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Encyclopedia > Ray Bradbury
Ray Bradbury

Ray Bradbury in 1975
Born August 22, 1920 (1920-08-22) (age 87)
Flag of the United States Waukegan, Illinois
Occupation Writer, Playwright
Nationality Flag of the United States American
Genres Science Fiction, Fantasy
Notable work(s) Fahrenheit 451, The Martian Chronicles

Ray Douglas Bradbury (born August 22, 1920) is an American literary, fantasy, horror, science fiction, and mystery writer best known for The Martian Chronicles, a 1950 book which has been described both as a short story collection and a novel, and his 1953 dystopian novel Fahrenheit 451. He is widely considered to be one of the greatest and most popular American writers of speculative fiction during the twentieth century. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1695x2340, 422 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Ray Bradbury ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Waukegan is a city in Lake County, Illinois, of which it is the county seat. ... This article is about work. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is a person who writes dramatic literature or drama. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... This article is about the novel. ... The Martian Chronicles is a 1950 science fiction novel by Ray Bradbury that chronicles the colonization of Mars by humans fleeing from a troubled Earth, and the conflict between aboriginal Martians and the new colonists. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... Dickens redirects here. ... H. G. Wells at the door of his house at Sandgate Herbert George Wells (September 21, 1866 - August 13, 1946) was an English writer best known for his science fiction novels such as The War of the Worlds and The Time Machine. ... For other persons named Stephen King, see Stephen King (disambiguation). ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Literature is literally an acquaintance with letters as in the first sense given in the Oxford English Dictionary (from the Latin littera meaning an individual written character (letter)). The term has, however, generally come to identify a collection of texts. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... “Horror story” redirects here. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Mystery fiction is a distinct subgenre of detective fiction that entails the occurrence of an unknown event which requires the protagonist to make known (or solve). ... The Martian Chronicles is a 1950 science fiction novel by Ray Bradbury that chronicles the colonization of Mars by humans fleeing from a troubled Earth, and the conflict between aboriginal Martians and the new colonists. ... This article is in need of attention. ... This article is about the philosophical concept and literary form. ... This article is about the novel. ... Speculative fiction - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...

Contents

Beginnings

Bradbury was born in Waukegan, Illinois, to a Swedish immigrant mother and a father who was a power and telephone lineman.[1] His paternal grandfather and great-grandfather were newspaper publishers.[2] Waukegan is a city in Lake County, Illinois, of which it is the county seat. ... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... Linemen repairing overhead lines (that supply power to trains) Linemen repairing electricity distribution lines (that supply power to homes) A lineman or linesman is a tradesman who constructs and maintains electric power transmission and distribution facilities. ... A father is the male parent of a child. ...


Bradbury was a reader and writer throughout his youth, spending much time in the Carnegie Library in Waukegan. He used this library as a setting for much of his novel Something Wicked This Way Comes, and depicted Waukegan as "Green Town" in some of his other semi-autobiographical novels — Dandelion Wine, Farewell Summer — as well as in many of his short stories.[3] A Carnegie library, opened in 1913 in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, designed in Spanish Colonial style Carnegie libraries for both public use and academic institutions were built with money donated by Scottish-American businessman Andrew Carnegie, earning him the nickname, the Patron Saint of Libraries. ... Something Wicked This Way Comes is a 1962 novel by Ray Bradbury. ... For music albums named Autobiography, see Greek eauton = self, bios = life and graphein = write) is a form of biography, the writing of a life story. ... For other uses, see Dandelion Wine (disambiguation). ... Farewell Summer is a novel by Ray Bradbury, scheduled to be published on October 1, 2006. ...


He attributes his lifelong habit of writing every day to an incident in 1932 when a carnival entertainer, Mr. Electrico[4], touched him with an electrified sword, made his hair stand on end, and shouted, "Live forever!"


The Bradbury family lived in Tucson, Arizona, in 1926–27 and 1932–33 as his father pursued employment, each time returning to Waukegan, but eventually settled in Los Angeles in 1934, when Ray was thirteen. Tucson (pronounced ) is the seat of Pima County, Arizona, United States, located 118 miles (188 km) southeast of Phoenix and 60 miles (98 km) north of the U.S.-Mexico border. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ...


Bradbury graduated from the Los Angeles High School in 1938 but chose not to attend college. Instead, he sold newspapers at the corner of South Norton Avenue and Olympic Boulevard. He continued to educate himself at the local library, and having been influenced by science fiction heroes like Flash Gordon and Buck Rogers, he began to publish science fiction stories in fanzines in 1938. Ray was invited by Forrest J Ackerman to attend the now legendary Clifton’s Cafeteria Science Fiction Club. Here Ray met the writers Robert A. Heinlein, Emil Petaja, Fredric Brown, Henry Kuttner, Leigh Brackett, and Jack Williamson. Launching his own fanzine in 1939, titled Futuria Fantasia, he wrote most of its four issues, each limited to under a hundred copies. Bradbury's first paid piece was for the pulp magazine Super Science Stories in 1941, for which he earned $15.[5] He became a full-time writer by the end of 1942. His first book, Dark Carnival, a collection of short works, was published in 1947 by Arkham House, a firm owned by writer August Derleth. Los Angeles High School, founded in 1873, is the oldest public high school in the Southern California Region and in the Los Angeles Unified School District. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... For other uses, see Flash Gordon (disambiguation). ... Buck Rogers is a fictional pulp character who first appeared in 1928 as Anthony Rogers, the hero of two novellas by Philip Francis Nowlan published in the magazine Amazing Stories. ... A fanzine (see also: zine) is a nonprofessional publication produced by fans of a particular cultural phenomenon (such as a literary or musical genre) for the pleasure of others who share their interest. ... Forrest J Ackerman (born November 24, 1916 in Los Angeles, California) is a legendary science fiction fan and collector of science fiction-related memorabilia. ... Robert Anson Heinlein (July 7, 1907 – May 8, 1988) was one of the most popular, influential, and controversial authors of hard science fiction. ... Emil Petaja (1915 - 2000) was a Finnish-American science fiction writer. ... Fredric Brown (October 29, 1906, Cincinnati – March 11, 1972) was a science fiction and mystery writer. ... Henry Kuttner (April 7, 1915 - February 4, 1958) was a science fiction author born in Los Angeles, California. ... Leigh Brackett (December 7, 1915, in Los Angeles, California – March 18, 1978) was a writer of science fiction, mystery novels and — best known to the general public — Hollywood screenplays, most notably The Big Sleep (1945), Rio Bravo (1959), The Long Goodbye (1973) and The Empire Strikes Back (1980). ... John Stewart Williamson (April 29, 1908 – November 10, 2006), who wrote as Jack Williamson (and occasionally under the pseudonym Will Stewart) was a U.S. writer considered by many the Dean of Science Fiction. [1] // Williamson spent his early childhood in western Texas. ... This article is about inexpensive fiction magazines. ... Cover of the 2001 Gauntlet Press edition, with painting by Bradbury Dark Carnival is a collection of the following Ray Bradbury short stories, published in October 1947: The Homecoming Skeleton The Jar The Lake The Maiden The Tombstone The Smiling People The Emissary The Traveler The Small Assassin The Crowd... Arkham House is a weird fiction specialty publishing house founded by August Derleth and Donald Wandrei. ...


A chance encounter in a Los Angeles bookstore with the British expatriate writer Christopher Isherwood gave Bradbury the opportunity to put The Martian Chronicles into the hands of a respected critic. Isherwood's glowing review followed and substantially boosted Bradbury's career. Christopher Isherwood (left) and W.H. Auden (right), photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1939 Christopher Isherwood (prior to 1946 Christopher William Bradshaw-Isherwood) (August 26, 1904 – January 4, 1986), Anglo-American novelist, was born in the ancestral seat of his family, Wybersley Hall, High Lane, in the north west of... The Martian Chronicles is a 1950 science fiction novel by Ray Bradbury that chronicles the colonization of Mars by humans fleeing from a troubled Earth, and the conflict between aboriginal Martians and the new colonists. ...


Ray Bradbury married Marguerite McClure (1922–2003) in 1947, and they had four daughters.


Works

Main article: List of works by Ray Bradbury

Although he is often described as a science fiction writer, Bradbury does not box himself into a particular narrative categorization: Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ...

First of all, I don't write science fiction. I've only done one science fiction book and that's Fahrenheit 451, based on reality. Science fiction is a depiction of the real. Fantasy is a depiction of the unreal. So Martian Chronicles is not science fiction, it's fantasy. It couldn't happen, you see? That's the reason it's going to be around a long time—because it's a Greek myth, and myths have staying power.[6] This article is about the novel. ... The Martian Chronicles book cover The Martian Chronicles (alternate title in the UK: The Silver Locusts) is a 1950 science fiction book by Ray Bradbury that chronicles the colonization of Mars by refugee humans from a troubled Earth, and the conflict between aboriginal Martians and the new colonists. ...

On another occasion, Bradbury observed that the novel touches on the alienation of people by media:

In writing the short novel Fahrenheit 451 I thought I was describing a world that might evolve in four or five decades. But only a few weeks ago, in Beverly Hills one night, a husband and wife passed me, walking their dog. I stood staring after them, absolutely stunned. The woman held in one hand a small cigarette-package-sized radio, its antenna quivering. From this sprang tiny copper wires which ended in a dainty cone plugged into her right ear. There she was, oblivious to man and dog, listening to far winds and whispers and soap-opera cries, sleep-walking, helped up and down curbs by a husband who might just as well not have been there. This was not fiction.[7]


Besides his fiction work, Bradbury has written many short essays on the arts and culture, attracting the attention of critics in this field. Bradbury was a consultant for the American Pavilion at the 1964 New York World's Fair and the original exhibit housed in Epcot's Spaceship Earth geosphere at Walt Disney World [8][9][10]. For other uses, see Essay (disambiguation). ... View of the New York Worlds Fair 1964/1965 as seen from the observation towers of the New York State pavilion. ... This article is about the Epcot theme park. ... For the phrase, see Spaceship Earth. ... Cinderella Castle, at the center of the Magic Kingdom, is Walt Disney World Resorts most recognizable icon Introduction Owned and operated by The Walt Disney Company, the Walt Disney World Resort in Florida, USA is home to four theme parks, two water parks, several resort hotels and golf courses...


Adaptations of his work

Many of Bradbury's stories and novels have been adapted to films, radio, television, theater and comic books. From 1951 to 1954, 27 of Bradbury's stories were adapted by Al Feldstein for EC Comics, and 16 of these were collected in the paperbacks, The Autumn People (1965) and Tomorrow Midnight (1966). Image File history File links Rb451. ... Image File history File links Rb451. ... Julie Frances Christie (born 14 April 1941) is an Academy Award-, Golden Globe-, BAFTA Award-, and Screen Actors Guild Award-winning British actress. ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit 451 (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... Al Feldstein (born October 24, 1925) is an American painter of Western wildlife and an influential author-editor who wrote, drew and edited for EC Comics and MAD Magazine. ... Entertaining Comics was headed by William Gaines but is better known by its publishing name of EC Comics. ...


Also in the early 1950s, adaptations of Bradbury's stories were televised on a variety of shows including Tales of Tomorrow, Lights Out, Out There, Suspense, CBS Television Workshop, Jane Wyman's Fireside Theatre, Star Tonight, Windows and Alfred Hitchcock Presents. "The Merry-Go-Round," a half-hour film adaptation of Bradbury's "The Black Ferris," praised by Variety, was shown on Starlight Summer Theater in 1954 and NBC's Sneak Preview in 1956.


From 1985 to 1992 Bradbury hosted a syndicated anthology television series, The Ray Bradbury Theater, for which he adapted 65 of his stories. Each episode would begin with a shot of Bradbury in his office, gazing over mementoes of his life, which he states (in narrative) are used to spark ideas for stories. In the television industry (as in radio), syndication is the sale of the right to broadcast programs to multiple stations, without going through a broadcast network. ... The Ray Bradbury Theater was an anthology series that ran for six seasons on HBO from 1985 to 1992. ...


The Martian Chronicles became a three-part TV miniseries starring Rock Hudson which was first broadcast by NBC in 1980. The Martian Chronicles was based on Ray Bradburys The Martian Chronicles and deals with the exploration of Mars and the inhabitants there. ... A miniseries (sometimes mini-series), in a serial storytelling medium, is a production which tells a story in a limited number of episodes. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... This article is about the television network. ...


In 1984, Michael McDonough of Brigham Young University produced "Bradbury 13," a series of thirteen audio adaptations of famous Ray Bradbury stories, in conjunction with National Public Radio. The full-cast dramatizations featured adaptations of "The Man," "The Ravine," "Night Call, Collect," "The Veldt," "Kaleidoscope," "There Was an Old Woman," "Here There Be Tygers," "Dark They Were, and Golden Eyed," "The Wind," "The Fox and the Forest," "The Happiness Machine," "The Screaming Woman" and "The Sound of Thunder". Famed voiceover actor Paul Frees provided narration, while Bradbury himself was responsible for the opening voiceover; Greg Hansen and Roger Hoffman scored the episodes. The series won a Peabody award as well as two Gold Cindy awards. The series has not yet been released on CD but is heavily traded by fans of "old time radio". Paul Frees (June 22, 1920 - November 2, 1986) was a voice actor born in Chicago. ...


Director Jack Arnold first brought Bradbury to movie theaters in 1953 with It Came from Outer Space, a Harry Essex screenplay developed from Bradbury's screen treatment, "The Meteor". Three weeks later, Eugène Lourié's The Beast From 20,000 Fathoms (1953), based on Bradbury's "The Fog Horn," about a sea monster mistaking the sound of a fog horn for the mating cry of a female, was released. Bradbury's close friend Ray Harryhausen produced the stop-motion animation of the creature. (Bradbury would later return the favor by writing a short story, "Tyrannosaurus Rex", about a stop-motion animator who strongly resembled Harryhausen.) Over the next 50 years, more than 35 features, shorts, and TV movies were based on Bradbury's stories or screenplays. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... It Came from Outer Space is a 1953 Science Fiction 3-D film directed by Jack Arnold, and starring Richard Carlson, Barbara Rush, and Charles Drake. ... Harry Essex was an American scriptwriter. ... The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms is a black and white 1953 science fiction film directed by Eugène Lourié. The films shooting title was Monster from Beneath the Sea. ... The Fog Horn is a short story by Ray Bradbury and the first in his collection The Golden Apples of the Sun. ... Ray Harryhausen, with creations from Clash of the Titans. ...


In 1969, The Illustrated Man was brought to the big screen, starring Oscar winner Rod Steiger, Claire Bloom & Robert Drivas. Containing the prologue, and three short stories from the book, the film received mediocre reviews.


Recently, Peter Hyams' film version of Bradbury's 1953 story, A Sound of Thunder (2005), brought an almost unanimous negative reaction from film critics. Reviewing for The New York Times, A.O. Scott observed that "it illustrates the dangers of turning a lean, elegant short story into a loud, noisy, incoherent B movie." Peter Hyams (born July 26, 1943) is an American screenwriter, director and cinematographer. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... The King of the Bs, Roger Corman, produced and directed The Raven (1963) for American International Pictures. ...


Oskar Werner and Julie Christie starred in Fahrenheit 451 (1966), an adaptation of Bradbury's novel by François Truffaut. A new film version of Fahrenheit 451 is being planned by director Frank Darabont. In 2002, Bradbury's own Pandemonium Theatre Company production of Fahrenheit 451 at Burbank's Falcon Theatre combined live acting with projected digital animation by the Pixel Pups. In 1984 Telarium released a video game for Commodore 64 based on Fahrenheit 451.[2] Bradbury and director Charles Rome Smith co-founded Pandemonium in 1964, staging the New York production of The World of Ray Bradbury (1964), adaptations of "The Pedestrian," "The Veldt" and "To the Chicago Abyss." Julie Frances Christie (born 14 April 1941) is an Academy Award-, Golden Globe-, BAFTA Award-, and Screen Actors Guild Award-winning British actress. ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit 451 (disambiguation). ... François Roland Truffaut (French IPA: ) (February 6, 1932 – October 21, 1984) was one of the founders of the French New Wave in filmmaking, and remains an icon of the French film industry. ... Fahrenheit 451 is the title of an expected film adaptation of Ray Bradburys novel of the same name. ... Frank Darabont (born January 28, 1959) is a three-time Academy Award nominated[1]American film director, screenwriter and producer. ... This article is about the year. ... Computer and video games redirects here. ... C-64 redirects here. ... The Pedestrian is a short story by author Ray Bradbury. ...


Five episodes of the USSR science fiction TV series This Fantastic World adapted Ray Bradbury's stories I Sing The Body Electric, Fahrenheit 451, A Piece of Wood, To the Chicago Abyss and Forever and the Earth.[11] And a Soviet adaptation of "The Veldt" was filmed in 1987. [12] State motto (Russian): Пролетарии всех стран, соединяйтесь! (Transliterated: Proletarii vsekh stran, soedinyaytes!) (Translated: Workers of the world, unite!) Capital Moscow Official language None; Russian (de facto) Government Federation of Soviet republics Area  - Total  - % water 1st before collapse 22,402,200 km² Approx. ... This article is about the novel. ... CCCP redirects here. ...


Honors and awards

2004 National Medal of Arts award recipient Ray Bradbury with President George W. Bush and his wife Laura Bush.
2004 National Medal of Arts award recipient Ray Bradbury with President George W. Bush and his wife Laura Bush.
  • In 2007 Bradbury received the French Commandeur Ordre des Arts et des Lettres medal.
  • For his contribution to the motion picture industry, Ray Bradbury was given a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6644 Hollywood Blvd.
  • An asteroid is named in his honor, "9766 Bradbury," along with a crater on the moon called "Dandelion Crater" (named after his novel, Dandelion Wine.)
  • On April 16, 2007, Bradbury received a special citation from The Pulitzer Board, "for his distinguished, prolific, and deeply influential career as an unmatched author of science fiction and fantasy."[13]
  • On November 17, 2004, Bradbury was the recipient of the National Medal of Arts, presented by President George W. Bush and Laura Bush. Bradbury has also received the World Fantasy Award life achievement, Stoker Award life achievement, SFWA Grand Master, SF Hall of Fame Living Inductee, and First Fandom Award. He received an Emmy Award for his work on The Halloween Tree.
  • The "About the Author" sections in several of his published works claim that he has been nominated for an Academy Award. A search of the Academy's awards database proves this to be incorrect.[14] One short film he worked on, Icarus Montgolfier Wright[15] was nominated for an Academy Award, but Bradbury himself has not been.
  • In 1990 Ray Bradbury Park was dedicated in Waukegan, Illinois. The author was present for the ribbon-cutting ceremony.The park contains locations described in "Dandelion Wine," most notably the staircase.
  • Honorary doctorate from Woodbury University in 2003. Bradbury presents the Ray Bradbury Creativity Award each year at Woodbury University. Winners include sculptor Robert Graham, actress Anjelica Huston, Cosmo editor Helen Gurley Brown, director Irvin Kershner, humorist Stan Freberg, and architect Jon A. Jerde.
  • Distinguished Contribution to American Letters Award for 2000 from the National Book Foundation. [16]

Image File history File links George Bush Jr, Ray Bradbury and Laura Bush White House photo by Susan Sterner. ... Image File history File links George Bush Jr, Ray Bradbury and Laura Bush White House photo by Susan Sterner. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Laura Lane Welch Bush (born November 4, 1946) is the wife of the forty-third and current President of the United States George W. Bush and is thereby the First Lady of the United States. ... Buskers perform on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. ... For other uses, see Asteroid (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Dandelion Wine (disambiguation). ... The Pulitzer Prizes for 2007 were announced on April 16, 2007. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Medal of Arts is an award and title bestowed on selected honorees by the National Endowment for the Arts. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Laura Lane Welch Bush (born November 4, 1946) is the wife of the forty-third and current President of the United States George W. Bush and is thereby the First Lady of the United States. ... First awarded in 1975, the World Fantasy Awards are handed out annually at the World Fantasy Convention (WFC) to recognize outstanding achievement in the field of fantasy. ... The Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master Award is an award given by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. ... An Emmy Award. ... The Halloween Tree is a 1993 feature-length animated film based on Ray Bradburys 1972 fantasy novel, The Halloween Tree. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Robert Graham is the name of several persons: Robert Graham (Privy Counsellor), English statesman who was a member of the Privy Council. ... Anjelica Huston (born July 8, 1951) is an Academy Award- and Golden Globe Award-winning American actress and former fashion model. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Irvin Kershner (born April 29, 1923) is an American film director born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Stanley Victor Freberg (born August 7, 1926 in Los Angeles) is an American author, recording artist, animation voice actor, comedian, puppeteer and advertising creative director. ...

Controversy over Fahrenheit 9/11

In 2004 it was reported that Bradbury was extremely upset with filmmaker Michael Moore for using the title Fahrenheit 9/11, which is an allusion to Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451, for his documentary about the George W. Bush administration. Bradbury expressed displeasure with Moore's use of the title but stated that his resentment was not politically motivated.[17] Bradbury asserts that he does not want any of the money made by the movie, nor does he believe that he deserves it. He pressured Moore to change the name, but to no avail. Moore called Bradbury two weeks before the film's release to apologize, saying that the film's marketing was set in motion a long time ago, and it was too late to change the title. [18] Michael Francis Moore (born April 23, 1954) is an American political-activist, a film director, author, social commentator, and political humorist. ... Fahrenheit 9/11 is a controversial, award-winning documentary film by American left-wing filmmaker Michael Moore which presents a critical look at the presidency of George W. Bush, the War on Terrorism, and its coverage in the American news media. ... This article is about the novel. ... The Bush administration includes President George W. Bush, Vice President Richard Cheney, Bushs Cabinet, and other select officials and advisors. ...


Documentaries about Ray Bradbury

  • Bradbury's works and approach to writing are documented in Terry Sanders' film Ray Bradbury: Story of a Writer (1963).

Terry Sanders is a two-time Academy Award winner, having produced and/or directed more than 70 dramatic features, televisions specials, documentaries and portrait films. ...

Further reading

  • William F. Nolan, The Ray Bradbury Companion: A Life and Career History, Photolog, and Comprehensive Checklist of Writings, Gale Research (1975). Hardcover, 339 pages. ISBN 0-8103-0930-0
  • Donn Albright, Bradbury Bits & Pieces: The Ray Bradbury Bibliography, 1974-88, Starmont House (1990). ISBN 155742151X. Never published but available in manuscript at The Center for Ray Bradbury Studies.
  • Robin Anne Reid, Ray Bradbury: A Critical Companion, Greenwood Press (2000). 133 pages. ISBN 0313309019
  • Jerry Weist, Bradbury, an Illustrated Life: A Journey to Far Metaphor, William Morrow & Company (2002). Hardcover, 208 pages. ISBN 0-06-001182-3
  • Jonathan R. Eller and William F. Touponce, Ray Bradbury: The Life of Fiction, Kent State University Press (2004). Hardcover, 570 pages. ISBN 0-87338-779-1
  • Sam Weller, The Bradbury Chronicles: The Life of Ray Bradbury, HarperCollins (2005). Hardcover, 384 pages. ISBN 0-06-054581-X

William F. Nolan is one of The Group of United States science fiction authors responsible for most of the scripts for the television show The Twilight Zone. ... Wiliam Morrow and Company is an American publishing company founded by William Morrow in 1926. ... Sam Weller is a fictional character in The Pickwick Papers, the first novel by Charles Dickens, and is allegedly the character that made Dickens famous. ...

References

General references:

  • Tuck, Donald H. (1974). The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction and Fantasy. Chicago: Advent, 61-63. ISBN 0-911682-20-1. 

Specific references: Author of A Handbook of Science Fiction and Fantasy. ... Advent: Publishers is a publishing house founded by Earl Kemp and other members of the University of Chicago Science Fiction Club in 1956, to publish criticism, history, and bibliography of the science fiction field, beginning with James Blishs The Issue at Hand. ...

  1. ^ Certificate of Birth, Ray Douglas Bradbury, August 22, 1920, Lake County Clerk's Record #4750. Although he was named after Rae Williams, a cousin on his father's side, Ray Bradbury's birth certificate spells his first name as "Ray."
  2. ^ Their immigrant ancestor was the royally-descended Thomas Bradbury who married Mary Perkins of Ipswich, Massachusetts, who was convicted of witchcraft at the Salem witch trials, but escaped and was not hanged.
  3. ^ Sites from these works which still exist in Waukegan include his boyhood home, his grandparents' home next door (and their connecting lawns where he and his grandfather gathered dandelions to make wine) and, less than a block away, the famous ravine which Bradbury used as a metaphor throughout his career.
  4. ^ In His Words. RayBradbury.com.
  5. ^ [1][dead link]
  6. ^ Books: Grandfather Time (Weekly Alibi . 09-27-99)
  7. ^ Quoted by Kingsley Amis in New Maps of Hell: A Survey of Science Fiction (1960).
  8. ^ Ray Bradbury. "In 1982 he created the interior metaphors for the Spaceship Earth display at Epcot Center, Disney World." http://www.raybradbury.com/bio.html
  9. ^ Ray Bradbury. "The images at Spaceship Earth in DisneyWorld's EPCOT Center in Orlando? Well, they are all Bradbury's ideas." http://www.raybradbury.com/articles_town_talk.html
  10. ^ Ray Bradbury. "He also serves as a consultant, having collaborated, for example, in the design of a pavilion in the Epcot Center at Walt Disney World." Referring to Spaceship Earth ...http://www.raybradbury.com/articles_book_mag.html
  11. ^ (Russian) State Fund of Television and Radio Programs
  12. ^ Veld at the Internet Movie Database
  13. ^ 2007 Special Awards from the Pulitzer Prize website]
  14. ^ Search Page Top - Academy Awards® Database - AMPAS
  15. ^ Icarus Montgolfier Wright at the Internet Movie Database
  16. ^ Distinguished Contribution to American Letters Award with his acceptance speech.
  17. ^ Ray Bradbury: "Michael Moore is an asshole"
  18. ^ Weller, Sam (2005). The Bradbury Chronicles: The Life of Ray Bradbury. New York: HarperCollins, 330-331. ISBN 0-06-054581-X. 

Ipswich is a coastal town in Essex County, Massachusetts, United States. ... 1876 illustration of the courtroom; the central figure is usually identified as Mary Walcott The Salem witch trials were a series of hearings by local magistrates and county court trials to prosecute people alleged to have committed acts of witchcraft in Essex, Suffolk and Middlesex Counties of Massachusetts in 1692... Sir Kingsley William Amis (April 16, 1922 – October 22, 1995) was an English novelist, poet, critic, and teacher. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... The Internet Speculative Fiction Database is a database of bibliographic information on science fiction and related genres such as fantasy fiction and horror fiction. ... Don Swaim is an American journalist, writer, and broadcaster. ... Wired for Books <http://wiredforbooks. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ray Bradbury - Wikipedia, den fria encyklopedin (411 words)
Ray Bradbury född 22 augusti 1920 i Waukegan, Illinois, nordamerikansk science fiction, fantasy och skräckförfattare, mest känd för The Martian Chronicles (1950) och Fahrenheit 451 (1953).
Typiskt för många av Ray Bradburys verk (se till exempel The Martian Chronicles ovan), är att de består av en samling noveller, försedda med en ramberättelse, som gör att det är vanskligt att avgöra om verket är en novellsamling eller en roman.
Trots alla böcker han skrivit om teknologiska företeelser har Bradbury aldrig framfört en bil.
Ray Bradbury - MSN Encarta (610 words)
Ray Bradbury, born in 1920, American writer of science fiction and fantasy.
Ray Douglas Bradbury was born in Waukegan, Illinois.
Bradbury’s novel Fahrenheit 451 (1953) is a dystopian vision of a future where television dominates society and books are illegal (the title refers to the temperature at which paper burns).
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