FACTOID # 22: South Dakota has the highest employment ratio in America, but the lowest median earnings of full-time male employees.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Raymond Chandler
Raymond Thornton Chandler

Born: July 23, 1888(1888-07-23)
Chicago, Illinois, USA
Died: March 26, 1959 (aged 70)
San Diego, California, USA
Occupation: Novelist
Nationality: American Flag of the United States
Writing period: 1933-1959
Genres: Crime
Debut works: Novel: The Big Sleep (1939)

Raymond Thornton Chandler (July 23, 1888March 26, 1959) was an author of crime stories and novels. His influence on modern crime fiction has been immense, particularly in the writing style and attitudes that much of the field has adopted over the last 60 years. Chandler's protagonist, Philip Marlowe, has become synonymous with the tradition of the hard-boiled private detective, along with Dashiell Hammett's Sam Spade. Raymond Chandler may refer to: Raymond Chandler was an author, known for The Big Sleep Raymond Chandler is the uncle of alleged Michael Jackson molestation victim Jordy Chandler, and author of a book about the case, see Allegations of child sexual abuse by Michael Jackson in the early 1990s. ... http://thrillingdetective. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the toll-free telephone number see Toll-free telephone number Year 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... “San Diego” redirects here. ... This article is about work. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... The Big Sleep is a 1939 novel by Raymond Chandler, with two film versions, one filmed in 1946, and another filmed in 1978. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the toll-free telephone number see Toll-free telephone number Year 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Authorship redirects here. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with mystery_fiction. ... A protagonist is the main figure of a piece of literature or drama and has the main part or role. ... Ed Bishop had the title role in BBC Radios The Adventures of Philip Marlowe. ... Synonyms (in ancient Greek syn συν = plus and onoma όνομα = name) are different words with similar or identical meanings. ... Hardboiled crime fiction is a uniquely American style pioneered by Dashiell Hammett, refined by Raymond Chandler, and endlessly imitated since by writers such as Mickey Spillane. ... Samuel Dashiell Hammett (May 27, 1894 – January 10, 1961) was an American author of hardboiled detective novels and short stories. ... Poster of the 1941 Warner Brothers film version of The Maltese Falcon, directed by John Huston Sam Spade was the leading character in the novel and movie The Maltese Falcon (1931). ...

Contents

Biography

Chandler was born in Chicago, Illinois, in 1888, but moved to Britain in 1895 with his mother after they were abandoned by his father, an alcoholic civil engineer for an American railway company. His mother's brother, a successful lawyer, supported them. Chandler entered Dulwich College in London in 1900, where he received a classical education. He did not attend university, instead spending time in Europe. He was naturalised as a British citizen in 1907 in order to take the Civil Service exam. He passed with the third highest score and took a job at the Admiralty, where he worked for just over a year. His first poem was published during this time. Chandler disliked the Civil Service's mindset of servility and quit, to the consternation of his family. Chandler unsuccessfully tried journalism, published some reviews, and continued to write poetry in the late Romantic style. It was the age of the Clever Young Man, but "I was distinctly not a clever young man," he later said of himself. [citation needed] Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Dulwich New College buildings. ... The Byzantine civil service in action. ... Flag of the Lord High Admiral The Admiralty was formerly the authority in the United Kingdom responsible for the command of the Royal Navy. ... Romantics redirects here. ...


In 1912, after borrowing money from his uncle (who made it clear the loan was to be repaid, with interest), Chandler returned to the United States and eventually settled in Los Angeles. He found work stringing tennis rackets and picking fruit. It was a lonely period of scrimping and saving. Finally taking a correspondence course in bookkeeping, he finished ahead of schedule and found steady employment. When the United States entered World War I in 1917, he enlisted in the Canadian Army, served in France, and was in flight training in England when the war ended. “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


After the armistice of 1918 he returned to Los Angeles and began an affair with a married woman, Cissy Pascal, who was 18 years his senior. They married in 1924 upon the death of Chandler's mother, whom he had brought to Los Angeles and who opposed the union. By virtue of his American wife Chandler now had both British and American nationalities. By 1932 Chandler had attained a vice-presidency at the Dabney Oil syndicate but a year later his alcoholism, absenteeism, and at least one suicide threat got him fired. Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ...


He taught himself to write pulp fiction in an effort to draw an income from his creative talents, and his first story, Blackmailers Don't Shoot was published in Black Mask in 1933. His first novel, The Big Sleep, was published in 1939. This article is about inexpensive fiction magazines. ... Black Mask was a pulp magazine launched in 1920 by H. L. Mencken and George Jean Nathan. ... The Big Sleep is a 1939 novel by Raymond Chandler, with two film versions, one filmed in 1946, and another filmed in 1978. ... See also: 1938 in literature, other events of 1939, 1940 in literature, list of years in literature. ...


Chandler worked as a Hollywood screenwriter following the success of his novels, working with Billy Wilder on James M. Cain's novel Double Indemnity (1944), and writing his only original screenplay, The Blue Dahlia (1946). Chandler also collaborated on the screenplay of Alfred Hitchcock's Strangers on a Train (1951), a story he thought implausible. By this time the Chandlers had moved to La Jolla, California, an affluent enclave on the coast near San Diego. ... Billy Wilder (June 22, 1906 – March 27, 2002) was an Austrian-born, Jewish-American journalist, screenwriter, film director, and producer whose career spanned more than 50 years and 60 films. ... James Mallahan Cain (July 1, 1892 – October 27, 1977) was an American journalist and novelist. ... Double Indemnity is a 1944 film noir. ... // July 20 - Since You Went Away is released. ... The Blue Dahlia (1946) is a film noir with an original screenplay by Raymond Chandler. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 – April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Strangers on a Train is a film released in 1951 by Warner Bros. ... One of the beaches at La Jolla Cove. ...


Chandler's wife died in 1954 after a long illness, during which Chandler was writing The Long Goodbye. Lonely and depressed, he turned once again to drink and never again turned away for long. His writing suffered in quality and quantity, and he attempted suicide in 1955. [citation needed] His life was both helped and complicated by the women who attracted his attention, notably Helga Greene (his literary agent); Jean Fracasse (his secretary); and Sonia Orwell (George Orwell's widow), who assumed Chandler was a repressed homosexual. [citation needed] After a stay in England he moved back to La Jolla, where he died of "Peripheral Vascular Shock and Pre-Renal Uremia" caused by Pneumonia at Scripps Memorial Hospital (Death Certificate). Helga Greene was awarded his estate after a legal wrangle with Fracasse. Chandler was buried at Mount Hope Cemetery, in San Diego. According to Frank MacShane, the author of The Raymond Chandler Papers, Chandler left specific instructions that he wanted to be buried next to his wife Cissy, but that the struggle over his estate resulted in him being interred instead in the cemetery's Potter's Field. The Long Goodbye (ISBN 0394757688) is a 1954 novel by Raymond Chandler, centered on his famous detective Philip Marlowe. ... A potters field is a place for the burial of unknown or indigent people. ...


Chandler's finely wrought prose was widely admired by critics and writers from W.H. Auden and Evelyn Waugh to Ian Fleming. Although his swift-moving, hardboiled style was inspired largely by Dashiell Hammett, his use of both sharp and lyrical similes in this context was quite original. Turns of phrase such as The muzzle of the Luger looked like the mouth of the Second Street tunnel, and The minutes went by on tiptoe, with their fingers to their lips, defines private eye fiction and a Chandleresque literary style, which is also the subject and object of innumerable parodies and pastiches. However, his most famous character, Philip Marlowe, is not a stereotypical tough guy, but rather a complex and sometimes sentimental figure who has few friends, attended college for a while, speaks a little Spanish, at times admires Mexicans, and is a student of chess and classical music. He will also refuse money from a prospective client if he is not satisfied that the job meets his ethical standards. Christopher Isherwood and W.H. Auden, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1939 Wystan Hugh Auden (February 21, 1907–September 29, 1973) was an English poet. ... Evelyn Waugh, as photographed in 1940 by Carl Van Vechten Arthur Evelyn St. ... Ian Lancaster Fleming (May 28, 1908 – August 12, 1964) was a British author, journalist and Second World War Navy Commander. ... Hardboiled crime fiction is a uniquely American style pioneered by Dashiell Hammett, refined by Raymond Chandler, and endlessly imitated since by writers such as Mickey Spillane. ... Samuel Dashiell Hammett (May 27, 1894 – January 10, 1961) was an American author of hardboiled detective novels and short stories. ... A simile is a comparison of two unlike things, typically marked by use of like, as, than, or resembles. Examples may include the snow was as thick as a blanket, or she was as smart as a crow, or the usage of emotions similes such as madder than a bull... A private investigator, private detective, PI, or private eye, is a person who undertakes investigations, usually for a private citizen or some other entity not involved with a government or police organization. ... In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... The word pastiche describes a literary or other artistic genre. ...


In his short stories and novels Chandler wrote very evocatively of Los Angeles and its environs in the 1930s and '40s. Many of the locations which he describes are real, some pseudonymous: "Bay City" is generally taken to represent Santa Monica, "Gray Lake" was the analog for Silver Lake, while "Idle Valley" is a synthesis of various wealthy enclaves in the San Fernando Valley. Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Santa Monica Pier Santa Monica is a coastal city located in Los Angeles County, California USA, by the Pacific Ocean, south of Pacific Palisades and Brentwood, west of Westwood, Los Angeles, and north of Venice. ... Silver Lake, Los Angeles, California. ... San Fernando Valley from its southwestern edge. ...


Chandler was also a perceptive critic of pulp fiction, and his essay "The Simple Art of Murder" is a standard reference. Raymond Chandler The Simple Art of Murder refers to both a critical essay and a collection of short stories written by hard-boiled detective fiction author Raymond Chandler. ...


All of Chandler's novels have been adapted for film, most notably The Big Sleep (1946), directed by Howard Hawks and starring Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall. Novelist William Faulkner also received a screenwriting credit for this film. Chandler's screenwriting, as limited as it was, and the adaptation of his novels to screen in the 1940s were important influences on American film noir. The Big Sleep is a 1939 novel by Raymond Chandler, with two film versions, one filmed in 1946, and another filmed in 1978. ... Howard Hawks (May 30, 1896 – December 26, 1977) was an American film director, producer and writer of the classic Hollywood era. ... Humphrey DeForest Bogart (December 25, 1899 – January 14, 1957) was an American actor. ... Betty Joan Perske (born on September 16, 1924), better known as Lauren Bacall, is a Golden Globe– and Tony Award–winning, as well as Academy Award–nominated, American film and stage actress. ... William Cuthbert Faulkner (September 25, 1897 – July 6, 1962) was an American novelist and poet whose works feature his native state of Mississippi. ... This still from The Big Combo (1955) demonstrates the visual style of film noir at its most extreme. ...


Novels

All concern the cases of a Los Angeles private investigator named Philip Marlowe. The plot lines often follow a pattern in which the individuals who hire Marlowe are revealed to be as corrupt and/or criminally complicit as those he is hired to protect them from. The Big Sleep is a 1939 novel by Raymond Chandler, with two film versions, one filmed in 1946, and another filmed in 1978. ... Farewell, my Lovely, by Susie Cornfield, (published by Garret Books, London UK) is a collection of tails and tributes to much-loved, departed pets, including the author’s own Brains the MagnifiCat The book features stories from Jilly Cooper, David Blunkett and Ann Widdecombe and a foreword from the Daily... The High Window is a 1942 novel written by Raymond Chandler. ... The Lady in the Lake is a 1943 detective novel by Raymond Chandler featuring — as do all his major works — the Los Angeles private investigator Philip Marlowe. ... The Little Sister is a novel by Raymond Chandler, starring his famous fictional detective Philip Marlowe. ... The Long Goodbye (ISBN 0394757688) is a 1954 novel by Raymond Chandler, centered on his famous detective Philip Marlowe. ... The Edgar Allan Poe Awards (popularly called the Edgars), named after Edgar Allan Poe, are presented every year by the Mystery Writers of America. ... Playback is the final, complete novel by Raymond Chandler to feature his iconic creation Philip Marlowe. ... Poodle Springs is the eighth Philip Marlowe novel. ... Robert B. Parkers novel Cold Service Robert B. Parker (born September 17, 1932) is an acclaimed American writer of detective fiction. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... A private investigator, private detective, PI, or private eye, is a person who undertakes investigations, usually for a private citizen or some other entity not involved with a government or police organization. ... Ed Bishop had the title role in BBC Radios The Adventures of Philip Marlowe. ...


Short stories

Chandler's short stories typically chronicled the adventures of Philip Marlowe or other down-on-their luck private detectives (John Dalmas, Steve Grayce) or similarly inclined good samaritans (such as Mr. Carmady). Exceptions are the macabre The Bronze Door and English Summer, a self-described Gothic romance set in the English countryside. Interestingly, in the 1950s radio series The Adventures of Philip Marlowe, which included adaptations of the stories, the name Marlowe was replaced by the names of other protagonists (for example Steve Grayce, in the adaptation of The King in Yellow). These changes actually restored the originally published versions. It was only in their later republished forms that Philip Marlowe was used (with the exception of The Pencil). The Good Samaritan The Good Samaritan is a famous New Testament parable, that appears only in the Gospel of Luke (10:25-37). ... Strawberry Hill, an English villa in the Gothic revival style, built by seminal Gothic writer Horace Walpole The gothic novel was a literary genre that belonged to Romanticism and began in the United Kingdom with The Castle of Otranto (1764) by Horace Walpole. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


Detective short stories

  • Blackmailers Don't Shoot (1933)
  • Smart-Aleck Kill (1934)
  • Finger Man (1934)
  • Killer in the Rain (1935)
  • Nevada Gas (1935)
  • Spanish Blood (1935)
  • The Curtain (1936)
  • Guns at Cyrano's (1936)
  • Goldfish (1936)
  • The Man Who Liked Dogs (1936)
  • Pickup on Noon Street (1936; originally published as Noon Street Nemesis)
  • Mandarin's Jade (1937)
  • Try the Girl (1937)
  • Bay City Blues (1938)
  • The King in Yellow (1938)
  • Red Wind (1938)
  • The Lady in the Lake (1939)
  • Pearls Are a Nuisance (1939)
  • Trouble is My Business (1939)
  • No Crime in the Mountains (1941)
  • The Pencil (1959; published posthumously; originally published as Marlowe Takes on the Syndicate, also published as Wrong Pigeon and Philip Marlowe's Last Case)

Most of the short stories published before 1940 appeared in pulp magazines like Black Mask, and so had a limited readership. Chandler was able to recycle the plot lines and characters from those stories when he turned to writing novels intended for a wider audience. For information on Black Mask, the surrealist group, see Black Mask (NYC). ...


Non-detective short stories

  • I'll Be Waiting (1939)
  • The Bronze Door (1939)
  • Professor Bingo's Snuff (1951)
  • English Summer (1976; published posthumously)

Note: I'll Be Waiting, The Bronze Door and Professor Bingo's Snuff all feature unnatural deaths and investigators (a hotel detective, Scotland Yard and California local police, respectively), but the emphasis is not on the investigation of the deaths. Unnatural death is a category used by coroners and vital statistics specialists for classifying all human deaths not properly describable as death by natural causes. ... A detective is an officer of the police who performs criminal or administrative investigations, in some police departments, the lowest rank among such investigators (above the lowest rank of officers and below sergeants), a civilian licensed to investigate information not readily available in public records (a private investigator, also called... For other uses, see Hotel (disambiguation). ... New Scotland Yard, London New Scotland Yard, it blowwsssss often referred to simply as Scotland Yard or The Yard, is the headquarters of the Metropolitan Police Service, responsible for policing Greater London (although not the City of London itself). ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ...


Atlantic Monthly magazine articles: The Atlantic Monthly (also known as The Atlantic) is an American literary/cultural magazine that was founded in November 1857. ...

  • Writers in Hollywood (December 1944)
  • The Simple Art of Murder (November 1945)
  • Oscar Night in Hollywood (March 1948)
  • Ten Percent of your Life (February 1952)

Published as

  • Stories & Early Novels: Pulp Stories, The Big Sleep, Farewell, My Lovely, The High Window (Frank MacShane, ed.) (Library of America, 1995) ISBN 978-1-88301107-9.
  • Later Novels & Other Writings: The Lady in the Lake, The Little Sister, The Long Goodbye, Playback, Double Indemnity, Selected Essays & Letters (Frank MacShane, ed.) (Library of America, 1995) ISBN 978-1-88301108-6.

Volumes in the Library of America series The Library of America (LoA) is a nonprofit publisher of classic American literature. ... Volumes in the Library of America series The Library of America (LoA) is a nonprofit publisher of classic American literature. ...

Cultural references

  • In an episode of the American sitcom Friends ("The One With Rachel's Dress"), the character Chandler mentions Raymond Chandler in response to Joey asking if there were any famous Chandlers. Joey, in response, believes that Chandler made the name up.
  • In Jim Carroll's song "Three Sisters", the lyrics include the phrase "But she just wants to lay in bed all night reading Raymond Chandler."
  • On a rare split 12" (with Castanets), free jazz duo I Heart Lung titled each track in homage of Chandler: "Speedboats for Breakfast" referring to Chandler's guess as to what the early residents of Santa Monica ate in the morning, "Song of the Boatman of the River Roon" from an early poem by Chandler, and "If I Were A Young Man Now" from a letter written late in his life.
  • The detective novelist Robert B. Parker based many of the characteristics of his detective, Spenser, on the Chandler tradition, to the degree that Spenser was described as born in Laramie, Wyoming, the same town in which Chandler was said to have been conceived. Parker holds a Ph.D. in English literature, and his doctoral thesis was partially about Chandler's writing.
  • In the movie Kiss Kiss Bang Bang, the "titles" of each of the days in the movie are also titles of Raymond Chandler works: the short story 'Trouble is My Business'; the novels 'The Lady in the Lake', 'The Little Sister' and 'Farewell, My Lovely'; and the essay 'The Simple Art of Murder'. However, the movie itself refers not to Chandler but to a fictional detective writer "Johnny Gossamer" as its inspiration.
  • In James O'Barr's The Crow graphic novel, the lyrics to the song, Raymond Chandler Evening by Robyn Hitchcock & The Egyptians, are featured in the panels leading up to lead character Eric Draven's bursting into the character Fun Boy's room.
  • Country/Goth band Miss Derringer uses the Chandler line "Dead Men Weigh More Than Broken Hearts" (from 'The Big Sleep') as song title on their second album 'Lullabies'.

'The argentine novelist and journalist Osvaldo Soriano used Raymond Chandler`s Phillip Marlowe as a character in his first novel, called "Triste, solitario y final" (translation from "Sad and lonely and final", a phrase said by Marlowe in The Long Goodbye). In that novel Soriano wrote as himself, an argentine guy lost in Los Angeles, who meets an old and final Marlowe. Together they have to solve the last mistery around Stan Laurel y Oliver Hardy. Soriano died in 1996, but his novels were translated into many languages, despite the fact that this books are not easy to get in english. Robyn Rowan Hitchcock (born March 3, 1953) is a singer-songwriter, psych folk artist, and occasional actor. ... Element of Light is the sixth album by singer-songwriter Robyn Hitchcock, released in 1986. ... Space station Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (ST:DS9 or STDS9 or DS9 for short) is a science fiction television series produced by Paramount and set in the Star Trek universe. ... Field of Fire is an episode from the seventh season of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. ... Odo is a shapeshifter played by Rene Auberjonois on the science fiction television series Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. ... Miles OBrien Miles Edward OBrien is a character in the fictional Star Trek universe, played by Colm Meaney. ... For the use of the word in a general sense, see Friendship. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Joseph Joey Francis Tribbiani, Jr. ... Jim Carroll Seattle, WA (September 2000) Photo by Eric Thompson Jim Carroll (born August 1, 1950 in New York City) is an author, poet, autobiographer, and punk musician. ... Castanets is the musical project of Raymond Raposa, a San Diego native currently residing in New York City. ... Santa Monica Pier Santa Monica is a coastal city located in Los Angeles County, California USA, by the Pacific Ocean, south of Pacific Palisades and Brentwood, west of Westwood, Los Angeles, and north of Venice. ... Robert B. Parkers novel Cold Service Robert B. Parker (born September 17, 1932) is an acclaimed American writer of detective fiction. ... Laramie is a city in and the county seat of Albany County in the U.S. state of Wyoming. ... Kiss Kiss Bang Bang is a 2005 crime / comedy film. ... Los Angeles outlaws Miss Derringer are a band known for the stunning vocals and beauty of singer Elizabeth McGrath and their vintage, dark, David Lynch influenced sound. ...


Further reading

MacShane, Frank (1976). The Life of Raymond Chandler. N.Y.: E.P. Dutton.


Hiney, Tom (1999). Raymond Chandler. N.Y.: Grove Press. ISBN 0-80213-637-0


Ward, Elizabeth and Alain Silver (1987). Raymond Chandler's Los Angeles. Woodstock, N.Y.: Overlook Press. ISBN 0-87951-351-9


Howe, Alexander N. "The Detective and the Analyst: Truth, Knowledge, and Psychoanalysis in the Hard-Boiled Fiction of Raymond Chandler." CLUES: A Journal of Detection 24.4 (Summer 2006): 15-29.


External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
 The works of Raymond Chandler
Novels: The Big Sleep | Farewell, My Lovely | The High Window | The Lady in the Lake | The Little Sister | The Long Goodbye | Playback | Poodle Springs
Characters: Philip Marlowe
Short story collections: Five Murderers | Five Sinister Characters | Fingerman and Other Stories | The Simple Art of Murder | Killer in the Rain
Other collections: Raymond Chandler Speaking | Selected Letters of Raymond Chandler | Chandler Before Marlowe
Screenplays: Double Indemnity | And Now Tomorrow | The Unseen | The Blue Dahlia | Strangers on a Train | Playback

  Results from FactBites:
 
Raymond Chandler - definition of Raymond Chandler in Encyclopedia (622 words)
Chandler was born in Chicago, Illinois, in 1888, but moved to Britain in 1895 when his parents divorced.
Chandler's finely wrought prose was widely admired by critics and writers from the high-brow (W.H. Auden, Evelyn Waugh) to the low-brow (Ian Fleming).
Chandler was also a perceptive critic of pulp fiction, and his essay "The Simple Art of Murder" is a standard academic reference.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m