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Encyclopedia > Randall Thompson

Randall Thompson (April 21, 1899 - July 9, 1984) was an American composer. He attended Harvard University, became assistant professor of music and choir director at Wellesley College, and received a doctorate in music from the University of Rochester School of Music. He went on to teach at the Curtis Institute of Music and at Harvard. He is particularly noted for his choral works. April 21 is the 111th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (112th in leap years). ... 1899 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... July 9 is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 175 days remaining. ... 1984 is a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... Wellesley College is a womens liberal arts college that opened in 1875, founded by Henry Fowle Durant and his wife Pauline Fowle Durant. ... Located in Rochester, New York, USA and founded in 1850, the University of Rochester is a private, coeducational and nonsectarian research institution. ... The Curtis Institute of Music is a music school in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania that offers courses of study leading to a performance Diploma, Bachelor of Music, Master of Music in Opera and Professional Studies Certificate in Opera. ...


Thompson composed three symphonies and numerous vocal works including The Testament of Freedom and The Peaceable Kingdom, inspired by Edward Hicks's painting. His most popular and recognizable choral work is his anthem, Alleluia, commissioned by Serge Koussevitsky for the opening of the Berkshire Music Center at Tanglewood. He also wrote the opera Solomon and Balkis. A symphony is an extended piece of music usually for orchestra and comprising several movements. ... Edward Hicks (1780-1849) was a folk and naive (primitive) artist and devout Quaker (member of the Religious Society of Friends). ... Sergei Aleksandrovich Koussevitzky (July 26, 1874 – June 4, 1951), better known as Serge, was a Russian-born conductor. ... Tanglewood is a music camp located in Lenox and Stockbridge, Massachusetts . ...


Leonard Bernstein was one of Thompson's students at Harvard. Bernstein with conductor Michael Tilson Thomas, at 1974 Charles Ives Centenary Concert in Danbury, Connecticut. ...

Contents


Works

Choral works

  • The Peaceable Kingdom - 1936 - inspired by the painting by Edward Hicks and based on texts chosen from Isaiah
  • Alleluia - 1940
  • The Testament of Freedom - 1943 - texts from Thomas Jefferson
  • The Last Words of David - 1949
  • Frostiana: Seven Country Songs - 1959 - a collaboration with Robert Frost

Edward Hicks (1780-1849) was a folk and naive (primitive) artist and devout Quaker (member of the Religious Society of Friends). ... Isaiah the Prophet in Hebrew Scriptures was depicted on the Sistine Chapel ceiling by Michelangelo. ... Order: 3rd President Vice President: Aaron Burr; George Clinton Term of office: March 4, 1801 – March 4, 1809 Preceded by: John Adams Succeeded by: James Madison Date of birth: April 13, 1743 Place of birth: Shadwell, Virginia Date of death: July 4, 1826 Place of death: Charlottesville, Virginia First Lady... Robert Frost Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963) is, in the estimation of many, the greatest American poet of the 20th century and one of the greatest poets writing in English in the 20th century. ...

Operas

  • Solomon and Balkis

Symphonies

  • Symphony No. 1
  • Symphony No. 2 - 1931
  • Symphony No. 3

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Randall Thompson Centenary (510 words)
Thompson was also a fluent symphonist, writing the kind of music that was felt to be particularly American in the 1930s and 40s - spacious and diatonic, close to Roy Harris or Rubbra, but without the individuality of Copland or the polish of Piston.
Thompson's pupils at Harvard included Leonard Bernstein who paid him back in the best possible way by conducting his Symphony No.2 and recording it in 1968, a very different climate from the one in which it was composed.
Thompson was born in New York into a New England family and went to a school in New Jersey where his father taught English.
Randall Thompson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (266 words)
Randall Thompson (April 21, 1899 – July 9, 1984) was an American composer.
Thompson composed three symphonies and numerous vocal works including The Testament of Freedom and The Peaceable Kingdom, inspired by Edward Hicks's painting.
Leonard Bernstein was one of Thompson's students at Harvard.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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