominic and the Conversion of England in Catholic Truth Society publications (1900); Father Dominic's letters and correspondence concerning his mission to England are published as a supplement to the 3rd vol.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m