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Encyclopedia > Randolph College
Randolph College

Motto: Vita Abundantior
(Life More Abundant)
Established 1891
Type: Private liberal arts college
President: John E. Klein
Faculty: 72
Undergraduates: 730
Location Lynchburg, VA, USA
Campus: suburban; 100 acres
Endowment: $155 million (2007)
Mascot: Wanda the WildCat
Website: randolphcollege.edu

Randolph College is a private coeducational liberal arts college located in Lynchburg, Virginia. It was founded in 1891 as the woman's college Randolph-Macon Woman's College. It was re-named Randolph College on July 1, 2007, when it became coeducational. For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Lynchburg is an independent city located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ... Lynchburg is an independent city located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Womens colleges in the United States in higher education are American undergraduate, bachelors degree-granting institutions, often liberal arts colleges, whose student populations are comprised exclusively or almost exclusively of women. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ...

Contents

History

The college was founded by William Waugh Smith, then-president of Randolph-Macon College, under Randolph-Macon's charter after failing to convince R-MC to become co-educational. Randolph-Macon Woman's College and R-MC were governed by a separate board of trustees beginning in 1953. Randolph-Macon Woman's College had historic ties to the United Methodist Church. After many attempts to find a location for Randolph-Macon Woman's College, the city of Lynchburg donated the property for the purpose of establishing a women's college. For the former womens college, see Randolph College. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... January 7 - President Harry S. Truman announces the United States has developed a hydrogen bomb. ... This article is about the current Christian denomination based in the United States. ...


The school was well-respected as an academic institution and while a women's college was considered one of the "Seven Sisters of the South." In 1916, it became the first women's college in the South to earn a Phi Beta Kappa charter. The Seven Sisters of the South refers to a group of highly regarded American womens colleges in the Southern United States. ... The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ...


Randolph-Macon Woman's College was in the top 10% of all colleges and universities in America in the percentage of women graduates who eventually earn a Ph.D.


Coeducation

See main: Question of coeducation and women's colleges:21st century

On 9 September, 2006, the school announced the adoption of a new strategic plan which included a platform for a global honors emphasis and coeducation. The school became coeducational on July 1, 2007. Womens colleges in the United States in higher education are American undergraduate, bachelors degree-granting institutions, often liberal arts colleges, whose student populations are comprised exclusively or almost exclusively of women. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ...


A letter in the 17 September 2006 issue of the Washington Post claims that the college decided to become coeducational because it felt that the market for women's colleges has decreased.[1] is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... ...


There were numerous protests on campus including rallies, blocking administrative offices, mass requests for transfer transcripts, banners all over campus, striking from classes, and participation in quiet protest to highlight lack of student voices in the board of trustee votes. [2] [3]


This led to the formation of a non-profit "Preserve Education Choice" (PEC) [4], comprised of students, faculty, and alumnae who are trying to reverse the decision. Two lawsuits were filed by Preserve Educational Choice[5]. On January 23, 2007, both lawsuits were dismissed in Lynchburg Circuit Court. [6] A 2 July 2007 article announced that PEC raised enough money to appeal both dismissals. [7] A 09 July 2007 article announced that a group of nine students brought the case to the Virginia Supreme Court where "Richmond lawyer Wyatt B. Durrette Jr. asked the state's high court to grant an appeal of the group's lawsuit, which Lynchburg Circuit Judge Leyburn Mosby Jr. dismissed in January." [8] is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... July 9 is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 175 days remaining. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


On 30 June 2007, professor emeritus of romance languages, Charlotte Stern, published the 24 page letter, How the Board of Trustees Hijacked R-MWC Right Before Our Eyes: An Open Letter to the R-MWC Community on the website, Preserve Educational Change. [9] This letter was "endorsed by 19 others, ranging from alumnae, former professors and a former president of Randolph's board of trustees. Dated June 30, the letter was sent to former and current faculty, administration and trustees, and widely circulated among alumnae."[10] The 21 July 2007 The News & Advance article, She said, she said: The coed debate broken down, summarized a few points of the letter and included responses from Randolph College. [11] The article also referenced, Ginger Hill Worden, Interim President, responds to What Every Trustee Should Know and 20 Reasons Why You Should Change Your Vote, a response published on the college website, which discussed earlier debates concerning the decision to adopt coeducation. [12] is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


The Virginia Supreme Court agreed to hear appeals in both the student contract and charitable trust cases. The appeals are expected to be decided in 2008. [13]


Notable people

Presidents

  • John Klein (beginning August 2007) [1]
  • Ginger H. Worden '69 (Interim President), 2006–2007
  • Kathleen Gill Bowman, 1994–2006
  • Lambuth M. Clarke, 1993–1994
  • Linda Koch Lorimer, 1987–1993
  • Robert A. Spivey, 1978–1987
  • William F. Quillian, Jr., 1952–1978
  • Theodore H. Jack, 1933–1952
  • N.A. Pattillo, 1931–1933
  • Dice Robins Anderson, 1920–1931
  • William A. Webb, 1913–1919
  • William Waugh Smith, 1891–1912 [2]

Notable alumnae

Name Known for Relationship to college
Pearl S. Buck Nobel Prize-winning author 1914
Blanche Lincoln U.S. Senator
Candy Crowley CNN senior political correspondent
Anne Tucker Museum of Fine Arts, Houston photography curator
(named "America's Best Curator" by TIME, in 2001)
Suzanne Patrick US Deputy Undersecretary of Defense for Industrial Policy
Rachel A. Dean U.S. Central Intelligence Agency, R.I.P. 9/2006

Pearl Sydenstricker Buck, most familiarly known as Pearl S. Buck (birth name Pearl Comfort Sydenstricker; Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) (June 26, 1892 – March 6, 1973), was a prolific American writer and Nobel Prize winner. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... Blanche Lambert Lincoln (born September 30, 1960) is a Democratic United States Senator from the State of Arkansas. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Magda Candy Crowley is a CNN political correspondent, specializing in U.S. presidential, gubernatorial, and Senate elections. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Look up time in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Traditions

One of the college's oldest traditions is the Even/Odd rivalry. The year the student graduates denotes if they are an Even or an Odd. The two staircases in Main Hall lobby are known as the "Even Stairs" and "Odd Stairs". According to superstition, a student who uses the wrong set of stairs will not graduate. The class of 1903 unoffically established the Odd/Even tradition by adopting the class of 1905 as "little sisters."


The campus symbol of the Odd classes is the "Odd Tree", located on the college's front lawn. Legend has it that the original Odd Tree was visciously burned down by Evens. A large cement replica of the trunk now stands in the spot where the original tree stood. The Odd symbols are the witch and the devil. Their colors are red, grey and blue. Their spirit organization is the Gamma 13 founded by the class of 1913.


The "Even Post" in front of Main Hall serves as a symbol of the Even classes. Dr. William Waugh Smith tied his horse, Mr. Buttons, to this hitching post every day. The Evens also adopted Dr. Smith's dog, Mr. Bones, as a mascot. Symbols of the Even classes are buttons (after the horse) and bones (after the dog). Their colors are green, white and tan. Their spirit organization is called the Etas.


Members of the Odd and Even classes attempt to keep their respective tree and post clean and white, while striving to spraypaint or otherwise deface the symbol of their rival class.


Throughout the semester Skeller Sings are held between the Odd and Even classes. The senior spirit group stands on the stage in the Student Center to lead their sister class with class songs. The junior spirit group is sent to the stairs to lead their class respectively. At the end of the Skeller Sing, both the Etas and the Gammas come together to sing the Song of Syncopation and the school song.


Even or Odd Day is celebrated during the spring term. Members of First Year Board secretly decorate the campus the night of Even/Odd Day to surprise their sister class. The Evens and the Odds then face off at dinner time with a water balloon fight.


"Bury the Hatchet" is celebrated at the end of the spring semester before graduation. A senior presents a hatchet to the most spirited junior to symbolize the Odds and Evens coming together in friendship at the end of the academic year.


Ring Week

Ring Week, held in November, is celebrated by juniors and their sister class, the first-years. The week begins with junior draw, when the juniors are picked by members of the first-year class. Throughout the week, the first-year will leave the junior gifts anonymously, and decorate their door. At the end of the week the juniors have a class dinner before taking part in a campus-wide scavenger hunt created by their first-years. The juniors are then presented with their class ring. Sometimes the first-year will have the junior complete a final task before receiving her ring such as breaking open a piñata, digging through Jell-O, or dancing outrageously.


Pumpkin Parade

Pumpkin Parade is celebrated by seniors and sophomores in October. Sophomores select a senior to secretly leave presents for during the week leading up to Pumpkin Parade. At the end of the week, the sophomore presents a carved pumpkin to her senior. The seniors, dressed in their graduation robes, carry their lighted pumpkins on a parade along the Crush Path across front campus. The parade ends on the steps of Moore Hall. There the senior and sophomore classes serenade one another with class and school songs.


Other Traditions

Never Ending Weekend is celebrated during the fall semester. The weekend begins on Friday with Tacky Party, a dance party where the attendants aspire to dress in the tackiest outfits possible. The Fall Formal dance follows on Saturday night.


Holiday dinner is celebrated during the last week of the fall semester. Sister classes dine together in dining hall, which is decorated for the occasion. At the end of the meal, students stand on their chairs and sing holiday songs. The evening is closed with the singing of the school song.


The Greek play has been a college tradition since 1909. Every other year a traditional Greek play is preformed in the Dell, an outside amphitheatre. The Greek play is unique to Randolph College.


In addition to the traditions described above the college is host to many others including: senior dinner dance, Founder’s Day, MacDoodle Day, and Christmas vespers.


Maier Museum of Art

The college's art collection is housed in the Maier Museum of Art[3]. Randolph-Macon Woman's College was chosen in 1951 to be the site of a confidential storage facility to be used by the National Gallery of Art in the event of a national emergency. The college signed a 50 year contract with the gallery and began work on "Project Y." The construction was finished in 1952, and the museum was dedicated later that year. The Maier Museum of Art specializes in American artwork. The collection includes:

  • George Wesley Bellow's Men of the Docks, the first purchase made by the Randolph-Macon Art Association in 1920, and the most valuable piece in the collection.
  • Red Umbrella, by Colleen Browning. This painting was a gift from the Cynthia L. Hellman Memorial Fund in 1973.
  • The Peaceable Kingdom, by Edward Hicks. Phyllis Crawford, class of 1920, donated this painting.
  • Mrs. Scott's House, by Edward Hopper. The Louise Jordan Smith Fund purchased this painting in 1936.
  • Yellow Cactus, by Georgia O'Keefe, was also purchased by the Louise Jordan Smith Fund in 1944.
  • Gilbert Stuart's portrait of Mrs. Robert Hooper, circa 1811, was purchased in by the Fine Arts Fund and Dr. and Mrs. Ben T. Bell in 1961.

On 1 October 2007, the Board of Trustees of the college announced a decision to sell at public auction the above mentioned Men of the Docks and The Peaceable Kingdom, along with Ernest Hennings' Through the Arroyo, and Rufino Tamayo’s Troubador. The sale of these pieces, at Christie's in New York in November 2007, is expected to raise at least $32 Million, to be invested in the college's endowment to help offset the continuing financial difficulties facing the college.[14] The decision was met with criticism by alumnae who have been strongly opposed to the sale since it was first mooted earlier in the year, and triggered the resignation on 2 October of the museum's director Karol Lawson, making her the third Randolph College employee to publicly resign in 2007 over the college's handling of the art collection.[15] is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Christies auction house in South Kensington, London Christies American branch in Rockefeller Center, New York Christies is a fine art auction house, the largest and by some accounts the oldest in the world. ... November 2007 is the eleventh month of that year. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Maier Museum is open from 1 to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday during the academic year, and 1 to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday during the summer months. Admission is free, but donations are welcome.


Special programs

University of Reading

Since 1968, Randolph-Macon Woman's College has provided a junior year of study at the University of Reading, England. Each year approximately 30 to 35 students are selected for the program. Whiteknights Lake Whiteknights Lake in winter The University Great Hall, on the London Road Campus The University of Reading is a university in the English town of Reading, Berkshire. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


In 2005, the administration announced its decision to discontinue the Reading program as of June 2006. Rising costs, increased interest in locations other than England, and preferences for semester-long or shorter study abroad programs were cited as reasons for this decision.[16] However, protests and pledges of donations from alumnae led the college to continue the Reading program through the 2006-2007 school year. The future of the Reading program remains uncertain.


The Reading program was allowed to continue again for the school year 2007-2008 and currently has 28 participants attending. The school has published new brochures calling the program “Randolph College Abroad: The World in Britain”[4]. From the links on the school website, it appears they are re-evaluating this program to be part of the their Global Honors.


American Culture

A major in American Culture offers Randolph College students the opportunity to study American society and culture by drawing upon resources, techniques, and approaches from a variety of disciplines. The American Culture program also accepts visiting students from other American colleges and universities for a one-semester intensive study of a particular theme and region, including literature, art, history, and travel components. As of October 25, 2007, the board of Trustees plans to cut the American Culture program, as well as other departments (most notably Anthropology) in an effort to improve the student-to-faculty ratio by decreasing faculty and hopefully increasing enrollment due to the attractiveness of a high student-to-faculty ratio.


References

  1. ^ "Why We Had No Choice but to Go Coed", The Washington Post, September 17, 2006. Retrieved on 2006-11-24. 
  2. ^ Nguyen, Janet. "R-MWC sends message to board of trustees", NewsAdvance.com, August 29, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-02-18. 
  3. ^ "YouTube footage of campus protests and efforts to save RMWC", Youtube, Dec 15, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-02-18. 
  4. ^ Preserve Education Choice
  5. ^ Coed Vote Brings Legal, Financial Repercussions
  6. ^ Challenges to coed decision dismissed
  7. ^ http://www.jacksonville.com/apnews/stories/070207/D8Q4O7F02.shtml
  8. ^ Va. Supreme Court hears argument for appeal of coed challenge
  9. ^ Stern, Charlotte. "How the Board of Trustees Hijacked R-MWC Right Before Our Eyes", Preserve Educational Choice Inc., 30 June 2007. Retrieved on 2007-07-22. 
  10. ^ Desrets, Christa. "She said, she said: The coed debate broken down", The News & Advance, 22 July 2007. Retrieved on 2007-07-22. 
  11. ^ Desrets, Christa. "She said, she said: The coed debate broken down", The News & Advance, 22 July 2007. Retrieved on 2007-07-22. 
  12. ^ Worden, Ginger Hill. "Ginger Hill Worden, Interim President, responds to What Every Trustee Should Know and 20 Reasons Why You Should Change Your Vote", Randolph College. 
  13. ^ Desrets, Christa. "Richmond Appeals go to Virginia Supreme Court", The News & Advance, 31 July 2007. 
  14. ^ Edson, Brenda. "Randolph College to Auction Four Paintings", www.randolphcollege.edu, October 2, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-10-03. 
  15. ^ Desrets, Christa. "Maier Museum art controversy boils", newsadvance.com, October 3, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-10-03. 
  16. ^ Bowman, Kathleen. "R-MWC's Reading, England Study-Abroad Program Discontinued", Randolph College, September 13, 2005. Retrieved on 2007-10-10. 

The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... YouTube is a popular video sharing website where users can upload, view and share video clips. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Randolph College
  • Information about the name change to Randolph College
  • Preserve Educational Choice Non-profit supporting legal fight to preserve Randolph-Macon Woman's College as single-sex institution
  • Alumnae Association website

 
 

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