FACTOID # 19: Cheap sloppy joes: Looking for reduced-price lunches for schoolchildren? Head for Oklahoma!
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Ralph Nader
Ralph Nader
Ralph Nader

Election date
November 4, 2008
Running mate Matt Gonzalez
Opponent(s) Hillary Clinton (D),
Mike Gravel (LP),
John McCain (R),
Barack Obama (D),
Ron Paul (R),
and numerous others.
Incumbent George W. Bush

Born February 27, 1934 (1934-02-27) (age 74)
Winsted, Connecticut
United States
Political party Independent
Other political
affiliations
Green (affiliated non-member)
Reform (affiliated non-member)
Occupation Attorney and Political Activist
Religion Maronite Catholic Church

Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934) is an American attorney, author, lecturer, political activist, and candidate for President of the United States in five elections. Areas of particular concern to Nader are consumer rights, humanitarianism, environmentalism, and democratic government. He was the first Arab American presidential candidate in US history.[1] The United States presidential election of 2008, scheduled to be held on November 4, 2008, will be the 55th consecutive quadrennial president and vice president of the United States. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Matt Gonzalez (born June 1965) is a former district supervisor, president of the Board of Supervisors, and mayoral candidate in San Francisco, California. ... Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947) is the junior United States Senator from New York, and is a candidate for the Democratic nomination in the 2008 presidential election. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Maurice Robert Mike Gravel (pronounced ) (born May 13, 1930) is a former Democratic United States Senator from Alaska, who served two terms from 1969 to 1981, and is a candidate in the 2008 presidential election. ... The Libertarian Party is an American political party founded on December 11, 1971. ... McCain redirects here. ... GOP redirects here. ... “Barack” redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Ronald Ernest Ron Paul (b. ... GOP redirects here. ... Third party is a term commonly used in the United States to refer to political parties other than the Republican and Democratic parties. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Winsted is a census-designated place and an incorporated city in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. ... This article is about the American political party, Green Party. ... The Reform Party of the United States of America (abbreviated Reform Party USA or RPUSA, generally known simply as the Reform Party) is a political party in the United States, founded by Ross Perot in 1995 who said Americans were disillusioned with the state of politics—as being corrupt and... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as intentional action or inaction to bring about social or political change. ... Maronites (Marunoye ܡܪܘܢܝܶܐ in Syriac, Mawarinah in Arabic) are members of one of the Eastern Rites of the Catholic church. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... An attorney is someone who represents someone else in the transaction of business: For attorney-at-law, see lawyer, solicitor, barrister or civil law notary. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... Lecturer is a term of academic rank. ... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as involvement in action to bring about change, be it social, political, environmental, or other change. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Consumer protection is government regulation to protect the interests of consumers, for example by requiring businesses to disclose detailed information about products, particularly in areas where safety or public health is an issue, such as food. ... There are a number of meanings for humanitarianism: humanitarianism, humanism, the doctrine that peoples duty is to promote human welfare. ... The historic Blue Marble photograph, which helped bring environmentalism to the public eye. ... Democracy is a form of government under which the power to alter the laws and structures of government lies, ultimately, with the citizenry. ... Arab Americans constitute an ethnicity made up of several waves of immigrants from 22 Morocco in the west to Oman in the east. ... The presidential seal was first used by president Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii The President of the United States (often abbreviated to POTUS) is the head of state and head of government of the United States. ... Pre-Colonial America For details, see the main Pre-Colonial America article. ...


Nader has run for President of the United States five times (in 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004 and 2008). In 1992 he ran as a write-in in both the New Hampshire Republican and Democratic primaries, and other primaries. In 1996 and 2000, he was the nominee of the Green Party; in 2004, he ran as an independent, but was also endorsed by the Reform Party.[2] His campaigns have been controversial, with his role in the 2000 election in particular being subject to much debate. Many Democrats accuse Nader of siphoning Democratic votes in key states that may have cost Al Gore the presidency.[3] Nader himself recently stated in a live interview that he believes Al Gore won the presidency but that it was "stolen from him ... by the [Florida] Secretary of State and Jeb Bush" and the US Supreme Court.[4] It is generally stated in the media that he blames the Democrats for George W. Bush's victory that year.[5][6] On February 24, 2008, he announced on NBC's Meet The Press that he is campaigning for the presidency in 2008.[7] Nader is currently the only 2008 presidential candidate calling for the impeachment of president George W. Bush and vice-president Dick Cheney and has made the topic one of his campaign's "Twelve Issues that Matter for 2008." [8] [9] A write-in candidate is a candidate in an election whose name does not appear on the ballot, but for whom voters may vote nonetheless by writing in the persons name. ... This article is about the American political party, Green Party. ... The Reform Party of the United States of America (abbreviated Reform Party USA or RPUSA, generally known simply as the Reform Party) is a political party in the United States, founded by Ross Perot in 1995 who said Americans were disillusioned with the state of politics—as being corrupt and... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... Katherine Harris (born April 5, 1957, Key West, Florida) is a former Secretary of State of Florida and member of the US House of Representatives. ... John Ellis Jeb Bush (born February 11, 1953) is an American politician, and was the 43rd Governor of Florida. ... The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[1]) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the federal judiciary. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the television network. ... Meet the Press (MTP) is a weekly television news show produced by NBC. It started as a radio show in 1945 as American Mercury Presents: Meet the Press, originating from WRC-AM in Washington. ... Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ...

Contents

Background and early career

Nader was born in Winsted, Connecticut. His parents, Nathra and Rose Nader, were Maronite Catholic immigrants from Lebanon. Rose and Nathra Nader's native language is Arabic,[10] and Ralph has spoken it along with English since childhood.[11][12] Winsted is a census-designated place and an incorporated city in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Rose Nader (February 7, 1906 - January 20, 2006, born Rose Bouziane) was the mother of U.S. activist, consumer advocate, and frequent third-party candidate, Ralph Nader. ... Maronites (Marunoye ܡܪܘܢܝܐܶ; in (Aramaic) Syriac, Mâruniyya مارونية in Arabic) are Catholics belonging to an Eastern Rite particular Church. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


Nathra Nader was employed in a textile mill, and at one point owned a bakery and restaurant where he engaged customers in political discourse.[citation needed]


Nader graduated from Princeton University in 1955 and Harvard Law School in 1958.[13] He served in the United States Army for six months in 1959, then began work as a lawyer in Hartford, Connecticut. Between 1961 and 1963, he was a Professor of History and Government at the University of Hartford. In 1964, Nader moved to Washington, D.C., where he worked for Assistant Secretary of Labor Daniel Patrick Moynihan. He also advised a United States Senate subcommittee on car safety. In the early 1980s, Nader spearheaded a powerful lobby against FDA approval of mass-scale experimentation of artificial lens implants. Nader also served as a faculty member at The American University Washington College of Law. Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Harvard Law School (colloquially, Harvard Law or HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... Hartford redirects here. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... The University of Hartford, often called UHA or UHart, was founded in 1877, and is a private, independent, and nonsectarian coeducational university located in West Hartford, Connecticut. ... Daniel Patrick “Pat” Moynihan (March 16, 1927 – March 26, 2003) was a United States Senator, Ambassador, and eminent sociologist. ... American University is a fully accredited university located at Ward Circle in northwest Washington, DC. It currently has roughly 5,000 undergraduate students, and approximately the same number of graduates. ... The American University Washington College of Law (WCL) was founded in 1896 as the culmination of the pioneering efforts of two women, Ellen Spencer Mussey and Emma Gillett, who wished to open the field of law to women. ...


Recognition

In 1999 an NYU panel of eminent journalists ranked Nader's book Unsafe At Any Speed 38th among the top 100 pieces of journalism of the 20th century.[14] In 1990 Life Magazine,[15] and again in 1999 Time Magazine,[16][17] named Nader one of the 100 most influential Americans of the 20th century. In its December 2006 article on the "100 most influential Americans" in history, in which its ten invited historians voted Nader 96th, The Atlantic Monthly stated: "He made the cars we drive safer; thirty years later, he made George W. Bush the president."[18] Exhibit featuring the book at Henry Ford Museum, Detroit Unsafe at Any Speed: The Designed-In Dangers of the American Automobile by Ralph Nader, published in 1965, is a book detailing his claims of resistance by car manufacturers to the introduction of safety features, like seat belts, and their general... The Atlantic redirects here; for the ocean, see Atlantic Ocean. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


Taking on the automobile industry

Nader's first consumer safety articles appeared in the Harvard Law Record, a student publication of Harvard Law School, but he first criticized the automobile industry in an article he wrote for The Nation in 1959 called "The Safe Car You Can't Buy."[19] In 1965, Nader wrote Unsafe at Any Speed, a study that purported to demonstrate that many American automobiles were unsafe, especially the Chevrolet Corvair manufactured by General Motors. The Corvair had been involved in numerous accidents involving spins and rollovers, and there were over 100 lawsuits pending against GM in connection to accidents involving the popular compact car. These lawsuits provided the initial material for Nader's investigations into the safety of the car[20] GM tried to discredit Nader, hiring private detectives to tap his phones and investigate his past, and hiring prostitutes to trap him in compromising situations.[21][22] GM failed to uncover any wrongdoing, and never explained resorting to smear tactics instead of defending the car in the popular press, where the company had considerable corporate influence. GM's avoidance of technical journals makes more sense, as it was well known among auto engineers that the early (1960-64) Corvair's swing axle suspension handled miserably.[23][24] Upon learning of GM's actions, Nader successfully sued the company for invasion of privacy, forced it to publicly apologize, and used much of his $284,000 net settlement to expand his consumer rights efforts. Nader's lawsuit against GM was ultimately decided by the New York Court of Appeals, whose opinion in the case expanded tort law to cover "overzealous surveillance".[25] The Harvard Law Record is a student-run publication at Harvard Law School. ... Harvard Law School (colloquially, Harvard Law or HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ... The Nation (ISSN 0027-8378) is a weekly [1] U.S. periodical devoted to politics and culture, self-described as the flagship of the left. ... Exhibit featuring the book at Henry Ford Museum, Detroit Unsafe at Any Speed: The Designed-In Dangers of the American Automobile by Ralph Nader, published in 1965, is a book detailing his claims of resistance by car manufacturers to the introduction of safety features, like seat belts, and their general... Corvair convertible The Chevrolet Corvair was an automobile produced by the Chevrolet division of General Motors from 1960 to 1969. ... General Motors Corporation (NYSE: GM), also known as GM, is an American automobile maker with worldwide operations and brands including Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, GMC, Holden, Hummer, Opel, Pontiac, Saturn, Saab and Vauxhall. ... A swing axle is a simple type of independent suspension first used in early 20C. aircraft, Sopwith, Fokker et al, 1910 or earlier usually with rubber bungee and no damping. ... The front suspension components of a Ford Model T. Suspension is the term given to the system of springs, shock absorbers and linkages that connects a vehicle to its wheels. ... Invasion of privacy is a legal term essentially defined as a violation of the right to be left alone. ... The Court of Appeals is New Yorks highest appellate court, created in 1847, replacing the Court for the Trial of Impeachments and the Correction of Errors. ... For other uses, see Surveillance (disambiguation). ...


Nader's advocacy of automobile safety and the publicity generated by the publication of Unsafe at Any Speed, along with concern over escalating nationwide traffic fatalities, led to the unanimous passage of the 1966 National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety Act. The act established the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, and marked a historic shift in responsibility for automobile safety (which shifted from the consumer to the manufacturer). The legislation mandated a series of safety features for automobiles, beginning with safety belts and stronger windshields.[26][27][28] National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety Act - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA, often pronounced nit-suh) is an agency of the Executive Branch of the U.S. Government, part of the Department of Transportation. ...


A 1972 National Highway Traffic Safety Administration safety commission report conducted by Texas A&M University concluded that the 1960-1963 Corvair possessed no greater potential for loss of control than its contemporaries in extreme situations.[29] A different account, however, was given in John DeLorean's "General Motors autobiography", On a Clear Day You Can See General Motors, 1979 (published under the name of his would-be ghostwriter, J. Patrick Wright), in which DeLorean asserts that Nader's criticisms were valid. The specific Corvair design flaws were corrected in the second half (1965-1969) of the Corvair's production, although by then the Corvair name was irredeemably compromised. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA, often pronounced nit-suh) is an agency of the Executive Branch of the U.S. Government, part of the Department of Transportation. ... Texas A&M University redirects here. ... De Lorean featured with his namesake car, the De Lorean DMC-12 John Z. De Lorean (born John Zachary Delorean) is a personality, engineer, and executive in the U.S. automobile industry, and founder of the De Lorean Motor Company. ... For other uses, see Ghostwriter (disambiguation). ...


Activism

Nader speaks out against the Iraq War at the September 15, 2007 anti-war protest.
Nader speaks out against the Iraq War at the September 15, 2007 anti-war protest.

Hundreds of young activists, inspired by Nader's work, came to DC to help him with other projects. They came to be known as "Nader's Raiders" who, under Nader, investigated government corruption, publishing dozens of books with their results: Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (2655 × 1770 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (2655 × 1770 pixel, file size: 3. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Memorial of a fallen Marine brought to the White House Protesters marching down Pennsylvania Avenue toward the Capitol Wikimedia Commons has media related to: September 15, 2007 anti-war protest The September 15, 2007 anti-war protest was a march from the White House to the United States Capitol. ...

  • Nader's Raiders (Federal Trade Commission)
  • Vanishing Air (National Air Pollution Control Administration)
  • The Chemical Feast (Food and Drug Administration)
  • The Interstate Commerce Omission (Interstate Commerce Commission)
  • Old Age (nursing homes)
  • The Water Lords (water pollution)
  • Who Runs Congress? (Congress)
  • Whistle Blowing (punishment of whistle blowers)
  • The Big Boys (corporate executives)
  • Collision Course (Federal Aviation Administration)
  • No Contest (corporate lawyers)
  • Destroy the Forest (Destruction of ecosystems worldwide)
  • Operation: Nuclear (Making of a nuclear missile)

In 1971, Nader founded the non-governmental organization (NGO) Public Citizen as an umbrella organization for these projects. Today, Public Citizen has over 140,000 members and scores of researchers investigating Congressional, health, environmental, economic and other issues. Their work is credited with facilitating the passage of the Safe Drinking Water Act and Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), and prompting the creation of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC). NGO redirects here. ... Public Citizen is a U.S. non-governmental organization, founded by Ralph Nader in 1971 and based in Washington, DC. Its activities span across a diverse range of issues, including energy policy, trade policy, campaign finance reform and accountability, consumer protection, medical malpractice, and public health. ... An umbrella organization is an association of (often related, industry-specific) institutions, who work together formally to coordinate activities or pool resources. ... The Safe Drinking Water Act was an act passed by Congress on December 16, 1974. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with freedom of information legislation. ... OSHA logo The United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is an agency of the United States Department of Labor. ... EPA redirects here. ... The United States Consumer Product Safety Commission (U. S. CPSC) is an independent agency of the U.S. federal government created in 1972 through the Consumer Product Safety Act to protect “against unreasonable risks of injuries associated with consumer products”. As of 2006 its acting chairman is Nancy Nord, a...


In the 1970s and 1980s Nader was a key leader in the anti-nuclear power movement. "By 1976, consumer advocate Ralph Nader, who later became allied with the environmental movement 'stood as the titular head of opposition to nuclear energy'"[30][31] He advocates the complete elimination of nuclear energy in favor of solar, tidal, wind and geothermal, citing environmental, worker safety, migrant labor, national security, disaster preparedness, foreign policy, government accountability and democratic governance issues to bolster his position.[32] CND logo In British politics, the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament has been at the forefront of the peace movement in the United Kingdom and claims to be Europes largest single-issue peace campaign. ...


Non-profit organizations

In 1980, Nader resigned as director of Public Citizen to work on other projects, forcefully campaigning against what he believed to be the dangers of large multinational corporations. He went on to start a variety of non-profit organizations: multinational corporation (or transnational corporation) (MNC/TNC) is a corporation or enterprise that manages production establishments or delivers services in at least two countries. ...

  • Capitol Hill News Service
  • Citizen Advocacy Center
  • Citizens Utility Boards
  • Congress Accountability Project
  • Consumer Task Force For Automotive Issues
  • Corporate Accountability Research Project
  • Disability Rights Center
  • Equal Justice Foundation
  • Foundation for Taxpayers and Consumer Rights
  • Georgia Legal Watch
  • National Citizens' Coalition for Nursing Home Reform
  • National Coalition for Universities in the Public Interest
  • Pension Rights Center
  • PROD (truck safety)
  • Retired Professionals Action Group
  • The Shafeek Nader Trust for the Community Interest
  • 1969: Center for the Study of Responsive Law
  • 1970s: Public Interest Research Groups
  • 1970: Center for Auto Safety
  • 1970: Connecticut Citizen Action Group
  • 1971: Aviation Consumer Action Project
  • 1972: Clean Water Action Project
  • 1972: Center for Women's Policy Studies
  • 1980: Multinational Monitor (magazine covering multinational corporations)
  • 1982: Trial Lawyers for Public Justice
  • 1982: Essential Information (encourage citizen activism and do investigative journalism)
  • 1983: Telecommunications Research and Action Center
  • 1983: National Coalition for Universities in the Public Interest
  • 1989: Princeton Project 55 (alumni public service)
  • 1993: Appleseed Foundation (local change)
  • 1994: Resource Consumption Alliance (conserve trees)
  • 1995: Center for Insurance Research
  • 1995: Consumer Project on Technology
  • 1997?: Government Purchasing Project (encourage purchase of safe products)
  • 1998: Center for Justice and Democracy
  • 1998: Organization for Competitive Markets
  • 1998: American Antitrust Institute (ensure fair competition)
  • 1999?: Arizona Center for Law in the Public Interest
  • 1999?: Commercial Alert (protect family, community, and democracy from corporations)
  • 2000: Congressional Accountability Project (fight corruption in Congress)
  • 2001: Citizen Works (promote NGO cooperation, build grassroots support, and start new groups)
  • 2001: Democracy Rising (hold rallies to educate and empower citizens)

Public Interest Research Groups (also known as PIRG) are volunteer-driven, non-profit organizations based mostly out of University campuses around the North American continent. ... The Center for Auto Safety (CAS) was founded in 1970 by Consumers Union and Ralph Nader as a Washington, D.C.-based lobbying group focused on the United States automotive industry. ... The Connecticut Citizen Action Group, or CCAG, is a public advocacy group prominent in Connecticut politics. ... Founded in 1980 by Ralph Nader, the Multinational Monitor is a monthly magazine (published ten times a year). ... Founded in 1982 by Ralph Nader, Essential Information is a non-profit organization involved in a variety of projects to encourage citizens to become active and engaged in their communities. ... Princeton Project 55 is a nonprofit organization established by members of the Class of 1955 at Princeton University to mobilize alumni and students, and others who share their concerns, to provide civic leadership and to develop and implement solutions to systemic problems that affect the public interest. ... The Appleseed Foundation is a political action group founded by Ralph Nader. ... The Consumer Project on Technology (CPTech) is a non-governmental organization founded by Ralph Nader in 1995. ... A website founded in 2001 that contains Ralph Naders interactive blog as well as one by Kevin Zeese. ...

Presidential campaigns

Third-party votes controversy

In the 2000 presidential election in Florida, George W. Bush defeated Al Gore by 537 votes. Nader received 97,421 votes. In fact, all seven of the other third-party candidates on the ballot Florida each received more than 537 votes see United States presidential election in Florida, 2000. George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ...


Proponents of the argument that Nader was the source of Gore's defeat claim that Nader pulled votes from Al Gore, and this tilted the election in Bush's favor. Opponents say that the controversy was due to poor election practices and cite the fact that there were 8 third party candidates on the ballot, both liberal and conservative, and to attribute the deciding factor to one of those candidates is illogical. Moreover, Nader has noted on many occasions that had Gore simply won his home state of Tennessee, he would have won the election.


The claim is that this was Nader's "greatest impact" on the election. Nader himself, both in his book Crashing the Party, and on his website, states: "In the year 2000, exit polls reported that 25% of my voters would have voted for Bush, 38% would have voted for Gore and the rest would not have voted at all."[33] Crashing the Party is a book by Ralph Nader detailing his experiences running in the 2000 US Presidential Election. ...


When asked by MSNBC's Tim Russert about the possibility of preventing a Democratic victory in 2008, Nader responded, "Not a chance. If the Democrats can’t landslide the Republicans this year, they ought to just wrap up, close down, and emerge in a different form." [34] Timothy John Russert, Jr. ...


Presidential campaign history

Main articles: Ralph Nader's presidential campaigns, Ralph Nader presidential campaign, 2004, and Ralph Nader presidential campaign, 2008
1972
"Draft Nader" effort had no ballot line to offer, nor did Nader authorize his name to appear on any ballot until 1992.
1990
Nader considered launching a third party around issues of citizen empowerment and consumer rights. He suggested a serious third party could address needs such as campaign-finance reform, worker and whistle-blower rights, government-sanctioned watchdog groups to oversee banks and insurance agencies, and class-action lawsuit reforms.
1992
Nader stood in as a write-in for "none of the above" in both the 1992 New Hampshire Democratic and Republican Primaries[35] and received 3,054 of the 170,333 Democratic votes and 3,258 of the 177,970 Republican votes cast.[36] He was also a candidate in the 1992 Massachusetts Democratic Primary, where he appeared at the top of the ballot.
1996
Nader was drafted as a candidate for President of the United States on the Green Party ticket during the 1996 presidential election. He was not formally nominated by the Green Party USA, which was, at the time, the largest national Green group; instead he was nominated independently by various state Green parties (in some areas, he appeared on the ballot as an independent).
2000
In the 2006 documentary An Unreasonable Man, Nader describes how, during the second Clinton Administration, he found that he was unable to get the views of his public interest groups heard in Washington, even by then President Clinton's administration. Nader cites this as one of the primary reasons that he decided again to actively run in the 2000 election as candidate of the Green Party, which had been formed in the wake of his 1996 campaign.
In October 2000, at the largest Super Rally of his campaign,[37] held in New York City's Madison Square Garden, 15,000 people paid $20 each[38] to hear Mr. Nader speak. Nader's campaign rejected both parties as institutions dominated by corporate interests, stating that Al Gore and George W. Bush were "Tweedledee and Tweedledum". The campaign also had some prominent union help: The California Nurses Association and the United Electrical Workers endorsed his candidacy and campaigned for him.[39]
In 2000, Nader received 2,883,105 votes, for 2.74 percent of the popular vote,[40] missing the 5 percent needed to qualify the Green Party for federally distributed public funding in the next election, yet qualifying the Greens for ballot status in many new states.
Nader's votes in New Hampshire and Florida exceeded the difference in votes between Gore and Bush.[41] A New Hampshire exit poll indicated that Nader's presence in the race was not a factor in Bush's victory in that state.[42] Winning either state would have given Gore the presidency, and while critics claim this shows Nader tipped the election to Bush, Nader has called that claim "a mantra — an assumption without data."[43] Michael Moore at first argued that Florida was so close that votes for any of seven other candidates could also have switched the results,[44] but in 2004 joined the view that Nader had helped make Bush president.[45][46] Other Nader supporters argued that Gore was primarily responsible for his own loss.[47] But Eric Alterman, perhaps Nader's most persistent critic, has regarded such arguments as beside the point: "One person in the world could have prevented Bush's election with his own words on the Election Day 2000."[48] Nation columnist Alexander Cockburn cited Gore's failure to win over progressive voters in Florida who chose Nader, and congratulated those voters: "Who would have thought the Sunshine State had that many progressives in it, with steel in their spine and the spunk to throw Eric Alterman's columns into the trash can?"[49] Nader's actual influence on the 2000 election is the subject of considerable discussion, and there is no consensus on Nader's impact on the outcome.[50][51][52][53][54]
2004
Nader announced on December 24, 2003 that he would not seek the Green Party's nomination for president in 2004; however, he did not rule out running as an independent candidate.
Meeting with John Kerry — Ralph Nader and Democratic Candidate John Kerry held a widely publicized meeting early in the 2004 Presidential campaign, which Nader described in An Unreasonable Man. Nader said that John Kerry wanted to work to win Nader's support and the support of Nader's voters. Nader then provided more than 20 pages of issues that he felt were important and he "put them on the table" for John Kerry. According to Nader the issues covered topics ranging from environmental, labor, healthcare, tax reform, corporate crime, campaign finance reform and various consumer protection issues.
Nader reported that he asked John Kerry to choose any 3 of the issues and highlight them in his campaign and if Kerry would do this, he would refrain from the race. Several months passed and Kerry failed to adopt any of Nader's issues as benchmarks of his campaign, so on February 22, 2004, Nader announced on NBC that he would indeed run for president as an independent, saying, "There's too much power and wealth in too few hands."
Paying Nader not to run — Nader also reported in the documentary An Unreasonable Man that many wealthy Democratic donors offered to give money to his public interest groups if he declined to run, however, none of these groups would go a step further to guarantee that his issues would get a fair hearing in Washington. Nader replied, "why should I spend all of your money working on issues that are just going to run into a brick wall in Washington?"
The campaign — Nader's 2004 campaign ran on a platform consistent with the Green Party's positions on major issues, such as opposition to the war in Iraq. Due to concerns about a possible spoiler effect in 2000, many Democrats urged Nader to abandon his 2004 candidacy. The Chairman of the Democratic National Committee, Terry McAuliffe, stated that Nader had a "distinguished career, fighting for working families", and that McAuliffe "would hate to see part of his legacy being that he got us eight years of George Bush." Nader received 463,653 votes, for 0.38% of the popular vote.[55] Nader replied to this, in filmed interviews for An Unreasonable Man, by pointing out that, "Voting for a candidate of one's choice is a Constitutional right, and the Democrats who are asking me not to run are, without question, seeking to deny the Constitutional rights of voters who are, by law, otherwise free to choose to vote for me." In this campaign, Democrats accused Nader of having his bid funded by Republicans who wanted a repeat of his effect on the 2000 election.[citation needed]
The campaign was marred by the court finding that thousands of signatures on petitions to get Nader on the ballot in Pennsylvania were fraudulent. [56] [57].
2008
Main article: Ralph Nader presidential campaign, 2008
In February 2007, Nader criticized Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton as "a panderer and a flatterer." Asked on CNN Late Edition news program if he would run in 2008, Nader replied, "It's really too early to say...."[58] Asked during a radio appearance to describe the former First Lady, Nader said, "Flatters, panders, coasting, front-runner, looking for a coronation ... She has no political fortitude."[59] Some Greens started a campaign to draft Nader as their party's 2008 presidential candidate.[60]
In June 2007, Nader said, "You know the two parties are still converging — they don't even debate the military budget anymore. I really think there needs to be more competition from outside the two parties."[61] Nader participated in the Green Party presidential debates in San Francisco on January 13, 2008, though not as an announced candidate. On January 30, 2008, he formed an exploratory committee for another possible run at the presidency, telling CNN he would run again if he could raise the necessary funds.[62]
On February 24, 2008, Nader announced his 2008 presidential bid on Meet the Press.[7] On February 28, 2008, Nader named former San Francisco Board of Supervisors president Matt Gonzalez as his running mate for the 2008 Presidential Election.

Ralph Nader Ralph Nader ran for the office of President of the United States four times (1992 as a write-in candidate in the New Hampshire primary, 1996 and 2000 for the Green Party, and 2004 as an independent. ... Ralph Nader Ralph Nader ran for the office of U.S. Presidency in the 2004 election, as he also had in several previous elections. ... A whistleblower is someone in an organization who witnesses behavior by members that is either contrary to the mission of the organization, or threatening to the public interest, and who decides to speak out publicly about it. ... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A write-in candidate is a candidate in an election whose name does not appear on the ballot, but for whom voters may vote nonetheless by writing in the persons name. ... The New Hampshire primary is the first of a number of statewide political party primary elections held in the United States every four years, as part of the process of the Democratic and Republican parties choosing their candidate for the presidential elections on the subsequent November. ... Political drafts are used to encourage or compel a certain person to enter a political race, by demonstrating a significant groundswell of support for the candidate. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... This article is about the American political party, Green Party. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... In the United States, people speak generally of the Green Party. ... Promotional movie poster for the film An Unreasonable Man is an upcoming 2007 documentary film that traces the life and career of the political activist Ralph Nader. ... President Clintons Cabinet, circa 1993 Headed by President of the United States Bill Clinton, the Clinton Administation was the executive branch of the federal government of the United States from 1993 to 2001. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... This article specifically discusses the national committee of the Green Party in the United States. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The California Nurses Association is the largest and fastest-growing union and professional association of registered nurses in California. ... The United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers of America (UE) is a United States labor union which was one of the first unions to affiliate with the Congress of Industrial Organizations in 1936 and grew to more than 400,000 members in the 1940s. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... An exit poll is a poll of voters taken immediately after they have exited the polling stations. ... Michael Francis Moore (born April 23, 1954) is an American political-activist, a film director, author, social commentator, and political humorist. ... Eric Alterman is a liberal American journalist, author, media critic, blogger, and educator, possibly best known for the political weblog named Altercation, which was hosted by MSNBC.com from 2002 until 2006, and now is hosted by Media Matters for America. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Not to be confused with Independent Party or Independence Party. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The spoiler effect is a term to describe the effect a candidate can have on a close election, in which their candidacy results in the election being won by a candidate dissimilar to them, rather than a candidate similar to them. ... Terry McAuliffe Terence Richard Terry McAuliffe (b. ... Image File history File links Ballot_box_current. ... This article is about the political process. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... CNN or Cable News Network is a cable television network that was founded in 1980 by Ted Turner & Reese Schonfeld [1]. It is a division of the Turner Broadcasting System, owned by Time Warner. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Meet the Press (MTP) is a weekly television news show produced by NBC. It started as a radio show in 1945 as American Mercury Presents: Meet the Press, originating from WRC-AM in Washington. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... San Francisco skyline. ... Matt Gonzalez (born June 1965) is a former district supervisor, president of the Board of Supervisors, and mayoral candidate in San Francisco, California. ... ...

Personal finances

According to the mandatory fiscal disclosure report that he filed with the Federal Election Commission in 2000, he then owned more than $3 million worth of stocks and mutual fund shares; his single largest holding was more than $1 million worth of stock in Cisco Systems, Inc. He also held more than $2 million in two money market funds. Nader owned no car or real estate in 2000, and said he lived on US$25,000 a year, giving most of his stock earnings to many of the over four dozen non-profit organizations he had founded.[63] The Federal Election Commission (or FEC) is an independent regulatory agency that was founded in 1975 by the United States Congress to regulate the campaign finance legislation in the United States. ... Cisco Systems, Inc. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ...


In 2000, The New York Times reported that Nader's secretiveness had "spawned a host of dark theories among his critics,"[64] among them a 1990 report in Forbes magazine that reported that Nader lived in a $1.5 million townhouse.[65] Nader told the Times that the townhouse belonged to his sister, which Forbes confirmed.[66][67]


Works

Books

Nader at a book signing
Nader at a book signing

Nader has authored, co-authored and edited many books, which include: Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1484x1422, 1683 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Ralph Nader User:DavidShankBone Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1484x1422, 1683 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Ralph Nader User:DavidShankBone Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner...

  • Unsafe at Any Speed. Grossman Publishers, 1965.
  • Action for a Change (with Donald Ross, Brett English, and Joseph Highland). Penguin (Non-Classics); Rev. ed edition, 1973.
  • Whistle-Blowing (with Peter J. Petkas and Kate Blackwell). Bantam Press, 1972.
  • Corporate Power in America (with Mark Green)
  • You and Your Pension (with Kate Blackwell)
  • The Consumer and Corporate Accountability
  • In Pursuit of Justice
  • Corporate Power in America
  • Ralph Nader Congress Project
  • Ralph Nader Presents: A Citizen's Guide to Lobbying
  • Verdicts on Lawyers
  • Who's Poisoning America (with Ronald Brownstein and John Richard)
  • The Big Boys (with William Taylor)
  • Nader, Ralph. The Good Fight: Declare Your Independency and Close the Democracy Gap. Paperback ed. Harper Collins Pub., 2004.
  • Nader, Ralph. Crashing the Party: Taking on the Corporate Government in an Age of Surrender. Paperback ed. St. Martin's Pr., 2002.
  • Nader, Ralph. Cutting Corporate Welfare. Paperback ed. Open Media, 2000.
  • Nader, Ralph, and Wesley J. Smith. No Contest: Corporate Lawyers and the Perversion of Justice in America. Hardcover ed. Random House Pub. Group, 1996.
  • Nader, Ralph, and Wesley J. Smith. Collision Course: the Truth About Airline Safety. 1st ed. McGraw-Hill Co., 1993.
  • Nader, Ralph, and Clarence Ditlow. Lemon Book: Auto Rights. 3rd ed. Asphodel Pr., 1990.
  • Nader, Ralph, and Wesley J. Smith. Winning the Insurance Game: the Complete Consumer's Guide to Saving Money. Hardcover ed. Knightsbridge Pub., 1990.
  • Nader, Ralph, and John Abbotts. Menace of Atomic Energy. Paperback ed. Norton, W.W. & Co., Inc., 1979.
  • Ralph Nader, Joel Seligman, and Mark Green. Taming the Giant Corporation. Paperback ed. Norton, W. W. & Co., Inc., 1977.
  • Canada Firsts (with Nadia Milleron and Duff Conacher)
  • The Frugal Shopper (with Wesley J. Smith. )
  • Getting the Best from Your Doctor (with Wesley J. Smith. )
  • Nader on Australia
  • The Ralph Nader Reader. Seven Stories Press, 2000. ISBN 1-58322-057-7
  • "It Happened in the Kitchen: Recipes for Food and Thought"
  • "Why Women Pay More" (with Frances Cerra Whittelsley)
  • "Children First! A Parent's Guide to Fighting Corporate Predators"
  • "The Seventeen Traditions" Regan Books, 2007. ISBN 0061238279
  • Citizen Power: A Mandate for Change by Mike Gravel, 2008. Foreword by Ralph Nader.

Exhibit featuring the book at Henry Ford Museum, Detroit Unsafe at Any Speed: The Designed-In Dangers of the American Automobile by Ralph Nader, published in 1965, is a book detailing his claims of resistance by car manufacturers to the introduction of safety features, like seat belts, and their general... Donald Ross (1872-1948) was one of the most significant golf course designers in the history of the sport. ... For other persons named Mark Green, see Mark Green (disambiguation). ... John D. Richard Q.C. (born July 30, 1934) is the Chief Justice of the Federal Court of Appeal. ... William Taylor (1765-1836) was a scholar, polyglot, and translator of German romantic literature. ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... Joel Seligman is the current President of the University of Rochester, in Rochester, New York, and is one of the leading authorities on securities law in the U.S.. Seligman was named the tenth president of the University of Rochester on December 1, 2004. ... For other persons named Mark Green, see Mark Green (disambiguation). ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... Maurice Robert Mike Gravel (pronounced ) (born May 13, 1930) is a former Democratic United States Senator from Alaska, who served two terms from 1969 to 1981, and is a candidate in the 2008 presidential election. ...

Articles

Bill D. Moyers (born June 5, 1934 as Billy Don Moyers) is an American journalist and public commentator. ... The United States presidential election of 2008, scheduled to be held on November 4, 2008, will be the 55th consecutive quadrennial president and vice president of the United States. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Selected speeches and interviews

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Television appearances

Ralph Nader appeared on Sesame Street in 1988. He was featured as "a person in your neighborhood." The song began "A consumer advocate is a person in your neighborhood." This was somewhat tongue-in-cheek, as his profession as a consumer advocate was largely self-defined, and he was perhaps the only professional full-time consumer advocate at that time. This song compares him to a postman or a policeman, members of professions whom you may run into on a daily basis. This appearance on Sesame Street was particularly memorable because this was the only time that the grammar of the last line of the song "A person who you meet each day" was questioned and corrected in the show. Ralph Nader refused to sing the grammatically incorrect line, and so a compromise was reached, resulting in Ralph Nader singing the last line as a solo with the modified words: "A person whom you meet each day."[68] Sesame Street is an American educational childrens television series for preschoolers and is a pioneer of the contemporary educational television standard, combining both education and entertainment. ...


Video and audio links

RealVideo format. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... RealVideo is a proprietary video format developed by RealNetworks. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

The University of California, Berkeley (also known as Cal, UC Berkeley, UCB, or simply Berkeley) is a prestigious, public, coeducational university situated in the foothills of Berkeley, California to the east of San Francisco Bay, overlooking the Golden Gate and its bridge. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Radio-Canada redirects here. ...

Notes

  • An Unreasonable Man (2006). An Unreasonable Man is a documentary film about Ralph Nader that appeared at the 2006 Sundance Film Festival.
  • Burden, Barry C. (2005). Ralph Nader's Campaign Strategy in the 2000 U.S. Presidential Election 2005, American Politics Research 33:672-99.
  • Ralph Nader: Up Close This film blends archival footage and scenes of Nader and his staff at work in Washington with interviews with Nader's family, friends and adversaries, as well as Nader himself. Written, directed and produced by Mark Litwak and Tiiu Lukk, 1990, color, 72 mins. Narration by Studs Terkel. Broadcast on PBS. Winner, Sinking Creek Film Festival; Best of Festival, Baltimore Int'l Film Festival; Silver Plaque, Chicago Int'l Film Festival, Silver Apple, National Educational Film & Video Festival.
  • Bear, Greg, "Eon" — the novel includes a depiction of a future group called the "Naderites" who follow Ralph Nader's humanistic teachings.
  • Martin, Justin. Nader: Crusader, Spoiler, Icon. Perseus Publishing, 2002. ISBN 0-7382-0563-X

Promotional movie poster for the film An Unreasonable Man is an upcoming 2007 documentary film that traces the life and career of the political activist Ralph Nader. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... For other uses, see Eon. ...

References

  1. ^ The Green Party gets serious
  2. ^ "Court OKs Nader on Florida ballot", CNN.com, Cable News Network LP, LLLP, 2004-09-18. 
  3. ^ "Feb. 24: Nader Announces He Will Run for President". |date=2008-02-04 | FoxNews.com, Associated Press, February 24, 2008
  4. ^ {{{last}}}. Interview. Jan. 31, 2008: Live broadcast interview with Ralph Nader, by Amy Goodman, DemocracyNow.org.. 31 January 2008: Interview on DemocracyNow.org (skip to second-half of the interview after the break, past the discussion re John Edwards).
  5. ^ "Feb. 24: Ralph Nader announces third-party run for president". | date=2008-02-24 | International Herald Tribune, Associated Press, February 24, 2008]
  6. ^ "Dispelling the Myth of the Election 2000: Did Nader Cost Gore the Election? by Irene Dieter, CAGP". 
  7. ^ a b "Feb. 24: Ralph Nader, political roundtable", NBC, 2008-02-24. Retrieved on 2008-02-24. 
  8. ^ http://www.boston.com/bostonglobe/editorial_opinion/letters/articles/2008/03/08/getting_to_know_ralph_nader/
  9. ^ http://www.votenader.org/issues/
  10. ^ Ralph Nader's Childhood Roots
  11. ^ CNN.com Specials
  12. ^ Ralph Nader
  13. ^ Candidates / Ralph Nader 2004
  14. ^ Barringer, Felicity. "MEDIA; Journalism's Greatest Hits: Two Lists of a Century's Top Stories", NY Times, 1999-03-01, pp. 2. 
  15. ^ Deparle, Jason. "Washington at Work; Eclipsed in the Reagan Decade, Ralph Nader Again Feels Glare of the Public", NY Times, 1990-09-21. 
  16. ^ Ralph Nader. The American Program Bureau.
  17. ^ Kelly, James. ""A Triumph of the Newsmagazine's Craft"", Time.com, Time Inc., 2006-05-15. "Nearly 100 Influentials were on hand that evening, including U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, Ralph Nader, Will Smith, George Lucas, Nobel laureate James Watson, Bill Belichick and Dr. Andrew Weil." 
  18. ^ The Top 100: The Most Influential Figures in American History. Atlantic Monthly 62 (December 2006).
  19. ^ Mickey Z. 50 American Revolutions You're Not Supposed To Know. New York: The Disinformation Company, 2005. p.87 ISBN 1932857184
  20. ^ Diana T. Kurylko. "Nader Damned Chevy's Corvair and Sparked a Safety Revolution." Automotive News (v.70, 1996).
  21. ^ Ralph Nader's museum of tort law will include relics from famous lawsuits-if it ever gets built December 2005
  22. ^ President Dwight D. Eisenhower and the Federal Role in Highway Safety: Epilogue -The Changing Federal Role May 7, 2005
  23. ^ Independent Suspensions: Swing axle suspension 1998
  24. ^ Original Triumph Spitfire -- Camber Compensator August 21, 1999
  25. ^ Nader v. General Motors Corp., 307 N.Y.S.2d 647 (N.Y. 1970)
  26. ^ Brent Fisse and John Braithwaite. The Impact of Publicity on Corporate Offenders. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 1983.
  27. ^ Robert Barry Carson, Wade L. Thomas, Jason Hecht. Economic Issues Today: Alternative Approaches. M.E. Sharpe, 2005.
  28. ^ Stan Luger. Corporate Power, American Democracy, and the Automobile Industry. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1999.
  29. ^ Brent Fisse and John Braithwaite, The Impact of Publicity on Corporate Offenders. State University of New York Press, 1983. p.30 ISBN 0873957334
  30. ^ Nuclear Power in an Age of Uncertainty (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Congress, Office of Technology Assessment, OTA-E-216, February 1984), p. 228, citing the following article:
  31. ^ Public Opposition to Nuclear Energy: Retrospect and Prospect, Roger E. Kasperson, Gerald Berk, David Pijawka, Alan B. Sharaf, James Wood, Science, Technology, & Human Values, Vol. 5, No. 31 (Spring, 1980), pp. 11-23
  32. ^ Frontline interview transcript
  33. ^ Dear Conservatives Upset With the Policies of the Bush Administration — Main Story Archive — Nader for President 2004 — www.votenader.org
  34. ^ Nader to Run Again - The Caucus - Politics - New York Times Blog
  35. ^ THE 1992 CAMPAIGN: Write-In; In Nader's Campaign, White House Isn't the Goal February 18, 1992
  36. ^ 1992 PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY
  37. ^ Nader 'Super Rally' Draws 12,000 To Boston's FleetCenter
  38. ^ CNN.com - Loyal Nader fans pack Madison Square Garden - October 14, 2000
  39. ^ Nader, the Greens and 2008
  40. ^ 2000 Presidential Election Results
  41. ^ 2000 Official Presidential General Election Results
  42. ^ Holly Ramer. Exit polls: Nader did not make difference for Bush in New Hampshire. The Associated Press, November 9, 2000.
  43. ^ Democrats Upset at 'Spoiler' in 2000 Race
  44. ^ Michael Moore message
  45. ^ THE CONSTITUENCIES: LIBERALS; From Chicago '68 to Boston, The Left Comes Full Circle - New York Times
  46. ^ Convictions Intact, Nader Soldiers On - New York Times
  47. ^ S/R 25: Gore's Defeat: Don't Blame Nader (Marable)
  48. ^ Ralph Nader on Jon Stewart
  49. ^ Alexander Cockburn. "The Best of All Possible Worlds." The Nation.November 9, 2000.
  50. ^ abstract of THE ROOTS OF THIRD PARTY VOTING The 2000 Nader Campaign in Historical Perspective. By: Allen, Neal; Brox, Brian J.. Party Politics, Sep2005, Vol. 11 Issue 5, p623-637, 15p, 3 charts
  51. ^ abstract of If it Weren't for Those ?*!&*@!* Nader Voters we Wouldn't Be in This Mess: The Social Determinants of the Nader Vote and the Constraints on Political Choice. By: Simmons, Solon J.; Simmons, James R.. New Political Science, Jun2006, Vol. 28 Issue 2, p229-244, 16p, 5 charts, 1 graph
  52. ^ Did Ralph Nader Spoil a Gore Presidency? A Ballot-Level Study of Green and Reform Party Voters in the 2000 Presidential Election
  53. ^ The Dynamics of Voter Decision Making Among Minor Party Supporters: The 2000 U.S. Presidential Election, British Journal of Political Science (2007), 37: 225-244
  54. ^ Minor Parties in the 2000 Presidential Election
  55. ^ 2004 Presidential Election Results
  56. ^ Not so fast, Democrats tell Nader | Philadelphia Inquirer | 02/26/2008
  57. ^ Democrats' Legal Challenges Impede Nader Campaign - New York Times
  58. ^ Nader Leaves '08 Door Open, Slams Hillary Reuters, February 5, 2007.
  59. ^ Ralph Nader: Hillary's Just a 'Bad Version of Bill Clinton' Feb. 16, 2007
  60. ^ DraftNader.org
  61. ^ Nader ponders run, calls Clinton 'coward'
  62. ^ Mooney, Alexander. "Nader takes steps towards another White House bid", CNN Political Ticker, Cable News Network LP, LLLP., 2008-01-30. 
  63. ^ Nader Reports Big Portfolio In Technology
  64. ^ James Dao. Nader Runs Again, This Time With Feeling The New York Times, April 15, 2000,
  65. ^ Peter Brimelow, Leslie Spencer. Ralph Nader, Inc. Forbes, Sept 17, 1990.
  66. ^ James Dao. Nader Runs Again, This Time With Feeling The New York Times, April 15, 2000.
  67. ^ Peter Brimelow, Leslie Spencer. Ralph Nader, Inc. Forbes, Sept 17, 1990.
  68. ^ David Borgenicht, Sesame Street Unpaved: Scripts, Stories, Secrets, and Songs, 1998 and 2002 reprint, ISBN 1-4028-9327-2

Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Michael Zezima (known as Mickey Z) (born April 30, 1960) is a writer, editor, blogger and novelist living in New York City with his wife, Michele. ... Disinformation Company logo The Disinformation Company is a multimedia company that specializes in presenting information of a controversial, subversive, extreme, or just plain unusual nature. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Reuters Group plc (LSE: RTR and NASDAQ: RTRSY); pronounced is known as a financial market data provider and a news service that provides reports from around the world to newspapers and broadcasters. ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

A Green party is a formally organized political party based on the principles of Green politics. ... Lebanese Americans are American citizens of Lebanese descent. ... Exhibit featuring the book at Henry Ford Museum, Detroit Unsafe at Any Speed: The Designed-In Dangers of the American Automobile by Ralph Nader, published in 1965, is a book detailing his claims of resistance by car manufacturers to the introduction of safety features, like seat belts, and their general... Henry Ross Perot (born June 27, 1930) is an American businessman from Texas, who is best known for seeking the office of President of the United States in 1992 and 1996. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Ralph Nader
  • Nader for President 2008
  • The Nader Page (not campaign-related)
  • Greens for Nader 2008 (a 2008 presidential draft site)
  • Ballot access details
  • 2004 Vote Profile: Ralph Nader
  • Digital History Ralph Nader
  • Interview with Ralph Nader for Princeton Report on Knowledge about the spin of information. April 26, 2007
  • Ralph Nader on The Hour July 14, 2007
  • 10 Things You Didn't Know About Ralph Nader March 23, 2007
  • Personal Financial Disclosure for Ralph Nader 1999 (filed in 2000)
  • Personal Financial Disclosure for Ralph Nader 2003 (filed in 2004)
Party political offices
New political party Green Party Presidential candidate
1996 (4th), 2000 (3rd)
Succeeded by
David Cobb
Preceded by
Pat Buchanan
Reform Party Presidential candidate
2004 (1) (3rd)
Incumbent
Notes and references
1. Most recent presidential election as of 2005
Persondata
NAME Nader, Ralph
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION American attorney and political activist
DATE OF BIRTH February 27, 1934
PLACE OF BIRTH Winsted, Connecticut, United States
DATE OF DEATH living
PLACE OF DEATH
This article is about the American political party, Green Party. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... David Cobb appealing for votes at the annual Fighting Bob Fest in Baraboo, Wisconsin, September 2004 David Keith Cobb (born December 24, 1962 in San Leon, Texas) is an American ex-lawyer and activist, and was the 2004 presidential candidate of the Green Party of the United States (GPUS). ... Patrick Joseph Pat Buchanan (born November 2, 1938) is an American politician, author, syndicated columnist and broadcaster. ... The Reform Party of the United States of America (abbreviated Reform Party USA or RPUSA, generally known simply as the Reform Party) is a political party in the United States, founded by Ross Perot in 1995 who said Americans were disillusioned with the state of politics—as being corrupt and... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Presidential election results map. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Reform Party of the United States of America (abbreviated Reform Party USA or RPUSA) is a political party in the United States, founded by Ross Perot in 1995 who said Americans were disillusioned with the state of politics--as being corrupt and unable to deal with vital issues--and... Henry Ross Perot (born June 27, 1930) is an American businessman from Texas, who is best known for seeking the office of President of the United States in 1992 and 1996. ... Patrick Joseph Pat Buchanan (born November 2, 1938) is an American politician, author, syndicated columnist and broadcaster. ... The United States presidential election of 2008, scheduled to be held on November 4, 2008, will be the 55th consecutive quadrennial president and vice president of the United States. ... Main article: United States presidential election, 2008 The following sections collect local-event-based public straw polls, representative of the American voter base, among Democratic, Republican, and other appropriate candidates for the 2008 presidential election. ... Main article: United States presidential election, 2008 This is a collection of scientific, nation-wide public opinion polls that have been conducted relating to the U.S. presidential election, 2008. ... The first intra-party debates between candidates for the 2008 Presidential election. ... This article lists the endorsements made by members of the 110th United States Congress for candidates for their partys nominations in the 2008 United States presidential election. ... Fundraising for United States presidential election of 2008 is a key factor in determining the viability of candidates for the United States presidential election, 2008, along with opinion polling. ... The following is a timeline of events leading up to the upcoming 2008 U.S. presidential election: // October 7 - Maureen Dowd writes article in New York Times entitled Can Hillary Upgrade? which claims that Hillary Clinton, serving as the junior Senator from New York, has mollified her criticism of the... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Main article: Opinion polling for the United States presidential election, 2008 This is a collection of scientific, nation-wide public opinion polls that have been conducted relating to the 2008 Democratic presidential candidates. ... The 2008 Democratic Presidential Debates are political debates prior to the 2008 Democratic Primaries. ... The 2008 Democratic primaries will be the selection process by which the Democrats choose their candidates in the 2008 election for President and Vice President of the United States through a series of primaries and caucuses culminating in the 2008 Democratic National Convention, to be held from Monday, August 25... The 2008 Democratic National Convention will be held from August 25 to August 28 in Denver, Colorado. ... Superdelegate is an informal term for some of the delegates to the Democratic National Convention, the presidential nominating convention of the United States Democratic Party. ... // These have filed (or announced plans to file) with the Federal Elections Commission (FEC). ... Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947) is the junior United States Senator from New York, and is a candidate for the Democratic nomination in the 2008 presidential election. ... New York junior Senator and former First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton had expressed interest in the 2008 United States presidential election[1] since at least October 2002, drawing media speculation on whether she would become a candidate. ... “Barack” redirects here. ... Barack Obama, the junior United States Senator from Illinois, announced his candidacy for the presidency of the United States in Springfield, Illinois, on February 10, 2007. ... Birch Evans Bayh III (commonly known as Evan Bayh) (pronounced like bye; IPA pronunciation: ) (born December 26, 1955) is an American politician who has served as the junior U.S. Senator from Indiana since 1999 and a former Governor of Indiana. ... Biden redirects here. ... United States Democratic Senator Joe Biden of Delaware, announced his candidacy for president of the United States on the January 7, 2007 edition of Meet the Press. ... Christopher John Dodd (born May 27, 1944) is an American lawyer and politician from Willimantic, Connecticut. ... Senior Senator Chris Dodd (D-CT) has sought the nomination of the Democratic Party for President of the United States since entering the race early in January 2007. ... This article is about the American attorney and politician. ... John Edwards campaigning in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on Labor day in 2007. ... Dennis John Kucinich (IPA: ) (born October 8, 1946) is an American politician of the Democratic party and a candidate for the Democratic nomination for President of the United States in both 2004 and 2008. ... Dennis Kucinich announced on December 26, 2006 that he would persue the nomination for the Democratic President of the United States. ... Dal LaMagna is a progressive political activist in Washington state. ... For other persons named William Richardson, see William Richardson (disambiguation). ... Thomas James Vilsack (born December 13, 1950) is an American politician, a member of the Democratic Party, and served as the 40th Governor of the state of Iowa. ... GOP redirects here. ... Main article: Opinion polling for the United States presidential election, 2008 This is a collection of scientific, nation-wide public opinion polls that have been conducted relating to the 2008 Republican presidential candidates. ... The 2008 Republican Presidential Debates are political debates before the 2008 Republican Primaries. ... The 2008 Republican primaries will be the selection process by which the Republicans elect delegates who will then elect the GOP candidate in the 2008 election for President and Vice President of the United States. ... The 2008 Republican National Convention will take place at the Xcel Energy Center in Saint Paul, Minnesota from September 1 until September 4, 2008. ... This article lists officially declared Republican candidates for the President of the United States in the 2008 election. ... McCain redirects here. ... John McCain, the senior United States Senator from Arizona, announced his formal candidacy for the presidency of the United States and in turn, his intention to seek the nomination of the Republican Party for the 2008 presidential election in Prescott Park on the waterfront of Portsmouth, New Hampshire on Wednesday... Ronald Ernest Ron Paul (b. ... Ron Paul is a 10th-term Congressman, a physician (M.D.), and a 2008 presidential candidate from the state of Texas, seeking the nomination of the Republican Party. ... Samuel Dale Brownback (b. ... Dr. Hugh Cort III is a candidate for U.S. president in the Republican primary and a psychiatrist from Alabama. ... John Cox redirects here. ... Daniel Ayers Gilbert, Dan Gilbert, (b. ... James Stuart Jim Gilmore III (born October 6, 1949) is a Republican politician who was Governor of Virginia from 1998 to 2002. ... Rudolph William Louis Giuliani III, (born May 28, 1944) is an American lawyer, prosecutor, businessman, and Republican politician from the state of New York. ... Former Mayor of New York City Rudy Giuliani’s 2008 presidential campaign began in October 2005 when the “Draft Rudy Giuliani for President, Inc” was formed. ... Huckabee redirects here. ... Mike Huckabee, former Governor of Arkansas, officially announced on January 28, 2007 his candidacy for the Republican Party nomination for the 2008 presidential election in the United States. ... Duncan Lee Hunter (born May 31, 1948) is an American politician who has been a Republican member of the House of Representatives since 1981 from Californias 52nd congressional district in northern and eastern San Diego. ... Fourteen-term Congressman and Vietnam War veteran Duncan Hunter of California has announced his intentions to run for the 2008 Republican nomination for President of the United States. ... Raymond L. McKinney (b. ... Willard Mitt Romney (born March 12, 1947) was the 70th Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... Mitt Romney is a Republican Party primary candidate to represent his party in the 2008 United States presidential election. ... Thomas Gerard Tancredo (born December 20, 1945) is an American politician and member of the Republican Party. ... The Tom Tancredo presidential campaign, 2008 for President of the United States began with the announcement of candidacy by the Colorado Congressman on April 2, 2007. ... This article is about the actor/politician. ... Fred Thompson is an unannounced Republican Party primary candidate to represent his party in the 2008 United States presidential election. ... For other people with similar names, see Thomas Thompson. ... The Constitution Party is a conservative United States political party. ... Constitution Party National Convention is held every 2-4 years. ... Alan Keyes (born August 7, 1950) is an American political activist, author and former diplomat. ... This article is about the American political party, Green Party. ... Cynthia Ann McKinney (born March 17, 1955) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Kent Mesplay is a scientist and political activist from San Diego, California. ... Kat Swift is an American political activist, and co-chair of the Green Party of Texas. ... The Libertarian Party is an American political party founded on December 11, 1971. ... On December 21, 2006, the United States Libertarian Party announced that the 2008 Libertarian National Convention will be held between May 23 and May 26 at the Adam’s Mark Hotel in Denver, Colorado. ... Maurice Robert Mike Gravel (pronounced ) (born May 13, 1930) is a former Democratic United States Senator from Alaska, who served two terms from 1969 to 1981, and is a candidate in the 2008 presidential election. ...   Mike Gravel, a former United States Senator from Alaska, on April 17, 2006 became a declared candidate for the Democratic nomination for President of the United States in the 2008 election,[1] announcing his run in a speech to the National Press Club. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Steven Steve Wynn Kubby (born December 28, 1946) is a Libertarian Party activist who played a key role in the drafting and passage of California Proposition 215. ... George Phillies (born 23 July 1947) is a Libertarian Party activist and professor of physics at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. ... Wayne Root (more commonly known as Wayne Allyn Root) is a business mogul, television celebrity, TV producer, best-selling author, professional sports handicapper, and aspiring politician based in Las Vegas, Nevada. ... Mary J. Ruwart (born 16 October 1949) is a libertarian speaker, writer, and activist, the author of the bestselling 1992 book Healing Our World: The Other Piece of the Puzzle. ... Douglas Gene Stanhope (born March 25, 1967) is an American stand-up comedian. ... The Socialist Party USA (SP USA) is one of the heirs to the Socialist Party of America of Eugene V. Debs and Norman Thomas. ... Brian Moore Brian Moore is an independent candidate running on an anti-war campaign for Democratic incumbent Bill Nelsons Senate seat in Floridas 2006 Senate election. ... John Taylor Bowles (born in 1957 in Maryland) is an American neo-nazi and is the NSMs candidate for the United States presidential election, 2008. ... Jonathon The Impaler Sharkey (born April 2, 1964 in Elizabeth, New Jersey) is a self proclaimed satanist and vampire (or sanguinary vampyre in his own words) running in the 2006 gubernatorial election in the state of Minnesota. ... Political drafts are used to encourage or compel a certain person to enter a political race, by demonstrating a significant groundswell of support for the candidate. ... A variation of a campaign button being put out by Americans For Rice. ... Elections for the United States House of Representatives will be held on November 4, 2008, with all of the 435 seats in the House being contested. ... Senate Seats up for election:  Two Republican incumbents Republican incumbent Retiring Republican Democratic incumbent No election Elections for the United States Senate will be held on November 4, 2008, with 35 of the 100 seats in the Senate being contested. ... Seats up for election. ... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as intentional action or inaction to bring about social or political change. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Winsted is a census-designated place and an incorporated city in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ralph Nader - definition of Ralph Nader in Encyclopedia (3219 words)
Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934) is an activist attorney who opposes the power of large corporations and has worked for decades on environmental, consumer rights, and pro-democracy issues.
Nader was the U.S. presidential candidate of the Green Party in 1996 and 2000.
Nader refused to withdraw from the race, citing specifically the importance to him of the removal of troops from Iraq.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m