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Encyclopedia > Ranulf Flambard

Ranulf Flambard, or Squiffy (died September 5, 1128) was Bishop of Durham and an influential government minister of William Rufus. September 5 is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years). ... Pope Honorius II recognizes and confirms the Order of the Knights Templar. ... Arms of the Bishop of Durham The Bishop of Durham is the officer of the Church of England responsible for the diocese of Durham, one of the oldest in the country. ... William II (c. ...


He was the son of a Norman parish priest in the diocese of Bayeux. Emigrating at an early age to England, the young Ranulf entered the chancery of William I and became conspicuous as a courtier. He was disliked by the barons, who nicknamed him Flambard in reference to his talents as a mischief-maker; but he acquired the reputation of an acute financier and appears to have played an important part in the compilation of the Domesday survey. In that record he is mentioned as a clerk by profession, and as holding land both in Hants and Oxfordshire. Before the death of the old king he became chaplain to Maurice, bishop of London, under whom he had formerly served in the chancery. Norman conquests in red. ... Pope Pius XI blesses Bishop Stephen Alencastre as fifth Apostolic Vicar of the Hawaiian Islands in a Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace window. ... Bayeux (pronounced ) is a small town and commune in the Calvados département, in Normandy, northwestern France. ... William I of England (c. ... This article is about the 11th century census. ... Arms of the Bishop of London The Bishop of London is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of London in the Province of Canterbury. ...


Early in the next reign Ranulf returned to the royal service. He is usually described as the chaplain of Rufus, but he is also called treasurer and his services were chiefly of a fiscal character. His name is regularly connected by the chroniclers with the rapacious extortion from which all classes suffered between 1087 and 1100.[1] He profited largely by the tyranny of Rufus, farming for the king a large proportion of the ecclesiastical preferments which were illegally kept vacant. He personally managed sixteen abbeys or bishoprics and obtaining for himself the wealthy see of Durham (1099). Tax farming was originally a Roman practise whereby the burden of tax collection was removed from the Roman State to private individuals or groups. ... Durham (IPA: locally, in RP) is a small city and main settlement of the City of Durham district of County Durham in North East England. ...


His fortunes fell upon the accession of Henry I, by whom he was imprisoned in the Tower of London. Flambard soon escaped, and is noted as not only the first inmate of this soon-to-be-infamous prison, but also the first person to escape from it. A popular legend represents the bishop as descending from the window of his cell by a rope which friends had conveyed to him in a cask of wine. He took refuge across the English Channel with Henry's brother Robert, Duke of Normandy. Henry I (circa 1068 – 1 December 1135) was the fourth son of William the Conqueror and the first born in England after the Norman Conquest of 1066. ... Her Majestys Royal Palace and Fortress The Tower of London, more commonly known as the Tower of London (and historically simply as The Tower), is a historic monument in central London, England on the north bank of the River Thames. ... Satellite view of the English Channel The English Channel (French: (IPA: ), the sleeve; Dutch: Het Kanaal) is the part of the Atlantic Ocean that separates the island of Great Britain from northern France and joins the North Sea to the Atlantic. ... Robert II (called Curthose for his short squat appearance) (c. ...


As Robert's advisor, he pressed the duke to dispute his brother Henry's claim to the crown of England. Robert invaded England in 1101, but he agreed at the Treaty of Alton to renounce his claim to the English throne. Events A second wave of crusaders arrives in the newly established Kingdom of Jerusalem, after being heavily defeated by Kilij Arslan I at Heraclia. ... The Treaty of Alton was an agreement signed in 1101 between Henry I of England and his older brother Robert, Duke of Normandy in which Robert agreed to recognize Henry as king of England in exchange for a yearly stipend and other concessions. ...


Robert rewarded the bishop by entrusting him with the administration of the see of Lisieux. After Robert's defeat by Henry at Tinchebray in 1106, the bishop was among the first to make his peace with Henry, and was returned to the see he had purchased in 1099. He retired from political life and Henry found in Roger of Salisbury an able financier who was infinitely more acceptable to the nation. Lisieux is a commune of the Calvados département, in the Lower Normandy région, in France. ... Combatants Robert Curthose, the Duke of Normandy Henry I of England Commanders William, Count of Mortain Robert of Bellême, 3rd Earl of Shrewsbury Ranulf of Bayeux Robert de Beaumont, Count of Meulan William de Warenne Helias, Count of Maine Alan IV, Duke of Brittany William, count of Evreux Ralph... Events September 28 - Henry I of England defeats his older brother Robert Curthose, duke of Normandy, at the Battle of Tinchebrai, and imprisons him in Cardiff Castle; Edgar Atheling and William Clito are also taken prisoner. ... Roger (d. ...


At Durham he passed the remainder of his life. His private life scandalized the local clergy; he had at least two sons, for whom he purchased benefices before they had entered on their teens; and scandalous tales are told of the entertainments with which he enlivened his seclusion. But he distinguished himself as a builder and a pious founder. He all but completed the cathedral[2] which his predecessor, William of St. Carilef, had begun; fortified Durham; built Norham Castle[3]; founded the priory of Mottisfout and endowed the college of Christchurch, Hampshire.[2] Durham Cathedrals famous Sanctuary Knocker on the North Door Ground plan of Durham Cathedral Legend of the founding of Durham depicted on cathedral The Cathedral Church of Christ, Blessed Mary the Virgin and St Cuthbert of Durham, which is almost always referred to as Durham Cathedral, in the city... William of St Calais (Carilef) (d. ... Norham Castle is a castle in Norham, Northumberland, England. ...

Religious Posts
Preceded by
William of St. Carilef
Bishop of Durham
1099–1128
Succeeded by
Geoffrey Rufus
Political offices
Preceded by
Waldric
Lord Chancellor
1107–1123
Succeeded by
Geoffrey Rufus

Notes

  1. ^ Chronicle extract at [1].
  2. ^ See Christchurch Priory.

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ranulf Flambard - LoveToKnow 1911 (605 words)
Migrating at an early age to England, the young Ranulf entered the chancery of William I.
He was disliked by the barons, who nicknamed him Flambard in reference to his talents as a mischief-maker; but he acquired the reputation of an acute financier and appears to have played an important part in the compilation of the Domesday survey.
A bishop, however, was an inconvenient prisoner, and Flambard soon succeded in effecting his escape from the Tower of London.
Science Fair Projects - Ranulf Flambard (691 words)
Ranulf Flambard, or Ralph (died September 5, 1128) was Bishop of Durham and a government minister of William Rufus.
Emigrating at an early age to England, the young Ranulf entered the chancery of William I and became conspicuous as a courtier.
Flambard soon escaped, and is noted as not only the first inmate of this soon-to-be-infamous prison, but also the first person to escape from it.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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