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Encyclopedia > Ralph Bakshi
Ralph Bakshi
American filmmaker.
"Sweetheart, I'm the biggest ripped-off cartoonist in the history of the world, and that's all I'm going to say."
Born October 29, 1938
Haifa, Palestine (now Israel)

Ralph Bakshi (October 29, 1938) is an American director of animated and occasionally live-action films. As the American animation industry fell into decline during the 1960s and 1970s, Bakshi tried to bring change to the industry by creating and directing a number of animated feature films that were aimed at adults instead of children. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (853x480, 30 KB) Summary Ralph Bakshi in the documentary Ralph Bakshi: The Wizard of Animation. ... October 29 is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Palestine (from Latin: ; Hebrew: Pleshet, פלשתינה Palestina; Arabic: ‎ Filastīn, Falastīn) is one of several names for the geographic region between the Mediterranean Sea and the banks of the Jordan River with various adjoining lands. ... October 29 is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Animation the technique of filming a sequence of drawings or positions of models to create an illusion of movement. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ...


Ralph Bakshi's films have created controversy while continuously breaking new ground in the form. He encouraged the public to look at animation in a new way by creating worlds that are sometimes familiar and sometimes alien, whose power and strangeness are completely absorbing. He pioneered animation with adult themes using political commentary and satire. Look up Controversy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The World According To Ronald Reagan, a satirical map by Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist David Horsey Satire is a technique of writing or art which exposes the follies of its subject (for example, individuals, institutions, organizations, or states) to ridicule, often as an intended means of provoking or preventing...

Contents

Life and career

Early days

Ralph Bakshi was born of Krymchak descent on October 29, 1938, in Haifa, then part of the British Mandate of Palestine. In 1939, his family came to New York to escape World War II. He grew up in the Brownsville section of Brooklyn. As a child, Bakshi loved comic books and art in general. He was also a boxer during his teen years. Bakshi first attended the Thomas Jefferson High School [1] then was transferred to the School of Industrial Art, where he graduated with an award in cartooning in 1957. Bakshi made a name for himself in animation during the fading days of theatrical studio cartoons. At the Terrytoons studio (best known for the Mighty Mouse cartoons), he started as a cel polisher then graduated to cel painting. The Krymchaks are a community of Rabbinical Jews of the Crimean peninsula. ... October 29 is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Map of the territory under the British Mandate of Palestine. ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Nickname: Big Apple Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... Combatants Allied Powers: United Kingdom Soviet Union United States Republic of China and others Axis Powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Chiang Kai-Shek Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tojo Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000,000 Total dead... Brownsville is the name of several places in the United States of America: Brownsville, Florida Brownsville, Kentucky Brownsville, Maryland Brownsville, Oregon Brownsville, Pennsylvania Brownsville, Tennessee Brownsville, Texas Brownsville, Vermont Brownsville is also a neighborhood in the borough of Brooklyn in Canada: Brownsville, British Columbia Brownsville, Nova Scotia Brownsville, Durham Region... Brooklyn (named for the Dutch city Breukelen) is one of the five boroughs of New York City. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... The sculpture outside the entrance to Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology (often abbreviated TJHSST) is a public magnet school in Fairfax County, Virginia, founded through the cooperation of state and county government as well as industry. ... The High School of Art and Design is a Career and Technical Education high school located at 1075 Second Avenue, between 56th and 57th Streets in Manhattan, New York City, New York. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mighty Mouse, the signature character of the studio. ... Mighty Mouse is an animated superhero mouse character created by the Terrytoons studio. ... A cel, short for celluloid, is a transparent sheet of plastic (usually acetate) on which objects are drawn or painted for traditional, hand-drawn animation. ...


Practicing nights and weekends, he quickly became an inker and then an animator, working on characters such as Mighty Mouse, Heckle and Jeckle, Deputy Dawg, Foofle & Lariat Sam. By age 25, he was directing these shows as well as Sad Cat, James Hound and others. At 28, he saved the jobs of the studio when he attended a series pitch meeting with the CBS Television Network, and improvised a superhero spoof cartoon proposal called The Mighty Heroes when the network rejected all the studio's prepared ones as well as directing it. Bakshi was introduced to the work of J.R.R. Tolkien by a director at Terrytoons in 1956. In 1957, he started trying to convince people that the Lord of the Rings books could be animated and tried to obtain the rights [2], finally succeeding in the mid-70s. Mighty Mouse is an animated superhero mouse character created by the Terrytoons studio. ... Heckle and Jeckle in Taming the Cat Heckle and Jeckle was a theatrical cartoon series created by Paul Terry, and released by his own studio, Terrytoons. ... Deputy Dawg was originally a Terrytoons cartoon character featured on the animated television series of the same name from 1959 through 1972. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Mighty Heroes was an animated television series created by Ralph Bakshi for the Terrytoons company. ... J. R. R. Tolkien in 1916. ... 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy novel written by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ...


In 1967, Bakshi moved to Paramount Studios, where he was placed in charge of this famous cartoon studio during what were to be its final days. Here he hired Mort Drucker, Wally Wood, Jack Davis, Joe Kubert, Jim Steranko, Gray Morrow and Roy Krenkel, and produced several experimental animated short cartoons, though none of them had a major impact with audiences. Paramount closed its cartoon studio for good in 1967. In 1968, Bakshi founded his own studio, Ralph's Spot, and headed a low-budget but distinctive animated series for television based on the Spider-Man comic book; new episodes appeared until 1970. After 1970, Bakshi left the world of television and went into full-length animated feature films. The Paramount Pictures logo used from 1988 to 1989. ... Mort Drucker is a cartoonist and caricaturist from Brooklyn, New York. ... Wallace Wally Wood (born June 17, 1927, Menahga, Minnesota, United States; died November 2, 1981), was an American writer-artist best known for his work in EC Comics and Mad. ... Jack Davis (born December 2, 1924) is an American cartoonist and illustrator. ... Joe Kubert is a legendary comic book artist who went on to found the Joe Kubert School of Cartoon and Graphic Art. ... Captain America #111 (March 1969): Sterankos signature surrealism. ... Gray Morrow (March 7, 1934 - November 6, 2001) was an American illustrator of paperback books and comics. ... Roy G. Krenkel, (1918-1983) was an American illustrator who specialized in fantasy drawings and paintings. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Ralphs Spot was a studio where Ralph Bakshi produced and directed animated cartoons for three years beginning in 1968. ... Spider-Man is an animated television series that ran from September 9, 1967 to June 14, 1970. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ...


Fritz the Cat, Heavy Traffic and Coonskin

Fritz the Cat.

In 1971, Steve Krantz tagged on as a producer on what was to be Bakshi's first feature film. Bakshi had written several original scripts that would later become Heavy Traffic, Wizards, and Cool and the Crazy, but Krantz suggested that Bakshi first develop a film adapted from someone else's work. They mulled over various projects, finally deciding on Robert Crumb's successful underground comic book Fritz the Cat. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1446x2110, 549 KB) Summary Source: [1] Fair use in demonstrating how the film, Fritz the Cat, was promoted when it was originally released, and also of the character, Fritz, being portrayed on this poster. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1446x2110, 549 KB) Summary Source: [1] Fair use in demonstrating how the film, Fritz the Cat, was promoted when it was originally released, and also of the character, Fritz, being portrayed on this poster. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1971 calendar). ... Steve Krantz is a film producer and writer who was most active from 1966 to 1996. ... Self-portrait. ... The term underground comics or comix describes the self-published or small press comic books that sprang up in the US in the late 1960s. ... Robert Crumbs Fritz the Cat Fritz the Cat is a comic book fictional character created by Robert Crumb. ...


Bakshi and Krantz flew out to Oakland to find Crumb and secure the rights. Crumb was only too happy to join them in the venture. Crumb saw the film as a perfect opportunity to immortalize his name in film, and agreed to give Bakshi and Krantz the film rights to the character.


In April of 1972 Fritz the Cat opened in LA and New York to rave reviews and was a box office smash, taking in $90 million worldwide. It was the first animated feature film to receive an X rating in the United States, and it was unquestionably aimed primarily at adult audiences—something that had previously been unheard of. Creator Robert Crumb, however, hated the film, and eventually wound up killing off the title character in retaliation. Fritz the Cat is a 1972 Animated film written and directed by Ralph Bakshi. ... X-rated, X certificate, X classification or similar terms are labels for movies implying strong adult content, typically pornography or violence. ...

Coonskin.

The financial success of Fritz the Cat gave Bakshi the opportunity to produce two more adult-oriented feature films, Heavy Traffic and Coonskin, which revealed Bakshi's interest in black history in America, another subject largely overlooked by Hollywood movie studios. Coonskin was sold to Al Ruddy during a screening of The Godfather by Bakshi who told Ruddy that he wanted to make an adaptation of the storybook "Uncle Remus." Bakshi Productions was opened and they began pre-production. Image File history File links Coonskin_(film). ... Image File history File links Coonskin_(film). ... Heavy Traffic is a 1973 American animated film written and directed by Ralph Bakshi, and originally distributed by American International Pictures. ... Coonskin, directed by Ralph Bakshi in 1975, is a unique combination of live action footage and animation, for adults only. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Albert S. Ruddy (born March 28, 1930) is a Canadian filmmaker. ... The Godfather is a 1972 film adaptation of the novel of the same name, written by Mario Puzo, directed by Francis Ford Coppola and starring Marlon Brando. ... Uncle Remus was the title and fictional narrator of a collection of stories by Joel Chandler Harris, published in book form from 1881; seven Uncle Remus books were published. ...


Heavy Traffic was still in production at this time with Steve Krantz, who responded to the news of Bakshi's work with Ruddy by locking Bakshi out of the studio. After two weeks' time, Krantz relented and asked Bakshi back to finish the picture. Live action was shot for Heavy Traffic to complement the animation. In 1973, Heavy Traffic was screened at the Museum of Modern Art where it continued to shock audiences and generate controversy and acclaim. In 1973, production of Coonskin began at Bakshi Studios on Melrose in Hollywood. Live action was also used in this film. Coonskin opened in 1975 with a screening at the Museum of Modern Art to much controversy and protests by the Congress of Racial Equality, leading Paramount Pictures to withdraw the film's release. Bryanston Distributing Company attached itself to the project and released it to theatres to continued fevered controversy. In film and video, live action refers to works that are acted out by flesh-and-blood actors, as opposed to animation. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... View across garden, in new MoMA building by Yoshio Taniguchi. ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... View across garden, in new MoMA building by Yoshio Taniguchi. ... The Congress of Racial Equality or CORE is a U.S. civil rights organization that played a pivotal role in the Civil Rights Movement of the 20th century. ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ...


Wizards and The Lord of the Rings

A poster for The Lord of the Rings, which illustrates a scene that was not featured in Bakshi's film and may have been intended for the unproduced sequel.
A poster for The Lord of the Rings, which illustrates a scene that was not featured in Bakshi's film and may have been intended for the unproduced sequel.

Bakshi became a self-proclaimed spokesperson for a new direction in animation during the 1970s, and he turned to the process of rotoscoping to cut costs while still trying to produce quality animation. This sparked a new controversy over the use of traced-over live action in his films: animation scholars accused him of not producing "real" animation, but simply training artists to trace over live action. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x869, 158 KB) Summary LOTR b style poster. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x869, 158 KB) Summary LOTR b style poster. ... J.R.R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings is the title of an animated film produced and directed by Ralph Bakshi, and released to theaters in 1978. ... Rotoscoping is a technique where animators trace live action movement, frame by frame, for use in animated films. ...


Bakshi turned away from race and cultural issues and began producing fantasy films. His first was Wizards in 1976. Bakshi ran into trouble when he was unable to complete the battle sequences with the budget 20th Century Fox had given him, and the studio refused to raise his funds. So he paid for the film's completion out of his own pocket and used rotoscoping for the battle sequences, which borrowed live-action material taken directly from World War II stock footage and feature films. In 1977, the film was released and received with great acclaim. haha For other meanings see Fantasy (disambiguation) Fantasy is a genre of art that uses magic and other supernatural forms as a primary element of plot, theme, or setting. ... Wizards (originally titled War Wizards[1][2]) is an animated post-apocalyptic science fiction/fantasy film about the battle between two wizards, a good wizard representing the forces of magic and an evil wizard representing the forces of technology. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Fox Plaza, the company headquarters. ... Combatants Allied Powers: United Kingdom Soviet Union United States Republic of China and others Axis Powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Chiang Kai-Shek Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tojo Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000,000 Total dead... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ...


Bakshi's next project was to become his best known work after Fritz the Cat. In 1978, he began an ambitious animated adaptation of J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings. This was the first successful attempt to film the epic novel. Bakshi had originally intended his adaptation to be made in three parts, later reduced to two parts after negotiation with the studio. The first part adapted half of the story, or three of the book's six parts (The Lord of the Rings is really one novel in six books but published in three volumes, and not a trilogy as is often believed). The second part was to pick up half-way through the story and adapt the remainder of the book. 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... J.R.R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings is the title of an animated film produced and directed by Ralph Bakshi, and released to theaters in 1978. ...


The final project cost $8 million to make and grossed over $30 million at the box office, but it was considered a flop by the film's original distributors. They opted to release the unfinished story as a standalone film—dropping "part 1" from its original title—and refused to fund a sequel, leaving Bakshi's vision forever incomplete. The term box office can refer to either: A place where tickets are sold to the public for admission to a venue The amount of business a particular production, such as a movie or theatre show, does. ... Stand-alone is a confusing and misleading term, used to refer to various categories of computer programs, but rarely in a consistent fashion. ...


Unfinished Projects

Aside from The Lord of the Rings Part 2, Bakshi had also approached various other projects which never came to pass. Among these was an animated adaptation of Hunter S. Thompson's legendary novel Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, done in the style of Ralph Steadman's legendary illustrations. Though Bakshi pursued the project, the person holding the rights, a girlfriend of Thompson's, presumably producer Laila Nabulsi, refused because she wanted the film to be made in live action. [3] Hunter Stockton Thompson (July 18, 1937 – February 20, 2005) was an American journalist and author. ... Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream is a novel by Hunter S. Thompson, illustrated by Ralph Steadman. ... Ralph Steadman (born May 15, 1936) is a British cartoonist and caricaturist. ...


Bakshi also tried to produce an animated film based on Hubert Selby Jr.'s controversial novel, Last Exit to Brooklyn. Bakshi acquired the rights from Selby after Heavy Traffic was completed, and Robert De Niro accepted a major role, but the project never came to pass. [4] Last Exit to Brooklyn was eventually made as a live-action film by director Uli Edel in 1989. [5] Hubert Selby, Jr. ... Cover of the 1988 Grove Press reissue of Last Exit to Brooklyn Last Exit to Brooklyn is a 1964 novel by American author Hubert Selby Jr. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Uli Edel (born April 11, 1947 in Neuenburg, Germany), German film director. ... // Events Actress Kim Basinger and her brother Mick purchase Braselton, Georgia for $20 million. ...


Another unmade Bakshi project was to be called Bobby's Girl, to be made from a screenplay he had co-written with a young and ambitious Canadian named John Kricfalusi. Bakshi had worked with Kricfalusi (who later went on to create Ren & Stimpy) on a series of other projects during the 1980s. Bobby's Girl, an R-rated teen exploitation set in the 1950s, was greenlighted by TriStar, but cancelled after its then-current president, Jeff Siganski, got fired. Both Kricfalusi and Bakshi have stated that they doubt the project will ever be made. [6] Canadian-born animator John Kricfalusi, as seen in a 2003 promo created for The New TNN (later to become Spike TV). ... Ren and Stimpy are the title characters of two cartoon TV series created by Canadian animator John Kricfalusi. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... The 1950s was the decade spanning the years 1950 to 1959. ... TriStar Pictures is a subsidiary of Columbia Pictures, itself a subdivision of Columbia TriStar Motion Picture Group, which is owned by Sony Pictures. ...


Bakshi also had plans for two unrealized feature films: The City (an anthology film), and The History of American Music, which, according to Bakshi, was "basically following a musician around in his travels." Neither of these projects came to pass. [7] An anthology film or omnibus film or portmanteau film is a film consisting of several different short films, often tied together by only a single theme or premise. ...


Later work

Ralph Bakshi on the set of Cool World.
Ralph Bakshi on the set of Cool World.

Bakshi returned to "street smart" movies in the early 1980s. American Pop and the completed version of Hey Good Lookin', came next, followed by Fire and Ice, with famed fantasy illustrator Frank Frazetta, but Hollywood had for the most part turned its back on animation at the time and Bakshi worked behind the scenes for most of the decade. In the mid-80s, he returned to his roots in TV cartoons. His biggest success in the 1980s was a TV cartoon series aired in 1987, Mighty Mouse: The New Adventures. The series was widely hailed by TV critics, and it is still prized by collectors of TV series today. It ran for two years. Complaints from television watchdog groups about perceived drug references were a driving force in its cancellation. Image File history File links Bakshi1. ... Image File history File links Bakshi1. ... 1992s Cool World marked Ralph Bakshis return to feature films after nine years and his last feature film to date. ... American Pop is a 1981 American animated film directed by Ralph Bakshi. ... Hey Good Lookin is a 1982 animated film written and directed by Ralph Bakshi, and distributed by Warner Brothers. ... DVD cover Fire and Ice, released in 1983, was a collaberation between cult heroes (and friends) Ralph Bakshi and Frank Frazetta, distributed by 20th Century Fox, who also distributed the 1977 Bakshi hit Wizards The animated feature, based on characters Bakshi and Frazetta co-created was made using the process... Frank Frazetta (born February 9, 1928) is one of the worlds most influential fantasy and science fiction artists. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1987, the Rolling Stones hired Bakshi to direct the music video for their version of "The Harlem Shuffle". The video featured a combination of live-action footage of the band lip syncing the song and Bakshi-esque animation, including early work by animator John Kricfalusi. [8] Bakshi returned to the big screen with another variation on "animated characters interacting with real-world people" in 1992 with Cool World. The film ended up being a very different film from Bakshi's original concept, and was a critical and box office disappointment. 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the rock band. ... Template:Needed Harlem Shuffle is an R&B song originally recorded by the duo Bob & Earl in 1963, and covered by Booker T and the MGs, as well as the The Rolling Stones in 1986. ... Lip synchronization is the synchronization of audio signals (sometimes with corresponding video signals) so that there is no noticeable lack of simultaneity between them. ... 1992s Cool World marked Ralph Bakshis return to feature films after nine years and his last feature film to date. ...


Bakshi did not produce any animated feature films for 13 more years, instead working on various television projects. Bakshi worked on a short-lived animated TV series called Spicy City in 1997, and in 2003 he was the model for and the voice of the eccentric, midget-hating Fire Chief in protégé John Kricfalusi's Ren and Stimpy Adult Party Cartoon. The same year, The Bakshi School of Animation and Cartooning, founded by Bakshi, went into operation. It is currently being run by artist and educator Jess Gorell and Bakshi's son, Eddie. [9] [10] --Duk 05:15, 16 May 2005 (UTC) Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Canadian-born animator John Kricfalusi, as seen in a 2003 promo created for The New TNN (later to become Spike TV). ... Ren and Stimpy are the eponymous characters of two cartoon television series created by Canadian animator John Kricfalusi. ...


Availability of his work on the Internet spiked a recent resurgence of interest, resulting in a three-day retrospective at American Cinematheque at Grauman's Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood, California and the Aero Theater in Santa Monica, California in April, 2005. At the proceedings, Bakshi announced plans to finance and produce a low budget animated feature titled Last Days of Coney Island. Other projects, such as American Beat [11] and sequels to Bakshi's earlier films Coonskin [12] and Wizards [13] have been reported, but these projects have not yet been greenlighted. The Museum of Modern Art has added his films to their collection for preservation. He currently lives in southwestern New Mexico, working as a painter. Graumans Egyptian Theatre, 1922 Graumans Egyptian Theatre, at 6712 Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood, California is a world famous movie theatre that opened in 1922. ... Greetings from Hollywood Hollywood is a district of the city of Los Angeles, California, U.S.A., that extends from Vermont Avenue on the east to just beyond Laurel Canyon Boulevard above Sunset and Crescent Heights Boulevards on the west; the north to south boundary east of La Brea Avenue... Location of Santa Monica in California and Los Angeles County Coordinates: Country State County United States California Los Angeles Incorporated November 30, 1886 City Council Bobby Shriver Robert Holbrook (mayor) Ken Genser Kevin McKeown Herb Katz Pam OConnor Richard Bloom Area    - City 41. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Last Days of Coney Island is a project being written, produced, directed and animated by filmmaker Ralph Bakshi. ... General Electric GE90-115B fanblade, on display at MOMA. The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) is an art museum located in Midtown Manhattan in New York City. ... New Mexico was the 41st satate to be admitted to the us. ...


Controversy and criticism

Bakshi has encountered much controversy and criticism during the span of his career. When it was first released, Fritz the Cat was criticized by some for its style and subject matter. Top animators of the era took a full page ad out in Variety telling Bakshi to "take [his] garbage back east." [14]


When it was originally released, the film Coonskin was wrongly seen as being racist. During a showing at the Museum of Modern Art, the building was surrounded by members of C.O.RE., led by a young Al Sharpton, none of whom had seen the movie. Bakshi asked why Sharpton didn't come in and see the movie, and Sharpton responded by saying "I don't got to see shit; I can smell shit!" Eventually, the group was persuaded to view the film. After the screening, Sharpton charged up to the screen, but there was no one behind him. He could hear voices behind him saying "It wasn't that bad!" [15] 1. ... Al Sharpton Alfred Charles Al Sharpton Jr. ...


Bakshi has also been accused of plagiarism by Mark Bodé, son of famed underground comix legend Vaughn Bodé, who saw Bakshi's film Wizards as being a rip-off of his father's Cheech Wizard comic book series. [16] However, Bakshi acknowledged Bode's influence on his website: To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Mark Bodé (1963) is an American comic book author and artist. ... Mr. ... Vaughn Bodé (July 22, 1941 - July 18, 1975), (IPA pronunciation: ) was an influential artist involved in and inspirational to underground comics, graphic design, and graffiti. ... Cheech Wizard was a cartoon character created by artist Vaughn Bode and appearing in various works, including the National Lampoon, from 1967 until Bodes death in 1975. ...

"Vaughn Bode was one of the world's great cartoonists. Vaughn, his wife and his newborn son at that time used to hang around my apartment in Manhattan and talk about doing an animated film together. Sure, he influenced me and many others, as I influenced him. He told me his secret to his Lizards was a simplification of Daffy Duck and Vaughn really loved Fritz the Cat - what I had done with it.
We were gonna do the Amorous Adventures of Puck - after Wizards. The script he wrote was hysterical, something about a Don Juan Lizard with a wooden dildo because in those days - Lizards had no balls. At any rate, I loved Vaughn and his family very much and never speak of him because of what he did to himself. (Bode died in an accident related to autoerotic asphyxiation) I try to erase that whole part of my life out of my mind. I really miss him and all the wonderful, brilliant things he would have done by now. Victoria's website forced me to finally admit that Vaughn was gone." [17]

In the same light, some critics have seen the film Cool World as being an attempt by Bakshi to try and imitate the success of Who Framed Roger Rabbit. This was never Bakshi's intention, and he had no control over the final screenplay. However, unfair comparisons between the two films (including a quote from actor Brad Pitt who stated that the film is like "Roger Rabbit on acid" [18]) added to this belief. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Erotic asphyxiation. ... Who Framed Roger Rabbit is a 1988 film, produced by Disney subsidiary Touchstone and Amblin Entertainment, that combines animation and live action. ... William Bradley Brad Pitt (born December 18, 1963) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ...


Bakshi's extensive use of the rotoscoping device has also been called into question, and some critics have wondered whether American Pop should have been animated or not, as the film tells a realistic story. Despite criticism, it is generally agreed upon that Bakshi is an influental force in the animation art form.


Influence

Bakshi's reputation as a spokesman for the medium has led to his being caricatured in various animated projects, usually as an obese, slovenly figure. He is widely believed to be the inspiration for the character of Comic Book Guy on The Simpsons and Ralph the Guard on Tiny Toons Adventures and Animaniacs. Noted fans of Bakshi's include directors Quentin Tarantino [19] and Spike Lee [20], who are both credited as being big fans of Bakshi's 1975 feature Coonskin. Tarantino featured the film in the third of a series of film festivals he hosted, where it was the fourth feature shown at the festival. Tarantino also spoke about the film at the Cannes Film Festival [21]. Director Peter Jackson was inspired to read The Lord of the Rings after seeing Bakshi's film. Jackson is quoted as saying of the film "I enjoyed it and wanted to know more." [22] Jackson's live-action adaptation borrows heavily from Bakshi's film. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Simpsons is an Emmy and Peabody Award-winning American animated sitcom created by Matt Groening for the Fox Network, becoming one of the first hits for the network, and is one of the most successful and critically acclaimed television shows ever produced. ... Ralph the Guard was a fictional character in the Warner Bros. ... Tiny Toon Adventures is an animated television series created by the Warner Bros. ... Steven Spielberg Presents Animaniacs was a popular American animated television series, distributed by Warner Bros. ... Quentin Jerome Tarantino (born March 27, 1963) is an American film director, actor, and Oscar-winning screenwriter. ... Shelton Jackson Lee (born March 20, 1957 in Atlanta, Georgia), better known as Spike Lee, is a American film director, producer, writer, and actor noted for his films dealing with social and political issues. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Peter Jackson Peter Jackson CNZM (born October 31, 1961, Pukerua Bay) is a New Zealand-born filmmaker best-known as the director of the epic film trilogy The Lord of the Rings, which he, along with his long time partner, Fran Walsh, and Philippa Boyens adapted from the novel by... The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring movie poster (2001) The Lord of the Rings film trilogy comprises three live action fantasy epic films; The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001), The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002) and The Lord...


Filmography

As writer/director

Fritz the Cat is a 1972 Animated film written and directed by Ralph Bakshi. ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Heavy Traffic is a 1973 American animated film written and directed by Ralph Bakshi, and originally distributed by American International Pictures. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... Coonskin, directed by Ralph Bakshi in 1975, is a unique combination of live action footage and animation, for adults only. ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... Wizards (originally titled War Wizards[1][2]) is an animated post-apocalyptic science fiction/fantasy film about the battle between two wizards, a good wizard representing the forces of magic and an evil wizard representing the forces of technology. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... Hey Good Lookin is a 1982 animated film written and directed by Ralph Bakshi, and distributed by Warner Brothers. ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Tattertown was an animated series created by Ralph Bakshi about a place where everything discarded in the world came alive. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The following article is a list of live action and animated short films directed by Ralph Bakshi. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cool and the Crazy was made for the cable television network Showtime in 1994 by cult director Ralph Bakshi. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... The following article is a list of live action and animated short films directed by Ralph Bakshi. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The following article is a list of live action and animated short films directed by Ralph Bakshi. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Last Days of Coney Island is a project being written, produced, directed and animated by filmmaker Ralph Bakshi. ... 2007 (MMVII) will be a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

As director

J.R.R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings is the title of an animated film produced and directed by Ralph Bakshi, and released to theaters in 1978. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... American Pop is a 1981 American animated film directed by Ralph Bakshi. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... DVD cover Fire and Ice, released in 1983, was a collaberation between cult heroes (and friends) Ralph Bakshi and Frank Frazetta, distributed by 20th Century Fox, who also distributed the 1977 Bakshi hit Wizards The animated feature, based on characters Bakshi and Frazetta co-created was made using the process... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dr. Theodor Seuss Geisel (March 2, 1904 – September 24, 1991), better known by his pen name, Dr. Seuss, was a famous American writer and cartoonist best known for his childrens books, particularly The Cat in the Hat. ... The Butter Battle Book is a childrens book written by Dr. Seuss. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Television Special is a television program that is essentially a television movie or a short film usually intended to be broadcast sporadically, typically once a year at most. ... 1992s Cool World marked Ralph Bakshis return to feature films after nine years and his last feature film to date. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... --Duk 05:15, 16 May 2005 (UTC) Categories: Possible copyright violations ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

As actor

Fritz the Cat is a 1972 Animated film written and directed by Ralph Bakshi. ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Heavy Traffic is a 1973 American animated film written and directed by Ralph Bakshi, and originally distributed by American International Pictures. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... Coonskin, directed by Ralph Bakshi in 1975, is a unique combination of live action footage and animation, for adults only. ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... Wizards (originally titled War Wizards[1][2]) is an animated post-apocalyptic science fiction/fantasy film about the battle between two wizards, a good wizard representing the forces of magic and an evil wizard representing the forces of technology. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... --Duk 05:15, 16 May 2005 (UTC) Categories: Possible copyright violations ... --Duk 05:15, 16 May 2005 (UTC) Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Ren and Stimpy are the title characters of two cartoon TV series created by Canadian animator John Kricfalusi. ...

Interviewed

  • Frazetta: Painting with Fire (2003)
  • Ralph Bakshi: The Wizard of Animation (2004)

2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Other

Cannonball Run II is a film that was released in 1984. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Vanilla Sky is a 2001 film which has been variously characterized by published film critics as an odd mixture of science fiction, romance, and reality warp [2], part Beautiful People fantasy, part New Age investigation of the Great Beyond[3] a love story, a struggle for the soul, or an... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ...

References

Ralph Bakshi/Biography


Ralph Bakshi Forum

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Ralph Bakshi

Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo-en. ... Wikiquote logo Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ...

External links

Ralph Bakshi [ edit ]
Films: Fritz the Cat • Heavy Traffic • Coonskin • Wizards • J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings • American Pop • Hey Good Lookin' • Fire and Ice • Cool World • Cool and the Crazy • Last Days of Coney Island • Short films
TV series: The Mighty Heroes • Mighty Mouse: The New Adventures • Spicy City
TV specials: Christmas in Tattertown • The Butter Battle Book

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ralph Bakshi - The Lord of the Rings Wiki (259 words)
Ralph Bakshi (October 1938) is a director of animated and occasionally live-action films.
As the American animation industry fell into decline during the 1960s and 1970s, Bakshi tried to bring change to the industry by creating and directing a number of animated feature films that were aimed at adults instead of children.
Bakshi had originally intended his adaptation to be made in three parts, later reduced to two parts after negotiation with the studio.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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