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Encyclopedia > Ralph Izard
Ralph Izard
Ralph Izard

Ralph Izard (January 23, 1741 or 1742May 30, 1804) was a U.S. politician. He served as President pro tempore of the United States Senate in 1794. Ralph Izard (U.S. Senator) Source: Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... January 23 is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events April 10 - Austrian army attack troops of Frederick the Great at Mollwitz August 10 - Raja of Travancore defeats Dutch East India Company naval expedition at Battle of Colachel December 19 - Vitus Bering dies in his expedition east of Siberia December 25 - Anders Celsius develops his own thermometer scale Celsius... // Events January 24 - Charles VII Albert becomes Holy Roman Emperor. ... May 30 is the 150th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (151st in leap years). ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Senator Ted Stevens of Alaska, the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the other being the House of Representatives. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...

Contents

Early life

Izard was born at "The Elms" near Charleston, South Carolina. His maternal grandfather was Province of South Carolina Governor Robert Johnson. Izard's parents died when he was a small child, and only one of his siblings survived to adulthood. He spent most of his childhood and youth studying in England. Izard returned to America in 1764, but did not remain in South Carolina for long. In 1767, he married Alice DeLancey of New York (a niece of James DeLancey). They had 13 children between the years of 1768 and 1792. Nickname: The Holy City, The Palmetto City Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ... The South Carolina Colony was originally part of the Province of Carolina, which was chartered in 1663 because the king was rewarding his loyal followers. ... A governor or governour (archaic) is a governing official, usually the executive (at least nominally, to different degrees also politically and administratively) of a non-sovereign level of government, ranking under the Head of state; furthermore the title applies to officials with a similar mandate as representatives of a chartered... Robert Johnson was the British colonial Governor of South Carolina in 1717-1719, and again from 1729-1735. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2005 est. ... 1764 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1767 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... James DeLancey (1703 – 1760) was acting colonial governor of New York from 1753 to 1755. ...


Career

He resided in London in 1771 and moved to Paris, France, in 1776. He was appointed commissioner to the Court of Tuscany by the Continental Congress in 1776, but was recalled in 1779. He returned to America in 1780 and pledged his large estate in South Carolina for the payment of war ships to be used in the American Revolutionary War. He was a member of the Continental Congress in 1782 and 1783. In 1788, he was elected to the United States Senate and served from March 4, 1789, to March 3, 1795, serving as President pro tempore of the Senate during the Third Congress. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... 1771 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country France Region ÃŽle-de-France Department Paris (75) Subdivisions 20 arrondissements Mayor Bertrand Delanoë  (PS) (since 2001) City Statistics Land area¹ 86. ... Year 1776 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Tuscany (Italian: ) is one of the 20 Regions of Italy. ... The Continental Congress is the label given to two successive bodies of representatives of the inhabitants of the Thirteen Colonies in 18th century British North America: The First Continental Congress met from September 5, 1774, to October 26, 1774. ... Year 1776 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1779 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Greenville-Spartanburg-Anderson Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32°430N to 35... Combatants American Revolutionaries, France, Dutch Republic, Spain, American Indians Great Britain, German mercenaries, Loyalists, American Indians Commanders George Washington, Comte de Rochambeau, Nathanael Greene, Bernardo de Gálvez Sir William Howe, Sir Henry Clinton, Lord Cornwallis (more commanders) The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (63rd in leap years). ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... A President Pro Tempore is a constitutionally recognized officer of the United States Senate who presides over the chamber in the absence of the President of the Senate. ... Dates of Sessions 1793-1795 The first session of this Congress took place in Philadelphia from December 2, 1793 to June 9, 1794. ...


Death and legacy

Izard retired from public life to the care of his estates and died near Charleston. He is interred in the churchyard of St. James Goose Creek Episcopal Church, near Charleston.


Izard was one of the founders of the College of Charleston. His children and relations married well: The College of Charleston (C of C) is a public university located in historic downtown Charleston, South Carolina. ...

Ralph DeLancey Izard (26 February 1785 – 21 January 1822), was a United States Navy officer who became a hero for his actions at Tripoli, during the Barbary Wars. ... Combatants United States Barbary States ( Ottoman Empire regencies) Commanders Richard Dale William Eaton Edward Preble Hassan Bey Strength 7 Ships 10 US Marines and Soldiers 70 Christian Mercenaries 4000 400 Arab Mercenaries Casualties 2 Ships destroyed 2 Marines killed, 3 wounded 9 Christian Mercenaries killed and wounded Unknown The First... USS Izard (DD-589), a Fletcher-class destroyer, was a ship of the United States Navy named for Lieutenant Ralph Izard (1785–1822), Izard was launched 8 August 1942 by the Charleston Navy Yard; sponsored by Mrs. ... Arthur Middleton (June 26, 1742–January 1, 1787), of Charleston, South Carolina, was a signer of the Declaration of Independence. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A governor or governour (archaic) is a governing official, usually the executive (at least nominally, to different degrees also politically and administratively) of a non-sovereign level of government, ranking under the Head of state; furthermore the title applies to officials with a similar mandate as representatives of a chartered... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,732 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... Isaac Motte (December 8, 1738 –May 8, 1795) was an American soldier and statesman from Charleston, South Carolina. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Greenville-Spartanburg-Anderson Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32°430N to 35... Lord William Campbell ( ? -1778) was the last English Governor of South Carolina. ... A governor or governour (archaic) is a governing official, usually the executive (at least nominally, to different degrees also politically and administratively) of a non-sovereign level of government, ranking under the Head of state; furthermore the title applies to officials with a similar mandate as representatives of a chartered... Sir James Wright (1716-1785) was an American lawyer and jurist who was the last British Royal Governor of Georgia. ... A Congressman or Congresswoman (generically, Congressperson) is a politician who is a member of a Congress. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Greenville-Spartanburg-Anderson Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32°430N to 35... Thomas Pinckney Thomas Pinckney (1750–1828), was an American soldier, politician, and diplomat. ... First Lieutenant Charles Manigault Morris, CSN Charles Manigault Morris (7 May 1820 – 22 March 1895) was an officer in the United States Navy and later in the Confederate States Navy. ... Lewis Morris (April 8, 1726– January 22, 1798) was an American landowner and developer from Morrisania, New York. ...

External links

Preceded by
None
United States Senator (Class 3) from South Carolina
1789–1795
Served alongside: Pierce Butler
Succeeded by
Jacob Read
Preceded by
John Langdon
President pro tempore of the United States Senate
May 31, 1794November 9, 1794
Succeeded by
Henry Tazewell

  Results from FactBites:
 
Women of the American Revolution - Mrs. Ralph Izard (1021 words)
The correspondence of Ralph Izard was published a few years since by his daughter, Anne Izard Deas, at the desire of her mother, whose anxiety to do justice to the memory of her husband proves her worthy of sharing in his fame.
Izard's wardrobe was robbed, and several of the marauders arrayed themselves in his best coats; valuable articles were seized in the presence of the mistress of the mansion, and an attempt was even made to force her rings from her fingers.
Izard's house was recovered, and restored by the conquerors to the owner, with a compliment to the matron whose strength of spirit had proved the means of their obtaining the victory.
George Izard (1776–1828) - Encyclopedia of Arkansas (1507 words)
George Izard was born on October 21, 1776, to Ralph Izard and Alice DeLancey Izard near London, England.
Izard, stung by the criticism, in 1816 published his wartime correspondence with the Department of War in an effort to vindicate his war record.
Izard soon advocated the establishment of an arsenal in Little Rock (Pulaski County) and, in a speech to the legislature in October 1825, highlighted the issues that would come to dominate his tenure as governor: natural resources, roads, treaties with Indians, Indian Removal, and the organization and strengthening of the militia.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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